Alignment: Overall Summary

Superkids Kindergarten instructional materials partially meet expectations of alignment to the standards. Materials partially meet the expectations of providing texts worthy of students’ time and attention. Instructional materials partially meet the expectation of providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials partially meet the criteria for providing opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Kindergarten materials provide partial support for foundational reading development and standards alignment. Instructional materials provide coherently sequenced questions and tasks to support students in developing literacy skills; however, materials do not provide culminating tasks in which students can demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills and materials do not include full support for students’ independent reading.


See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
37
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
18
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations for text quality for complexity and alignment to the standards. Materials include questions, tasks, and assignments that are text-based; however, questions, tasks, and assignments are not sequenced to build towards the completion of a culminating activity that integrates knowledge.  Students have some opportunities to engage in evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Materials partially address foundational skills to build comprehension so that students can make connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading.  Materials partially meet expectations for including materials, questions, and tasks that provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  Materials provide opportunities for students to gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
13/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for including anchor texts that are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests. Texts partially meet the text complexity criteria and distribution for the grade. Materials partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and the series of text connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required for the grade level. Students engage in a range and volume of reading.


Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

Anchor texts, such as the Super Smart digital read-alouds, are high quality, including rich language and engaging content. Accompanying illustrations are also high quality, supporting students' understanding and comprehension of the associated text. However, some anchor texts, such as the Student Books, are not of publishable quality. The Student Books used for whole group are used for skills-based instruction and are decodable stories with students reading aloud with the teacher. 

Examples of anchor texts that are rich and high quality include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, the teacher uses the Super Smart digital read-aloud, “How Food Grows” by Judy Woodburn. This text is interactive and includes videos to engage students. It also includes high-interest photographs of children planting seeds. The text contains strong content and academic vocabulary.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, the teacher uses the Super Smart digital read-aloud, “A House for Muffin” by Charman Simon. The text is engaging, worthy of reading, age-appropriate, and contains vibrant illustrations.
  • In Unit 18, Lesson 2, the teacher uses the story, “The Odd Picnic” (no author listed). The short story contains some rich vocabulary including words like "gulp," "lug," and "stump." Illustrations are appealing and the story is age-appropriate.

Example of Student Books that are not of publishable quality include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, the teacher uses the text, “Gregory’s Green Goggles” by Diane Chapman. This is a teacher read-aloud. The text contains some rich vocabulary, but does not contain illustrations.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 4, the teacher uses the story, “Icky” (no author listed). The short story is used to identify the title and track print. The story consists of basic language and no academic vocabulary.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 3, the teacher uses the text, “Frits” (no author listed). This is a story from the Meet the Superkids Student Book. It has low-quality illustrations with 1-2 short, basic sentences for each illustration. The text provides no rich content or academic vocabulary.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 3, the story “Let’s Get Set” (no author listed) is used. This is a short story which is used to build reading fluency. The text contains basic language and no academic vocabulary.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Materials include informational texts read aloud by the teacher. The Small Group Reading library books provide additional informational and literary leveled-readers. The materials include 53 library books, including ten informational text titles. The publisher provides a suggested list of Read Alouds for each unit containing collections of high-quality trade books; however, those titles are not included in the daily lesson plans and do not include directions for inclusion. Materials contain genres such as: folktales, comics, fairy tales, poetry, science, and social studies text.

Examples of informational texts include, but are not limited to:

Unit 4: Campout! by Judy Woodburn

Unit 6: Play Ball! by Judy Woodburn

Unit 8: Information about Insects by Judy Woodburn

Unit 12: Wheels by Charnan Simon

Unit 12: I Sell unknown author

Unit 13: Gulls by Valerie Tripp

Unit 14: A Great Place by Judy Woodburn

Unit 15: Colorific! by Valerie Lee Schaefer

Unit 16: United States Presidents by Maria Parrot-Ryan

Unit 21: Real Kings and Queens by Maria Parrott-Ryan

Unit 22: Where Does Pepper Come From? And Other Fun Facts by Brigitte Raab

Unit 22: Riddle Me This! by Hugh Lupton


Examples of literary texts include, but are not limited to:

Unit 14: Get It! by Valerie Tripp  

Unit 16: The Lost Stuff by Valerie Tripp

Unit 17: The Odd Comics by Valerie Tripp

Unit 18: The Doll Hospital by Valerie Tripp

Unit 20: Frits Visits Grandpop by Valerie Tripp

Unit 20: “Lily and the Wagwags” author unknown

Unit 22: Mirror, Mirror: A Book Reverso Poems by Marilyn Singer

Unit 22: Beastly Verse by JooHee Yoon

Unit 23: “The Big Box Fix Up” author unknown

Unit 24: Fast Sam by Valerie Tripp


Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task.

The Meet the Superkids Library Books used in Units 1-13 range from "non measured" wordless picture books and Beginning Reader (BR) Lexile to 290L. These are typically used as a whole class read-alouds with students reading with the teacher and are at a level below what is appropriate use for Kindergarten students. The program guides recommends using these books in small groups beginning in Unit 9; however, that is not indicated clearly within the daily lesson plans. 

The Superkids' Club Library Books used in Units 14-24 for small group reading have the following median Lexile scores: Easy level median of 80, On-level median of 250, and Challenging level median of 350. These are at an appropriate level for Kindergarten students as they are used.

Super Smart Digital Read-Alouds are at a level appropriate for their use. However, there is no quantitative information provided for these.

Student Books are decodable stories often used in the program for whole group skills-based instruction. These are not at an appropriate level when used as core anchor texts. 


Examples of texts that are above grade level and appropriate include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Super Smart, The Odd Ostrich”
    • Quantitative: unknown
    • Qualitative: The text includes vibrant photographs with several lines of text on each page. There are multiple text features such as, a bar graph and a comparison of dinosaurs and ostriches using pictures to compare. The text makes many comparisons and supports the reader with strong picture cues.
    • Reader and Task: The teacher guides students through answering text-dependent questions on each page of the digital read-aloud. Questions include vocabulary, cause/effect, graphic features, compare/contrast, and draw conclusions. Students complete Super Smart practice pages during the Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins to make a mini book used for retelling.
  • In Unit 8, Super Smart, “Information About Insects”
    • Quantitative: unknown
    • Qualitative: The read-aloud contains rich vocabulary including words like “buzz” and “creep.” The photographs are vibrant and include important text features with a diagram and labels.
    • Reader and Task: The teacher guides students through answering text-dependent questions on each page of the digital read-aloud. Questions include: vocabulary, text features, figurative language, compare/contrast, summarize, main idea and details. The teacher guides students to complete Super Smart practice pages during the Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins to make a mini book used for retelling.

Example of anchor texts that are below grade level include:

  • In Unit 6, Student Book Reader, “Sal”
    • Quantitative: unknown
    • Qualitative: The reader contains no sentences, rather a series of pictures accompanied by one word.
    • Reader and Task: The text is used for print awareness, phonemic awareness of initial and final /s/, phonics to associate Ss with /s/, vocabulary, and to teach nouns and verbs. The teacher guides students through answering text-dependent questions and completing student book pages. While this text is appropriate as a decodable, it is below appropriate level as an anchor read-aloud text.

  • In Unit 8, Student Book Reader, “Icky”
    • Quantitative: unknown
    • Qualitative: The short story is used to listen to the story, identify the title, and track print. The story consists of basic language and no academic vocabulary.
    • Reader and Task: This text is also used for print awareness, phonemic awareness of initial /i/, phonics to associate Ii with /i/, vocabulary, and to teach nouns and verbs. The teacher guides students through answering text-dependent questions and completing student book pages. While this text is appropriate as a decodable, it is below appropriate level as an anchor read-aloud text.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to increase their literacy skills by using Super Smart Digital Read Alouds for each Unit, decodable Student Book Stories, Superkids’ Club Leveled Library texts for Units 1-4 and Units 5-13 and Superkids’ Club Informational Library texts starting in Unit 14. Most lessons in the Teacher's Guide contains explicit instruction for teachers to guide students’ comprehension growth. Lessons do not include appropriate scaffolds for students to become more involved in questioning and participating in discussions.

Questioning sequences are similar throughout the year and do not have a consistent increase in rigor. Additional time and questions are not provided when using more complex texts. Questioning is teacher-led and lacks both depth of knowledge and text-based questions throughout the year's worth of instruction.

Examples of how materials partially support literacy growth include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 8, the teacher uses the text, “Oswald’s Special Surprise,” to help students generate questions and make predictions. The teacher models a Think Aloud by saying, “As I read, I ask myself questions about what might happen next. Right now I’m wondering how the animals will know which way to go. I ask myself, What has happened in the story so far? Can this help me understand what will happen next? Earlier when the friends had to choose which way to go, they heard /o/-/o/-/o/ and went toward the sound. I think they might hear /o/-o/-/o/ again and turn that way.”
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, the teacher uses the text, “Four Seasons for Sports,” to helps students determine the main idea. The teacher models a Think Aloud by saying, “When I read something that has a lot of information, I ask myself questions to help me figure out what the most important ideas are. I ask, What is this part about? What did I learn? The part I just read is about winter. I learned that winter has short days and cold weather. It can have snow and ice, so people like to ice skate, ski, and sled.”
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, students listen to the teacher read, “Loving Care” twice. The teacher asks comparing and contrasting questions, “What do we find out on this page and page 1 about how a human infant and a lion cub are alike? How is the safe place for lion cubs different from the safe place for an infant?” To help students understand vocabulary and retell details, the teacher says, “Helpless means not able to do things for yourself. What do we find out on this page about how an infant is helpless? What do we find out on this page about how a lion cub is helpless?”

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.  

The publisher provides qualitative information for the Super Smart Digital Informational Read-Alouds including text structure, text features, and key vocabulary; however, no quantitative analysis is provided. For the Superkids Library, the publisher provides quantitative analysis that includes word count, Guided Reading Levels, and Lexile Levels. The publisher documents are located in the Materials Resources tab; however, no information is provided for Student Books, which are a part of small group lessons. Additionally, qualitative features are inconsistently provided within the lesson plans, also no rationale for placement within lessons is consistently provided.

Examples of how the materials provide inconsistent text complexity analysis and rationale include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 8, students listen to, “How Food Grows” to learn and discuss how food grows. The publisher provides the following information: Text structures include Sequential (time) order; Text Features include Labels (food names), Diagram (plant parts), Time-lapse videos (plant growth); and Key Vocabulary includes soil, seeds, roots, stem, leaves, seedling. No quantitative analysis is provided.
  • In Unit 8, the teacher is provided key vocabulary, text structure of the article, text features, and key science concepts. Teacher directions state: “Step 1: introduce the test and Step 2: guide listening and comprehension.” A general rationale is given in the introduction to the Super Smart Teacher Guide: “Teaching the lessons can help you develop children’s listening comprehension skills with more complex texts that they can read themselves [and] build children’s content knowledge and vocabulary.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in a variety of reading and read-alouds to become independent readers. The Superkids Reading Program contains 24 units. Instructional materials in Kindergarten provide up to 75 minutes of daily instruction including 10-15 minutes of word work daily routines and 50-60 minutes of word work student book or reading student book. One to two times per unit, a 30 minute differentiated reading practice instruction is provided and one time per unit, a 30 minute informational digital read aloud is provided for initial instruction. Instructional materials include Super Smart Digital Read-Alouds, Student Books, and Library Books including informational, easy, on-level, and challenging texts for small group instruction.

Examples of how materials provide opportunities to engage in a range and volume of reading include, but are not limited to:

  • Students engage with the Supersmart Read-Alouds as the teacher reads the interactive text with the whole group. The titles are largely social studies and science-oriented and provide exposure to a variety of text types and topics. These books may be read multiple times and for multiple purposes.
  • The Student Book contains a variety of decodable texts featuring the Superkids. Students read these titles after a discussion to help the students connect with the text and learn new vocabulary that may be introduced. These texts include any new letter-sounds that have been taught in the unit. If sight words are included (referred to as Memory Words in the materials), they are listed for the students to practice.
  • The First Semester Meet the Superkids Library includes literary and informational texts that range from wordless books through the first four units to more challenging leveled books.
  • The Second Semester Superkids Club Informational Text Library includes one title per unit. Overall, the titles become increasingly more difficult over the course of the year. The Superkids Club Leveled Libraries begin in the second semester. There is one book per level (easy, on-level, and challenging) per unit.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
8/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Questions, tasks, and assignments do not build to a culminating task that integrates skills. The instructional materials provide some opportunities for discussion that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary. Materials partially meet the criteria for providing opportunities for different genres and modes of writing. Students have some opportunities for evidence-based writing. The instructional materials partially meet the expectation that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.


Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Tasks require the student to go back into the text to answer both explicit and inferential questions as they listen to the story being read aloud. During guided whole group time, teachers support students as they read and discuss texts together. Comprehension questions prompt in-depth discussions of the text and vocabulary terms. Students are motivated throughout the year to engage with texts, develop their own inquiries, and utilize Reader pages.

Examples of text-based questions, tasks, and assignments that require students to engage with the text include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 8, the teacher does a read-aloud of Oswald’s Special Surprise. After reading, students are asked, “What does Ox mean when he says the letter is Mysterious? Why are the animals confused about what to do?”. In order to answer these questions, students must get the answer from the text. Students are also asked inferential questions on page 35, “How do you think the animals will know which way to go? Why do you think this will happen?”
  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, students are asked to understand characters from the story, “Golly.” Students are asked, “Do you think Cass is happy to have Golly in her garden? Why not?”. Students are required to use the text (words and pictures) to discuss the answer.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 6, the teacher reads and pauses to ask comprehension questions and model strategies. In the after-reading discussion, students connect texts. The teacher asks, “Do you remember the poem 'Pretending' about a child who pretends to be different things? Show how the child from that poem would pretend to be the ladybug in 'Ladybug, Ladybug'.” Children should act out flying and drinking dew. See Unit 4 (A), Lesson 7, if children need help recalling “Pretending.”
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 4, the teacher asks the following questions for the story, "Icky," “What does it looks like the Superkids are doing with the pretend TV? What do students think Icky is pretending to be on TV and how they can tell? Do you think Cass’s TV show is about the real life of panthers or a story about make-believe panthers? Why? Which of the pretend TV shows do you think would be the most interesting to watch? Why?”
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 7, students are asked to compare and contrast. Students are asked, “How are the instruments on this page alike?” Students need to use the pictures and listening comprehension to answer the question.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 6, the teacher does a read-aloud of "Fun Fish Facts". After reading several paragraphs the teacher asks, “Why do fish travel in big groups? Why does the author say this is a good idea?”
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 4, the students listen to an audio recording of the story The Big Bus. After listening, students read the story in small groups, and the teacher asks, “Why does Doc say the bus is a bit cold? How does Alf feel about the bugs on the bus? What does Ettabetta do about the bugs? Does Lily think the bus will make a good clubhouse? How do you know?”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten do not meet the expectation for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

The instructional materials contain sequences of text-based questions; however, these text-dependent questions do not build towards a culminating task. Opportunities are missed for students to integrate skills to demonstrate understanding through the completion of a culminating task. In every Kindergarten Super Smart, children put together a mini-book, which they use to help them retell the main ideas presented in the text. However, mini-book activities do not develop into a culminating task that demonstrate students’ learning over the course of a unit or incorporate the sequences of high-quality text-based questions.

Examples of questions that do not build to a culminating task include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, the teacher helps students use the Super Smart Practice page 3 to make a mini-book. Students use their book to help them retell what they learned about dogs from “School for Dogs." The anchor story, “Gregory’s Green Goggles,” is not connected to a culminating task. The Library Story, “Golly,” has comprehension questions, and suggested independent culminating tasks on Practice page 3, including circle a smiling or frowning Cass to show how she felt about Golly’s actions.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 4, students listen to an audio recording of the story, “The Big Bus”. After listening, students read the story in small groups and the teacher asks, “Why does Doc say the bus is a bit cold? How does Alf feel about the bugs on the bus? What does Ettabetta do about the bugs? Does Lily think the bus will make a good clubhouse? How do you know?”. There are also a series of questions for an after-reading discussion. However, the only task suggestion in the Teacher Guide is to reread the story multiple times for fluency and confidence. The writing task in this lesson is to draw a picture of a clubhouse.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 5, the teacher gives instructions for coloring the mini-book pages on Practice page 15. The teacher helps students cut apart and put together the pages as a book. Students use these books as a prompt for retelling what they learned from “Colorific!”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

While the materials provide frequent opportunities for students to discuss the texts that are being read aloud to them, there is a lack of guidance or protocols for discussions. The Daily Read-Aloud Routine contains a list of comprehension questions to ask students for fiction and informational texts; however, this guide does not contain explicit protocols for students to engage in discussions in small groups or in pairs. Most discussions occur as the teacher asks questions and the students respond as individuals within a whole group.

The Teacher Guide provides comprehension questions within each unit for the teacher to ask students who typically respond orally to these questions when they are called upon by the teacher. Opportunities are missed for students to engage in evidence-based discussions with peers or within small groups using protocols to guide discussions. The Pleasant’s Pointers sidebars that show up in some lessons provide occasional examples of desired speaking and listening behaviors. However, these behaviors are not practiced or revisited as a part of future lessons.

Examples of how students engage in speaking and listening work include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, the teacher reads the read-aloud story three times. During reading, questions are asked to develop vocabulary. Students practice using context clues, “Fruits and vegetables grow ‘in the dirt or soil’. What is soil?”. Students are asked about parts of a plant, “What part of the plant takes in water from the soil? What part carries water to the leaves? What does it mean that the stem works like a straw?”. The teacher conducts a think aloud about picture 8b to determine word meaning using context clues. Teacher language is provided for modeling responses; however, there are no protocols to support students as they respond. No opportunity is provided for students to discuss the vocabulary or lesson together. In the same lesson, the Pleasant’s Pointers sidebar reads, “At the beginning of the school year, establish guidelines for classroom discussions. Model and discuss good listening and speaking behaviors. Point out that good listeners pay attention to the speaker, wait for their turn to speak, and ask questions if they are confused or curious. Good speakers speak clearly and loud enough to be heard by everyone. They stay on topic and are respectful of others’ ideas.” These guidelines/pointers are not practiced or reinforced anywhere else in the lesson.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, students read the text ,“Doc,” and discuss the vocabulary multiple times: photo album, younger, older, and changed. Students build background knowledge before reading the book. The teacher is directed to, “explain that in this story, Doc looks at a photo album, a book that is full of photos, or photographs, showing family and friends. Discuss what a photograph is (a picture you take with a camera or mobile device) and why people make photo albums. (The photos remind them of special times.) Have children describe any photos they’ve seen of themselves when they were younger, either a baby or a few years old.” These lessons do not include protocols or directions to support students in engaging in discussions with classmates or as a part of the group.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 6, the teacher sets a purpose for listening by asking students to listen to the nursery rhyme to find out what the ladybug is supposed to do. The teacher pauses to ask comprehension questions and model strategies. The teacher reads the nursery rhyme once straight through so students can enjoy its rhythm and rhyme. During the second read, the teacher pauses to ask questions and model the think aloud shown under the nursery rhyme. Students respond orally to questions to demonstrate they recognize text structure and can determine main ideas.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 6, the teacher introduces key vocabulary before reading. The teacher explains how some fish live in the ocean and asks students to name other places where fish might live. As a whole group, the teacher and students discuss gills, what they are used for. The teacher displays a picture card pointing out where gills are located asks students to name other parts of a fish, such as scales. During and after reading, the teacher develops vocabulary by questioning, “What are baby fish called? What is a big group of fish called?” The teacher asks about multiple meanings, “What is another meaning of the word fry? What is another meaning of the word school?” Students are not given a protocol to follow as they respond to the questions.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Before, during, and after reading, students respond to both text-dependent and text-independent questions. Over the course of the year, students interact more with the teacher in a listening/speaking format than with other students.  Opportunities are missed for students to share ideas with each other regarding texts they read or listen to. Some speaking and listening work requires students to use evidence from texts and sources. 

Examples of how materials partially support students' listening and speaking include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, pages 28-30, the teacher asks students to listen to and discuss a multimedia text. The teacher reads, “Campout!” twice and discusses it with the students. The teacher asks the whole class, “What does the author think about camping? What are these boys bringing camping? What do the red and blue arrows point to?”
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, the teacher reads, “A House for Muffin.” In the after-reading discussion, the teacher asks, “Do you think it would be hard to build a doghouse? Why or why not?”. The lesson indicates the answers should be supported with reasons based on information from the text.
  • In Unit 20, Lesson 3, students listen to an audio recording of “Lily and the Wagwags.” Students read in a small group with the teacher. The teacher leads the questioning and discussions with students throughout the reading and models a Think aloud to generating questions. Support is provided for the teacher in the Teacher Guide to do the Think Aloud activity.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Materials include on-demand and process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction as well as short and longer writing tasks and projects; however, opportunities are missed for students to revise and edit with explicit instruction and guidance. With guidance and support, students respond to questions and suggestions from peers, but do not add details and revise or edit to strengthen their writing. Instructional materials include the use of some digital resources, where appropriate, beginning in Unit 14. The writing experiences do partially support students in beginning to build writing skills, but the teacher will need to supplement to begin building students' abilities in early revision and production practice.

Examples of a mix of writing that does not include editing and revising opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lessons 4 and 5, the teacher uses Resource Page 4 to model how to draw favorite things and then students draw their favorite things. The next day, the teacher models how to draw a favorite character and then students draw their favorite character.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, students work together to make a list of things they learned about insects from reading the Super Smart,  Information About Insects by Judy Woodburn. Students contribute facts about insects and the teacher lists them on chart paper.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 2, the teacher reminds students they can share information about how something looks or feels by telling about its size, shape, color, or texture. In this lesson, students draw and write about a gift they would like to give Ettabetta. The teacher asks students what kind of gift Ettabetta got in the mail and can they imagine giving Ettabetta any other gift that begins with a letter and letter-sound they have been taught. Students draw and write to describe a gift. The teacher distributes Resource Page 11 and tells students to draw the gift they want to give Ettabetta on the bottom half of the page. On the handwriting lines, students write words to describe and name the gift.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 5, students draw and write about their favorite Superkid. Instructions state, “Use Draw-and-Write Paper and the Superkids Chart. On Draw-and-Write Paper, draw yourself doing something fun with a favorite Superkid. Label the drawing with your name and the Superkid’s name. On the handwriting lines, write a few words to tell what you and the Superkid are doing together.” The teacher models and students practice.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 1, students help the teacher generate a list of class events. In Lesson 2, page 12, students help the teacher generate a personal list of events. Then the students discuss events with a partner. In Lesson 3, pages 13-14, the teacher models picking one event to write about and draws a picture and writes a sentence about the event. The students do the same. In Lesson 4, pages 15-16, students add more to their previous writing. In Lesson 5, page 17, students edit and share their finished writing. This writing task is one week long.
  • In Unit 17, Lesson 5, the teacher teaches writing an e-mail message. Students contribute to the email message the teacher types by generating ideas for the e-mail message. The teacher models writing the e-mail message and then reads the message back to the class and sends the message.
  • In Unit 22, Lessons 1-3, students work on opinion writing for a book review. In Lesson 1, the teacher asks students to choose one of four books they liked and has students discuss what they liked about the book. In Lesson 2, students begin writing their book review using the sentence frame, “This book is about ________.” In Lesson 3, students continue the writing project by adding what they think about the book and why. Students are provided the sentence frame, “I think this book is ______ because ______.”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

In the Materials and Resources for Teachers, Writing Instruction Overview, Kindergarten writing lessons cover: Informative/Explanatory, Opinion, and Narrative Writing. The Kindergarten curriculum focuses on Informative/Explanatory, Opinion, and  Narrative. Materials provide informal opportunities for students and teachers to monitor progress in writing skills, but few formal opportunities are present to monitor progress in writing skills to assure students can complete the text type.  Teachers will need to supplement to assure all text types are introduced and practiced and to assure that students are meeting the goals of each writing type, as inclusion of rubrics and guidance for monitoring is inconsistent.

Examples of opportunities to practice different writing types include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, the teacher makes a shared list of “Things We Like to Do” and students contribute to the shared list. In Lesson 2, the teacher models drawing something he or she likes to do. An example for the teacher is provided. Students draw their own picture showing something they like to do.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, students draw and write about something that makes them glad. The teacher tells students to talk with a partner about what they will draw to show something that makes them glad. The teacher distributes Draw-and-Write Paper and reminds students that they should draw their picture in the box, include themselves in their drawings and make their faces show they are glad. When students finish, the teacher tells them to write the word “glad” on the handwriting lines, reminding them to say the word slowly, listen for the sounds, and write the letter that stands for each sound.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, teachers guide students while listing facts about insects. A reference is made to learning a lot about insects from “Super Smart Information About Insects.” The teacher and students work together to create the list on chart paper. If students need help recalling facts, they are instructed to look back through the text again and discuss the information on the pages.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 2, students draw a picture of the pond after the teacher thinks aloud and draws a pond. In Lesson 3, page 44, students complete a sentence together with the teacher about what happens at a pond. Students write about an animal or something else in their drawing.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 1, students help the teacher generate a list of class events unsupported by a text. In Lesson 2, page 12, students help the teacher generate a personal list of events, then the students discuss events with a partner.  In Lesson 3, pages 13-14, the teacher models picking one event to write about, draws a picture, and writes a sentence about the event. Following the modeling, the students do the same. In Lesson 4, pages 15-16, the students add more to the previous writing. In Lesson 5, page 17, students edit and share their finished writing.
  • In Unit 20, Lesson 2, students brainstorm possible headings for an informational animal book. The teacher writes headings on board in a sentence frame format to support student writing, for example, “Where _____ Live” and “What ___ Eat”. This is informational writing, however no research is done to verify information.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Frequent writing opportunities are presented to learn, practice and apply writing types, but do not always require using text-based evidence. Writing opportunities do not require students’ recall of information to develop opinions from reading closely and working with evidence from texts and sources.

Writing opportunities are rarely connected to texts and/or text sets either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports. The teacher will have to supplement to provide students practice in writing work related to texts.

Examples that are present in the materials include, but are not limited to the following; however, note that the majority of writing work is not connected to texts students are working with: 

  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, students draw and write to tell about themselves. The teacher explains they can also draw and write to teach others things they know about. The teacher points out they learned a lot about insects from the Super Smart,  Information About Insects by Judy Woodburn, and in this lesson, they will work together to make of list of things they learned about insects.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, the teacher explains the character Hot Rod from the Student Book, "Hot Rod" likes to go fast in his car. Together the teacher and students make a list of things that go fast, separating by categories: land, air, and water. In Lesson 2, students are asked to draw something that goes fast.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 5, students draw and write about their favorite Superkid, “Use Draw-and-Write Paper and the Superkids Chart. On Draw-and-Write Paper, draw yourself doing something fun with a favorite Superkid. Label the drawing with your name and the Superkid’s name. On the handwriting lines, write a few words to tell what you and the Superkid are doing together.”
  • In Unit 22, Lessons 1-3, students work on an opinion writing for a book review. In Lesson 1, students choose one of four books they liked and discuss what they liked about the book. In Lesson 2, students begin writing their book review using the following sentence frame, “This book is about ________.” In Lesson 3, students continue writing what they think about the book and why. Again students are provided with a sentence frame, “I think this book is ______ because ______.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The materials include instruction in grammar and conventions standards over the course of the year. Printing upper and lowercase letters is included throughout each of the 24 units, as a letter is the focus of every unit. In many cases, the teacher presents and models information; however, independent student practice and application is limited. Practice is often limited to out-of-context opportunities. Limited instruction and practice on capitalizing the first word in a sentence is included. Beyond printing many upper and lowercase letters, language standards are not increasingly complex and do not provide adequate repeated instruction for student mastery.

Students have opportunities to print many upper and lowercase letters. A new letter is taught in each unit. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Word Work, the teacher displays the Ice Cream Paper on the whiteboard and writes upper case C and uppercase G on the lines; students identify the letters. There is discussion about why the two letters are different. The teacher demonstrates the formation of uppercase G. Students are instructed to touch below the strawberry line, circle back, ending at the vanilla line and slide left. Students then trace and write uppercase G in the student book.

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring nouns and verbs. For example:

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Reading, students look at page 1 of the student book. The teacher tells students words that name people, places, or things are called nouns. The teacher tells students other words tell actions that someone or something does. The teacher asks what the person on the paper is doing. Students name other actions the character is doing. The teacher tells students action words are called verbs. The teacher generates words for people, places, things, and actions. Students explain if the words are nouns or verbs and why.

Students have opportunities to form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes). For example:

  • In Unit 14, Lesson 3, Word Work, the teacher instructs plurals with -s endings. The teacher introduces plurals by drawing one dot and writing the word dot on the board. The teacher adds dots to the board and adds -s to dot and reads the word dots. The teacher discusses what adding the letter -s to the end of dot does to the meaning of the word (makes it mean more than one dot). The teacher explains that -s can be added to the end of other words to make the word mean more than one.

Students have opportunities to understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how). For example:

  • In Unit 12,  Lesson 6, Reading, students generate questions to make predictions about, “Hot Rod’s Sharing Solution” by Valerie Tripp.

Students have opportunities to use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with). For example:

  • In Unit 13, Lesson 1, Word Work, the teacher uses position words to describe the location of some of the Superkids in the pyramid, “Golly is at the top of the pyramid. Golly is standing over Oswald and Doc. Oswald is next to Doc. Icky is in the middle of the bottom row. Tic is on the left side and Ettabetta is on the right side.” The teacher uses position words to play a riddle game about the Superkids.

Students have opportunities to produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities. For example:

  • In Unit 24, Lesson 8, Writing, students use action words in sentences they write about themselves in their Student Book (p. 32) describing themselves as a Superkid. The teacher explains the words given, “I like to,” are the beginnings of sentences. The teacher instructs students to complete each sentence using one of the action words from the list or another action word they know. The teacher encourages students to include other words in their sentences telling more about the actions. The teacher reminds students to put a period or an exclamation mark at the end of each sentence.

Students have opportunities to capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I. For example:

  • In Unit 9, Lesson 5, Word Work, the teacher has students look at the first sentence in a story. The teacher reminds them the uppercase letter at the beginning and the period at the end show the group of words as a whole, is a sentence. Students count how many sentences are in the story.

Students have opportunities to recognize and name end punctuation. For example:

  • In Unit 10, Lesson 4, Word Work, the teachers instructs students about different types of sentences. The teacher reviews declarative sentences and periods. The teacher instructs about interrogative sentences and the use of question marks. The teacher writes two sentences about a worm, "Is it flat/It is flat". Students distinguish between interrogative and declarative sentences. The teacher asks what mark belongs at the end of the interrogative sentence (question mark) and what mark belongs at the end of the declarative sentence (period).

Students have opportunities to write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes). For example:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Word Work, students encode Cc for /k/ and Oo for short /o/. Using Student Book p. 8, students trace C for camel, O for ostrich, C for canary, C for caterpillar, O for ox, and O for otter. The teacher names the animal in the picture and has children trace the letter matching the sound at the beginning of the animal name.

Students have opportunities to spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships. For example:

  • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Word Work, the teacher says a word, gives a context sentence, and students write the word (4 words are provided).
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 3, Word Work, students encode letters for initial sounds and blend sounds to decode secret words on Student Book, page 7. Students write initial letters of picture names to form these words: elf, leg, sled, gift. Then students cut apart and glue pictures next to matching written words.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
16/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness, and phonics that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context. Materials meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge and directionality. Materials meet the expectation that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. Materials meet expectations that materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks. Materials partially meet the criteria for supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported. Materials partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

In the instructional materials, students have opportunities to learn phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, and phonics. The opportunities occur during Daily Routines, Word Work, and Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins. However, limited opportunities are provided for students to receive explicit instruction in each of these skills. Students have opportunities to practice rhyming words in the Daily Routines (e.g. produce rhyming words, blend onsets and rimes, pronounce vowels in CVC words, and substitute sounds to make new words). Daily practice of blending and segmenting onsets and rimes begins in Unit 3. One-to-one letter correspondence is taught, modeled, and practiced in each unit and focuses on one letter a week. Additionally, students have opportunities to practice letter-sound relationships with one sound/letter per week, with long vowels not being taught until Unit 24. Students are provided practice in: identifying a letter in writing, writing the letter, identifying the sound orally, and identifying the pictures of words starting with the given letter. However, opportunities are missed for students to demonstrate their understanding of syllables through being able to produce, blend, or segment syllables in spoken words.

Examples of adequate opportunities to learn and understand phonemes, but limited opportunities to learn how to segment syllables include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Daily Routines, when the teacher says a word that has the initial sound of /k/, students take a step forward.
  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Word Work, the teacher explains some of the words in the poem rhyme and words that rhyme sound the same at the end. The teacher states the words "tall" and "fall" from the poem and asks if the words sound the same at the end. Students are asked to name other words rhyming with "tall" and "fall" (ball, call, hall). The teacher reads word pairs from the poem, and students give a thumbs up for pairs that rhyme and thumbs down for pairs that do not rhyme (6 pairs).
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Daily Routines, students practice counting syllables. The teacher says two words and asks which is longer (6 pairs of words). The teacher repeats each word slowly. The teacher claps once for each syllable. Students repeat each word and clap with the teacher. The lesson plan notes teachers can provide additional practice using auditory discrimination and phonological awareness activities in Building Blocks of Reading.
  • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Daily Routines, students practice isolating phonemes. The teacher says a word and asks students to say each sound in the word separately. The teacher models explaining the sounds in "cat" are c-a-t. Students practice with 8 words.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Work Work, students are guided to blend words. The teacher explicitly tells students to put their finger under the of "Dog" and slide their finger from the left to right as they blend the sounds and read the word.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 4, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, students create a flip book for -ad words. Students are instructed to put letters l, d, and s on separate half index cards and -ad on a full index card. Students create a flip book to practice blending.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 6, Daily Routines, the teacher uses letter cards to create the word "did" in a pocket chart. The teacher changes one letter at a time to create new words and students read each new word.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 5, Daily Routines, students have opportunities to substitute individual phonemes to make new words. The teacher uses letter cards to make words. Students blend the sounds to read the words. The teacher changes letters in the middle of each word. Students blend the sounds in the new word.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 2, Daily Routines, students hold up their arms in the U shape if the teacher says a word that begins with the /u/ sound, as in up.

Examples of opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. one-to-one correspondences, long and short sounds with common spellings, and distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying sounds of the letters) include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Word Work, the teacher reviews the letter O and asks students to say the sound the letter O makes. Students find the word beginning with the uppercase O in the title. The teacher asks if the words "Oswald" and "odd" have the same beginning sound. Students circle pictures with names beginning with O.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Daily Routines, students write the last letter they hear the teacher say (hug, had, mud, bag, frog, wood).
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Word Work, the teacher guides students to write the missing medial vowels on the "Toc, Tac, or Tic" worksheet. The teacher emphasizes the medial sound when identifying the character the picture shows.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Word Work, the teacher introduces students to the letter F. The teacher says the words, "Frits" and "fish." The teacher asks what sound students hear at the beginning of the word and what letter matches the sound. Students identify the letters in the box next to the picture. The teacher explains the letter F stands for the /f/ sound. Students identify each picture on the page and circle pictures of words starting with F.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 5, Daily Routines, the teacher says, hat, hit, hot, and hut in the context of a sentence while the students write down each word. The teacher then has students identify what sounds make each word different.
  • In Unit 24, Lesson 4, Word Work, the teacher reviews short /a/. The teacher explains each vowel has a short sound and a long sound. The teacher says, "apple" and "apron" and asks students if the sounds at the beginning are the same. The teacher explicitly points out the letter name A on the letter card is the same. The teacher reviews the long /a/ sound in the initial and medial position and reviews words.

Examples of cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness and phonics instruction to build toward application include, but are not limited to:

  • Students receive phonemic awareness and phonics lessons daily through Skills Lessons and Daily Routines. Students practice identifying rhyming words and blending to decode words. A new letter is introduced each week, from Unit 1-24, with a focus on letter-sound relationships. Long vowels sounds are addressed in Unit 24.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

The lessons include a consistent structural format to introduce and teach each new letter to students. Teachers are directed to use an alphabet card to introduce the letter. Students are provided opportunities for the first 17 weeks of instruction to count the letters in the Superkids' name. One letter is the focus of instruction per unit, resulting in all 52 letters not being addressed until the end of week 24. Each unit includes opportunities for students to identify the letter, find the letter in text, and write the letter. Teachers explicitly teach how to form letters and provide time for scaffolded handwriting support. Materials include instruction in print concepts, such as reading words from top to bottom, left to right, knowledge that words are separated by spaces in print, and one-to-one correspondence.

Examples of how materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities for students to learn how to identify and produce letters include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Word Work, students are introduced to tactile cards, a program resource available for each letter of the alphabet. Cards show the uppercase and lowercase forms of each letter and allow for kinesthetic reinforcement.
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Word Work, the teacher models how to write an uppercase O while explaining how to form the letter. With teacher guidance, students practice tracing O on page 6.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Word Work, the teacher directs students to turn to page 2 in the Student Book and name the letter next to the character, Doc (D/d). Then, the teacher asks students what sound the letter d makes. Students practice by circling the pictures that begin with /d/.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 1, Word Work, students are explicitly taught the letter B/b. The teacher introduces the sound in context and then uses the illustration to identify items that begin with the letter B/b. The Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins provide support in reinforcing the letter/sound B/b through identifying pictures that begin with the letter B/b.
  • In Unit 24, Lesson 1, Word Work, students are introduced to the letter Z/z. Using the ice cream printing paper, where the three scoops of ice cream represent the bottom line (chocolate scoop), the midline (vanilla scoop) and the top line (strawberry scoop), students write the uppercase Z and the lowercase z and compare and contrast the letters through the description of how they are alike and how they are different.

Examples of how the materials include frequent and adequate tasks and questions about the organization of print concepts, include are not limited to:

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Reading, the teacher directs students to look at one frame of the story at a time, going left to right, top to bottom, on page 8 and then again on page 9 in the Student Book featuring “S for Sal".
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Word Work, students use their Student Book to look at the front cover and find the names, “Tic, Tac, and Toc”. The teacher guides students to see that each name has the same amount of letters. Students tell the teacher the amount of letters.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, the teacher reminds students sentences are made up of words with spaces between them. The lesson does not include explicit instruction about spaces between words.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Word Work, students play a game called "Alf and the Alligators". Students select a letter card, name the lowercase letter, and place the lowercase letter card on the alligator with the matching uppercase letter on the game board.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

The materials contain opportunities for students to purposefully read emergent level texts, practice decoding words, and learn to read high-frequency words. Students are introduced to high-frequency words, called Memory Words, in Lessons 8 through 24. Memory words are taught in isolation, used in-context, and are reinforced through games and activities interspersed throughout the materials. Students regularly read grade-level and decodable texts with purpose and understanding. Prior to reading, the teacher states a purpose for reading and the questions inside of the materials guide the teacher to support the purpose.

Examples of multiple opportunities provided over the course of the year for students to purposefully read emergent-reader texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 8, Lesson 4, Reading, the teacher tells students to read the story and find out what each Superkid pretends to be on TV.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 4, Reading, the teacher tells students to read the story and try to figure out what the Superkids think about the bus.
  • In Unit 19, Lesson 3, Reading, the teacher tells students to read the story and find out how the Superkids’ feelings change from the beginning to the end of the story.

Examples of opportunities provided over the course of the year in core materials to support students' development of  automaticity and accuracy of grade-level decodable words include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 9, Lesson 6, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, students are provided sentences to whisper to another student in a game of Telephone. The last student says the sentence while the first student shows the sentence strip.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 4, Word Work, students complete Student Work Book, page 10, by circling the words that name the pictures (cat, glass, dog, tell, tag).
  • In Unit 17, Lesson 5, Word Work, students practice reading decodable words in the Student Work Book, on page 18, together to practice /m/. Students match each picture to the words they read at the bottom of the page (lemon, mug, mitten).

Examples of how students have opportunities to read and practice high-frequency words include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, Word Work, students learn the high-frequency word "the". Students turn to a page in the book and find three words in the boxes at the top of the page. The teacher points to the first word, "the", and asks students to identify each letter. The teacher tells students t-h-e spells "the". Students trace the word the at the top of the page.
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 2, Word Work, students learn the high-frequency word "no". Students refer to a page in the student book and look at what the Superkids character is doing (shaking her head no). The teacher points to the word "no" in the picture and asks students to identify the letters in the word.
  • In Unit 21, Lesson 4, Word Work, the teacher previews Memory Words and decodable words from the play. The teacher writes memory words and decodable words on the board. The teacher points to the frequency word "like", a new memory word. Students read "like" and the other memory words in the first row (like, of, no).
  • In Unit 23, Lesson 3, Word Work, students learn the high-frequency word "you". Students read the word "you" and spell it out y-o-u. Students practice encoding the word "you" by tracing and writing the word.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The instructional materials include opportunities for students to apply word recognition and analysis skills in connected text and tasks in Lessons 1-13. In Lessons 14-24, materials include leveled texts for students to read below, on level, challenging, and informational texts. Students apply word recognition and word analysis skills using these texts. Additionally, instructional materials provide frequent opportunities for students to read high-frequency words in connected text and tasks.

Examples of how materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g. one-to-one correspondences, syllable segmentation, rime and onset recognition, long and short sounds with common spellings and distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying sounds of the letters) in connected text and tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 7, Daily Routine, students write the first two letters they hear the teacher say (act, can, cop, got, gap).
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Daily Routine, students write the last letter they hear the teacher say (hug, had, mud, bag, frog, wood).
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, students encode medial vowels. Students copy c-a-t, and the teacher asks what sound is in the middle of "cat" (/a/) and what letter stands for this sound?  
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 13, Word Work, the teacher explicitly teaches the Memory Word "the". Students read and trace the word "the".
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 5, Daily Routine, the teacher says the words, "hat, hit, hot, and hut," in a context sentence while the students write down each word. The teacher then has the students identify what sound makes each word different.
  • In Unit 18, Lesson 2, Word Work, teachers have students listen for the final /p/ sound.  Students tap one finger on their desk when they hear /p/ at the end of a word.
  • In Unit 19, Lesson 4, Word Work, students practice writing the Memory Word "for" by tracing and writing it.
  • In Unit 24, Lesson 6, Word Work, students use letter cards to identify long /i/. The teacher says words, and students hold-up the "i" letter card when they hear the long /i/ sound.

Examples of how materials provide opportunities to read high-frequency words in connected text and tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 12, Lesson 13, Word Work, the teacher introduces the Memory Word "the". The teacher instructs that the letters in "the" do not stand for their usual sounds, so students must remember how to read the word instead of blending the sounds for the letter.  Students then read and trace "the".
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 3, Word Work, students learn the meaning of the Memory Word "of" during vocabulary. Students practice encoding the Memory Word during spelling using Student Book pages 6-7.
  • In Unit 18, Lesson 2, Word Work, students learn the Memory Word "put". Students complete Student Book page 3 to practice encoding and decoding the Memory Word.
  • In Unit 18, Lesson 3, Reading, students first preview Memory Words (put, the, of, no, gulp, sip, help, lug, picnic, problem, stumps) from the Interactive Book Story, “The Odd Picnic”. Students then listen to an audio recording of the story. In small group instruction, students read one to two sentences to the teacher for the teacher to assess individual decoding skills.

Examples of how lessons and activities provide students with opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks and opportunities for students to practice encoding in context include, but are not limited to:

  • Units 1-13 include a whole class text for all units. The teacher introduces the text, and students read texts with teacher support.
  • Leveled readers library begins in Lesson 14. Students decode words in connected text.  Easy, on level, challenging, and informational texts are included.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 4, Reading, students read the story, “Tug’’ on pages 8-10 and decode words taught in previous lessons.
  • In Unit 23, Lesson 3, Reading, students trace and write the word "you" at the beginning of each sentence to complete it.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

Assessment opportunities are included in the instructional materials. A readiness assessment is included for the beginning of the year. Six progress tests for the Meet the Superkids section and five progress tests for Superkids’ Club section are included. Progress tests include letter recognition, letter identification, and letter-sound correspondence questions for the Meet the Superkids section. Progress Tests for the Superkids’ Club section include: questions about letter recognition, letter identification, letter-sound correspondence, comprehension, and writing. The progress tests align to content taught throughout the Superkids materials. Daily lessons include multiple opportunities for informal assessment through: Daily Routines, completion of student skill work from Student Books, Practice Pages, independent activities and observation during Ten-Minute Tuck-ins. While there are reinforcement and extension provided for differentiation at the end of most lessons, there is not a clear or specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments should be supported. Assessments are used to identify students struggling in foundational skills, but next steps for instruction are not provided. Also, instructional materials do not provide opportunities to assess high-frequency words in formal assessments.

Examples of how multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills, but are missing opportunities for assessment of high-frequency words include, but are not limited to:

  • After Unit 3, the formal summative Progress Test 1 is given from the online Assessment materials or the Assessment Book. Part 1 includes phonemic awareness knowledge acquisition. Students identify initial sounds /k/, /o/, /g/, by pointing to the picture beginning with the same sound as the word the teacher says. Part two includes letter recognition knowledge acquisition. Students identify letters Cc, Oo, Gg by circling the letter the teacher names for each “upper” or “lower” case letter. Part three includes phonics knowledge acquisition. Students identify initial letter-sound correspondences c/k/, o/o/, g/g/. Students are instructed to say the name of the object in a picture to themselves and listen to the sound at the beginning of the word. Then, students look at the letters below the picture. Students must point to the letter that makes the sound they hear at the beginning of word identifying the picture beginning with c/k/, o/o/, g/g/.
  • After Unit 11, formal summative Progress Test 5 is given from the online Assessment materials or the Assessment Book. Part one includes phonemic awareness knowledge acquisition. Students identify initial sounds /f/, /e/, by pointing to the picture beginning with the same sound as the word the teacher says. Part two includes letter recognition knowledge acquisition. Students identify letters  Ff, Ee, by circling the letter the teacher names for each “upper” or “lower” case letter. Part three includes phonics knowledge acquisition. Students identify the medial vowel-sound correspondences a/a/, e/e/, i/i/, o/o/. Students are instructed to say the word for a picture that has a medial vowel of a/a/, e/e/, i/i/, o/o/ to themselves and listen to the sound in the middle of the word. Then, students look at the letters below the picture. Students must point to the letter that makes the sound they hear in the middle of the word with a medial vowel of a/a/, e/e/, i/i/, o/o/ and circle it to confirm.
  • After Unit 13, formal summative Progress Test 6 is given from the online Assessment materials or the Assessment Book. Part one includes phonemic awareness knowledge acquisition. Students identify initial sounds /h/, /u/, by pointing to the picture beginning with the same sound as the word the teacher says. Part two includes letter recognition knowledge acquisition. Students identify letters Hh, Uu, by circling the letter the teacher names for each “upper” or “lower” case letter. Part three includes phonics knowledge acquisition. Students identify initial letter-sound correspondences h/h/, u/u/. Students are instructed to say the name of the object in a picture to themselves and listen to the sound at the beginning of the word. Then, students look at the letters below the picture. Students must point to the letter making the sound they hear at the beginning of word identifying the picture beginning with h/h/, u/u/.
  • After Units 1-13 have been taught, the formal summative Benchmark Test is given from the online Assessment materials or the Assessment Book. It assesses students’ mastery of the objectives taught in Meet the Superkids. The test is given to progress monitor students’ skills and to confirm placement of students who might be ready to work above their grade level. The test is divided into five parts, each covering a different skill.
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Daily Routines, materials provide opportunities for an informal assessment in phonemic awareness and handwriting.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, Word Work, materials provide opportunities for an informal assessment that can be completed during the student encoding practice.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 3, Word Work, materials provide opportunities for an informal assessment that can be completed during the student decoding practice.

Examples of assessment materials providing teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding include, but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide a Class Record Form for teachers to track student performance on: Progress Assessment, Beginning of the Year Test, and End of the Year Test.
  • Materials provide a record form for individual student informal assessments. Informal assessments can be recorded when working one-on-one with students, in small group instruction, or in whole class instruction. The informal assessment chart lists general skills to be assessed for each area of core instruction.
  • In the Materials section, formal assessments are available online or in the Assessment Book. A formal screening assessment called a Readiness Test is given at the beginning of the school year to assess students’ early literacy skills. The test is divided into sections including: Kindergarten concepts, assessing fine motor skills, shapes, position words, and descriptive words; Phonemic Awareness concepts, assessing word distinction and sound distinction; Listening Comprehension; and Letter Recognition, assessing letter identification and letter matching.
  • In the Materials section, formal assessments are available online or in the Assessment Book. The Progress Tests help measure students’ mastery of specific objectives and plan for reinforcement activities. There are six tests, each covering objectives taught in the previous units’ lessons.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Suggestions for differentiation are included for English Learners, students performing below grade level, and students performing above grade level. Superkids materials include Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins with every lesson, which provide instructional support to students who have not yet mastered the skill taught in the lesson. Superkids Skill Building Book provides additional practice for students. Gradual release of responsibility is used within the instructional plans for teachers; however, lessons do not include consistent, targeted opportunities for foundational skill differentiation specifically for students lacking previous foundational skills. While differentiation opportunities can provide differentiation of learning, some opportunities are accommodations or additional practice opportunities. For example, in the Program Guide, for differentiating Work Work, it states: “...work with struggling students individually or in a small group to complete the page. Read words and sentences on the page aloud with children.” Acceleration opportunities and teacher guidance for acceleration are limited. For example, in the Program Guide, for differentiating Work Work, it states: “If above-level students finish Student Book pages quickly, before the rest of the class is ready to move on, make sure they have meaningful work they can do when they finish, such as reading Superkids’ Library Books.”

Examples of how materials provide limited high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, a phonics reinforcement for the initial Cc /k/ is provided for students needing additional instruction. Using picture cards and a pocket chart, the teacher shows students a picture of Cass and tells them what sound they hear at the beginning of her name (/k/). Teachers continue to add more pictures of cards with the same initial letter and sound having students identify the beginning letter and sound. Finally, students tell how the picture names are alike, they begin with the sound /k/ and the letter c.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 5, Word Work, students practice letter recognition by playing a game called Four in a Row. The top part of the game includes boxes with upper and lowercase letters. The bottom includes hooks, which are the game pieces. The teacher has the students identify each letter in the boxes and then reads aloud a list of words. Students are to cover the letter they hear, using the hooks, at the beginning of each word (apple, turtle, lid, farm, igloo, tent, grass, fun, goat, ladder, ant, itch).
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 3, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, the teacher helps students with decoding and encoding. The teacher first helps students name the pictures (elf, glasses, grapes) and points to each picture while the students identify the initial sounds and letter of each one. Once finished, they read the secret word (egg). The same process is repeated for the second row (gum, lemon, apple, star, sock). After the students identify the secret words, they cut apart the pictures on the right and glue them to the matching box (egg, glass, fist).
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 2, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, a phonemic awareness reinforcement for initial h/h/ is provided for students needing additional instruction. Students stand in a circle and play a version of Simon Says called Hot Rod Says. When the teacher says an action that begins with the sound /h/, students do the action. When the teacher says an action that does not begin with /h/, students stand still.

Examples of how materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 7, Lesson 4, Word Work, an opportunity for differentiation or support for below-level students is included. Suggestions include teachers to use the third Ten-Minute Tuck-In on page 22 to reinforce the students’ understanding of the -ad family.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Word Work, support for ELL students is included. The ELL support section tells teachers most students will be successful with the sound for short e, they might struggle with distinguishing between short e and long a. It is suggested that the teacher gets ahead of this concern by focusing on proper articulation of short e starting with this unit.
  • In Unit 17, Lesson 3, Reading, the differentiation tip provides a suggestion for students performing below-level. The teacher tells students that words that are jagged and yellow in boxes that look handwritten are to help show part of Cast’s list.
  • In Unit 20, Lesson 3, Reading, the differentiation tip for small group includes reviewing the Memory Words (of, for, and no). Students find the words and underline them in their Student Books on page 28-32 before reading the entire story.

Examples of instructional materials providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, a spelling reinforcement lesson to encode ng words in letter-sound boxes is provided for students needing additional instruction.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Reading, during small-group reading, students who need additional support in fluency receive opportunities to practice with a literary text.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, Daily Routine, students practice phonemic awareness with the teacher by making a hand motion when they hear a word that begins with /l/.
  • In Unit 22, Lesson 3, Daily Routine, the teacher reads a word, uses the word in a sentence, and the students write the word. Students are to identify the rhyming word (rob, job, lump, jump).

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Texts are organized around a topic/topics to support students in building  knowledge and vocabulary, and sets of text-dependent questions and tasks provide students with opportunities to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. The materials partially meet the expectations of including process writing instruction and a progression of writing skills, a progression of focused shared research and writing projects. Materials partially meet the expectations for supporting students' independent reading. Materials do not provide opportunities for students to complete a culminating task in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills.

Criterion 2a - 2h

18/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

The instructional materials including: Student Books, Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Alouds, and the suggested Teacher Read-Alouds, are centered around a topic. Sufficient prompting and support to explore, listen to, and read beginning texts is provided. Lessons include scaffolding for differentiating instruction using Ten-Minute Tuck-ins. The Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins, when used, reinforce vocabulary and provide extra support. The Teacher’s Guide provides scaffolding and differentiation among texts for English Language Learners. The materials provide opportunities for students to actively listen and read to each other, display vertical articulation of literacy skills, and exhibit a higher level of academic vocabulary growth.

Over the course of a year, the instructional materials support and grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Examples of topics and connected texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, the topic is how dogs learn commands and tricks. Students read a library book, “Golly” about a dog named Golly. In Lesson 2, Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Aloud is “School for Dogs”.  Suggested Teacher Read-Alouds are "Dogs, I’m My Own Dog", "Ragweed’s Farm Dog Handbook", and "Do You Really Want a Dog?".
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, the topic is how balls are used in games and sports. Scaffolding is provided for the teacher to discuss and role play good sport and bad sport. The Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Aloud, “Play Ball!”, is introduced. The Suggested Teacher Read-Alouds are organized around the topic of sports and include the following titles: “Learning to Ski with Mr.Magee”, “Squirrels on Skis”, “Tillie the Terrible Swede: How One Woman, a Sewing Needle, and a Bicycle Changed History” and “Fall Ball.”
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, the topic is musical instruments and other aspects of marching bands. The teacher and students use the "Tic,Tac, and Toc" song which introduces the letter Tt and its sound. Students read a Library book “Toss it” and two additional texts, “Tag” and “Tac, Toc, and Turtles.” The Super Smart Informational Read-Aloud is “Join the Band” and the suggested Teacher Read-Alouds are “Little Melba and Her Big Trombone”, “The Loud Book”, “What is Sound?” and “Nana in the City.”
  • In Unit 18, Lesson 2, the unit topic is planning and making food for a picnic. Students listen to the Smart Start Informational Digital Read-Aloud text, “Pack a Picnic.” The Suggested Teacher Read-Alouds connect to the topic of animal habitats and include the following titles: “Swallows in the Birdhouse”, “Wild”, “Where Does Kitty Go in the Rain?”, and “Sleep Like a Tiger.”

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The materials include student tasks that are differentiated for below and on-grade level learners to build skills needed to understand texts and topics. Students are asked to analyze: words/phrases, key ideas and details, structure, and craft, using read-aloud texts. Small-group reading consists of questions and tasks in which students are asked to: comprehend, analyze picture-text relationships, connect events, draw and support conclusions, compare and contrast, retell details, understand the author’s reasons, connect text to self, make predictions, give and support opinions, understand vocabulary, grasp text features, and examine word play. Throughout the school year, components such as language, word choice, key ideas, details, structure, and craft continue to be taught, reinforced, and embedded in students’ work. The materials contain teaching of text features using a variety of genres including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

Examples of coherently sequenced questions and tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, students are asked to identify rhyming words in the poem, “At the Zoo”. Students also discuss the vocabulary in the poem.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2,  students use the story, “Play Ball!”, to identify the main topic, “What is the story, 'Play Ball!' about?” and “What is something new you learned?” using text references.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 6, after-reading discussion, students recognize text structure.  The teacher facilitates a think aloud: “As I read, I notice some words rhyme, such as do and dew, and some words get repeated, such as ladybug and fly.  I say these words with a rhythm or beat, like a song or chant. Because of the rhyme and rhythm, I can tell I’m reading a poem.”
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 5, students draw conclusions.  The teacher asks, “Why does Sal tag Cass? Why do you think Sal is turned away from Cass in the picture?”
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 5, page 25, Guide Reading and Comprehension, After-Reading Discussion, students draw conclusions. The teacher asks, “How do you think Ed felt when he started sliding on his sled? Glad? How do you know?”. On pages 27-28, Guide Listening and Comprehension, the teacher asks, “What do you think enormous means? Big? What are some other words that mean the same as big? Large, huge.”  
  • In Unit 20, Lesson 3, students read, “Lily and the Wagwags”. Students analyze the text to determine key ideas, “What does Lily want to do next? How will Wagwags get there?” Students also analyze vocabulary, “What does blast off mean?”
  • In Unit 21, Lesson 6, students are asked to discuss the plot, problem, and solution in the story, “The Glum Princess.”  Students are asked, “What was the problem at the beginning of the play? How was the problem finally solved?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The materials contain questions both during and after reading; however, students are not asked to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across multiple texts. Text-based questions that lead students through the comprehension and main ideas of the text are only provided during the actual reading of the text. Questions are asked only during the read aloud. While they are appropriate for the read aloud activity, they do not support building knowledge once the activity is completed. 

There are very few tasks that ask students to demonstrate knowledge gained from a text or across multiple texts. Additionally, the major tasks are not always text-based. Students respond to their readings with self-to-text connections and write about topics without text support.

Examples of sequenced questions asked during read alouds include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, during the reading of the Super Smart Interactive Digital Read-Aloud, “Camping”, the teacher is prompted to ask, “What do the read and blue arrows point to? What is at the end of the red hiking trail? What is at the end of the blue hiking trail?” Students must refer to and analyze the pictures and text in the story to answer.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 4, Teacher’s Guide, the students listen to an audio recording of the story, “The Big Bus”. After listening, students read the story in small groups and the teacher asks, “Why does Doc say the bus is a bit cold? How does Alf feel about the bugs on the bus? What does Ettabetta do about the bugs? Does Lily think the bus will make a good clubhouse? How do you know?” 
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 6, After-Reading Discussion questions for the read-aloud story, “Ettabetta and the Enchanted Forest” to determine important ideas include, “What trick did Ettabetta play on the Superkids? Do you think it was nice of Ettabetta to play a trick on her friends? Did Ettabetta’s trick surprise you? Why or why not? Do you like stories with surprise endings? Why or why not?”
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 5, the teacher asks, “What did we find out about warm colors on the last two pages? What did we find out about cool colors on the last two pages? Why do you think the artist used lots of red and yellow in this picture of a barn in summer?”
  • In Unit 17, Lesson 4, the teacher asks, “Which sense were the last few pages about? What kind of information do your eyes tell your brain when you see something, such as an ice cream cone? What does this page tell us about how our sense of smell can help us?”
  • In Unit 21, Lesson 3, the teacher asks, “Why do you think this page shows a king wearing a brick on his head? Why might it be great for a castle to have stone walls? Why did the author include pictures of rooms from different castles?”
  • In Unit 23, Lesson 5, in order to help students understand steps in a process the teacher asks, “How is this new glass different from the old jar? What gave the glass its new shape?”. To help students draw conclusions, the teacher asks, “If you poured melted glass into a mold that looked like a square box, what would the new glass look like?”. To help students compare and contrast, the teacher asks, “What is one way the pictures with labels are the same? How is recycling cans at a factory like recycling jars?”. To help students understand picture-text relationships, the teacher asks, “What are some things that can be made from recycled metal?”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten do not meet the expectation that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The materials prompt the teacher to ask questions before, during, and after reading to monitor student comprehension. Mini-books, Reader Responses, Practice Pages, and Comprehension pages provide opportunities for students to display knowledge through writing, speaking, and listening; however, culminating tasks are not present in the instructional materials for students to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics. Tasks are extensions of the unit theme and focus mainly on speaking by retelling and vocabulary work rather than supporting students' demonstrating knowledge.

Examples include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 3, students use a large cardboard box to represent Golly’s doghouse and surround it with books, posters, magazines, stickers, and other materials about dogs, to set up a “sniff garden”. Students are asked to describe the sights, smells, sounds, and textures they experience as a four-legged creature.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, after reading “Four Seasons for Sports”, the students orally answer, “Which season do you like best? Why?”. Below-level readers are provided with a sentence frame. The project for this unit is to turn a corner of the room into a sports center and tell about their favorite game, making team banners, and doing exercises in the classroom.
  • In Unit 15, the teacher helps students cut apart and put together pages as a mini-book. Students use their books as a prompt for retelling what they learned from, “Colorific!”, a story about mixing paint colors. The teacher helps students name different feelings including: happy, sad, mad, scared, excited, and relaxed. For each feeling, students discuss things or times that make them feel that way. The teacher tells students to make a picture showing one of those feelings or a combination of feelings.
  • In Unit 23, Lesson 5, the teacher helps students use Super Smart Practice Pages 23a and 23b to make a mini-book. Students use their books to retell what “Trash or Treasure?” taught them.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

The materials provide year-long vocabulary development, but lack consistent explicit instruction in vocabulary words and support for the words throughout the year. For example, vocabulary words taught during the Student Book lesson are not correlated in the Super Smart lesson and are not supported across multiple texts. At times, attention is not paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words. While vocabulary learning is supported through speaking and listening, opportunities are missed for students to connect their learning to tasks. 

Examples of how vocabulary development is year-long, but lacks consistent instruction include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 6, using the Super Smart article, “Play Ball!”, the teacher asks several questions to help students understand vocabulary, “When you bounce a ball, what does the ball do? When you shoot a basketball, what are you doing? How do you move your arms when you swing at a tennis ball?”
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 6, the teacher introduces key vocabulary before reading. The teacher explains how some fish live in the ocean and students name other places where fish might also live. Next, the teacher and students discuss what gills are and how they are used. A picture card is displayed and the teacher points out where gills are located and helps students name the other parts of a fish such as scales. During and after reading, the teacher helps students develop vocabulary by asking, “What are baby fish called? What is another meaning of the word fry? What is a big group of fish called? What’s another meaning of the word school?”
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 1, using the Super Smart article, “A Great Place”, the teacher asks text-specific questions to help students understand vocabulary, “What is your community? What’s another word that means the same as litter?”
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 5, the teacher reads, “Colorific!” twice. Throughout the text, students understand vocabulary by answering the following questions, “What does it mean to create the perfect colors? Which colors are called primary colors? What are they the most important for doing?”
  • In Unit 17, Lesson 2, students read, “The Odd Comics” and discuss the the following key vocabulary terms: comics, odd, sprinkler, glasses, rest, and blurry. The teacher reads the book title with students. The teacher points out the comics that Ettabetta and Oswald are holding and explains what comics are. Next, the teacher points out in the picture the sprinkler shooting out water and the towels around Ettabetta’s and Oswald’s necks and asks what the Superkids might do in this story.  Students may respond by saying, “Read odd comics and run through the water sprinkler.”
  • In Unit 19, Lesson 1, students read, “A Medal for Icky” and discuss the following key vocabulary terms: medal, race, fastest, fantastic, upset, and plan.
  • In Unit 21, Lesson 7, the teacher reads, “Real Kings and Queens” twice and asks students questions to help them understand the vocabulary, "What does the ruler of a country or kingdom do?”. The teacher explains a ruler is the leader of a country who makes the rules that other people in that country must follow.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the expectation that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

The materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level and writing instruction supports student growth over the school year. Materials include lesson plans with teacher modeling; however, protocols are not in place for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. In Kindergarten, writing occurs daily, but includes handwriting skills rather than tasks focusing on the writing process.

Writing rubrics lack detailed indicators to determine next steps in order to improve student writing development. Writing tasks do not always require students to reference the text, therefore, students do not gain a substantive understanding of texts through writing. Materials include supports for students working above and below grade level expectations. To assure comprehensive support of writing development, the teacher will need to supplement with these supports. 

Examples of how materials include instruction aligned to standards, but do not monitor writing development nor consistently require students to reference texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, the lesson focuses on creating a class shared list of things they like to do. After, students draw something they like to do. The Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Aloud text is, “The Odd Ostrich”, which is an informational text about ostriches. No mention of the topic or text is included within the writing completed by students.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 7, the final expectation is two event drawings which students can label with a word. Students draw who made them feel better. The teacher distributes students’ Ouch Stories from the previous lesson and reminds them that they drew themselves hurt or sick in the first box. Students draw a picture to show the person who helped them feel better and what that person did to help. If students already know how to write the person’s name, for example, “Mom”, they are encouraged to write it near their drawing.
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 4, students write a sentence and draw a picture about an event. In the previous lesson they created a book cover. After writing, students “share the first page of their book with a partner.” In Lesson 5, page 24, Teacher’s Guide, students draw and write a sentence about another event in their story. When finished, students share their stories in small groups.
  • In Unit 22, Lessons 1-3, students work on an opinion writing for a book review. In Lesson 1, the teacher has students choose one of four books they liked and has students discuss what they liked about the book. In Lesson 2, students begin writing their book review using the sentence frame, “This book is about ________.” In Lesson 3, students continue writing about what they think about the book and why. Students are provided with a sentence frame, “I think this book is ______ because ______.”

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

While there is evidence to support a progression of writing tasks that scaffold students’ writing skills, encourage students to develop knowledge, and understand a topic, there is insufficient evidence of students engaging in learning about the components of focused, shared research, and writing projects utilizing texts and other source materials.

Research skills, questions, and tasks almost always involve a single text or the background knowledge and experiences of the student. The materials provide writing instruction, but there is a lack of evidence to support explicit writing instruction in shared research, writing skills, and tasks. No evidence was found to support research projects being built into contexts and culminating tasks. The materials do not provide opportunities for both short and long projects. There is a lack of instructional support for teachers to develop student knowledge of a topic using the provided resources throughout the year.

Examples of how research and writing projects use one text, are not culminating tasks, and lack support for teachers include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, the teacher and students make a shared list of favorite places using chart paper. The teacher reminds students that Alf likes to imagine having adventures in lots of exciting places. Students are asked to name some of the places Alf imagines visiting. The teacher points out Alf dreams about exciting places far away, but a place doesn’t have to be far away to be special.  The teacher asks students if they have any favorite places they like to go to again and again. The teacher tells students in this lesson, they will make a list of some of their favorite places and in the next lessons, they will draw a picture to tell others about a place that is special to them.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 2, students are asked to draw and write about their favorite Superkid from the Student Reader. The teacher models using details from the stories as reasons when speaking, but the modeled writing is simply a labeled picture and sentence fragment explaining what the student would like to do with the Superkid. Modeling does not include text support, the teacher uses the “Superkids Chart” with pictures and names of the characters for ideas. Students are encouraged to pick a Superkid and decide something fun they would like to do with the Superkid, but no use of the text is involved.
  • In Unit 20, Lesson 1, students begin writing about an animal they know a lot about using a graphic organizer students completed about their animal in Unit 19. Students write sentences to tell what their animal eats and does. In Lesson 2, page 45, the teacher introduces headings and together the class brainstorms headings. The students then add headings to their books. In Lesson 3, pages 46-47, the teacher models editing and students edit for capitalization and ending punctuation.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Kindergarten partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Throughout the lessons, there is evidence to support independent reading. The instructional materials support independent reading and aid both teachers and students with occasional built in supports and scaffolding opportunities to foster independence; however, there is a lack of evidence to support students reading across a wide span of texts. Most texts are not organized with built in supports and scaffolds to foster independence. The materials lack opportunities to support a balance between in-class and out-of class time for independent reading. Procedures are not found in lessons for growth towards consistent independent reading besides a "Teach the Informational Library Book" or as a "Pointer" for teachers. There is not a system for the teacher or student to monitor and track independent reading.

Examples of how materials do not include independent reading opportunities nor teacher supports include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Superkids Program Guide, page 35, when teaching the guided reading Library Book lessons, each lesson ends with suggestions for Independent Activities students can do on their own. Activities include rereading for fluency practice, drawing and/or writing in response to the text just read, and completing a Practice Page that helps build comprehension and vocabulary related to the text. Students can read, reread, or listen to Library Books from the current or previous units. Students are encouraged to read and discuss the books at home using the parent portal. On page 50, some suggestions for providing independent activities include: after children read a Library Book, teachers write or have students write the title on their Student Reading Log, and circle a facial expression to show how they liked the text. Student Reading Logs are printable from the teacher portal. However, the log is used just to log texts read during small-group guided reading and circling the facial expression for how they liked the book, not independent in-class reading. If a district has purchased the Superkids Library Books, parents and students can access these materials on a computer or tablet at home. Teachers can set up their class in the teacher portal and add parent names and emails for parents to set up an account online.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 4, while working with a small group, the rest of the class complete work they can do independently. For example, reread Student Book stories or Library Books, play games in Superkids Online Fun, or complete a Student Book page or a Practice Page. After students have read and discussed a story with the teacher, they reread the story on several occasions to an adult, an older child, on their own with or without audio support.
  • In Unit 18, Lesson 1, to teach the lesson whole class, the teacher uses the online version of the book in the teacher portal. Students complete the Practice Page after reading the book. Teachers are prompted to make the book available for independent reading. In Lesson 4, the teacher teaches the easy, on-level, and challenging Library Books to small groups using the lessons in the Library Teacher’s Guide. Students complete the Practice Page after reading a book and the teacher makes the books available for independent reading.
  • In Unit 21, Lesson 2, teachers are directed to teach the Informational Library book and make the books available for independent reading.  
  • In Unit 22, Lesson 2, the teacher teaches the Library Book using the lesson in the Informational Text Library Teacher’s Guide to the whole class using the online version of the book in the teacher portal. Students complete the Practice Page after reading the book, and the teacher makes the books available for independent reading.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/15/2019

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Meet the Superkids, Grade K, First Semester Units 1-13 Teacher Materials 978-1-6143-6859-5 Zaner-Bloser 2017
Superkids' Club, Grade K, Second Semester Units 14-24 Teacher Materials 978-1-6143-6860-1 Zaner-Bloser 2017
Meet the Superkids, Grade K, First Semester Student Books 978-1-6143-6868-7 Zaner-Bloser 2017
Superkids' Club, Grade K, Second Semester, Student Books 978-1-6143-6869-4 Zaner-Bloser 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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