Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Reach for Reading Grade 2 partially meet expectations of alignment. The Grade 2 instructional materials partially meet expectations for Gateway 1. The materials partially meet the criteria that texts are worthy of students' time and attention, of quality, and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for the grade level. The materials partially meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts. The materials meet the criteria for materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards. The Grade 2 instructional materials partially meet expectations for Gateway 2 and provide some opportunities for students to build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
46
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
26
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Reach for Reading Curriculum for Grade 2 partially meets the expectations that high-quality texts are the central focus of lessons, are at the appropriate grade level text complexity, and are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in service to grow literacy skills. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention; however, some of the texts used for read aloud are not above the complexity levels of what most Grade 2 students can read independently and some of the texts remain qualitatively low and do not provide opportunities for students to develop reading independence. Materials provide some opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts. Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language are targeted to support foundational reading development.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
15/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that texts are worthy of students' time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, and support students' advancing toward independent reading. Anchor texts are of publishable quality and reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Some of the texts used for read aloud are not above the complexity levels of what most Grade 2 students can read independently, remain quantitatively low in complexity, and do not provide opportunities for students to develop reading independence. Materials expose students to a broad range of text types and disciplines and include a volume of reading so students can achieve grade-level reading proficiency by the end of the year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations of including shared and read-aloud texts in terms of quality and engagement. The majority of the texts are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and listening. The texts consider a range of cultures and interests and provide students the opportunity to engage with strong academic vocabulary, vibrant illustrations, and texts that they can identify with.

Examples of high-quality texts include:

  • In Unit 1, students read “Jobs Around the World” by Christina Vila which is a social studies article that includes vibrant photos and examples of jobs that will engage students.
  • In Unit 2, students read Twilight Hunt by Narelle Oliver which is a realistic fiction “seek and find” text that includes evocative language and images of nature in the evening, such as moths.
  • In Unit 3, students read Frog Brings Rain by Joseph Bruchac, which is a traditional tale of the Navajo about fire and weather. There are strong verbs throughout the text and colorful illustrations.
  • In Unit 4, students read a variety of Aesop’s Fables that contain rich vocabulary and important morals. The illustrations are age-appropriate.
  • In Unit 5, students read Day and Night by Glenn Plean which is a nonfiction text about the earth's’ movement and how we get day and night. This text teaches the concept of antonyms and includes bold illustrations and text features along with science vocabulary, such as earth and axis.
  • In Unit 6, students read Stone Soup, based on the Chinantec Tradition and rewritten by Justin Kiernan. This classic folktale, used for close reading, is previewed with song lyrics that outline the story.
  • In Unit 7, students read Odd Couples by Amy Sarver, which is a science article about animals that pair up and help each other in the world. This text contains high-interest information, exciting animal photos, and good content vocabulary.
  • In Unit 8, students read America is... by Louise Borden which is a literary nonfiction text about various places and features of the United States. There is rich vocabulary about America, such as freedom and pledge. It includes many features of our country such as skyscrapers, swamps, and bayou.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade levels. Students are exposed to various texts throughout the program. The whole group and read aloud texts include a mix of nonfiction and fiction texts with a variety of genres including folktales, scientific texts, poems, articles, and plays.

Examples of fictional texts include:

  • Unit 1: “The Adventures of Taxi Dog” by Debra and Sal Barracca- poem
  • Unit 2: “Clever Creatures”  by Douglas Florian- poem
  • Unit 3: Lila and the Secret of Rain by David Conway- tale
  • Unit 4: The Smell of Fish and the Sound of Rice by David Lee- folktale
  • Unit 5: "What Makes the Seasons?" by Megan Montague Cash- poem
  • Unit 6: Domino Soup by Carmen Agra Deeedy- play
  • Unit 7: Go to Sleep Gecko by Margaret Read McDonald- folktale
  • Unit 8: "America: A Weaving" by Bobbi Katz- poem

Examples of nonfiction texts include:

  • Unit 1: Working Her Way Around the World by Clare Cavanaugh- photo essay
  • Unit 2: A Frog has a Sticky Tongue by Pamela Graham- science fact book
  • Unit 3: "Make Rain" by Mimii Mortezai- science experiment
  • Unit 4: "Giving Back" by William Albert Allard- human interest feature
  • Unit 5: A Tree for All Seasons by Robin Bernard- science book
  • Unit 6: Mi Barrio by George Ancona- photo essay
  • Unit 7: "Why Bees are Friends" by Michelle Brown- persuasive article
  • Unit 8: America Is... by Louise Borden- literary nonfiction

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

Students listen to read alouds from the Big Books and Interactive Read Alouds. Leveled books are used for Small Group Instruction. One read aloud book is chosen each week relating to the concept of the unit provided. Some of the texts used for read alouds are not above the complexity levels of what most Grade 2 students can read independently. According to the publisher, some of the texts have Lexiles of 200-400. The Teacher Edition includes a Translation Key that shows the DRA, Lexile, and Reading Recovery levels. The texts span the levels of G (beginning about 200-400 Lexile) to P (500-700 Lexile).

Examples of read aloud texts that are at the appropriate level for complexity for read alouds include:

  • In Unit 1, students hear The Adventures of Taxi Dog by Debra and Sal Barracca, which has a Lexile of 600, though listed by the publisher of having a Lexile of 300-500. The qualitative level is middle low. They also read Serving the Community by Talia Reed, which has a Lexile of 610, though listed as having a  Lexile of 200-400, and has a qualitative feature of middle high.
  • In Unit 3, students hear This is the Rain by Lola M. Schaefer, which has a Lexile of 500-700 and a qualitative feature of middle high. Students also hear Lila and the Secret of Rain by David Conway, which has a Lexile of 300-500, but a middle-high qualitative feature analysis.
  • In Unit 4, students hear Biblioburro by Jeanette Winter, which has a Lexile of 580 and a middle low qualitative measure.
  • In Unit 5, students hear Fletcher and the Falling Leaves by Julia Rawlinson, which has a Lexile of 570 though the Lexile is listed as 300-500. It is listed as having a middle-high qualitative measure.
  • In Unit 7, students hear Animal Partnerships, which is listed as having a Lexile of 500-700 and middle-high qualitative features.
  • In Unit 8, students hear A Picnic in October by Eve Bunting, which has a Lexile of 600 and middle-high qualitative features, and Celebrate Independence Day by Deborah Hellingman, which has a Lexile of 810 and middle low qualitative features.

Examples of read aloud texts that fall below the appropriate text complexity level for read alouds because students could read them independently in Grade 2 include:

  • In Unit 2, students hear Little Skink’s Tall by Janet Huffman, which has a Lexile of 560 and a qualitative feature of middle low.  They also read A Frog has a Sticky Tongue by Pamela Graham, which is listed as having a Lexile of 200-400 and a middle low qualitative feature.
  • In Unit 4, students hear Maria and the Baker’s Bread by Daphne Liu, which has a Lexile of 480, though listed as having a Lexile of 200-400, but has a qualitative measure of middle high.
  • In Unit 5, students hear A Tree for all Seasons by Robin Bernard, which has a Lexile of 510 though listed Lexile of 300-500 and has a middle low qualitative feature.
  • In Unit 6, students hear the story The Brother Who Gave Rice by Dori Jones Yang, which has a Lexile of 400 and a middle low qualitative measure. In addition, they hear The Mangrove Tree by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trombone which is listed as having a Lexile of 300-500 according to the publisher, but according to Lexile.com has a Lexile of 1190. The qualitative features are middle high.
  • In Unit 7, students hear The Hen, the Rooster, and the Bean by Lada Josefa Krafty, which is listed as having a Lexile of 200-400 and qualitative features that are middle low.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

The texts used for read alouds or whole group close reading do not increase in complexity throughout the school year to help students develop independence of grade level skills. The quantitative features and qualitative features fluctuate throughout the program, with no clear reason as to how they will build towards independence. The quantitative features in the beginning of the year are similar to the quantitative features at the end of the year, with various levels throughout the year. The skills vary throughout the year, with some increasingly more complex skills being introduced toward the end of the year, such as synthesis. Students also have access to small group reading texts that are labeled below level, at level, or above level.

Examples of texts with which students engage during whole group reading include:

  • In Unit 1, students hear the poem, "Adventures of Taxi Dog" by Debra and Sal Barracca, which is considered a level L and is qualitatively low and students learn how to make predictions. Then they hear Serving the Community by Talia Reed, which has a level of K and is considered qualitatively middle high and students learn how to identify details.
  • In Week 3, students hear Lila and the Secret of Rain by David Conway, which has a level of M and is considered qualitatively middle high, and students learn about problem and solution. The complexity increases when students read This is Rain by Lola M. Schaefer in Week 3, which has a Level of P, and is also middle high, and students learn about cause and effect.
  • In Week 5, students hear Fletcher and the Falling Leaves by Julia Rawlinson, which has a quantitative level of M and is considered qualitatively middle high, and students learn about theme and visualizing. Then in Week 3, students hear A Tree for All Seasons by Robin Bernard, which has a lower complexity level with a Level L for quantitative features and is considered middle low for qualitative features. Students continue working on visualizing and also learning about comparing and contrasting.
  • In Unit 7, students hear The Hen, the Rooster, and the Bean by Lada Josefa Kratky which is one of the lowest level texts read in the program with a quantitative level of I. Students learn about character’ motives and synthesis, which are more complex skills and is considered qualitatively middle low. Students then read Animal Partnerships by Amanda Gelhardt with a level N and is considered qualitatively middle high. Students continue working on synthesis in this week.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The materials provide a qualitative measure in the form of Complexity Rubrics found under the Resource list tab; however, the rubrics do not share the rationale for why the specific text was chosen. Additionally, the qualitative measure provided is very broad such as middle low, with no explanation of what makes the text qualitatively middle low. The quantitative features are listed using Guided Reading Levels, DRA Ranges, and Lexile Ranges. The program materials give a general rationale for why all of the texts were chosen for the program, but none are specific. The materials state that the Student Editions include National Geographic content and authentic literature worth reading and rereading and that the units are four weeks long, built around a science or a social studies topic.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that anchor and support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Throughout the year, students engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading proficiency. Throughout the week, students hear a read aloud and participate in small reading groups. There are also learning stations that students go to where students may listen to a text, read a text in unison with a group of other students, or read with a partner.  Students also read independently at various times throughout the week.

In addition, students are exposed to a broad range of text types and disciplines throughout the year during read alouds, small groups, learning centers, and independent reading. Units have a shared reading and a close reading pairing each week with additional supplemental texts. There are also leveled readers related to the topic of each unit for small group and independent reading.

Examples of the various disciplines a student might read in various units include:

  • In Unit 2, students read or hear:
    • Little Skink’s Tail by Janet Halfmann, which is an animal fantasy
    • Twilight Hunt by Narelle Oliver, which is realistic fiction
    • "Camouflage in the Ocean" by Ryan Simmons, which is a science article
    • A Frog has a Sticky Tongue by Pamela Graham, which is a fact book
    • "Clever Creatures" by Douglas Florian, which is a poem
  • In Unit 4, students read or hear:
    • Maria and Baker’s Bread by Daphne Liu, which is a folktale
    • Aesop’s Fables retold by Shirleyann Costigan, which is a fable
    • Wisdom of the Ages, which is a proverb
  • In Unit 6, students read or hear:
    • The Brother Who Gave Rice by Dori Jones Yang, which is a folktale
    • Domino Soup by Carmen Agra Deedy, which is a play
    • "Stone Soup" by John Forster and Tom Chapin, which is song lyrics
    • "In a Mountain Community" by S. Michele McFadden, which is a human interest feature
    • Mi Barrio by George Ancona, which is a photo essay
  • In Unit 8, students read or hear:
    • A Picnic in October by Eve Bunting, which is realistic fiction
    • "America: A Weaving" by Bobbi Katz, which is a poem
    • Celebrate Independence Day by Deborah Heiligman, which is a social studies book
    • America.. by Louise Borden, which is literary nonfiction
    • "This Land is Your Land" by Woody Guthrie, which is song lyrics
    • "Celebrating Our Country’s Flag" by David Torres, which is a history article

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
13/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based and require students to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit, as well as valid inferences, from the text. Some culminating tasks refer back to the texts in the unit, but others do not. The materials provide practices and protocols for opportunities to discuss and interact with the curriculum content and vocabulary. Students have daily opportunities to practice speaking and listening; however, the practice opportunities are not always connected to the read-aloud text. Materials include multiple opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction and opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply narrative, opinion, and informative writing are provided; however, the majority of the writing lessons focus on informative writing. Students have an opportunity to write about the text that they listened to or the text that they read. Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. 

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials include opportunities for students to discuss the text by being asked text-dependent and text-specific questions. Students are asked specific questions related to the text and at times, are asked retell questions. These questions are found for both shared reading and decodable texts. Students are asked questions about the text, but also about the text features, including visuals.

Examples of text-dependent questions include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students read Market Day and answer questions: "What does the boy’s dad sell at his stand? What happens after people pet Sam? Why was this day fun for the boy?"
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read the decodable reader, The Best Trick, and answer questions: "What trick helps the bug blend in on page 5? Using the visual on page 14, which animals can hide in the woods?"
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students read the decodable text, Play Pumps, and answer questions: "Why do people in some countries use a lot of water every day? What happens if people do not have clean water?"
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students hear Aesop’s Fables and answer questions: "Why the lion laughed when the mouse says she will help him someday? How will the mouse be able to save herself from being eaten?"
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, student hear Day and Night and are asked if the sun really moves - up and down in the sky.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students read Domino Soup and are asked how Abuelo tricks people into cooperating with his plans and how important that will be to the story.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, read the decodable, Big Partners, and answer questions: "Why birds often partner with mammals? What does a capybara look like? Why are birds good partners for capybaras?"
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, students read Exploring National Symbols and answer questions: "Why do some flags have stars in rows and others have them in a circle? Why does Uncle Sam wear stars and stripes?"

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

The culminating tasks in Grade 2 are Unit Projects, some refer back to the texts in the unit, but others do not. While some require students to integrate knowledge, others require students to be creative and use their background knowledge, such as writing a recipe. At the end of each unit, students are given a choice of how they want to show their understanding of the unit Big Question. The choices are called Write It! Talk About It! or Do It!, and the Write It! And Do It options list the speaking and listening standards, while the Write It! lists the writing standards.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, students write ways animals survive on one set of cards and the names of animals and insects on another set of cards and then play a memory matching game, choose an animal from one of the texts and tell a partner a riddle about it, draw an animal from one of the texts and describe what it does to survive, or make a TV show about one of the animals.
  • In Unit 3, students learn about where water comes from and can choose to keep a journal about when and how they used water during the day, interview a partner about ways they get water throughout the day, make up movements about how rain is made up in the clouds, or write a letter to a cloud and tell why it is important and how it helps. Of these four options, only two of them integrate skills to demonstrate knowledge from the unit and the texts read throughout the four weeks.
  • In Unit 5, students learn about nature, and students are given the option of making a cartoon about each of the four seasons and write what happens in each box, discuss the different ways nature changes with a partner, create a mini skit for the class about how nature changes, or write about changes in nature that they see in the morning, middle of the day, and end of the night. While the majority of these projects require understanding from the texts, the final one does not.
  • In Unit 6, students can write a picture book about people, places, and groups that help others, review Stone Soup and write their own story and act it out like a TV Show (though this does not have to be about the text), look at pictures of murals in their texts and then paint special things about their community in a group mural, or create a poster about why people in the community should clean the park. Some of these options integrate skills to demonstrate understanding while others do not.
  • In Unit 8, students can either write a song about America and what it means to them, give a news report about a famous American landmark close to where they live, make up a skit about a holiday, or write a recipe for a favorite meal that they enjoy at home. Similar to other units, some of the options for the end of unit project require integration of ideas from the texts to demonstrate knowledge, but some do not require any knowledge or understanding from the unit.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide practices and protocols for opportunities to discuss and interact with the curriculum content and vocabulary. The Best Practices Routines, which are the speaking and listening protocols, are located in the front of the Teacher Edition. There are protocols for partner discussions, group conversations, and presentations. Clear directions and protocols are provided and supported by the Academic Talk Flip Chart. Group conversations are scaffolded with roles that are clearly defined and supported with sentence stems to help students fulfill their role in the discussion.

The partner discussion protocol includes sentences stems and opportunities for each partner to talk. The group conversation protocol includes roles for each student including a facilitator, encourager, timekeeper, and note taker. There are also sentence stems to help students with the discussion. At the end of the discussion, the class comes back together and students share what their groups discussed.

The presentation protocols are outlines for students and include criteria such as stand up tall, speak clearly and loud enough for everyone to hear, and introduce the presentation. The protocol also includes directions for listeners and includes listen attentively, ask questions if you do not understand something, and make eye contact. The Cooperative Learning suggestions in the text also provide support for partner and group discussion configurations that can be used with the protocols.

Examples of opportunities for evidence-based discussions but without the use of the protocols include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 5, the wrap-up section has students work in groups to respond to the Big Question, “What does it take to survive?” Discussion question prompts include what are some ways animals hide from danger and what do you know about how animals hunt and find food.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 5, in the wrap-up activity, students are to review the contents of their weekly folders. They then form groups and discuss the Big Question of the week.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 2, students work as partners to discuss how people helped others in the poem, “Teamwork,” and the stories, The Brothers Who Gave Rice and “Star Team.” The teacher is directed to encourage the use of key vocabulary, including together, teamwork, cooperate, and share.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Day 5, students are directed to review the contents of their weekly Folders and the unit concept map. They then form groups and use what they have learned to discuss the Big Question, "What does America mean to you?" The teacher circulates and prompts students with questions, such as "What do the different symbols of the United States tell you about the country? How do they make you feel?"

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Students practice their speaking and listening daily, though it is not always connected to the texts that they listen to in read alouds. Some of the specific opportunities come before the text is read during a vocabulary lesson or during an opportunity to make predictions. While students do hear the texts and follow-up questions are provided that could support speaking and listening, it is not specified for teachers.

Examples of opportunities for students to practice their speaking and listening, though not always in conjunction with a text, include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 5 students are partnered to respond to questions about their reading of Twilight Hunt, including "What is something from the story that Screech Owls do in real life? Choose an animal from the story and describe its color, shape, and size."
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 5, the Wrap-Up section directs teachers to have children review the materials from the week, form mixed groups, and have children use what they learned to discuss the Big Question, "Where does water come from?" The teacher circulates and asks prompting questions when needed.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 2, the Talk Together section references the Language Builder Picture Cards (with pictures of things from nature) that students had been using in the previous activity. The teacher reminds the students that the pictures are something from nature.  While this is in connection with a text, it is not done in response to the text. Throughout the week students are learning about nature and this is an activity to increase the vocabulary.
  • In Unit 7, Week 4, Day 4, students chorally reread the text, Pelican Watch. The teacher then leads the group in discussing the text with questions designed to build comprehension: "Why do birds gather on the Oregon Coast? How does a brown pelican catch a fish?"

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The materials include multiple opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction. In each lesson, students write either in response to the text or using the text as a mode. On the fourth week of every unit, there is a process writing task that includes narrative, expository, and opinion writing.

Examples of opportunities for students to participate in on-demand writing include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students write a journal entry where they make an inference about Little Skink from their story.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 3, students think about the text and PlayPumps and why people build these machines. The students have the option of either writing a letter to their school community listing the reasons why it would or would not be a good idea to build a PlayPump near their school or to write a letter to a community in Africa and tell them what they think about the PlayPump by explaining the reasons for their opinions.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Lesson 4, students are divided into groups and are given sections from the text, “In a Mountain Community.” Each group works together to write the main idea of the assigned section.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 3, after reading the text, students write whether they think Elephant was right or wrong when he said, “Some things you just have to put up with.”

Process Writing opportunities include students participating in longer writing projects over the course of several days to help students understand the writing process. These occur in Week 4 of every unit. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students write a descriptive essay story. On Day 1, they study a model, on Day 2 they prewrite, and on Day 3 they draft. Then one Day 4 they revise and edit, and on Day 5 they publish and present.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students begin to write an interview. They begin by studying a model and then brainstorm by choosing a  topic and getting organized by creating their own sequence chain. Students then draft, revise by working with a partner, edit, and publish and present.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students write a comparison. After studying a model and prewriting, they draft, revise with a partner, edit, and publish and present their writing.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, students write a personal narrative with an opinion. They go through the entire writing process starting with analyzing a model, prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, publishing, and presenting.

Students also have Power Writing to help build their writing stamina. They are given one minute to write as much as they can about a topic. For example,

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, students write as much as they can in one minute about rain.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 3, students write as much as they can in one minute about the word, connect.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year-long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Instructional materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply narrative, opinion, and informative/expository writing; however, the majority of writing lessons focus on informative/expository writing. Students have opportunities to write daily with the focus primarily being expository prompts, with some opinion writing prompts. Narrative writing is part of the process writing and is rarely done with the daily on-demand writing.

Each week focuses on a different writing genre, sometimes aligned to the text. Model writing samples and other instructional supports accompany each unit. A longer writing assignment is included in each unit that spans the course of a week. Each of these is a different writing genre.

Examples of narrative writing include:

  • In Unit 3, the writing project is to write a folktale about where rivers come from or what can stop the rain.
  • In Unit 6, the writing project is to write a story about people who work together to make something happen.
  • In Unit 8, the writing project is to write a personal narrative about what America means to them or someone else.

Examples of expository writing include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students write a post for the Internet Bulletin Board about their favorite place in their community.
  • In Unit 2, students write an article that compares how two animals survive.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students write about states of water. They pick a state of water and write three clues about it for others to guess.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students write one sentence about the theme or the message of the story, The Smell of Fish and the Sound of Rice.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students write a description of a season by following guiding questions: "What does the season feel like? What kind of clothes do people wear?"
  • In Unit 7, students write an expository report about a partnership in nature.

Examples of opinion writing include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students work in groups to write their opinion on what they think is the best camouflage in two sentences using the texts from the unit.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students write whether they think Elephant was right or wrong.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, students write one or two sentences telling whether they think “You’re a Grand Old Flag” is a good Fourth of July song.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Throughout the materials, students have an opportunity to write about the text that they listened to or the text that they read. Students often work in partnerships to complete writing assignments about the texts. Students may be asked to summarize what they read, provide details, share opinions, or make inferences. Throughout the week, there are multiple opportunities for the students to write about the texts.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students choose a character from Quinto’s Neighborhood and then can either explain the job of the character from Quinito's neighborhood or compare a character from Quinito's neighborhood to someone they know with the same job.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students work with a partner to pick an animal or insect from Hide and Seek to write an inference that explains why the animal or insect has the ability to hide.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students work in pairs to write about the causes and effects in This is the Rain.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students work in pairs to pick a character from Maria and the Baker’s Bread and then fill out the character map in order to write about the character’s personality traits.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students work in small groups to write about one of the natural events from When the Wind Stops. Students must explain how the natural event is part of a repeating cycle or a pattern.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students write a summary of The Brother Who Gave Rice.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students write down two important ideas from the story, The Hen, The Rooster, and the Bean.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, after reading a poem, students work in pairs to write two or three sentences about what they think the poem means.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

In each week of each unit, there is a five-day grammar lesson sequence. The lessons begin with finding the grammar skill in text. The teacher then introduces the skill and the rule. On Day 4, there is a writing activity where the teacher models the skill in writing. The skill is often practiced using a Practice Master. There are many weeks that introduce and/or review previously taught skills. Over the course of the year, there are several grade level language standards that are not addressed in the grammar lessons.

Students have opportunities to use collective nouns. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 2, the teacher introduces collective nouns and teaches the rule.

Students have opportunities to form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, the teacher points out examples of irregular plural nouns in the Anthology. The teacher introduces irregular plural nouns and teaches the rule. On Day 3, the teacher reviews collective nouns and irregular plural nouns. On Day 4, the students complete sentences with the correct plural or collective noun.

Students have opportunities to use reflexive pronouns. For example:

  • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher introduces reflexive pronouns. The teacher points out that reflexive pronouns end in -self and -selves and teach the rule: A reflexive pronoun refers to the subject of a simple sentence.

Students have opportunities to form and use the past tense of frequently occurring regular verbs. For example:

  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 2, the teacher introduces regular past tense action verbs and teach the rule: verbs in the past tense tell about actions that happened in the past, past tense verbs can be formed using -ed.

Students have opportunities to use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, the teacher introduces adjectives, comparison adjectives and demonstrative adjectives.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, the teacher introduces adverbs and introduces adverbs that tell when.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher introduces adverbs that tell where. On Day 2, the teacher introduces adverbs that tell how. On Day 3, the teacher teaches the rule of when to use adverbs and when to use adjectives. On Day 4, the teacher reviews the use of adverbs in writing.

Students have opportunities to produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 4, the teacher models how good writers make sure their sentences have both a naming and telling part.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher introduces compound sentences that are statements. On Day 2, the teacher introduces compound sentences that are commands.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 2, the teacher introduces compound sentences that are questions. On Day 3, the teacher introduces turning statements into questions.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, Day 3, the teacher introduces rewriting sentences by adding prepositional phrases and teaches the rule: you can rewrite sentences to add more information by adding prepositional phrases.

Students have opportunities to capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, the teacher displays a chart with the rules for capitalizing days of the week, months, and holidays. Students then apply the rules by playing a game using proper nouns.

Students have opportunities to use an apostrophe to form contractions. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher points out contractions in the Anthology text and then introduces contractions with am, is and are. Then the teacher teaches the rule: a contraction combines words and uses an apostrophe. On Day 2, the teacher introduces contractions with has, have and had.

Students have opportunities to consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. For example:

  • In Unit 8, Week 1, students review how to use a dictionary to check spellings. Students then practice using the dictionary to place words in alphabetical order.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
18/22
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards. Students have opportunities to learn and practice phonics skills; however, some phonics skills are not taught until the final two units of instruction. The materials include units that review previously taught grade level phonics skills, but the review sequence does not allow adequate focus and time on grade level phonics skills. Some opportunities for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words are included. The materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills. Assessments monitor progress and inform instruction throughout the year, and the materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

The materials contain opportunities for students to learn Grade 2 phonics. Lessons to teach phonics contain Sing with Me Phonics Songs Book, Sound/Spelling Cards, Word Builder (computer based), Write-On/Wipe-Off Board, and Practice worksheets. Within the materials are routines for dictation and decoding. The materials contain units of phonics skills that are review from prior grade levels. This sequence of review does not allow adequate focus and time for phonics skills. The majority of prefix and suffix explicit instruction does not occur until Units 7 and 8.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. distinguish long and short vowel sounds, apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode two syllable words with long vowels). For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students learn to decode two syllable words with a long a. On Day 3, the teacher shows students the CVCe syllable pattern and includes two syllable words, such as inhale, escape, mistake. Students decode unmade, cupcake, and cascade.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students learn to distinguish between words with short /i/ and long /i/. Students sort Word Cards into two piles based on the long and short vowel sounds. On Day 2, the teacher displays words with short /i/ and long /i/. Students read and sort the words by vowel sound.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students learn two vowel digraphs: ai and ay. Students sort words with Word Cards into two piles based on the long /a/ being formed by ai or ay. On Day 1, the teacher uses Decoding Routine 1 to teach ai and ay. Students decode words, such as aid, drain, wail, way, play, stray.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students learn words with i, ie, and igh. Students sort words with Word Cards into two piles based on long /i/ sound that formed by i, ie, igh. On Day 2, students spell words with i, ie, igh using their Write-on/Wipe-Off Board. The teacher states a word and segments the sounds in the word. Students match each sound to a Sound/Spelling Card and write the word.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students learn three prefixes (un-, re-, mis-) and three suffixes (-y, -ly, -ful). On Day 1, Step 1 includes displaying the word, unsafe. The teacher points to the prefix and explains the meaning. The teacher shows words with the other two prefixes and explains the prefix. In Step 2, the teacher distributes Letter Cards and has students build words that will have the prefixes added to them. In Step 3, the teacher guides students to read words with prefixes. On Day 3, students learn the three suffixes and the teacher uses a similar routine to the prefix lesson on Day 1 to teach the suffixes.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, students learn four prefixes (dis-, pre-, im-, in-) and four suffixes (-er, -or, -less, -ness). On Days 1 and 2, students learn to read words with the prefixes. On Days 3 and 4, students learn to read words with the suffixes.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application, but the sequence contains review of Kindergarten and Grade 1 standards. The review of standards extends into Unit 3 of eight units. For example:

  • In Unit 1, students learn skills and words with short /a/, /i/, /o/, /e/, /u/. Students also learn ck and ng.
  • In Unit 2, students learn skills and words with r, l, s blends, final blends, and words with the following digraphs: ch, tch, th, wh, sh, ph.
  • In Unit 3, students learn long a, CVCe syllables, long /i/ and /o/, long /e/, open and closed syllables, inflected endings, and long /u/.
  • In Unit 4, students learn words with ai, ay, multisyllabic words, words with ee, ea, ie, words with oa, ow, CVCC words with long /o/, and compound words.
  • In Unit 5, students learn words with i, ie, igh; words with kn, wr, gn, mb; words with -y; words with oo, ue; words with -er, -est; words with ew, ui, ou, ue; and words with -es, -ed, -ing.
  • In Unit 6, students learn words with r-controlled vowels.
  • In Unit 7, students learn words with prefixes (un-, re-, mis-), words with suffixes (-y, -ly, -ful), vowel digraphs (oo, ea, ou, au, aw), vowel variant (al, all), diphthongs (oi, oy, ou, ow), and initial schwa.
  • In Unit 8, students learn prefixes (dis-, pre-, im-, in-); suffixes (-er, -or, -less, -ness); final syllables (C + le, -tion, -ture); final syllables (with schwa + r, n, l); and multisyllabic words.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

The materials contain opportunities for students to learn and practice text structures and text features. In the main materials, there are lessons for text structures and text features.

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 2, students learn to identify topic and main idea. The teacher models using the title and picture to figure out topic. On Day 3, the teacher asks questions to get students to figure out topic and main idea: “Who or what are these pages about? What is the main idea?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 2, students learn about the elements of poetry. On Day 3, the teacher explains rhyme and rhythm. The teacher asks: “What clues let you know that 'Animal Rhymes' are poems?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher uses Word Maps to teach the terms problem and solution. The teacher models using a Problem-and-Solution Chart with a read aloud passage. During Day 1 Listen and Comprehend, the teacher asks questions: “What is the problem in the village? How is Lila trying to bring rain to the village?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 2, the teacher explains sequence as the order in which events happen. The teacher asks questions: “What part of this page tells you the sequence, or order, of the steps? What happens after the rain falls to the ground?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher uses a Word Map and a Sequence Chain to teach the term, sequence. The teacher shows eVisual 4.9 and has students listen for sequence words. During Day 1 of Listen and Comprehend, the teacher asks, “What happens before Luis reaches the children?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher use a Word Web to teach the term, elements. The teacher reminds students that elements are characters, setting, and plot. The teacher uses eVisual 6.1 to model using a Story Map to organize elements. The teacher asks questions about the main text’s elements: “Where do you think the story takes place? What kind of person do you think Younger Brother is, based on this text?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher uses the Frayer Model to teach the term, main idea. The teacher shows eVisual 6.10 and has students listen for the main idea and important details from “Working Together.” During the reading of the main text, the teacher asks, “What is the main idea of this page?”

Materials include frequent and adequate  lessons and activities about text features (e.g. title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 3, the teacher has students look at the map to figure out what information maps display.
  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher uses questions to get students to notice text features: "How is Evan’s icon like his favorite place? How is Zoe’s icon like her favorite place? How does the photo help explain Zoe’s message?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher asks questions in order to get students to notice the boldface font: “What is a drought? How did you find the answer?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 3, the teacher asks questions in order to get students to understand a map: “What does the map on page 177 show? How does this map help you understand the text?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher asks the question to get students to use the photos: “How do the photos help you better understand the information in the article?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 1, the teacher asks questions to get students to use two text features, caption and heading: “Look at the caption above the photograph of Marc standing in front of the mural. What information do you learn about the mural? Reading the heading on page 394. What information do you expect to learn in this section?”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Opportunities to practice fluency are included daily, although the opportunities are not in-depth fluency lessons. On Days 1, 3, and 5, the teacher materials suggest students read a decodable text from NGReach.com and use Fluency Routine 2 to read the text. On Days 2 and 4, the teacher materials suggest students reread Read on Your Own Book to check accuracy and rate. On many Day 3s, the teacher models the fluency focus such as intonation, expression, and phrasing. There are four Fluency Routines used in the materials. High Frequency Word instruction and practice is included in Days 1-4 with assessment on Day 5.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read grade level text. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3, there is “Set a Purpose: Meet some of the people in Quinito’s neighborhood. Find out what jobs they do.” During reading, the teacher asks questions related to the purpose such as: “Which family member is a nurse? Which family member is a carpenter?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 3, there is “Set a Purpose: Find out how a new invention helps many people.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 3, there is “Set a Purpose: Find out what happens when the seasons change.”
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, Day 3, there is “Set a Purpose: A family’s store is almost always open. Will it stay open on the Fourth of July?”

Opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade level decodable words, but materials only include a brief teacher model on Day 3 of the fluency focus. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher explains fluent readers as: “Fluent readers change their voices to match different kinds of sentences.” The teacher models reading aloud with intonation using the Big Book. The teacher points how using a raised voice at the end of a question and speaking louder to emphasize the exclamation. The teacher reads two lines on page 8 in a monotone voice and asks students to repeat the sentences with proper intonation.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher explains fluent readers as: “Fluent readers use their voices to express different feelings when they read aloud.” The teacher models expression when reading aloud from the Big Book. The teacher explains how using voice can help readers feel tension. The teacher reads the next line with a flat voice and students repeat the sentence using expression.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher explains using phrasing: “When you use correct phrasing, you pause between groups of words in a sentence. This gives your listeners time to better understand what is being read.” The teacher reads aloud the last sentence on page 5 of the text to model correct phrasing. Students read silently with the teacher, and students point to the places that the teacher pauses. Students read the sentence aloud with the teacher using correct phrasing.

Materials do not fully support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. Explanation to the teacher as to how to teach reading strategies is not always specific besides general directions such as monitor for miscues and prompt self-correction. The Corrective Feedback Routine can be used to assist the teacher in providing feedback to the student. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, students whisper read the decodable text, “Market Day.” The teacher is to monitor for miscues and prompt self-correction. If students cannot self-correct, the teacher is to provide corrective feedback.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 4, students whisper read the decodable text, “Don’t Panic, Be Safe.” The teacher is to monitor for miscues and prompt self-correction. If students cannot self-correct, the teacher is to provide corrective feedback.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 4, in Check & Reteach, the objective states, “Read Decodable Texts Fluently and with Comprehension.” Each student is to read aloud a page from “Muskrats and Rails.” The teacher is to note the reading speed and miscues. Students with low reading speeds should use partner reading or the Comprehension Coach to build automaticity.

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words daily. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, students complete Practice Master PM2.29 to trace and then write the following High Frequency Words: wait, know, other, warm, year, yellow, world, without.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 1, the teacher reads aloud page 3 to teach the high frequency words. The teacher uses High Frequency Words Routine 1: “Say the High Frequency Word, say a sentence with the word, say the word again and have children repeat it and then write it.” Students track the print and echo as the teacher reads aloud. Student work in partners to read the sentence and spell the High Frequency Words. Students read the following words: been, both, different, friend, great, house, kind, place.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 4, students listen to the teacher pronounce the High Frequency Words (eye, animal, ball, few, move, food, might, large, number, often). Students echo the pronunciation. The teacher covers the words on the word wall, and students say the word and spell it. The teacher uncovers the word for students to check their spelling.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The materials include opportunities for students to read and write words based on a Grade 2 word pattern starting in Unit 4. Students read decodable texts that focus on the word pattern each week. Students also read and write high-frequency words. Students read decodable texts that contain high-frequency words.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g. apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels, decode words with common prefixes and suffixes) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 2, students read the decodable text, The Good Deeds Day by Kate Pershing. Students decode words with the vowel digraph ee in the text, such as deeds, need, wheel, and street.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 2, students read the decodable text, Fossils by Maria Alvarez. Students decode words with the vowel digraphs ew, ui, ou, ue such as clues, jewels, glue, and bruise.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 4, students read the decodable text, Farmers’ Market by Olivia Lee. Students decode multisyllabic words with ar, such as farmstand, parsnips, cartons, and gardens.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, Day 2, students read the decodable text, We All Immigrated by Imogene Cole. Students decode words with prefixes, such as disbelief, disappear, preteen, indirect, and immigrated.

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4, students read the decodable text, The Golden Rule and More by Janet Ward. Students read the following high-frequency words in the text: would, nice, may, around, alone, thank, push, wouldn’t and teachers.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 4, students participate in Guess the Word. Partner 1 selects a secret word that could be a high-frequency word and gives a clue to the meaning of the word. Partner 2 tries to figure out the word based on the clue.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 2, students read the decodable text, Lightning! by Deanne W. Kells. Students read the following high-frequency words in the text: starts, hear, air, round, and even.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 2, students read the decodable text, Bird Partners by Jamie Rowley. Students read the following high-frequency words in the text: please, close, and show.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, Day 2, students read the decodable text, Keep Cultures Alive by Troy Bonaventure. Students read the following high-frequency words in the text: sing, states, music, still, got, songs, tell, story, and example.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4, students play Illustrate a Word. Partners choose a spelling word. Each partner writes the word at the bottom of a page. Students exchange papers and illustrate the words on their new papers. Students share their picture and work together to write a sentence for each word.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 4, in groups of three, students play Adding Words. Player 1 selects a word card, shows the word and states the word. Player 2 selects a word card and places it before or after the first card, and states a sentence with both words. Player 3 selects a word card and adds to the sentence using the three words.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 4, students play Riddles. In groups of three, each student selects two spelling words. Each student writes a riddle on the selected words on an index card. Students show each other their riddles and the student who solves the riddle displays the next riddle.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

The materials include assessments that monitor progress and inform instruction throughout the year with formative, interim, and summative assessment tools that include assessment of foundational skills. The Reading Placement test assesses the reading level and places students in the appropriate leveled books. The Assessment Handbook includes Weekly Tests and Unit Tests that assess skills taught throughout the unit including foundational skills. Embedded assessment informs instruction at point of use and then provides the appropriate instructional routine for any reteach that may be needed. Reach into Phonics Foundations Diagnostic Assessments have both a Beginning of the Year and Mid Year Assessment. The Beginning of the Year assessment is used to identify students in need of intervention. The Mid Year assessment is used to measure growth and also to identify those students that have not yet mastered certain foundational skills. The Reach in Phonics Foundations booklet includes intervention lessons to address the areas of need with a progress monitoring component.

  • In the Reach in Phonics Foundations Teacher Guide, A1, Assessment Overview, an assessment chart indicates Diagnostic Assessments for foundational skills (Concepts of Print, Phonological Awareness, Letter-Sound Correspondence, Dictation, High Frequency Words, Phonics and Fluency). The Reading Progress Assessments include Decoding, High Frequency Words, Accuracy, Rate, Expression and Comprehension.
  • In The Reach in Phonics Foundations Teacher Guide, Unit 1, Weeks 1-2 Assessment and Reteach, the teacher is directed to administer the Reading Progress Assessment. Teachers are directed to continue with Week 3-4 instruction for those students that have gained two words or more per minute. For those students that did not, the teacher is directed to reteach in one of the following skills: match and isolate beginning sounds, short /a/, /i/, /o/ in closed syllables, final -s in plural possessives, vc/cv syllable division, read/spell high-frequency.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, the teacher implements a Check and Reteach formative assessment. Students must isolate and match the middle sound in safe, take and vane. For students that are unable to demonstrate the skill, the teacher is directed to clap out the syllables and ask what is the second sound you hear? This is repeated with the words vane, face, made, and cape.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, T437d, assessment and reteaching resources are listed for teachers. The assessments include objectives in Foundational Skills (Phonics, High Frequency Words), Spelling, Fluency, and Grammar and Writing.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Materials provide instructional routines in the area of phonological awareness, decoding, dictation, high-frequency words and fluency. These are listed as reteach resources for teachers based on the end of week assessment results. Teachers are also directed to these lessons after administering the informal assessment, Check and Reteach. Each week also includes leveled readers for teachers to use in small group differentiated lessons. Additional teaching strategies are listed for students with specific needs, below level, above level, and ELL. The differentiation routines stay the same within each unit across the year.

Example includes:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, there is a differentiated strategy listed for students that are below-level that mix up the spelling or pronunciation of long /a/ and short /a/ words. The teacher is supposed to reinforce that when an /e/ is added to the end of a word it causes the /a/ to make the long sound or the sound of its name. The teacher shows the word cards cap and man. Then the teacher adds the -e to the end of the word and emphasizes that the vowel now says the long /a/. The students pronounce the words several times.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 3, there is a differentiated strategy listed for students that are English learners. The issue listed is that Spanish speakers write two vowels to make the long sound. The students practice building words using a_e.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1, there is a differentiated strategy listed for students that have Special Needs and have trouble making the long /i/. Students hold their chin between their thumb and forefinger. Student say the long /i/ and note how their chin moves when they say the sound. Then students keep their hands on their jaw as they say sentences that include words that have the long /i/.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 2, there is a differentiated strategy listed for students that are above level. For those students that complete the long /i/ activity quickly, the students find and build additional long /i/ words from “Crow and the Pitcher.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, in the Assessment and Reteach section on page T165d, teachers are directed to use the Decoding Routines, Dictation Routines, High Frequency Words Routines, Fluency Routines, and the Reach into Phonics Foundations as resources.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, there is a Check and Reteach informal assessment. Teachers are directed to use High Frequency Words Routine 2 for students that misspell high-frequency words.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations for Gateway 2. The materials include texts organized around a topic to build students' knowledge and vocabulary. Coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts are included and students have opportunities to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Some questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. The materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary and words in and across texts. Writing instruction and tasks do not consistently increase in complexity or lead to students independently demonstrating grade-level proficiency by the end of the year. The materials provide opportunities for focused research projects that encourage students to develop knowledge by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and sources. While the materials include a design for independent reading, a plan for how independent reading is implemented and a system for accountability for independent reading both inside and outside of the classroom are not present.

Criterion 2a - 2h

26/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The text sets within each unit that the whole class hears during read alouds build students’ knowledge in the units. The same topic is addressed in small group reading and in the Learning Stations.

The eight units contain topics about science or social studies content. Over the course of four weeks per unit, students participate in listening, reading, writing, and discussion around a science or social studies topic and a Big Question.

Examples of units that are organized around a topic include:

  • In Unit 1, students read about neighborhoods and community, with the Big Question, "What is a community?" Over the four weeks, students read social studies articles, photo essays, a poem, and realistic fiction to address the Big Question. Examples of texts include Quinito’s Neighborhood by Ina Cumplano, Jobs Around the World by Christina Vila, Serving the Community by Talla Reed, and Mr. Soto’s Second Grade Class.
  • In Unit 3, students learn where water comes from. Over the four weeks, students read science and magazine articles, a tale, a profile, and a science experiment. Examples of texts include Lila and the Secret of Rain by David Conway, Make Rain by Mimi Mortezal, PlayPumps: Turning Work into Play by Catherine Clarke Fox, and Rivers Matter by Sandra L. Postel.
  • In Unit 5, students study the social studies topic of why people work together. Over the course of four weeks, students read folktales, plays, song lyrics, a human interest feature, and photo - essays. Examples of texts include The Brother Who Gave Rice by Dorl Jones Yang, Stone Soup by John Forster, The Mangrove Tree by Susan L. Roth, and Mi Barrio by George Ancona.
  • In Unit 7, students read about the science topic of how living things depend on each other. Over the course of four weeks, students read folktales, science articles, a profile, and a persuasive article. Examples of texts include Go to Sleep, Gecko retold by Margaret Read MacDonald, Enric Sala; Marine Ecologist by Kristin Cozort, Animal Partnerships by Amanda Gebhardt, and Why Bees Are Our Friends by Michelle Brown.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Throughout the program, students are asked a series of questions to help them analyze the details,  key ideas, and structure of individual texts. The materials include some questions asking students to analyze craft and language. Students analyze text features and make inferences throughout the program. They are asked to analyze problems and solutions, cause and effect, and characters.

Examples of a series of coherently sequenced questions and tasks include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students read the decodable text, Orcas Island. Students are asked a series of questions about identifying details, asking questions, and making connections: "What is the main idea? What are things you can do on Orcas Island? Why is fog a problem for people on a boat near Orcas Island? What would you like to do on Orcas Island?"
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students are asked a series of questions about comparing and contrasting after listening to a science fact book. They are asked how giraffes and goats are alike and what features both lionfishes have in a picture.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students hear Rivers Matter. There is an extensive series of comprehension questions beginning with questions connecting the previously read text, The Mighty Colorado, to the current text. Students are also asked about the author’s reasons, analyzing the problem and solution, and identifying cause and effect.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students read The Good Deeds Day and answer questions focused on analyzing key details from the text. Students are asked, "What would happen if the school did not have a custodian? What does page 7 tell you about helper dogs?"
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students hear a short folktale and answer analysis of detail questions: "Where do you think the story takes place? What kind of person do you think Older Brother is? What type of person do you think Younger Brother is?"
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, students hear the song lyrics for “This Land is Your Land.” Questions during the first read focus on text features and analyzing elements of poetry and song lyrics that are related to poetry. The second read continues to analyze elements of poetry and poetic language and also visualizing and making inferences.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Throughout the year, students read a variety of texts that help them build science and social studies knowledge. With these texts, students are asked a series of text-dependent questions that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read science articles, "Hide and Seek" and Twilight Hunt. Both of these texts introduce the idea of camouflage. Before reading "Hide and Seek," students review Twilight Hunt and discuss how certain animals can disappear when they are hiding from an owl. After reading Hide and Seek, students answer questions: "How is the mantis in the photograph hiding? Why is the goby fish in the photo hard to see? What happens when the animal and its habitat are the same?" The next day, students read another text, The Best Trick, where they read and discuss more animals who camouflage in their habitats.
  • In Unit 4, students read a variety of texts about problems others face in the world. Students hear How You Can Save Water after hearing Iraqi Children get Wheelchairs and Big Smiles. Students complete a writing activity about other problems in the world that people can help solve.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students read a science article about the earth and weather. On Day 2, students compare the author’s purpose of When the Wind Stops and Day and Night. The teacher guides the students through a series of questions and activities to compare the purpose of the article and changes in nature. The students create comparison charts to review the two texts and then use the chart to write a statement about one of the author’s purposes.
  • In Unit 8, students read many texts on the topic of America. In Week 2, they share an interactive read-aloud of a poem, “What American Means to Me,” in which one boy tells how he feels about America. This is contrasted with the previous text they heard, America: A Weaving, which contains many cultures and traditions in America. There are a series of questions during the reading to build comprehension and knowledge.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

At the end of each unit, students have Unit Projects that they complete. Students have a choice of four different projects that they can choose from. However, only some of the projects require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic though integrated skills, and because students have a choice in which project they complete, some students may elect the projects that do not require any knowledge from the unit.

For example:

  • In Unit 2, students learn what it takes for animals and plants to survive. The various project choices allow students to demonstrate their knowledge through integration of skills.
    • Students write ways that animals survive one set of cards. They write animals and insects on another set of cards. They then mix the cards and match the animals to the way they survive.
    • Students choose an animal from one of the text selections and tell a partner a riddle about it.
    • Students pretend they are scientists studying animals and they draw the animal and describe what it does to survive.
    • Students pretend to make a TV show about amazing animals. They choose some animals and then plan the show and work with classmates to present it.
  • In Unit 4, students read about helping others. Some of the projects require students to integrate knowledge from the unit, but in other choices, students can use background knowledge.
    • Students write their own proverb about helping others. They draw pictures to illustrate it and share it with the class.
    • Students reflect on the different people and characters they have read about. They share with a partner their feelings on their selected person/character as well as their opinion about what makes them kind and how they are heroes.
    • Students write a play using one of the fables from the unit and perform it with other students.
    • Students write a chant or a song about helping others that includes repetition and rhyme. This does not require text evidence or integration of skills to demonstrate knowledge, as students can complete this project with background knowledge.
  • In Unit 6, students learn about why people work together in a community. Many of the projects do not require students to demonstrate knowledge through the integration of skills.
    • Students work with a partner to make a booklet about places or groups in the community that help people. Students may be able to use their own experiences to complete this project.
    • Students work with a partner to create their own version of Stone Soup. They act out the version of the story for the class. This integrates the skills of reading, listening, and speaking.
    • Students work with a group to paint a mural on bulletin board paper that shows what is special about the community. This does not integrate skills, nor does it require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic.
    • Students make a poster to ask the community to help clean the park. This does not integrate skills, nor does it require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic from the unit.
  • In Unit 8, examples of different Unit Projects students choose include:
    • Students work with a partner to write their own song about America. They perform the song for the class and explain what America means to them.
    • Students work with a partner to pretend they are reporters and they give a news report about a famous American landmark close to where they live. They share this in front of the class.
    • Students use characters from Apple Pie 4th of July to create a skit about a holiday. They perform this skit for the class.
    • Students write a recipe for a favorite meal that they enjoy at home. This does not integrate skills nor does it require students to use knowledge from the unit.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The materials have a daily emphasis on vocabulary. Activities involve learning the word and applying the word, and some activities focus and aid in the comprehension and building of knowledge.

There are three vocabulary routines listed in the Best Practices section in the Teacher’s Edition:

In the Introduce Word routine, students begin by repeating the word and rating the word using a thumb up or thumb down. The teacher defines the word for the students and then together they work on elaborating. The teacher often has students talk about the word, give examples and non examples, and connecting it across content areas. Examples of the implementation of this routine include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 2, students are introduced to the Key Words for the week, building, home, library, park, school. Routine 1 is carried out and the words are found within the texts for the week.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students are introduced to the Key Words for the week, draws, inventions, machine, pipes, pump, wells. Routine 1 is carried out and questions include the Key Words or the answers require the Key Words. Students then talk about where water comes from and use the Key Words.

The second routine is Expand Word Knowledge where students work in pairs using a graphic organizer, which is often four corners: word, picture, word in context, and definition. Students are then assigned keywords for the graphic organizer. Examples of the implementation of this routine include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students work in pairs to become experts on the ten words for the week. They study one word at a time and create a “Fold Up Tab” that contains the word, a picture, a definition, and a context sentence.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, students make portrait graphics for the words where they write the word, draw a picture, and write a definition and sentence. Students then do a picture walk of the text they are about to read using the Key Words to tell why the illustrator might have included each picture.

The final vocabulary routine is the Share Word Knowledge where pairs are formed and they share their filled-in graphic organizer from the second routine. Then they discuss and write sentences in their journals with the words. This reinforces the academic vocabulary learned throughout the unit. Examples of this implementation of this routine include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students take turns presenting their four corner posters to a partner. Each pair then conducts a Three - Step Interview where they ask and answer questions about how the picture and sentence show the meaning of the Key Word.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, students engage in a Jigsaw protocol to share how their pictures from the previous day show the meaning of the Key Words.

Additional support is provided for students with vocabulary acquisition. One support is Review, Extend, and Reteach which is where the teacher remodels the graphic organizer activities. Another support is Text-Talk Read Aloud where the teacher discusses the vocabulary after the text has  been read aloud by walking through the first few steps of the Vocabulary Routine 1. A final support is reteaching vocabulary for students who need additional instruction or review. The first routine is used, but in smaller groups.

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students learn new words, but for students who need help with the words, additional work is provided where students name examples of the Key Words.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students learn how prefixes help them with vocabulary words. The teacher checks the understanding by asking what the prefix is in the word impure and then students define the word impure. For students who do not know the word, additional questions are asked such as would a glass of cloudy water be impure to help them understand the word.

In addition to learning new vocabulary words, students also learn vocabulary strategies. The strategies help them learn a series of new vocabulary words. These lessons occur on Weeks 2 and 4 of the unit. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students learn that a dictionary can tell the meaning of a word, how to spell it, and what part of speech it is. Students then practice using a picture to find the definitions, spelling, and part of speech. Additional activities are throughout the week to help them practice this skill.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students learn what a synonym is. Then they read a passage and identify synonyms for words.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

Materials include multiple and varied opportunities for both on-demand and process writing tasks that span the year’s worth of instruction. Students write daily through varied opportunities, such as one minute power writing, writing about what they read, and writing to improve grammar.  Students also write on Day 5 of small group reading time. Students also participate in a week-long writing project each week. However, not all writing tasks increase in complexity from the beginning to the end of the school year. Week long writing projects are introduced during the fourth week of every unit; however, the same instructional routines occur each week, with only a difference in the writing prompt. Each writing project begins with students studying a model, prewriting and completing a RAFT, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Daily writing skills lessons do not consistently increase in complexity or lead to students independently demonstrating grade-level proficiency by the end of the year. Guidance and supports provided throughout the year remain the same. Each week students write each day, but the progression of writing lessons do not increase in complexity, and at times the skills do not connect across the days to support increasing independence.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students begin on Day 1 with writing about how features of two animals from A Frog Has a Sticky Tongue compare to each other. On Day 2, students work in pairs to choose an animal from A Frog Has a Sticky Tongue to make an inference about it by writing two sentence to explain their inferences. On Day 3, students choose two of the animals from the text and make a list of details about each animal and then write sentences sharing how the animals are alike and different, which is built on from Day 1. Then on Day 4, students discuss author’s purpose and write parts of the article that show the author’s purpose. On Day 5, students work with a partner to find information in the text that tells how the animals use light and use that information to write a sentence that completes a sentence frame. While all of the writing prompts involve animals, the writing skills do not build throughout the week.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students write about a character’s trait with a partner on Day 1. On Day 2, students write journal entries describing a text-to-self connection they made with Maria and the Baker’s Bread. On Day 3, students write a new moral for the fable they discussed, and, on Day 4, students write about a character from Aesop’s Fables. Then on Day 5, students write about their favorite fable. While many of the lessons support students’ understanding of fables, the writing skills do not increase gradually to promote proficiency towards independence.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, students write about the song, "This Land is Your Land" on Day 1. On Day 2, students write a paragraph summarizing which categories fit both "This Land is Your Land" and America Is. Then on Day 3, students write one to two sentences telling whether they think "You're a Grand Old Flag" is a good song to sing on the Fourth of July. On Day 4, students write a new verse for the song ,"You’re a Grand Old Flag." Finally on Day 5, students write about what America means to one of the authors whose work they read during the week. While all of the writing prompts during the week help students have a better understanding of American Patriotism, it does not contain tasks that support building students writing skills.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Over the course of the year, students have some opportunities to learn different components of research skills such as researching about our national bird and geckos; most of these opportunities occur as options during Learning Stations. Materials include opportunities for students to begin developing their research concepts as they grow knowledge and literacy skills. There are some points of practice within the materials for students to demonstrate individual research components with texts that build knowledge. There are some opportunities for students to complete a shared research or writing project by using a variety of texts and/or other source materials.

Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students write questions to ask for an interview and practice interviewing each other using the Three-Step interview.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students learn how to sequence events. They draw a picture and write one or two sentences about their step from the Anthology. Students then work to assemble in the correct order.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students summarize steps in a process for an experiment.
  • In Unit 7, students research and then write a report about a partnership in nature. Over the course of the five days, students choose a topic and then write questions to know what they want to find out. They then find their answers in books on the internet. Students use a main idea and details chart to help them organize their information and then write their draft. Students write the main idea in a paragraph with facts and details. They also learn about generalizations and how to use information from a text to form generalizations.
  • In Unit 7, Week 4, students write about what America means using the texts, "This Land is Your Land", Exploring Two U.S. National Parks, Celebrating Our Country’s Flag, and Exploring National Symbols. They choose one author whose work they read to write about what America means to that author and are prompted to use evidence from the text to support their writing.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Independent reading is mentioned in this program, but a plan for how it is implemented and a system for accountability for how students will engage in a volume of independent reading both inside and outside of the classroom does not exist. While all the information for independent reading is found in the Small Group Reading Guide, it does not explain when this should occur in or outside of the classroom nor for how long each day. There is no recording device provided nor accountability for how much students read or how well students read.

The Teacher’s Edition provides a basic independent reading routine but is not specific. It suggests that teachers select topics and provide a rich collection of books to choose from, though teachers need to select these books. Recommended Books for each unit are listed in the Teacher’s Edition and are identified by fiction and nonfiction, and are connected to the overall unit and topic/theme. It is suggested that the books include known texts, classroom favorites, and picture books. Students should be supported in selecting their books of interest for independent reading according to the Teacher’s Edition, but how a teacher should do this is not explicitly stated. After independent reading, students should share their reading experiences and summarize what they read. Teachers are encouraged to extend the independent reading by giving extension activities such as drawing a picture related to the book or writing a short play based on the book.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A
abc123

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 10/02/2019

Report Edition: 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X