Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Reach for Reading Kindergarten partially meet expectations of alignment. The Kindergarten instructional materials partially meet expectations for Gateway 1. The materials partially meet the criteria that texts are worthy of students' time and attention, of quality, and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for the grade level. The materials partially meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts. The materials meet the criteria for materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards. The Kindergarten instructional materials partially meet expectations for Gateway 2 and provide some opportunities for students to build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. 

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Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
50
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Reach for Reading Curriculum for Kindergarten partially meets the expectations that high-quality texts are the central focus of lessons, are at the appropriate grade level text complexity, and are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in service to grow literacy skills. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention; however, the majority of the texts remain qualitatively low and do not provide opportunities for students to develop reading independence. Materials provide some opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts.  Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language are targeted to support foundational reading development. 

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
17/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that texts are worthy of students' time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, and support students' advancing toward independent reading. Anchor texts are of publishable quality and reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity, but the majority of the texts remain qualitatively low in complexity and do not provide opportunities for students to develop reading independence. Materials expose students to a broad range of text types and disciplines and include a volume of reading so students can achieve grade-level reading proficiency by the end of the year.      

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

Materials include Read with Me Big Books and Read Aloud Trade Books that are worthy of careful reading. Many of the texts are engaging and represent a wide range of cultures. Through the read alouds, students gain knowledge as well as literary skills, making them worthy of careful listening.

Examples of texts included in the Kindergarten material that are of varying degrees of worthiness include:

  • In Unit 1, students hear the book Come with Me to School by Olga Romero, which is a big book filled with simple songs and poems. The text has bright illustrations that show the parts of the narrators’ classroom and explains the things students do in school.
  • In Unit 2, students read a folktale called The Creaky Bed, but no author is provided. The story is engaging and age-appropriate and the teacher is instructed to read with different voices for the various animal characters. Students also listen to Goldilocks and the Bear Family, which is a classic fairy tale.
  • In Unit 3, students listen to the big book, Honza’s Little House, a folktale about a farmer and the animals moving into his home. While the illustrations are colorful, the teacher is instructed to change voices to the character, without attention being given to the text. Students also listen to Sofia and the Sunflower, which is a fairy tale retelling of Jack and the Beanstalk and helps students understand the fairy tale genre.
  • In Unit 4, students listen to the classic folktale, The Little Red Hen.
  • In Unit 5, students listen to an informational text that is relevant and interesting to their age called How to Grow a Garden.
  • In Unit 6, students hear a story called The Bus for Us by Suzanne Bloom, which introduces four-wheeled vehicles but without character development or plot development. The text is simple and the illustrations are colorful.
  • In Unit 7, students read The Apple Dumpling by Rowan Sellers which is a photo essay and includes questions and information about studying animals.
  • In Unit 8, students hear a lullaby called “The Night is Singing” by Jacqueline Davies.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. The whole group and read aloud texts include a mix of nonfiction and fictional texts with a variety of genres including folktales, scientific texts, articles, poems, and songs. Students are exposed to various texts throughout the program.

Examples of fictional texts throughout the curriculum include:

  • Unit 1: “Mary Wore a Red Dress”- Song
  • Unit 2: “Families, Families”- Song
  • Unit 3: The Tale of the Three Little Pigs- Folktale
  • Unit 4: The Four Friends- Folktale
  • Unit 5: The Evergreen Tree- Story
  • Unit 6: City Cat, Country Cat- Fable
  • Unit 7: The Builder and the Oni- Folktale
  • Unit 8: The Night is Singing - Story
  • Unit 9: “Now I am Ready”- Poem

Examples of informational texts throughout the curriculum include:

  • Unit 1: My School Day by Lee Scott- Big Book
  • Unit 2: Families by Cory Phillips- Big Book
  • Unit 3: "Amazing Animal Facts"- Informational Article
  • Unit 4: "How to Grow a Garden"- Informational Article
  • Unit 5: Winter Everywhere- Nonfiction Opinion
  • Unit 7: “Help Wanted”- Informational Article
  • Unit 9: “My School Map”- Map

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

Students listen to read alouds from the Read with Me Big Books and Read Aloud Trade Books. Leveled books are used for Small Group Instruction. One read-aloud book is chosen each week relating to the concept of the unit provided. According to the publisher, the books provide more challenging vocabulary and concepts than students can read independently.

Examples of texts read aloud to students and their qualitative complexity include:

  • In Unit 1, students hear the poem, "We Always," which is labeled qualitatively low. In small groups, one text read with students is The Night Before Kindergarten, which has a 570L.
  • In Unit 2, one text students hear is The Creaky Bed, which is labeled qualitatively middle low. One of the small group texts is Fred Stays with Me, which has a 430L.
  • In Unit 3, students hear the text, Amazing Animal Fact, which is labeled qualitatively middle low. In a small group, students read Seven Hungry Babies, which has a 460L.
  • In Unit 4, students hear the text, The Four Friends, which is labeled qualitatively middle low.
  • In Unit 5, all of the texts are labeled as qualitatively low or qualitatively middle low. One of the small group texts is Winter is the Warmest Season, which has a 480L.
  • In Unit 6, students hear the text, Stone Soup, which is labeled qualitatively middle low.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

Materials support some literacy skills over the course of the school year through increasingly complex texts to develop independence of grade level skills; however, the majority of the texts remain qualitatively low in complexity, not providing opportunities for students to develop independence. Selections from the Big Book read alouds are labeled as qualitatively low or qualitatively middle low. At the beginning of the year, most of the texts students listen to are songs, poems, and photo books with transitions to more folk tales and stories as the units progress. Toward the end of the year, students begin to listen to informational articles. Additionally, reading comprehension skills do not increase in complexity over the year to develop student independence.

Examples of texts with which students engage during whole group reading include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students read texts that are qualitatively low such as My School Day by Lee Scott and Come with Me to School by Olga Romero. Skills in this unit include retelling.
  • In Unit 2, students hear What Families Do, which is considered qualitatively low and Gio and His Family by George Ancona, which is considered middle low. Skills in this unit include identifying the topic and main ideas.
  • In Unit 4, students read a series of informational texts that are either qualitatively low or middle low, with no real increase in complexity. In Week 1, students hear Sofia and the Sunflower by Guadalupe Lopez, which is qualitatively low. Students learn how to identify cause and effect. In the following weeks, students hear Just One Seed by Alma Flor Ada, How to Grow a Garden by Lada Josefa Kratky, and Amazing Bugs!, all of which are qualitatively middle low. Students spend two weeks on determining sequence and then revisit main ideas and details.
  • In Units 5 and 6 students begin hearing more stories and fables, which are mostly categorized as low, with a few labeled middle low. Skill instruction includes making connections and comparing and contrasting.
  • In Unit 7, students begin hearing informational articles, which are all qualitatively middle low. Each week focuses on a different reading comprehension skill including identifying main idea and details and visualizing.
  • In Unit 8, students begin reading more stories. This is the first increase in complexity in the series with texts considered qualitatively middle high. These texts include Why the Sun Comes Up When Rooster Crows, How Day and Night were Divided, and My Shadow by Robert Louis Stevenson. Each week a different comprehension strategy is addressed including ask questions and identify details.
  • The final unit, Unit 9, has two stories considered qualitatively low, and two poems considered qualitatively middle low. Students hear Practice Makes Perfect and Keisha Ann Can! by Daniel Kirk, both of which are considered qualitatively low. Students review comprehension skills previously taught such as asking questions and making connections.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The materials provide a qualitative measure in the form of Complexity Rubrics found under the Resource list tab; however, the rubrics do not share the rationale for why the specific text was chosen. Additionally, the qualitative measure provided is very broad such as middle low, with no explanation of what makes the text qualitatively middle low. The program materials give a general rationale for why all of the texts were chosen for the program, but none are specific. The materials state that the Student Editions include National Geographic content and authentic literature worth reading and rereading and that the units are four weeks long, built around a science or a social studies topic.


Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that anchor and support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Throughout the year, students engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading proficiency. Throughout the week, students hear a read aloud and participate in small reading groups. There are also learning stations that students go to where students may listen to a text, read a text in unison with a group of other students, or read with a partner.  Students also read independently at various times throughout the week.

In addition, students are exposed to a broad range of text types and disciplines throughout the year during read alouds, small groups, learning centers, and independent reading. Units have a shared reading and a close reading pairing each week with additional supplemental texts. There are also leveled readers related to the topic of each unit for small group and independent reading.

Below are examples of the various disciplines a student might listen to in various units throughout the Kindergarten materials:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, during shared reading students hear the poem, "What Families Do"; during close reading students hear the photo book, Gio and His Family by George Ancona; and students read a recipe as a supplemental text, "Tasty Treat" by Kristin Cozort.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, during shared reading students hear the folktale, The Donut by Lada Josefa Kratky; during close reading they hear the story, Feast for Ten by Cathryn Falwell; and students read poem as a supplemental text, "Mix a Pancake" by Christina Rossetti.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students hear the folktale, The Little Red Hen; during shared reading students close read the story, Just One Seed by Alma Flor, and the poem, "Seeds" by Douglas Florian.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, during shared reading students hear the informational text, Amazing Bugs!; during shared reading students close read a photo essay, Garden Helpers by Sarah Chauhan; and students read the supplemental text, Hurt No Living Thing by Christina Rossetti.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, during shared reading students hear the story, A Home for Silly Bear; students close read the fable, City Cat, Country Cat by Julius Fester; and students read another fable as a supplemental text, Race Day by Hector Ramirez.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, during shared reading students hear the folktale, Stone Soup by Gabriel Setoun; students close read the story, Bear About Town by Stella Blackstone; and students read a song as the supplemental text, "The Bear Went over the Mountain."
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, during shared reading students hear the folkstale, How Day and Night were Divided; students close read the folktale, The Story of the Sun and the Moon by Ken Nesbitt, and the poem, "My Shadow" by Robert Louis Stevenson.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, during shared reading students hear the folktale, Fox, Mole, and the Moon; during close reading students read the folktale, Why Sun and Moon Live in the Sky, and the poem, "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star." 

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
13/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based and require students to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit, as well as valid inferences, from the text. Culminating tasks are mainly used to summarize unit learning and are typically not text-dependent. The materials provide practices and protocols for opportunities to discuss and interact with the curriculum content and vocabulary. Students have daily opportunities to practice speaking and listening; however, the practice  opportunities are not always connected to the read-aloud text. Materials include multiple opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction and opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply narrative, opinion, and informative writing are provided; however, the majority of the writing lessons focus on informative writing. Students have an opportunity to draw or write about the text that they listened to or the text that they read. Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for the grade level.    

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials throughout the program include opportunities for students to discuss the text by being asked text-dependent and text-specific questions. Students answer specific questions related to the text and, at times, answer retell questions. Students often must refer to the text to answer questions.

Examples of text-dependent questions found throughout the program include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students hear the big book, Come to School with Me, and after the second read, the teacher asks the students what the boy and the other children do at the beginning of the school day.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students hear the big book, Feast for 10, and students are asked recall questions such as what happens first in the story and what happens next in the story.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students hear the story, Rooster’s Big Job, and begin analyzing characters. They are told that the most important characters often do the most talking in a story and are then asked which character does the most talking in this story. Students are also asked what lesson the rooster learned in this fable.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students hear "Amazing Bugs," and then are asked what the topic of the article is and to identify the main idea. Students identify the main idea of the individual sections and identify a detail that tells about the main idea.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students hear Winter Everywhere, and after the second read, they are asked how winter is different in Alaska and Florida and what is one way that winter in Florida is the same as in all the other states.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, hear the big book, The Bus for Us, and are asked to retell what they read by identifying what happens first, next, and at the end of the story.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students hear the big book, Career Day, and after the second read, students are asked what job Mrs. Madoff does, where she does her job, and how a teacher’s job is similar to a principal’s job.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, students hear Fox, Mole, and the Moon, and students are asked after the second read why Fox and Mole have to wait until the moon gets thin to tie a rope around it and where the mole lives today.
  • In Unit 9, Week 2, students hear Much to Learn and are asked how the hawk grabs the mouse.  

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

Culminating tasks are Unit Projects at the end of each unit, are mostly used to summarize the learning of the theme or topic, and are generally not text-dependent. Some of the Unit Projects do not require the students to demonstrate an understanding nor does they require students to integrate skills. There is also a unit assessment at the end of each unit.

Examples of Unit Projects include:

  • In Unit 1, students review some of the School Days Journals that they have made throughout the week, bind them together and make a book. This does not require any integration of knowledge and skills and is a project to put together all of the work from the unit.
  • In Unit 2, students engage in a Three-Step Interview to learn about one another’s family members. After modeling the procedure, students work in groups of three to do these interviews. While this is about the theme of the unit (family), it does not integrate skills learned to demonstrate understanding.
  • In Unit 3, students have an animal masquerade. They make masks to show the animal they chose to become an expert on. They then mingle and act out their animal’s movements and sounds. This does require some integration of skills since students spend time in the unit learning about animals.
  • In Unit 4, students learn about plants and animals, and for the Unit Project, students plan and plant a pretend garden in their classroom. They are separated into groups of four and work on developing a list of items or steps for each of the topics on how to plant.
  • In Unit 5, students make season and weather puppets and use them to tell about a season. Students work in groups to make the puppets and rehearse their puppet show. In the unit, students learn about the weather, so this project reinforces their new knowledge.
  • In Unit 6, students make a scroll drawing of their community after learning about community in the unit. Students work in groups to show different concepts about community.
  • In Unit 7, students learn about different jobs, and then for a culminating activity, students dress up as one of the jobs they read about and are prepared to explain what they learned and the clothes they are wearing. This does integrate knowledge and skills from the unit.
  • In Unit 8, students make a drawing of something interesting they have learned about the sky from the unit. They then explain to the class why they found this subject so interesting.
  • In Unit 9, students make a book about everything they have learned throughout the year. Students share things they have learned in school and outside of school.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide practices and protocols for opportunities to discuss and interact with the curriculum content and vocabulary. The Best Practices Routines, which are the speaking and listening protocols, are located in the front of the Teacher Guide. There are protocols for partner discussions, group conversations, and presentations. Clear directions and protocols are provided and supported by the Academic Talk Flip Chart. Group conversations are scaffolded with roles that are clearly defined and supported with sentence stems to help students fulfill their role in the discussion.

The partner discussion protocol includes sentences stems and opportunities for each partner to talk. The group conversation protocol includes roles for each student including a facilitator, encourager, timekeeper, and note taker. There are also sentence stems to help students with the discussion. At the end of the discussion, the class comes back together and a few students share what their groups discussed.

The presentation protocols are outlines for students and include criteria such as stand up tall, speak clearly and loud enough for everyone to hear, and introduce the presentation. The protocol also includes directions for listeners and includes listen attentively, ask questions if you do not understand something, and make eye contact. The Cooperative Learning suggestions in the text also provide support for partner and group discussion configurations that can be used with the protocols.

Examples of opportunities for evidence-based discussions include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 5, students review the book, My School Day, and revisit the Big Question, "What happens at school?" Students form three groups and each group is assigned one of the Key Words: learns, share, and friend. Groups gather to discuss the Big Book and the Big Question. Students then apply the Key Word for their group to school and then the students come together to share their ideas.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 1, students review how trees change with the seasons. The teacher guides students through a discussion of other changes that occur during seasons (e.g., air temperature, precipitation, etc.) using vocabulary words including hot, cold, cool, etc. The students do a Pair and Share to discuss their findings and then to share out with the larger group. However, there is no protocol for this routine.
  • In Unit 9, Week 2, Day 4 in the whole-class setting, the teacher reminds the student of the Big Question for the week, “What do we learn at school?” and uses sentence frames to help students make statements about what they have learned from the text and activities. Then, the students do a Turn and Talk using the sentence frames. The teacher calls on a few of the pairs to share what they have created with the frames.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Students practice their speaking and listening daily, though it is not always connected to the texts that they listen to in read alouds. Many of the specific opportunities come before the text is read during a vocabulary lesson or during an opportunity to make predictions. While students do listen to the texts and follow up questions are provided that could provide support for speaking and listening, it is not specified for teachers.

Examples of opportunities for students to practice their speaking and listening, though not always in conjunction with a text include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, the teacher reminds the students of the vocabulary that they just learned (food, healthy, hungry, and meal). The teacher creates a chart with the three daily meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner) and prompts students with questions to fill in the chart. Then, students work in pairs to practice using the sentence frames to fill in the chart. Students are encouraged to ask questions about foods or families as they talk and use the sentence frames. While this is an example of students practicing their speaking and listening, it is not in conjunction with what they are reading.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 5, students gather the texts from the week where they have been reading about baby animals. The teacher reviews the names for baby animals they have learned (e.g., calf, pup, cub, chick) and reminds the students that some animal groups share the same names with other animal groups. The teacher creates a chart listing the animals that fit under a certain baby name. Then, students compare two animals who share a baby name (e.g., calf) and talks about their similarities and differences.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 3, students read the Big Book, Splash Into Water. The teacher asks the students what seasons they think it is on the farm. The teacher pages through the book with the students as they give reasons from the text for their responses. Then, the teacher talks about different seasons and what students would see, hear, feel, smell during those seasons on the farm (all Key Words). Children use details in the photos from the book to support their responses. The teacher encourages the students to use the Key Words and details from the pictures to support their responses.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, Day 2, the teacher works with the students to use text-related vocabulary (clouds, moon, sun, stars, planet) as a part of a shared chart-making activity; however, this comes before the text is read. The teacher and students draw and label together, while the teacher supports with questions and statements such as, "First, I will draw the sun. What shape should the sun be? What label should I use?" Then, students are directed to pair and share to write sentences about the diagram. They are to use the Key Words in their discussion and writing. Finally, students are asked if this activity has contributed to their understanding of the topic and if they still have questions; those questions are added to the bulletin board for the week.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Materials include multiple opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction. In each lesson, students write either in response to the text or use the text as a model and there are also process writing tasks that take place on the fifth day of the week and span for three weeks. In kindergarten, students often draw first and then either write themselves or dictate the sentences to an adult.

Examples of opportunities for students to participate in on-demand writing throughout the week include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 4, students draw pictures to show different activities in the classroom and then label their pictures with the time of the day. Then students share their drawings, order the activities, and create a class book.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, students draw and then write or dictate sentences about characters in the read-aloud, There’s a Billy Goat in the Garden.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 1, students draw a picture from the poem, “Jack Frost,” and then write a sentence about it.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 2, students choose a tool they read about in the book, Tools, and draw a picture of it. They then write the name of the tool to label their tool.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, Day 4, students work with the teacher to brainstorm words that describe the sun based on the story they heard in class. They then write about the sun, using one or more of the words on the list.

Examples of Process Writing opportunities where students participate in longer writing projects over the course of several weeks to help them understand the writing process include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students begin a three-week project on writing a narrative. The first week they decide on which family activity they are going to write about and plan what happens first, next, and last. Then the second week, students make their writing even better by adding or changing words. In the final week, students publish their writing.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students are introduced to a three-week writing project on plants. In the first week, students choose a plan and write facts about it. In the second week, they revise and edit their writing, and in the final week, they will publish their writing.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, students learn how to revise an opinion writing piece they started earlier in the unit. The teacher models how to revise and then students revise and edit their work.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Instructional materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply narrative, opinion, and informative writing; however, the majority of writing lessons focus on informative writing.  Narrative writing focuses on process writing and students have few opportunities for opinion writing. Materials provide tasks for students to draw or write different genres of writing. Students write stories, opinion pieces, and informative sentences based on the texts they have read.

Each week focuses on a different writing genre, sometimes aligned to the text. Model writing samples and other instructional supports accompany each unit. A longer writing task is assigned in each unit that spans the course of three weeks. Each of these is a different writing genre.

Examples of narrative writing include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students plan and draft a narrative story about a family activity.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students write a new scene for the story they are reading. They also draw an original scene from the book and then write a sentence to describe it.

Examples of opinion writing include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students write what they like about the boy’s school day in My School Day.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students continue working on an opinion piece started the previous week on a season they like.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students write an opinion piece on their favorite book.

Examples of expository writing include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students write or dictate what they know how to do, draw pictures that show the beginning, middle, and end, and label the steps with the words beginning, middle, and end.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students write or dictate sentences that tell about their ideas of a feast they would like to have.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students publish their final copy of the facts they have been working on over the past few weeks.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students write about winter activities.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students draw a picture of something that happened in the story and then write a sentence about the event.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Throughout the Kindergarten materials, students have an opportunity to draw or write about the text that they listened to or the text that they read. In the beginning units, there is less of this, but after the first few units, students have multiple opportunities to write each week about the stories they are listening to in class.

Examples of this include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students write about their favorite thing that the boy does in My School Day.
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, students choose a character from The Creaky Bed and then draws a picture to show how the character feels in the story and then writes a sentences or dictates a sentence about how the character feels.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students draw their character and then complete a sentence frame to tell about the character.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students write a cause and effect sentence about the story, The Four Friends, and draw a picture of it.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students draw a tree in one of the seasons in The Evergreen and write in the sentence frame, "This is a tree in _______."
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students revisit the story, The Apple Dumpling, and fill in the sentence, “The old woman trades ______ for _______."
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students think about the bridge in The Builder and the Oni and then complete the sentence, "The bridge is _________.”
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, students choose a meeting between the main character, Henny Penny, and a secondary character and draw a picture about the meeting with a sentence about what happens.
  • In Unit 9, Week 2, students write a sentence about their favorite page in the book and draw a picture of what happened.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

In each week of each unit, there is a five-day grammar lesson sequence. On Day 4 of each instructional sequence, there is a Vocabulary and Grammar focus for instruction that teaches about nouns, verbs, prepositions, and the components of a complete sentence. Writing is included daily. While this component mostly focuses on the writing process, capitalization and ending punctuation is reviewed during publishing.

Students have opportunities to print many upper- and lowercase letters. For example:

  • In Unit 1, T62, the teacher is directed to use Scripts for Letter Formation and the backcover of Alphachant Mm to model forming the letter M and m. Students follow along and trace the letters. There are additional practice pages for students to complete.

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring nouns and verbs. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 4, the teacher explains that words that name things are called nouns. The teacher uses Vocabulary Builder and Manipulatives to develop the students understanding of a noun. Using a sentence frame, the students create sentences that include nouns. Students then complete a Master Practice page for more practice.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 4, the teacher explains that fix is an action word, or verb, and that an action word tells about what a person does. The teacher presents several examples of verbs that are similar in meeting. Students then complete a Practice Master page to practice verbs and shades of meeting.

Students have opportunities to form regular plural nouns orally by adding -s or -es. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 4, students learn how to make nouns show more than one. The teacher displays the Vocabulary Builder and Manipulatives Set. The teacher holds up the salad and uses a self stick note to add an -s to the end to make the word salads and -es to the end of sandwich to make the word sandwiches. The teacher explains that -s and -es can be added to the end of words to make them mean more than one. Students complete the Practice Master for more practice.

Students have opportunities to understand and use question words (interrogatives). For example:

  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher introduces the Big Question for the unit: "What jobs can people do?" The teacher creates a concept web about jobs and writes a question that will be the focus for each week: "How do people work? What different jobs do people have? How do people use tools to do work? How do people work together?"

Students have opportunities to use the most frequently occurring prepositions. For example:

  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 4, the teacher explains the function of prepositions while pointing them out during a Big Book read aloud. Students are asked to look at the pictures and to give a sentences that tells whereusing a preposition. Children interview a partner and the partner uses a sentence frame that requires the use of preposition.

Students have opportunities to produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities. For example:

  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 4, T78, the teacher explains that there is a naming part and a telling part in each sentence. Students identify phrases that are not complete sentences and turn them into complete sentences by adding either a naming or telling part. The teacher provides a sentence frame and modeling to scaffold.

Students have opportunities to capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun, I. For example:

  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 5, students publish an opinion piece of writing. The teacher reminds the students to use a capital letter at the beginning of the sentence.

Students have opportunities to recognize and name end punctuation. For example:

  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 1, students use word cards and punctuation cards to build sentences.

Students have opportunities to write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 3, students spell s. The teacher says a word that begins with /s/. The teacher segments the onset and rime and asks students to identify the letter card that makes the sound of the initial sound. The students write the letter on their wipe boards.

Students have opportunities to spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships. For example:

  • In Unit 8, Week 4, Day 3, the teacher says the word robe and the students repeat it. The teacher segments the sounds. The students identify the sounds in the words and matches them to the appropriate letter card. The students write the word on the wipe board. The activity is repeated for the words home, joke, and rope.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
20/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards. Students have opportunities to learn and practice phonological awareness, phonics, and print concepts. Opportunities for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words are included; however, opportunities are missed to set students up with an explicit purpose before reading an emergent-reader text. The materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills. Assessments monitor progress and inform instruction throughout the year, and the materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.    

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Kindergarten materials contain opportunities for students to learn Kindergarten phonological awareness and phonics. Within the materials there are routines for phonological awareness, dictation, and decoding. Phonological Awareness is practiced during Days 1-4 during Learn Sounds, Letters, and Words for five minutes per day, which contains twelve routines for phonological awareness.

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to learn and understand phonemes (e.g. produce rhyming words, segment syllables, blend onsets and rimes, pronounce vowels in CVC words, and substitute sounds to make new words). For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, students listen to a sentence, "We are at school." The teacher repeats the sentence and claps at each word. Students say the sentence and clap each word with the teacher.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher states, “I will say two words. Listen to the sound at the beginning of each word. If the beginning sound of each word is the same, give me a thumbs-up sign.” The teacher says the following combinations: rule/time, desk/dig, milk/bed, pet/pal, lunch/date, mud/met, table/write, match/mint.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, the teacher reviews the letter a and the sound that a makes at the beginning of the word apple. The students then identify which of the given picture card names begin with the /a/ sound using a thumbs up.

Lessons and activities provide students adequate opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. one-to-one correspondences, long and short sounds with common spellings, and distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying sounds of the letters). For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher uses the Decoding Routine 1 to teach the sound and letter m. The teacher introduces the sound with words that begin with m. The teacher has students listen for words that start with m. The teacher displays the Sound/Spelling Card 2.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher uses the Decoding Routine 2 to blend words with short /a/. Word builder cards are used to spell am. Students are directed to say the first letter sound, then the second letter sound and then blend them to read the word. The activity is repeated with the following words: at, Sam, pat, cat, cap, tap, sat, map

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness instruction to build toward application. For example:

  • In Unit 1, students learn to match beginning sounds.
  • In Unit 2, students learn to match beginning sounds, recognize rhyme, identify and isolate beginning sounds, generate rhyming words, and pronounce syllables in spoken words.
  • In Unit 3, students learn to match final sounds, count syllables, segment syllables, blend onset and rime, and identify and isolate final sounds.
  • In Unit 4, students learn to match middle sounds, blend sounds, identify and isolate middle sounds.
  • In Unit 5, students learn to identify and isolate middle sounds, segment sounds, identify and isolate beginning and final sounds, add beginning sounds.
  • In Unit 6, students learn to substitute final sounds, identify and isolate beginning and final sound, blend sounds and segment sounds.
  • In Unit 7, students learn to substitute middle sounds, add final sounds, match and isolate middle sounds, substitute beginning and final sounds, blend sounds, add beginning sounds, and segment sounds.
  • In Unit 8, students learn to substitute middle sounds, segment sounds, match and isolate middle sounds, match and isolate beginning and final sounds, add final sounds.
  • In Unit 9, students learn to match and isolate middle sounds, match and isolate final sounds, segment sounds, substitute final sounds.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. For example:

  • In Unit 1, students learn the sound and letter /m/m.
  • In Unit 2, students learn the sound and letter /s/s, blend and spell words with /s/s, the sound and letter /t/t, blend and spell words with /t/t, the sound and letter /p/p, blend and spell words with /p/p, the sound and letter /k/c, and blend and spell words with /k/c.
  • In Unit 3, students learn to blend, read, and spell words with /a/, learn the sound for and letter /n/n, blend, read, and spell words with n, learn the sound and letter /h/h, blend, read, and spell words with h, learn sound and letter /r/r, blend, read, and spell words with r.
  • In Unit 4, students learn the sound and letter /i/i, blend, read, and spell words with /i/i, learn sound letter /f/f, blend, read, and spell words with /f/f, learn sound and letter /g/g, blend, read, and spell words with /g/g, learn sound and letter /b/b, blend, read, and spell words with /b/b.
  • In Unit 5, students learn the sound and letter /o/o, blend, read, and spell words with /o/o, learn the sound and letter /l/l, blend, read, and spell words with /l/l, learn the sound and letter /d/d, blend, read, and spell words with /d/d, learn the sound and letter /v/v, blend, read, and spell words with /v/v.
  • In Unit 6, students learn the sound and letter /e/e, blend, read, and spell words with /e/e, the sound and letter /j/j, blend, read, and spell words with /j/j, the sound and letter /w/w, blend, read, and spell words with /w/w, the sound and letter /k/k, blend, read, and spell words with /k/k.
  • In Unit 7, students learn the sound and letter /u/u, blend, read, and spell words with /u/u, students learn the sound and letter /y/y, blend, read, and spell words with /y/y, students learn the sound and letter /z/z, blend, read, and spell words with /z/z, students learn the sound and letter /kw/qu, /ks/x, blend, read, and spell words with /kw/qu, /ks/x.
  • In Unit 8, students learn the sound and letter long /a/a_e, blend, read, and spell word with long /a/a_e,  the sound and letter long /i/i_e, blend, read, and spell word with long /i/i_e, the sound and letter long /o/o_e, blend, read, and spell word with long /o/o_e.
  • In Unit 9, students learn the sound and letter long /yoo/u_e, blend, read, and spell word with long /e/e_e,  /e/e_e.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Kindergarten materials contain opportunities throughout the school year for students to learn and practice concepts of print. Concepts of print such as directionality and letter spacing are addressed during the reading of decodable text. Opportunities to learn letter identification and letter formation are addressed during Learn Sounds, Letters, and Words.

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and multimodal activities for students to learn how to identify and produce letters. There are scripts in the Best Practices section for teaching students how to write all 52 letters. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher displays eVisual 1.1 and sings “The Alphabet Song” while pointing to the letters. The teacher shares the Phonics Picture Cards for students to name the letters of the alphabet. Students participate in a letter chant when they find a partner with the same letter from PM1.1.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 2, the teacher and students sing “The Alphabet Song” and then students are placed into small groups to alphabetize the letters they have.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher shows Alphachant Ss and identifies the capital S and lowercase s. Students find and point to the letter s. On Day 2, students learn the letter formation for Ss.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, students learn to identify and write Hh. Students who have difficulty forming the letters are to practice writing the letters by dipping a finger in water and writing on the chalkboard.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2, students learn to identify and write Ii. Students who have difficulty forming the letters are to practice writing the letters by dipping a finger in finger paint and writing on paper.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, the teacher shows Alphachant Jj and identifies the capital J and lowercase j. Students find and point to the letter j. On Day 2, students learn the letter formation for Jj.
  • In Week 6, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher shows Alphachant Kk and identifies the capital K and lowercase k. Students find and point to the letter k. On Day 2, students learn the letter formation for Kk.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher shows Alphachant Zz and identifies the capital Z and lowercase z. Students find and point to the letter z. On Day 2, students learn the letter formation for Zz.

Materials include frequent and adequate tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g. follow words left to right, spoken words correlate sequences of letters, letter spacing, upper- and lowercase letters).

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 2, students learn book handling skills. With a partner, students Turn and Talk to show each other how to handle the book.
  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 2, students receive letter cards and the teacher asks students to identify various letters.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 4, the students find the book cover, title, and title page. The teacher uses page 2 of See to show pictures and words.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 4, students learn about directionality using a text called Tap, Nan, Tap!. The teacher shows how to track print from left to right and how to make a return sweep to the next line. The teacher asks, “Where will you begin reading? Show how you will read the words on page 3.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 4, students learn to recognize words and spaces between words. Students are directed to put a finger at the beginning and end of words. The teacher then asks, “What comes right after the word Look, before the next word?” Students identify a space.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 4, the teacher demonstrates how to open the book shows directionality. Students track the print as the teacher reads aloud. The teacher reminds students to track print as they read on their own.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, Day 4, students point to the book cover and title. The teacher asks students how many words are in the title.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read emergent-reader texts during Learning Stations. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2 of Learning Stations, students reread My Sister. Students read the text to a partner and do the following: “Page through the book and find the pictured items that begin with the letter s and create a list by drawing or writing the name of each item.”
  • In Unit 7, Week 1 of Learning Stations, students read I Like It Here. After reading, students go through the book to find word that begin with k.

Opportunities are missed to set students up with an explicit purpose before reading an emergent-reader text. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 4, the first read of Look! directions state, “Use Decoding Routine 5 or the Decode and Self-Correct prompts to conduct a whisper read of Look!.” The Decoding Routine does not explicitly ask the teacher to inform students of the purpose of reading.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 5, the second read of What Do You Have? includes the following directions: “Tell children that they are going to read the book What Do You Have? a second time. Use Decoding Routine 5 to conduct a choral reading.”

Materials support students’ development of automaticity and accuracy of grade-level decodable words over the course of the year. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 3, the teacher uses Decoding Routine 2 to have students blend words with h. The teacher uses Word Builder to display hat. The teacher states the first two sounds. Then the teacher blends the words. Students echo the words. The students decode hat and ham.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 4, the teacher uses Decoding Routine 6 to have students blend and read words chains. The teacher builds fit. The teacher models reading. Students read the word as the teacher sweeps a finger beneath the word. The teacher replaces the t with n to make fin. The Decoding Routine starts again with fin.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 4, the teacher uses Decoding Routine 6 to have students blend and read word chains. The teacher builds van. The teacher models reading. Students read the word as the teacher sweeps a finger beneath the word. The teacher replaces the v with t to make tan. The Decoding Routine starts again with tan.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher uses Decoding Routine 2 to have students blend words with the short /u/. The teacher uses the Word Builder to display bus. The teacher states the first two sounds. Then the teacher blends the words. Students echo the words. The students decode hut, bun, hug, sun.

Students have opportunities to read and practice high-frequency words. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, students learn the high-frequency words my. The teacher uses Practice Master PM2.3 to give each student a Word Card of my. Then the teacher uses High Frequency Word Routine 1 to teach my.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher reviews High Frequency Words. The teacher cuts out Word Cards a, my, see from the Practice Master PM2.23. The teacher displays the word, reads it aloud, and student repeat. The teacher spells the word, and students spell the word aloud. The teacher has students use the word in a oral sentence.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, the teacher cuts out the following words: look, at. The teacher holds up the word, and students say the word. Students take turns saying the word in a sentence. The teacher selects two students to stand in front of the class. Students read the cards and chant: “Look at…”
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 4, the teacher uses Word Builder to display what, a, and, for, go, here, I, is, see, the, you. Students read the words aloud. The teacher assigns Practice Master PM5.20 for students to have more practice reading high frequency words.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher uses Practice Master PM8.32 to make Word Cards for said and put for each student. The teacher uses High Frequency Word Routine 1 to teach each word. Students say each word and spell each word.
  • In Unit 9, Week 1, Day 2, the teacher reviews the two high frequency words: all and one. Students come to the Word Wall and point to the words as they read the words aloud.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The materials include opportunities for students to read and write words based on a word pattern. Students read pre-decodable (Unit 1 and Unit 2) and decodable texts that focus on the word pattern each week. Students also read and write high-frequency words. Students read decodable texts that contain high-frequency words.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g. one-to-one correspondences, syllable segmentation, rime and onset recognition, long and short sounds with common spellings and distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying sounds of the letters) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 5, the teacher uses the decodable text, Mmmmm!, to do a shared reading. While reviewing the text, the teacher asks students to identify the capital M and lowercase m. Students point to the m and say /m/. Students whisper read the text and then read the text with a partner.
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, the teacher uses Alphachant Mm with students. The teacher reads the text, and students find the letter m in the text.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 4, the students whisper read the decodable book, What Is It?. The decodable book includes the high-frequency word, what, that was instructed in this five-day instructional sequence along with the phonics focus of blending words with l.

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read high-frequency words in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 4, the students whisper read the decodable book, Look!. The decodable book includes the high-frequency word, lookthat was instructed in this five-day instructional sequence. The teacher monitors and listens for miscues. The teacher prompts for self-correction and uses corrective feedback for students that do not self-correct.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 2, the students review the high-frequency word, are, and chant a rhyme that spells the word are. Students then complete an assignment that includes reading sentences with the word, are.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3, students spell words with n. The teacher says the word an and the students repeat it.  The teacher segments the sounds. The students identify the first sound and match the sound to the letter.  The students write the word on their wipe boards. The activity is repeated for nap, can, pan.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, in the Reading and Writing Learning Station students partner read On Your Own Book 8, Tap, Nap, Tap! Then the students go through the book and list all the words that begin with the letter n.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, in the Reading and Writing Learning Station students build words with u using magnetic letters. Students write each new word on an index card.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

The Kindergarten materials include assessments that monitor progress and inform instruction throughout the year with formative, interim, and summative assessment tools that include assessment of foundational skills. Reading Placement test assesses student reading level and places students in the appropriate leveled books. The Assessment Handbook includes Weekly Tests and Unit Tests that assess skills taught throughout the unit, including foundational skills. Embedded assessment informs instruction at point of use and then provides the appropriate instructional routine for any reteach that may be needed. Reach into Phonics Foundations Diagnostic Assessments have both a Beginning of the Year and Mid Year Assessment. The Beginning of the Year Assessment is used to identify students in need of intervention. The Mid Year Assessment is used to measure growth and also to identify students that have not yet mastered certain foundational skills.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 2, T63, there is a Check and Reteach formative assessment that assesses students’ ability to associate the sound and letter m and to read the high-frequency word a. Students read the word a as it is displayed in a pocket chart. Then the students are to choose a word that begins with the m from a group of cards with several distractor cards. The card is placed next to the word a. Students read the phrase aloud and complete the sentence orally.
  • In the Reach in Phonics Foundations Teacher Guide, A1, Assessment Overview, an assessment chart indicates Diagnostic Assessments for foundational skills (Concepts of Print, Phonological Awareness, Letter-Sound Correspondence, Dictation, High Frequency Words, Phonics, and Fluency. The Reading Progress Assessments include Decoding, High Frequency Words, Accuracy, Rate, and Expression.
  • In the Reach in Phonics Foundations Teacher Guide, A2, Assessment Overview, an assessment schedule is included that indicates which of the Diagnostic Assessments to Administer at the Beginning, Middle and End of Year.
  • In Unit 8, T348, a Foundational Skills Test assesses the Phonological Awareness, Phonics and Spelling, and High Frequency Words that were taught during the unit. Reteach and Practice resources anad routines are listed as a reference for teachers.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Each unit includes reteaching lessons in the area of phonological awareness, phonics, concepts of print, and high-frequency words. Teachers are directed to these lessons after administering the informal assessment, Check and Reteach. Each week also includes leveled readers for teachers to use in small group differentiated lessons. Additional teaching strategies are listed for students with specific needs and below level. The differentiation routines stay the same within each unit across the year. 

An example of the differentiation routine includes: 

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, the materials contain a Reteaching section for Phonological Awareness, Phonics, Concepts of Print, Comprehension, High Frequency Words.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher is directed to use Decoding Routine 3 to reteach vowel-first blending with children that are having difficulty with sound-by-sound blending.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 5, the teacher is directed to use the Reteach lessons on T11 for any student having reading high-frequency words or decoding.
  • In Unit 3, page LR2, there are Leveled Reader, Reading Routines that include 4 weeks of level text. There is a book for Below Level students, On Level students, and Above Level students.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 4, there are differentiated strategies listed for students with Special Needs for middle sound identification and Below Level students for high-frequency words.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for Gateway 2. The materials include texts organized around a topic to build students' knowledge and vocabulary. Coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts are included; however, opportunities for students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts are limited. Some questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. The materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary and words in and across texts. Writing instruction and tasks do not consistently increase in complexity or lead to students independently demonstrating grade-level proficiency by the end of the year. The materials provide opportunities for focused research projects that encourage students to develop knowledge by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and sources. While the materials include a design for independent reading, a plan for how independent reading is implemented and a system for accountability for independent reading both inside and outside of the classroom are not present. 

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The text sets within each unit that the whole class hears during read alouds build students’ knowledge in the units. The same topic is addressed in small group reading and in the Learning Stations.

The eight units contain topics about science or social studies content. Over the course of four weeks per unit, students participate in listening, reading, writing, and discussion around a science or social studies topic and a Big Question.

Examples of units throughout the program that are organized around a topic include:

  • In Unit 2, students read about the social studies topic, family. They read songs, poems, picture books, folktales, stories, and a fairy tale to answer the question, "What do families do together?" Specific topics each week under this broad category include family members, family activities, meals and food, and being together. Texts include Gio and his Family by George Ancona, Families by Cory Phillips, Feast for 10 by Cathryn Falwell, and You and Me Together by Barbara Kerley.
  • In Unit 4, students read and learn about plants by focusing on the Big Question, "How are plants alike and different?" Students read poems, folktales, fairy tales, informational articles, photo essays, and stories. The individual topics each week include making plants grow, the life cycle of plants, plants that people use, and plants and animals. Texts include Sofia and the Sunflower by Guadalupe V. Lopez, Seeds by Douglas Florian, Apples by Jennifer Peters, and Hurt No Living Thing by Christina Rossetti.
  • In Unit 6, the social studies topic is town and students study how communities are different. Over the course of four weeks, students read stories, fables, songs, and folktales to address the Big Question. Students learn about places to live, places to go, transportation, and mapping the community. Texts include Race Day by Hector Ramirez, Flowers Around Town by Shirleyann Costigan, The Bus for Us by Suzanne Bloom, and Bear About Town by Stella Blackstone.
  • In Unit 8, the science topic is the sun, moon, and stars. Students read folktales, poems, and lullabies in order to explain what is in the sky. Throughout the four week unit, students learn about waking and sleeping, the day sky, day and night, and the night sky. Texts include The Night is Singing by Jacqueline Davies, Why the Sun Comes Up When, The Story of the Sun and the Moon by Kenn Nesbitt, and Live in the Sky, retold by Lada Josefa Kratky.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Throughout the program, students are asked a series of questions to help them analyze the details, key ideas, and structure of individual texts. Weekly lessons focus on a different reading comprehension skill such as identifying main idea and detail, cause and effect, and sequencing. Toward the end of the curriculum, questions begin to prompt students to refer to the text.

Examples of a series of coherently sequenced questions and tasks about analyzing details and structure include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud, Come with Me to School. Students learn about text structure by learning that things happen in a specific order or sequence. Students use the text and fill out a three-column chart to identify the beginning, middle, and end. Students use keyword cards to prompt responses for what happens in school in each column.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students listen to The Donut and learn about sequence. Students are asked questions about sequence: "What happens at the beginning of the story? What happens next? What happens at the end of the story?"
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students listen to the text, Amazing Animal Facts. Students learn about compare and contrast. Students are asked, "How are people like other animals? How are people different from sharks? What is one way people are different from all animals?"
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students listen to the folktale, The Four Friends. Students learn about cause and effect. After listening to the story, the teacher explains that they will use details in the story to think about what happens and why and answer questions: "Why does the monkey put dark soil around the elephant's back? What is the effect of doing that? What happens at the end of the story? Why were the animals able to share the apples?"
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students are asked questions requiring them to analyze details as they learn about the skill of visualizing: "What details help them imagine what the window looks like? What details help them picture the palm trees?"
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, students learn about topic, main idea, and details as they listen to the article, A Firefighter’s Tools. Questions focus on details: "How do a mask and air tank help a firefighter? Why do firefighters need to use long hoses?"

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas in individual texts; however opportunities across multiple texts is limited. Most questions found within units focus on building comprehension of the text, instead of the topic. Question types primarily include retelling, language, and making connections.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students hear the story, Rooster’s Big Job. During the first lesson, students answer comprehension questions about the story: “What lesson did the rooster learn in the fable?” On the second day, students answer questions that require them to analyze characters in the story, There’s a Billy Goat in the Garden. Students are asked to think about both stories when asked how the two stories are alike; however, this question does not require students to analyze the integration of knowledge.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students engage in a nonfiction opinion text about winter weather in four different parts of our world. During this lesson, students answer comprehension questions that integrate knowledge: “How is winter sunshine in Alaska and Florida different? What is one way that winter in Florida is similar to winter in other states?” Students also hear Every Season and answer comprehension questions that help integrate knowledge: “What is summer like? How is summer like spring? What do flowers do in spring?”
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, students hear the informational article, A Firefighters Tool, and are asked both story element questions and questions that help students analyze knowledge: “How do a mask and an air tank help a firefighter?” However, students also hear the text, Tools, which asks more questions about the text than the topic: “How many sentences are on these three pages? What is the farmer growing?”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Instructional materials provide some culminating tasks in which students demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. Students work on writing projects that span three weeks within each unit, and some of the writing projects require students to use what they have learned throughout the week to complete the writing task; however, some of the writing projects are narratives and do not require integration of skills to demonstrate knowledge.

Examples of process writing tasks that require students to integrate skills and knowledge include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students make a fact book that they work on throughout the unit. Students create a page for the class book. Throughout the unit, students read a variety of texts on animals and beginning in Week 2, they pick one animal to write facts about. Students listen to texts about animals, discuss animals, and write about animals, all to help with the culminating project.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students make a final copy of an opinion paper they worked on throughout the week. Students begin the task in Week 2, pick their favorite season, and write about it. Throughout the four-week unit, students read several texts about seasons and talk about the seasons.  
  • In Unit 7, students spend three weeks writing facts about a job. Students read texts throughout the week that highlight different jobs to help them with this culminating task. Students hear the big book, Jobs, to help them with this task.  Students integrate skills throughout the week to complete this project such as interviewing each other about different jobs they might like. In the third week, students focus on firefighters and are asked questions such as, “How can a mask and an air tank help a firefighter?”

However, not all units have a culminating task that integrate skills or require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic. For example:

  • In Unit 2, students create a narrative about a family activity. During the week, students read a variety of texts, including nonfiction texts about animals.
  • In Unit 8, students create a narrative. While they are reading narratives and use them as model texts throughout the unit, no knowledge of a topic is built nor do students have to show their understanding of a topic.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The instruction materials have a daily emphasis on vocabulary. Some of the activities involve learning the word, while others focus and aid in the comprehension and building of knowledge.

There are three vocabulary routines listed in the Best Practices section in the Teacher’s Edition. One is the Introduce Word routine where students begin by repeating the word and rating the word using a thumb up or thumb down. The teacher defines the word for the students and then together they work on elaborating. The teacher often has students talk about the word, give examples and non examples, and connect the word across content areas. Examples of the implementation of this routine include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 2, students are introduced to the Key Words, friend and share. Routine 1 is carried out and then the students hear the story, My School Day, where the words are used.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, students learn four key science words (adult, baby, parent, young), before hearing a book called Baby Names. All four words are prevalent in the story and important to know in order to understand the book.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 2, students learn the Key Word, store. They learn about it out of context using this vocabulary routine, but then read a story about a store. On the next day, the students review all of the words from this unit with a partner.

The second routine is the Expand Word Knowledge where students work in pairs using a graphic organizer, which is often a four corners: word, picture, word in context, and definition. Students are then assigned keywords for the graphic organizer. Examples of the implementation of this routine include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 3, students make a “window” (piece of paper laid horizontally and with ¼ of each side folded in toward the centerline of the paper to create two flaps) for the word weather. Students write the word on the left-hand flap and draw a picture to represent the word on the right-hand flap.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 3, students make a Four Corners graphic organizer with a small group to illustrate and define a single word from the week’s vocabulary.

The final vocabulary routine is the Share Word Knowledge where pairs are formed and students share their filled-in graphic organizer from the second routine. Then they discuss and write sentences in their journals with the words. Examples of the implementation of this routine include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 4, students use the 4 Corner Posters they made the day before for the week’s Key Words. They follow the routine to share their knowledge of the words then write sentences to accompany them on the back of the posters.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 4, students use the window they created to share a vocabulary word with a partner. Each student shows their window, reads his or her sentence, and talks about the word. Then, the students work together to write additional sentences.

In addition to learning new vocabulary words, students also learn vocabulary strategies. These lessons occur on Weeks 2 and 4 of the unit. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 2 students review that a noun names a person, place, thing, or idea and that an action verb tells what someone or something does. The teacher then reads sentences and explains that sentences can have multiple nouns or verbs in the sentence. Students read a variety of sentences that contain Key Words and identify nouns and verbs.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, students learn about compound words. Students work in partnerships to define compound words. They do this over the course of several days.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Instructional materials include multiple and varied opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction. Students draw, dictate, or write daily; however, not all writing tasks increase in rigor from the beginning to the end of the school year.

Daily writing skills lessons do not consistently increase in complexity or lead to students independently demonstrating grade-level proficiency by the end of the year. In the beginning of the year, students draw and write one-word answers in sentence frames, and in the middle of the year, students complete sentence frames. Towards the end of the year, students continue to draw, label, dictate, and fill in one-word sentence frames.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students begin by drawing pictures of themselves learning. Students either label their drawings or complete a sentence frame on Day 1. On Day 2, students draw their favorite thing the boy does during the day in the read-aloud story, My School Day. They write a one-word label for their picture and complete a sentence frame. Then on Day 3, students draw one thing the boy does at school in My School Day that they also do in school, which builds on the previous day's writing prompt. On Day 4, students write which color they like best. On Day 5, students choose a food they like to eat for lunch and they draw a picture of it. In all of the examples, students draw a picture to get their ideas across, though the topic changes daily.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1, students begin the week by naming an animal they have read about, draw a picture, and fill in a sentence frame. On Day 2, students write or dictate sentences that tell about the different kinds of animals moving into Honza’s house. On Day 3, students draw Honza’s house with all of the animals and fill in a sentence frame to describe their picture. On Day 4, students write about animal homes by also filling out a sentence frame. On Day 5, students begin a writing project where they write about an animal and include facts about it.
  • In Unit 7, Week 4, students write a thank you note from either Gus or Bessie from The Shoemaker and the Elves. The teacher models and they work on a shared writing example on Day 1. On Day 2, students draw a picture answer to the question about what they would like to be when they grown up. Students write or dictate sentences to tell about their picture. On Day 3, students draw a picture of a character from Bear at Work doing his or her job and fill in a sentence frame, which is similar to writing tasks in the beginning of the year. On Day 4, students write or dictate sentences that tells what is happening in the picture they draw of a scene in The Enormous Turnip. On Day 5, they work on publishing their fact book that they began in Week 2.  

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Over the course of the year, Kindergarten students have some opportunities to learn different components of research skills such as using sources and encyclopedias. Students also have opportunities to contribute to class books, such as Things to Read and a class encyclopedia on animals. There are points of practice within the materials for students to demonstrate individual research components with texts.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students draw a picture and complete the sentence frame: I like to read _____. Teachers are prompted to bind student work together to make a class book, Things to Read.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students practice identifying and collating facts about animals. Students choose an animal and write facts about it after they have read about different farm animals. In the cross-curricular activity in this unit, students practice classifying farm animals. They use photos to discuss and sort animals.
  • In Unit 3, students learn about an encyclopedia and create an encyclopedia page for the class encyclopedia on animals.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students make a map about a place in the community. They complete the sentence frames: My page shows the ____. I get ____ at the ____. Student pages are then organized into a community map.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, the teacher guides students through creating a job ad using information from the read-aloud, Help Wanted!
  • In Unit 9, Week 2, students complete a unit project that includes creating a book about what they have learned. The students divide their books into two chapters, At School and Outside of School. They create a cover, title, and name the author. The book include skills and activities they learn at school and outside of school.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Independent reading is mentioned in this program, but a plan for how it is implemented and a system for accountability for how students will engage in a volume of independent reading both inside and outside of the classroom does not exist. While all the information for independent reading is found in the Small Group Reading Guide, it does not explain when this should occur in or outside of the classroom nor for how long each day. There is no recording device provided nor accountability for how much students read or how well students read.

The Teacher’s Edition provides a basic independent reading routine but is not specific. It suggests that teachers select topics and provide a rich collection of books to choose from, though teachers need to select these books. Recommended Books for each unit are listed in the Teacher’s Edition and are identified by fiction and nonfiction, and are connected to the overall unit and topic/theme. It is suggested that the books include known texts, classroom favorites, and picture books. Students should be supported in selecting their books of interest for independent reading according to the Teacher’s Edition, but how a teacher should do this is not explicitly stated. After independent reading, students should share their reading experiences and summarize what they read. Teachers are encouraged to extend the independent reading by giving extension activities such as drawing a picture related to the book or writing a short play based on the book.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 10/02/2019

Report Edition: 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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