Alignment: Overall Summary

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
37
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
18
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
13/20

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

Some anchor texts, such as the Super Smart digital read-alouds, are high quality, including rich language and engaging content. Accompanying illustrations are high quality as well, supporting students' understanding and comprehension of the associated text. However, some anchor texts, such as the student readers, are not of publishable quality. The student readers used as read-alouds do not meet the expectations of this indicator.

Examples of anchor texts that are rich and high quality include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, students read the digital informational text, “The Pyramids” by Judy Woodburn. This informational read-aloud is interactive to help engage students. There is strong content and academic vocabulary, as well as text features such as a map and labels. The text is sequential describing how to build a pyramid and is worthy of reading.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 5, students read the digital informational text, “How People Learned to Fly” by Charna Simon. The text is engaging and filled with interactive animation elements explaining the history of flight. The text contains photographs and illustrations.
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 9, students read the Super-Duper informational mini-magazine, “Who Am I” author unknown. Academic language is rich and content is of high-interest for reading.

Example of student readers that are not of publishable quality include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, students read the Superkids Short, “When the Superkids Pretend” (author unknown). This poem lacks strong content and academic vocabulary. This poem is low-interest and has low-quality illustrations.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, students read the Superkids Short, “Lily’s Little Boat” (author unknown). This story lacks strong content and academic vocabulary. This story is low-interest and has low-quality illustrations.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, students read the Superkids Short, “It’s So Hot” (author unknown). This is a short play lacking strong content and academic vocabulary. It does have a detailed illustration, but only one. The play is two pages long and is incomplete.
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 1, students read the Superkids Short, “The Superkids Like Books” (author unknown). The story lacks strong content and academic vocabulary. It is written like a list and the teaching focus is for fluency practice, rather than building content knowledge.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Materials include fiction and informational texts. One hard-covered Reader is used each semester and contains several poems, realistic fiction, decodable stories, and a play. Interactive, narrative versions of titles from each Reader are available online. Seventeen informational Super-Duper mini-magazines are included and used for decoding practice and to build content knowledge and vocabulary. During Small-Group Reading, the 51 book library book collection offers easy, on-level, and challenging titles for students. Interactive narrated versions of the books are available online. The publisher provides a list of suggested Read Alouds for each unit that contains collections of high-quality trade books; however, those titles are not included in the daily lesson plans. Text types and genres include: realistic fiction, fantasy, science, and social studies texts.

Examples of informational texts include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: “Cluck” author unknown

Unit 4: “The Pyramids” by Judy Woodburn

Unit 8: “A Visit to a Coral Reef” author unknown

Unit 8: “Caves” author unknown

Unit 8: “Winter Camping” author unknown

Unit 9: “Insect Pets” author unknown

Unit 10: “Storms Ahead” by Valerie Lee Schaefer

Unit 12: “How Your Body Works” by Maria Parrot-Ryan

Unit 15: “Making Music” by Judy Woodburn

Unit 16: What Do Authors and Illustrators Do? by Eileen Christelow

Unit 16: Thomas Jefferson Builds a Library by Barb Rosenstock

Unit 16: The Children Who Loved Books by Peter Carnavas

Unit 16: The Animal Book: A Collection of the Fastest, Fiercest, Toughest, Cleverest, Shyest and Most Surprising Animals on Earth by Steve Jenkins

Unit 16: Saving Animal Babies by Amy Schields


Examples of literary texts include, but are not limited to:

Unit 1: “Help” author unknown

Unit 1: “The Bad Chipmunk” author unknown

Unit 4: “Benjamin’s Octopus” author unknown

Unit 6: “Toc’s Chicken Pox” author unknown

Unit 8: “Rebecca’s Pond” author unknown

Unit 9: “Icky’s Play” author unknown

Unit 10: “Gus, the Duck-Billed Platypus” author unknown

Unit 12: “Play Ball” author unknown

Unit 15: “That was Yesterday” author unknown

Unit 16: Hermelin the Detective Mouse by Mini Grey

Unit 16: A Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip Christian Stead

Unit 16: The Bush Concert by Helga Visser


Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task.

Some texts in the program are at a level of rigor appropriate for Grade 1 students. The Library books are leveled readers span Easy level ranges from 140-680L, On-level ranges from 120-650L and Challenging level ranges from 230-710L. Super Smart Digital Read-alouds are at a level appropriate for Grade 1 students. These informational texts are mostly above the level students can read independently and are used daily.

Other texts are inappropriate for students as anchor texts because they are labeled to be used as a read aloud, but are not above the level students can read independently. The Superkids Readers range from Lexile Beginning Reader (BR) to 1270L, indicating some selections are appropriate for this use while others are not. These texts are also used daily.

Examples of texts that are above grade level and appropriate include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Super Duper Informational Mini-Magazine, “Fix It!”
    • Quantitative: unknown
    • Qualitative: This text contains strong content and academic vocabulary (i.e. communicate, powerful, and balanced), rich language, and powerful illustrations.
    • Reader and Task: The teacher previews vocabulary, story words, and decodable words and then guides students through fluency practice by modeling fluency. The teacher guides students through connecting events in an informational text during small group.
  • In Unit 11, Super Duper Informational Mini-Magazine, “Making Waves”
    • Quantitative: Lexile Level 620
    • Qualitative: The text includes colorful photographs including some of children in boats. It also has a labeled diagram and colorful photographs including some of children in boats. The text also has a labeled diagram of a cruise ship and some humorous pictures of boats. The text contains rich vocabulary and figurative language.
    • Reader and Task: The teacher previews vocabulary, story words, and decodable words and then guides students through fluency practice by modeling fluency.  The teacher guides students through retelling during small group.
  • In Unit 14, Super Duper Informational Mini-magazine, “Muscles”
    • Quantitative: Lexile Level 440
    • Qualitative: The informational text is an interactive read-aloud including strong content, rich language, and vibrant photographs.
    • Reader and Task:  The teacher previews vocabulary, story words, and decodable words and then guides students through fluency practice by modeling fluency. The teacher guides students understanding picture and text relationships during small group.  

An example of an anchor text that is below grade level includes:

  • In Unit 11, Student Reader story, “It’s so Hot”
    • Quantitative: Lexile Level 80
    • Qualitative: The decodable text is a play with 13 parts including simple content.
    • Reader and Task:  The teacher first reads the text in small group as Reader’s Theatre and then reads aloud to model fluency.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials support students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to increase their literacy skills by using Super Smart Digital Informational read-alouds used in Lesson 5 of each Unit, decodable short and long Student Readers stories, Super Duper Mini-Magazines, Leveled Libraries used to extend comprehension during Lesson 5 of each Unit, and Daily Read Alouds. Only a suggested list of Read Alouds is available for each Unit. Teacher instructional guidance for daily read alouds is a non-text-specific routine. Other lessons contain more explicit instructions for teachers to guide students’ comprehension growth. Lessons do not include appropriate scaffolds for students to become more involved in questioning and participating in discussions. Questioning sequences are similar throughout the year and do not have an increase in complexity. Questioning is teacher-led and lacks both depth of knowledge questions and text-based questions throughout the year's worth of instruction.

Examples of how materials partially support literacy growth include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 9, the teacher uses the Super Duper Magazine article, “Pet Clinic," to help students draw conclusions by asking, “How do you think this vet feels about pets? What makes you think so?”
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 5, using the Super Smart, “How Your Body Works," the teacher helps students draw conclusions by asking saying, “Joints between bones help parts of your body move in different ways. Why do you suppose our hands have so many joints?”
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 5, the teacher uses the Super Smart, “Busy Ben:  A Biography of Benjamin Franklin," to help students draw conclusions by asking, “Do you think Ben Franklin was a good writer? Why?”
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 7, after reading “The Lost Mitt,” the teacher helps students understand problem and solution by asking, “How might the story have changed if Ettabetta had told Frits about losing his mitt right after she looked for it?”

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The publisher provides qualitative information for the Super Smart Digital Informational Read-Alouds that includes text structure, text features, and key vocabulary; however, no quantitative analysis is provided. For the Superkids Library, the publisher provides quantitative analysis that includes genre and informational topics, word count, Guided Reading Level, and Lexile levels. Publisher documents are located in the Materials Resources tab; however, no information is provided for Student Books, which are part of small group lessons. Student Reader information includes word count and Lexile levels; Super-Duper Mini Magazine information includes curriculum area and topic. In some parts of the materials, qualitative features are provided within the lesson plans, but no rationale for placement within lessons is consistently provided.

Examples of how the materials provide text complexity analysis and rationale include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, students listen to the Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Aloud, “Money.” The publisher provides qualitative information including the following: "Text structures, description with main ideas and supporting details; Text features, interactive activities: sort needs vs. wants, earn, spend, or save, photo inserts, labels; and Key vocabulary, earn, choices, needs, wants, carefully, decisions." No qualitative information or rationale for placement is provided.
  • In Unit 5, the text, “The Big, Bad Blob” is introduced, but no rationale is given. On page 4, suggested teacher Read-Alouds, four books are suggested on topics of space, but no additional rationale is provided.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 5, the teacher introduces the Super Smart story, “Storms Ahead!”. The informational text is an interactive read aloud. The qualitative features provided include: "Text structure, description with main ideas and supporting details; Text features, weather maps, animations, videos, speech balloons; Key vocabulary, meteorologist, hail, cumulonimbus, sleet, produce, disturb, tornado, hurricane." The Teacher Guide connects this story to the fictional story, “In Case of Rain,” where students read about projects to do on a rainy day. There is no Lexile Level given for this selection.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 meet the expectation that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in a variety of reading and read-alouds to become comprehenders and independent readers. The Superkids Reading Program begins a Review Unit followed by 16 units. Each lesson provides 120 minutes of instruction per day in the areas of word work (30 minutes) and reading (60 minutes). Both components are taught whole group. There are daily opportunities for students to read in small ability groups and complete independent tasks. Instructional materials include Super Smart Digital Read-Alouds, Student Books, Readers, Super-Duper Mini Magazines, and Superkids Library Books including review, easy, on-level, and challenging texts for small group instruction.


Examples of opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading include, but are not limited to:

  • Students engage with the Super Smart Read-Alouds as the teacher reads the interactive text with the whole group. The titles are largely social studies and science-oriented and provide exposure to a variety of text types and topics. These books may be read multiple times and for multiple purposes.
  • The Readers contain a variety of decodable texts featuring the Superkids. Students read these titles after a discussion to help them connect with the text and learn new vocabulary that may be introduced. These texts include any new letter-sounds that have been taught in the unit. If sight words are included (referred to as Memory Words in the materials), they are listed for the students to practice.
  • The Superkids Libraries contain a mix of literary and informational texts with three different levels: Easy, On-level, and challenging. There is one book per level per unit. Overall, the titles become increasingly more difficult over the course of the year. 
  • The Super-Duper Mini Magazines provide additional opportunities for shorter, non-fiction, magazine-style articles.


Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
9/16

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 meet the expectation that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Tasks require the student to go back into the text to answer both explicit and inferential questions as they listen to the story being read aloud. During guided whole group time, teachers support students as they read and discuss texts together. Comprehension questions prompt in-depth discussions of the text and vocabulary terms. Students are motivated throughout the year to engage with texts, develop their own inquiries, and utilize Reader pages.

Examples of text-based questions, tasks, and assignments that require students to engage with the text include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, students compare and contrast characters, “How did Golly and Hot Rod feel after each of their problems got fixed?”. Also on Page 58, Review Unit, Teacher’s Guide, Recognize Plot: Problem and Solution, students are asked, “The story, ‘The Flat Cat’ also told about a problem. Who had a problem in that story? What was his problem? How did Hot Rod’s problem get fixed?”
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, students are asked to understand characters and cite text evidence for the story, “The Monster Under the Bus.” Students are asked, “How do you think the girls feel? How does the picture show us that?” Students are required to use the text to discuss the answer.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 7, Small Group Reading Story, “The Contest: A Play,” the teacher asks, “What do the Sun and the Wind each think about themselves? What must the Sun or the Wind do to win the contest? What does the puffing do to the man’s coat? What does the man do? What happens when Sun keeps smiling? What does this mean for the contest?”
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 5, Student Book Teacher’s Guide, students interpret an idiom from the story, “That’s Not So Scary!” using an interactive whiteboard read aloud. Students are asked, “What does the boy mean when he says thunderstorms and lightning sometimes shake him up?” Students are required to use the text, listening comprehension, and pictures to discuss and support their answers.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 9, students are asked to understand text features for the Small Group Reading story, “Friends and Fights” in the Super-Duper Magazine. Students are asked, “Why is ‘Don’t let your conflict grow’ written in big letters? Why are the letters bigger at the end of grow?”. Students are required to use the words and pictures in the text to discuss and support their answers.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 do not meet the expectation that materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

The instructional materials contain sequences of text-based questions; however, these text-dependent questions do not build towards a culminating task. Opportunities are missed for students to integrate skills to demonstrate understanding through the completion of a culminating task. Students display their knowledge, of texts read, through drawing and writing as prompted by reader response exercises in the independent activities. However, independent activities do not develop into a culminating task that demonstrates students’ learning over the course of a unit.

Examples of questions that do not build to a culminating task include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 11, Lesson 10, students complete a Poster Project as an independent activity for the text, “A Super Day at Happy Land.” Students make posters about a ride or activity at Happy Land. The teacher tells students to write, “Have Fun at Happy Land!” along the top of their poster and draw a picture of a ride or activity at Happy Land and write a sentence to tell about it. Prior to this project, students answer questions, "How did Oswald feel when he rode in the sailboat? Who got to ride a boat at Happy Land? How was their boat ride like Oswald’s? How were the two boat rides different?"
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 5, students read the informational story, Wild About Birds. Students are asked both explicit and inferential questions about the text, “Which birdwatching tool helped us spot the bird? How did it help us? How do red-tailed hawks adapt their sleeping and eating when living in cities? When do egrets stop in cities?”. These are examples of high-quality sequences of text-based questions, as well as an after reading discussion. However, there is no culminating task after the book discussions.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

While the materials provide frequent opportunities for students to discuss the texts that are being read aloud to them, there is a lack of guidance or protocols for discussions. The Daily Read-Aloud Routine contains a list of comprehension questions to ask students for fiction and informational texts; however, this guide does not contain explicit protocols for students to engage in discussions in small groups or in pairs, with most discussions occurring as the teacher asks questions and the students respond as individuals within a whole group.

The Teacher Guide provides comprehension questions within each unit for the teacher to ask students who typically respond orally to these questions when they are called upon by the teacher. Students interact more with the teacher in a listening/speaking format than with other students. Opportunities are missed for students to engage in discussions with peers or within small groups using protocols to guide discussions.

Examples of how students engage in speaking and listening work include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 1, Lesson 6, the teacher reads a poem aloud to model fluency. The teacher displays, “Ettabetta’s Radish Patch” or has students turn to it in their Readers. The teacher explains that poems often have a rhythm, or beat, like a song and models as the poem is being read aloud. When finished, the teacher asks the students, “What does Ettabetta do with the radish seeds? What does it means when the radishes pop up?” 
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, after reading the story, “The Best Sandbox Ever” from the Superkids Reader, a sentence frame is provided to assist students with academic language, “When I was little, I  _______ .” However, not all units provided this type of support.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 9, students read the nonfiction magazine Super-Duper: Pick It Up. Before reading, the teacher asks what might be used to pick something up, besides their hands, and students discuss. The teacher then introduces what a forklift is before reading.  
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, the teacher guides students in small groups as they read aloud and discuss, “The Very Best Gift.” Students listen to others read in small groups and help sound out decodable words. The teacher reminds children how to say Story Words and Memory Words as needed. Additionally, the teacher uses comprehension questions to prompt a discussion of the story and its vocabulary.


Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Before, during and after reading, students respond to both text-dependent and text-independent questions. Over the course of the year, students interact more with the teacher in a listening/speaking format than with other students.  Some speaking and listening work requires students to use evidence from texts and sources.However, opportunities are missed for students to share ideas with each other regarding texts read or listened to.

Examples of how materials partially support students' listening and speaking include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, the teacher asks questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood. The students are directed to practice and apply what they have been taught. In this case, students ask questions about an object, using who, what, where, when, why, and which questions. There are no guidelines for creating supports to ensure students can speak about what they are reading and researching or listening to others talk about the same topic.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, students are directed to, “Discuss how a pattern can help us know what is next in a text.” The teacher asks students if they knew after the first few pages that they’d probably see more gifts and thank-you notes. The teacher points out how noticing the story’s pattern often helps them figure out what might happen next. The teacher tells students the pattern in the story helped them figure out that they’d read about more gifts and thank-you notes. The teacher asks students if they knew for sure what the next gift would be or where it would come from and points out that not knowing those things for sure helps make the story more interesting.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 5, the teacher reads and discusses the Interactive Read Aloud, “How Your Body Works.” Discussion questions are provided, “Do you think the author wrote this Super Smart to tell kids a fun story or to help kids learn something? How can you tell?”. These questions do not require comprehension of the text. 

An example of text-based questions that do elicit comprehension of the text includes: 

  • In Unit 14, Lesson 5, the teacher leads the discussion with some students responding using questions, “What does 'Wild About Birds' teach us about? What is one kind of bird you learned about? Retell details. What did you learn from the text about how to be a birdwatcher? Do you think the author wants us to think birdwatching is fun or not? Did she get you to believe birdwatching could be fun? Why or why not?”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 meet the expectation that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The instructional materials focus each unit on one genre of writing including: narrative, informational, and opinion writing. All genres of writing are revisited throughout the year. During narrative writing tasks, students select topics, edit sentences for capitalization and end marks, and generate story ideas. Within informational and opinion writing lessons, students engage in reviewing facts and introducing and supporting opinions. Writing prompts and checklists are available to support and grow students’ writing skills. Both on-demand and process writing tasks are included throughout the year. On-demand writing addresses a variety of text types and purposes, including: descriptive, opinion, explanatory, and narrative. There are multiple opportunities for students to write, draft, revise, and edit their writing assignments. Instructional materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects, appropriate for the age. Digital resources are used where appropriate.

Examples of age-appropriate writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, students write opinions. The teacher tells students to write a sentence that gives their opinion about one of the picture cards. The teacher reminds students to begin their sentence with “I like”, “I do not like”, “I think”, or “I do not think”. Students are told to look at the sentences on the board for help spelling "like", "are", and "do."
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 7, students focus on daily narrative writing. A story planning chart graphic organizer is provided for students to help organize their writing. The teacher reviews how to plan a story using the graphic organizer. Students choose story topics and the teacher reminds them they should write about one time they did something. Students share their story plans in the small group. The teacher models writing the story using the planner and then the students begin writing their stories.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 10, students write a description of a place and reread their lists. The teacher distributes handwriting paper asking students to use the details in their list to help them write at least three sentences describing what their place is like. The teacher points out they do not have to write about all five senses. If children finish writing early, paper is provided so they can draw a picture to go with their description.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 4, students write a message to a classmate. The teacher distributes double-sided copies of Resource pages 2a–2b. The teacher gives pairs of students each other’s names so partners can work together in Lesson 5, but do not have the pairs sit together that day. The teacher directions state, “Tell children to write their partner's name under 'To', their own name under 'From', and their message to their partner on the back. Remind students that their message should have at least one sentence that tells something they’ve done or plan to do and one question that asks their classmate something.”
  • In Unit 9, the entire unit focuses on narrative writing.
    • In Lesson 1, the teacher models what a personal narrative is and explains that students will be learning to write personal narratives. Students discuss and choose topics for personal narratives.
    • In Lesson 2, the teacher introduces the story planning chart on Resource Page 2 (beginning, middle, end) and models writing a story beginning, middle, and end with pictures and a few words. An example is provided. Students discuss their choices and use Resource Page 2 to plan their own personal narratives.
    • In Lesson 3, students learn to draft their personal narrative using their plan.
    • In Lesson 4, students draft the middle section of their narrative.
    • In Lesson 5, the teacher is directed to, “Use Resource Pages 4a–4c, the plans you and students wrote in Lesson 2, and the stories started in Lesson 3 to teach students how to write an ending for a personal narrative.” Students then write an ending for their narrative.
    • In Lesson 6, students learn to revise writing and students use Resource Page 5 to revise their writing.
    • In Lesson 7, the teacher is directed to, “use your own and students’ revised stories from Lesson 6 and copies of Resource Pages 7–9: the Book Front Cover, Book Page, and Book Back Cover to make a four-to-five-page blank book for yourself and each student.” The teacher models how to publish the personal narrative into a book.
    • In Lesson 8, the teacher models how to use Resource Page 14, an editing checklist. Students practice this skill.
    • In Lesson 9, the students illustrate their writing and make the cover of their books.
    • In Lesson 10, the students learn to complete the back page of their books by writing supportive comments on each other’s books.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 4, the focus is on explanatory writing using a how-to text. The teacher models a how-to text using a graphic organizer to plan. In Lesson 5, the teacher models how to use the graphic organizer to write the rough draft and then students use the provided template to write their rough drafts. Students take turns sharing their writing so far. In Lesson 8, the teacher reviews editing and the students use the editing checklist to edit their writing.
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 3, students brainstorm ideas and the teacher creates a list of favorite things at school. In Lesson 4, pages 47-48, the teacher displays a model of a My Favorite Thing Page and reads it to the students. Students then write their My Favorite Thing page. The teacher encourages them to write a substantive amount of details and illustrate when finished. Below-level students are provided with sentence frames, “My favorite thing in first grade was ______. I liked it/it was fun because ____ .”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

In the Materials and Resources for Teachers, writing lessons cover: Informative, Explanatory, Opinion, Narrative, Descriptive, Correspondence, and Poetry Writing. Materials provide informal opportunities for students/teachers to monitor progress in writing skills, but few formal opportunities are present to monitor progress in writing skills. While there are in-the-moment guidance points for teachers to respond to students' writing development, to assure students have robust practice with the writing types, teachers will need to supplement. 

Examples of opportunities to practice different writing types include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, students write opinions. The teacher tells students to write a sentence giving their opinion about one of the picture cards. Students are reminded to begin their sentence with "I like", "I do not like", "I think", or "I do not think." Students can look at the sentences on the board for help spelling "like", "are", and "do." In Lesson 7, page 71, student plan reasons to support their opinion. The teacher displays Resource Page 3, Web Starter or draws it on chart paper explaining how the outer circles support the middle circle. Following the modeling, the teacher distributes copies of the Web Starter for students to select their favorite season and write at least two reasons why it is their favorite.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, after teacher modeling, students write a narrative based on a topic they chose. Students use the graphic organizer to plan their writing and then write their draft. When finished writing they draw a picture to go with their writing.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 5, students write a reply to a message. The teacher distributes copies of Resources Pages 2a and 2b. Students write their partners name under “To” and their name under “From” and write a message to their partner. The teacher reminds students to write an answer to the questions their partner asked and then write something else nice and friendly. Students are encouraged to write sentences neatly so their partner can read their writing. Below-level students may need help framing a response to the question asked and others may have trouble formulating an additional sentence to write. The teacher can explain that the student can write something more about themselves or say something nice about their partner. Above level students are encouraged to write a message to a family member telling them about something that happened in school. When partners are finished, they exchange replies and take turns reading them to each other. Positive feedback is given to writers for providing good details about themselves and asking or answering a question clearly.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 4, students write a how-to text. The teacher prompts students by asking them to “Choose a topic that is easy to explain in a few steps, such as how to build a snowman.”
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 7, students write a descriptive paragraph. Directions prompt students “To describe a fun activity they would have done or would like to do.”
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 8, the teacher reminds students after they finish copying their sentences they need to edit their pages using the Editing Checklist on Resource Page 8. When students finish editing, they need to illustrate their books. The teacher reminds students pictures are very important because they help readers better understand the information and labels by the pictures can teach other facts not included in the sentences. The teacher models this process and then students edit their books. When finished, a few students take turns sharing how they drew and labeled a picture in their books. The teacher gives positive feedback for including pictures and labels that help readers better understand the information and invites listeners to give feedback and ask questions.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectations that materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Frequent writing opportunities are presented to learn, practice, and apply writing types, but they do not always require using text-based evidence. Writing opportunities do not require students’ recall of information to develop opinions from reading closely and working with evidence from texts and sources.

Examples of some opportunities for evidence-based writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, students are reminded the Super-Dupers and Super Smarts they have read aloud are all informational texts containing facts. The teacher writes a fact and an opinion about something, such as apples, on the board and reads both sentences aloud. Students identify which is an opinion and label it with an "O" and which is a fact and label it with an "F". The teacher points out if something is a fact, students can usually check an informational text or the Internet to see if it is true. Students tell any facts they know about apples and the teacher lists them on the board.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 1, students are reminded they have read several poems in their Reader this year, such as “A Gift I Like” and “My Happy Rainy Day”. The teacher points out poems can be written for many reasons. Today students will practice choosing adjectives and precise verbs to complete a poem. The teacher explains this will give students practice using adjectives and precise verbs when they write their own poems.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The materials includes instruction in grammar and conventions standards. There are frequent opportunities for students to print lowercase and uppercase letters. All grammar and conventions standards are addressed over the course of the year in the materials; however, students have limited opportunities to apply new skills to their own writing. At times the teacher provides instruction and modeling; however, student application is limited to practice items on a worksheet, often filling a word in a blank. Additionally, the materials lack opportunities for students to learn and apply grammar and conventions standards in increasingly sophisticated contexts. Materials include instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level.

Students have opportunities to print all upper and lowercase letters. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Word Work, the teacher dictates words and sentences. Students write the provided words and sentences. The teacher then writes sentences on the board and reads the sentences aloud. Students copy the sentences as an independent handwriting activity.
  • In Review, Lesson 2, Word Work, the teacher guides students’ formation of Ll, Ss, Tt. The teacher models the formation of the uppercase and lowercase letters on the ice cream paper describing to students the strokes made when forming the letters. Students trace the letters on their ice cream paper.

Students have opportunities to use common, proper, and possessive nouns. For example:

  • In Review, Lesson 13, Word Work, the teacher explains possessive nouns using Word Work Book p. 30. The teacher reminds students an apostrophe can take the place of a letter when two words are combined, as in "let’s". The teacher explains an apostrophe can also show ownership. When an apostrophe and the letter s are placed at the end of a noun, as in "robin’s", it tells who has or owns something. The teacher tells students the robin’s nest means that the nest belongs to the robin. Students trace "robin’s". Students write possessive nouns to complete p. 30.

Students have opportunities to use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop). For example:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Writing, the teacher provides instruction on using "is" or "are" to match with a singular or plural noun. The teacher explains "are" is a verb used when telling about more than one of something, such as dogs. The teacher explains how to use "is" when telling about just one of something, such as one dog. The teacher helps students choose the correct verb when they write their sentences.

Students have opportunities to use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything). For example:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Word Work, the teacher provides instruction about pronouns and models using the following pronouns using Word Work Book p. 5: she, her and he. Students trace the pronouns on the handwriting lines.

Students have opportunities to use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home). For example:

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Word Work, the teacher provides instruction on forming words with -ed ending. The teacher reviews using an -ed ending with Word Work Book page 50. The teacher reminds students -ed added to the end of a verb, or action word, means the action has already happened. Students trace the blue word and add -ed to the end, so the verb tells what already happened.

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring adjectives. For example:

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Writing, the teacher guides students through how to describe an object. The teacher uses Resource Page 2 to show words can be used to tell how something feels when it is touched, such as: soft, fuzzy, or hard. During the Grammar Focus, the teacher explains that words can describe what something looks, feels, or acts like and they are called adjectives. The teacher states simple sentences with adjectives, and students name the adjective in each sentence.

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because). For example:

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 8, Word Work, students are taught conjunctions "and" and "or". The teacher explains "and" is a word joining two or more things together. The teacher explains "or" is used to show a choice between two or more things. Using Word Work Book p. 73, students are guided to underline "and" in the first sentence and "or" in the second sentence. Students answer questions by circling a picture and writing the picture name on the lines to practice "and" and "or".

Students have opportunities to use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives). For example:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 8, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, the teacher gathers pairs of related objects. The teacher explains when we have two things, we can use the words "this" and "that" to tell about one of the things and help others know which thing we’re talking about. The teacher models with a nearby object, describing it using "this". The teacher then points to an object far away and describes using "that".

Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward). For example:

  • In Unit 12, Lesson 5, Writing, the teacher discusses how to use prepositional phrases to add interesting details to sentences. The teacher writes two pairs of sentences telling about the same activity, but the sentences are not detailed. The second pair of sentences is similar, but uses a prepositional phrase. The teacher reads both pairs of sentences aloud and asks which pair gives more information. The teacher underlines the prepositional phrase and points out adding a phrase is a good way to add descriptive detail. The teacher guides students to use prepositional phrases to add details to sentences. The teacher provides a sentence starter, and students suggest a phrase that could be added to complete the sentence. Students practice writing prepositional phrases to add details to sentences using a Resource Page with sentence starters.

Students have opportunities to produce and expand complete, simple, and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts. For example:

  • In Review, Lesson 6, Writing, the teacher instructs and models sentences are complete when they include a noun and a verb. The teacher models completing simple sentences with a verb. Students complete sentences on Resource Page 4. Students produce simple, declarative sentences by filling in the blanks.
  • In Review, Lesson 7, Writing, the teacher reviews different end marks sentences can have, and students complete Resource Page 5 by writing the three different types of sentences.

Students have opportunities to capitalize dates and names of people. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, Writing, the teacher explains writing a friendly letter. When reviewing the parts of a friendly letter, the teacher tells students the greeting often starts with "Dear" and is followed by the person’s name and a comma. The teacher tells students "Dear" and each word in the name begin with an uppercase letter.

Students have opportunities to use end punctuation for sentences. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 10, Writing, the teacher guides students through editing their writing. The teacher reminds students to check the end of each sentence for an end mark: period, exclamation mark, or question mark.

Students have opportunities to use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. For example:

  • In Unit 10, Lesson 8, Writing, the teacher discusses steps in the editing process. The teacher reviews how to use the Editing Checklist, which includes the statement: I used commas correctly. Students use the editing checklist to edit their writing.

Students have opportunities to use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Word Work, the teacher uses the Word Work Book p. 33 to introduce the following Memory Words: do, have, show, how, me, a. Students follow along as the sentences are read aloud and then trace the Memory Words. Teachers and students read and spell the Memory Words together several times.

Students have opportunities to spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions. For example:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Word Work, students encode words with final "ch". Students use their Super Secret Reader to complete Student Work Book p. 2. Students trace the word matching the picture and ending with a "ch". Students read and spell the words they make out loud with the teacher.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
15/22

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

In the instructional materials, students opportunities to learn phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, and phonics, including: decoding long and short vowels, blends, and digraphs. The opportunities occur during Daily Routines, Word Work, and Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins. However, opportunities are missed for students to receive explicit instruction in orally producing single syllable words by blending sounds and segmenting single syllable words into a complete sequence of individual sounds. Students receive instruction in sound-spelling correspondence in Units 1-4. Instruction in the use of final "e" and common vowel conventions for representing long vowel sounds, occurs throughout Daily Routines and Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins. Knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a printed word is addressed in Units 10, 12, and 15.

Examples of adequate opportunities to learn and understand phonemes (e.g. distinguish long and short vowels, blend sounds, and pronounce vowels in single-syllable words), but limited opportunities to segment single-syllable words include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Word Work, the teacher states nine words aloud. Students are asked to make a sneezing sound when they hear a word that begins with /ch/. The teacher says the word "reach" and asks students what sound they hear at the end. The teacher repeats the process with the other eight words.  
  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, the teacher uses sound boxes to show students how to isolate letter sounds. The teacher models with the word "chip" by saying the word and asking students how many sounds they hear. The teacher says the word again and asks students how to spell the first sound. The teacher places the word cards in the box as students identify the sounds. The teacher identifies "chip" as having three sounds. This process is repeated for five additional words.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Word Work, the teacher explicitly teaches vowels having short and long sounds. Students trace long vowel-marks and identify picture names with long-vowel sounds on a worksheet. Students orally identify which long vowel sound the name has and which letter stands for the identified sound.

Examples of opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. spelling-sound correspondences of digraphs, decode one-syllable words, know final-e and long vowels, syllable and vowel relationship) include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Word Work, students learn about the letter sound correspondence for sh /sh/. The teacher explicitly tells students sometimes two letters can make one sound. Having students identify the character on the page is making a “shhhh!” sign to be quiet and emphasizing the “sh” with “Shhhhh!” The teacher explains when the letters "s" and "h" are together they make one sound /sh/.
  • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Daily Routines, students read words from the Big Book of Decoding. Students identify and read words with the -itch ending and the -ash ending.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Daily Routines, students read words aloud from the Big Book of Decoding. Words are from the -ing and -umble word families.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Word Work, students learn about words ending in -ed.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Word Work, students learn the rule for adding -ed and -ing endings onto words. The teacher explains the rule, and students apply to the rule to Word Work Book page 61, after reading the new words with the inflectional endings aloud.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, Word Work, students are introduced to the CVCe word pattern and are taught to decode and encode CVCe words.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 10, Daily Review, students use the Big Book of Decoding to read CVCe words aloud from a list.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 8, Word Work, the teacher reviews if there is only one vowel and one consonant before the ending of a word, the vowel is usually long. Students practice by reading words aloud and drawing lines to matching pictures.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, students practice identifying and counting vowel sounds to determine the number of syllables in a word.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 8, Word Work, the teacher reviews syllables with students. The teacher reminds students separating long words into syllables can make it easier to read. The teacher reminds students each syllable should have a vowel sound. If there are two consonants in the middle, the word is usually divided between them. Students practice dividing words into syllables.

Examples of cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness and phonics instruction to build toward application include, but are not limited to:

  • Students receive phonemic awareness and phonics lessons daily through Skills Lessons and Daily Routines:
    • Units 1-4: students receive instruction in sound-spelling correspondence
    • Unit 5: -ing/-ed CVC/CVCC words
    • Unit 6: CVCe words
    • Unit 7: CVCe words with -s, -ing, -ed
    • Unit 8: CVVC words with ai, oa, ea, ee, ue, ie
    • Unit 9: contraction n’t
    • Unit 10: associate y with /ī/, associate y with /ē/, associate ay with /ā/; add -er and -est to words ending in y
    • Unit 11: contractions with is, are, will; long vowel Tricksters (open syllables)
    • Unit 12: associate all with /ôl/, associate aw with /ô/; syllabication
    • Unit 13: associate ar with /är/, associate or with /ôr/, associate er, ir, and ur with /ėr/
    • Unit 14: associate oi and oy with /oi/, associate c with /s/, associate g with /j/
    • Unit 15: associate ow with /ou/, associate ou with /ou/, associate ow with /ō/; prefix re-; syllabication
    • Unit 16: vowel team /oo/; Tag-along e words

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

The materials include explicit instruction in recognizing the distinguishing features of a sentence in the review unit at the start of the year. Lessons include instruction about first words, capitalization, and ending punctuation. Throughout other units, students are provided an Editing Checklist and encouraged to edit and revise their writing to ensure sentences begin with an uppercase letter and end with appropriate punctuation. Students learn about the nuances of sentence structure and text structure through literary and informational text analysis and writing. Students are asked questions while reading about main idea, cause-effect, and problem-solution of fictional and informational texts. Students compare and contrast elements of stories throughout the units. Questions are included throughout the units to address text features and structures; however, opportunities are missed for students to receive explicit instruction in text features with adequate student practice.

Examples of how materials include frequent, adequate lessons and tasks/questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g., recognize features of a sentence) include, but are not limited to:

  • In Review Unit, Lesson 4, Word Work, the teacher points out the words in the speech balloons are a sentence. The teacher tells students a sentence is a group of words always beginning with an uppercase letter and ending with a mark to show where the sentence ends.
  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Writing, the teacher models editing for capitalization and ending punctuation through reviewing the purpose of beginning uppercase letters and ending marks. The teacher uses a short story with editing needs and guides student editing for beginning uppercase and ending marks.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 8, Writing, the teacher guides students in editing simple errors in beginning uppercase letters and ending punctuation in their own friendly letter.
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 7, Writing, the teacher reviews an editing checklist which includes capitalization and ending punctuation. The teacher explains students should use this checklist for their Memory Book. Students practice editing and revising their Memory Books using the Editing Checklist.

Examples of how students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g., main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect) include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Reading, students engage in reading literary Student Reader stories and a Super Smart Informational paired text. In this lesson, students learn about main ideas of informational text. Students also compare and contrast how bills and coins are alike and different.
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 10, Reading, the teacher discusses how main idea is the big idea and how the main idea is supported by key details. The teacher asks the students what “Pet Clinic” is about. The teacher displays a main idea and details horizontal chart to complete with the students. Students identify a detail from page 3 with support from the teacher. The routine continues on pages 4-6.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 8, Reading, the teacher models cause and effect using a T-chart with the headings, “What happened?" and "Why did it happen?”. The teacher writes what happened and students discuss how it happened in the story, “Yuck! Yuck!” The teacher writes student findings on the T-chart.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, Reading, students identify sequence of events during small group instruction. The teacher explains how stories have a beginning, middle, and end. The teacher models the events from “Play Ball”, by adding beginning events under the heading, "Beginning". The teacher continues this process for the middle and end events.

Materials include limited lessons and activities about text features (e.g., title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Opportunities are missed for students to receive explicit instruction in text features with adequate student practice. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 9, Reading, students read and discuss the informational text, “Pet Clinic”. Students learn about picture-text relationships and understand picture insets.
  • In Unit 3, Lesson 9, Reading, the teacher asks questions about the use of diagrams in an informational text. The teacher asks how a specific diagram helps the reader gain additional meaning about a text.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 5, Reading, students read and discuss the informational text, “How Your Body Works”. Students learn about photographs with labels in order to learn more information from the text feature.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 meet the expectation that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

The materials contain opportunities for students to purposefully read texts, learn reading strategies, practice reading fluency, and learn to read irregularly spelled words. Materials contain questions for teachers to monitor student reading with purpose and understanding. Frequent opportunities for fluency practice are provided with teacher modeling and students practicing in pairs. Students learn reading strategies, including the use of context clues and re-reading, with the teacher modeling the use of the strategy with text.

Examples of multiple opportunities provided over the course of the year for students to purposefully read on-level texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Small Group Reading section, the teacher supports students who are on-level by reminding them to read the underlined and capitalized words in the text in a slightly louder voice. The teacher models by reading the first sentence aloud, then listens as students take turns reading a paragraph aloud. The teacher encourages students to work toward a fluent pace.
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 6, Small Group Reading section, the teacher supports students who are above-level by telling students the reader should read the way the text would be spoken. The teacher models reading a few lines of the story with expression. Students work in pairs to read parts of a character’s line. The teacher encourages students to read at a fluent pace with expression.  
  • In Unit 16, Lesson 8, Reading, the teacher reminds students to think about the beginning, middle, and end of the story while reading. The teacher explains summarizing is telling the most important things happening in a few sentences. Students practice summarizing “Zoo Clue” with guidance from the teacher.

Examples of opportunities provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and decodable words include, but are not limited to: 

  • Materials provide opportunities for students to practice accuracy, rate, and expression through small-group instruction with leveled texts.
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 7, Reading, students read, “The Monster Under the Bus” with a partner and read the words underlined in all capital letters with a louder voice to model expression.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Reading, the teacher models reading with natural phrasing. The teacher explains at the end of the sentence is a period and to not pause until students get to the period.
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Reading, the teacher reads aloud part of the story to model the pace for reading. The teacher listens to students read parts of the story aloud.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Reading, the students read aloud a Reader’s Theater. The teacher models how to read at an appropriate pace. Students read aloud in groups while the teacher listens.  

Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 9, Reading, the teacher models what to do if the reader is not sure what the text means. The teacher tells students the reader needs to reread and think about the ideas together.   
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 9, Reading, the teacher asks what the word "extinct" means and models where to find information in the text using context clues to find the meaning of an unknown word.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 7, Reading, the teacher asks a question about a sentence from the text and asks students what clues on the page helps the reader figure out the answer. 

Examples in the materials where students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Word Work, the teacher reviews Memory Words (have, how, a, me, show, and do). Students read the memory words aloud with the teacher. Students read sentences with a word missing and fill in the appropriate memory word. Students say and spell the memory word aloud for each sentence and read the completed sentence aloud.  
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Daily Routine, students read aloud the memory word flashcards (said, only, you, out, of here, from, or there, your).  
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 2, Reading, students learn the irregularly spelled memory words: both, laugh, cold, does, and know. The teacher introduces each word, and the students orally repeat. After the teacher completes a read-aloud with the memory words, students read and trace each word.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 5, Word Work, students practice memory words by playing a game called, “Match It”.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The instructional materials provide multiple opportunities for students to practice word recognition and analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. Superkids Shorts are included in every unit for guided practice in decoding, word recognition, fluency, and comprehension.  Leveled texts are included in every unit for easy, on-level, and challenging. Additionally, Memory Words are included in text after they have been taught.

Examples of how materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g. spelling-sound correspondences of digraphs, decode one-syllable words, syllable and vowel relationship, decode two-syllable words, read words with inflectional endings) in connected text and tasks include, but are not limited to:  

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Reading, teachers help students blend sounds to read the ch/ch/ words in the first two columns. Teachers define and demonstrate chest (front of the body between the neck and stomach) and chomp (to bite something).
  • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Reading, students review decodable words from the poem, “Ettabetta’s Radish”. Teachers help students blend the sounds to read the sh/sh/, ch/ch/, and tch/ch/ words below the title. Students repeat until they can read the words smoothly.
  • In Unit 3, Lesson 1 Daily Routines, students read aloud columns one and two on page 7 of the Big Book of Decoding. Students find and read aloud the -itch word that tells where a car might end up if it goes too fast on a slippery road (ditch) and the -ash word that means to go fast (dash).
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, Reading, students review CVCe words. The teacher instructs students to blend the sounds to read aloud the CVCe pattern words below the title, “Ettabetta is Seven!” Students repeat the CVCe pattern words several times until they can read them smoothly.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 2, Word Work, students apply their knowledge to practice page 107. Students complete the page to practice decoding CVVC words with ee and ea to match the pictures.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, Word Work, students read one- and two-syllable words and practice identifying vowel sounds and counting syllables to complete Word Work Book page 56.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 8, Word Work, students count and write the number of syllables in each word and match each word to a picture.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, Word Work, students trace base words and add -s to form plurals. Teachers have students "tell what is shown in box 2 (cakes) and how many they see. (three)" when completing Word Work Book page 96.  Students read the word under the pictures aloud.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 4, Daily Routine, students read aloud words with -s and -es from the Big Book of Decoding.

Examples of instructional materials providing frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Word Work, students use Student Work Book page 17 to trace Memory Words: where, when, what, which, why, who. Students read the Superkids Short, “Ben’s Shop” including the Memory Words.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 7, Word Work, students encode irregularly spelled words by filling in the correct word to complete the sentence (said, only, of, here).
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 6, Word Work, students write n’t contractions to complete sentences on Student Work Book page 8. Contractions include: don’t, can’t, won’t.

Examples of how lessons and activities provide students with opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks and  opportunities for students to practice encoding in context include, but are not limited to:

  • Fluency practice passages are provided for Units 1-16. Students apply word recognition and decoding skills. Memory Words are included after they are taught.
  • Leveled library texts are included for Units 1-16. Students decode words in connected text. Easy, on-level, and challenging texts are included.
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 7, Reading, students read decodable words in the story, “Toc’s Chicken Pox".
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 7, Reading, the teacher introduces the Superkids Short text. The teacher points out Super e words that end with s. The teacher introduces the story word blue and students repeat. The teacher reads the text while students follow along. Students practice reading the Superkids Short text in small groups while the teacher listens.  
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 8, Word Work, students encode CVVC words and add endings by filling in the blanks to complete the sentences.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

Formal and informal assessment opportunities are included in the instructional materials. Formal assessments include: beginning, mid-, and end-of-year tests as well as unit progress tests. The Progress Tests align to content taught throughout the Superkids curriculum. Daily lessons include multiple opportunities for informal assessment through: Daily Routines, completion of student skill work from Student Books, Practice Pages, independent activities and observation during Ten-Minute Tuck-ins. While there are reinforcement and extension provided for differentiation at the end of most lessons, there is not a clear or specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments should be supported. Assessments are used to identify students struggling in foundational skills, but next steps for instruction are not provided.

Examples of how multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills include, but are not limited to: 

  • In the Adventures of the Superkids Beginning of the Year test - Phonemic Awareness section, the teacher tells the students to look at the picture and then circle the picture that begins with the same sound (three choices).
  • In the Adventures of the Superkids Unit 5 Progress Test, Fluency section, teachers work one-on-one with students. Students read words in the box in order and the teacher marks any words read incorrectly or take more than a few seconds to read.
  • In the Unit 8 Mid Year Test, Spelling section, students are asked to spell words with sound spelling patterns that have been taught. The teacher reads a word, provides a sentence using the word, and repeats the word. Students write the spelling word on their papers.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 10, Daily Routines, the teacher informally assesses students in decoding, spelling, and handwriting. In decoding, the teacher changes one word to the next by changing letters cards. Students read aloud each word and identify which letter was changed.
  • In Unit 16 End of Year Test, Decoding section, the teacher states a word aloud. Students read words in a box and fill in the circle next to the word the teacher said. Fifteen words are identified.

Examples of assessment materials providing teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding include, but are not limited to: 

  • In the Materials section, Formal Assessments are available online or in the Assessment Book. A formal Beginning of the Year test is used to assess students’ knowledge of phonemic awareness, phonological awareness, fluency, and comprehension. The test is divided into several parts including: identifying spoken words that begin or end with the same letter-sound, identifying rhyming words, associating letters with sounds, reading Memory Words with accuracy and automaticity, and reading and comprehending literary text.
  • In the Materials section, Formal Assessments are available online or in the Assessment Book. The Progress Tests help measure students’ mastery of specific objectives and plan for reinforcement activities. The Progress Tests are available after each Unit, 1 through 16.
  • Individual Student Record Form includes observation date/notes for teacher to record notes as students work. Core instruction areas include phonics and structural analysis, spelling, comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and writing. Student record form for formal assessment includes space to record test results and plans for instruction for each assessment.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Suggestions for differentiation are included for English Learners, students performing below grade level, and students performing above grade level. Ten-Minute Tuck-ins are included with every lesson to support students who have not yet mastered the current skill of the lesson. Gradual release of responsibility is used within the instructional plans for teachers; however, lessons do not include consistent, targeted opportunities for foundational skill differentiation specifically for students lacking previous foundational skills. While differentiation opportunities can provide differentiation of learning, some opportunities are accommodations or additional practice opportunities. For example, in the Program Guide, for differentiating Work Work, it states: “...work with struggling students individually or in a small group to complete the page. Read words and sentences on the page aloud with children.” Acceleration opportunities and teacher guidance for acceleration are limited. For example, in the Program Guide, for differentiating Work Work, it states:Above-level students may finish Word Work Book pages quickly, before the rest of the class is ready to move on. Make sure they always have meaningful work they can do when they finish, such as reading a book, writing in a journal, or doing independent activities suggested in the lessons.”

Examples of instructional materials providing high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Ten-Minute Tuck-In, a phonics and vocabulary reinforcement for decoding and acting out words with ch and tch is provided for students needing additional instruction. Teachers display a card with an underlined ch-, -ch, and -tch word. Students read the word aloud. Then teachers use the word in a sentence that children can act out.
  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Reading, during small group reading while the literary text, “What Can You Get With a Nickel?” Students performing below grade-level are reminded they can sound out longer words, such as problem and nickel, the same way they do shorter words by blending the sounds for the letters from left to right. The teacher is to prompt students to run a finger under the letters as they sound out longer words.

Examples of how materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Core Materials, a Differentiated Instruction for Guided Reading guide is included for teachers. The guide reviews routines for the below-level, on-level, and above-level groups. In the below-level group, the teacher reads aloud the text to the students, asking comprehension questions. The teacher identifies difficult words and helps students decode. Finally, the students follow along while the teacher rereads the text, then students read a part chorally or individually for the group.
  • Materials include an assessment correlations chart related to standards. The chart identifies each standard addressed on the individual assessments and informs teachers where to find additional targeted skill practice for students not mastering standards and those needing challenged within the Superkids Skill-Building book.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Section 2, ELL support is included. Materials include guidance for students after they complete pages 35 and 36. The teacher says each sentence twice, once using the two words above the handwriting line and then again using the contraction. The teacher points to words when saying them aloud. Students repeat each sentence and the teacher points to the words.

Examples of students having limited practice opportunities with each grade-level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 12, Lesson 6, Reading, the lesson provides a differentiation tip to help students who need additional practice in fluency. The teacher models how to read with expression and prompts students to read showing how the characters feel based on what happened in the story.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 7, Reading, the lesson provides a differentiation tip on allowing readers above-level practice reading with expression by reading, “Alf’s and Fritts” with a partner. While reading, students practice reading with anger to show the character’s feelings.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

Criterion 2a - 2h

18/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

The instructional materials including: the Superkids Reader story, Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Alouds, and suggested Teacher Read-Alouds, are centered around a topic. There is sufficient prompting and support to explore, listen to, and read beginning texts. Lessons provide scaffolding for differentiating instruction using Ten-Minute Tuck-ins. The Ten-Minute Tuck-Ins when used reinforce vocabulary and provide extra support. The Teacher’s Guide provides scaffolding and differentiation among texts for English Language Learners. The materials provide opportunities for students to actively listen and read to each other, display vertical articulation of literacy skills and exhibit a higher level of academic vocabulary growth.

Over the course of a year, the instructional materials support and grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Examples of topics and connected texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, the topic for this unit is deserts and ancient Egypt. Students read the Superkids Book, “The Best Sandbox Ever”, a text about one of the Superkids thinking about when they were younger and playing in the sandbox like it was the desert. In Lesson 2, students continue to build knowledge by reading the Superkids book, “Lily’s Desert Project”.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, the topic is toys and horses. Students read “Lily’s Little Boat”. The suggested Teacher Read-Alouds all are: “Toys!: Amazing Stories Behind Some Great Inventions”, “Too Many Toys”, “Midnight: A True Story of Loyalty in World War I”, and “Rosie’s Magic Horse”.
  • In Unit 10, the topic focus is storms. In Lesson 1, the poem for the Superkids Book is, “My Happy Rainy Day”. The suggested Teacher Read-Alouds all are about the Week 1 topic of storms, "Miss Mingo Weathers the Storm" and "Thunderstorms, Monsoon Afternoon, and Storm Scientist". In Lesson 2, students read, “In Case of Rain”. In Unit 10, Lesson 5, students continue to build knowledge by reading the Super Smart text, “Storms Ahead!”. However, the Library Books for this unit do not go along with the topic of storms.
  • In Unit 16, the topic for this unit is books and libraries. Students read, “The Superkids Likes Books!” and “The Case of the Mystery Monster.” Students continue to build knowledge by reading the Super Smart Informational Digital Read-Aloud, “Busy Ben,” which is a biography about Benjamin Franklin.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Student tasks are differentiated for below and on-grade level learners to build skills needed to understand texts and topics. Students are asked to analyze: words/phrases, key ideas and details, structure, and craft, using read-aloud texts. Small-group reading consists of questions and tasks in which students are asked to: comprehend, analyze picture-text relationships, connect events, draw and support conclusions, compare and contrast, retell details, understand the author’s reasons, connect text to self, make predictions, give and support opinions, understand vocabulary, and grasp text features, and examine word play.  Throughout the school year, components such as language, word choice, key ideas, details, structure, and craft continue to be taught, reinforced, and embedded in students’ work. The materials contain extensive vocabulary instruction and teaching of text features using a variety of genres including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, page 21, Adventures of the Superkids Teacher’s Guide), students are asked to understand vocabulary in the story “Help”.  Students are asked, “Did Cass just tell the boys her plan or did she communicate her idea in another way too?” Teacher discusses communicate.  
  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, pages 20-21, Small-Group Reading, Discuss Characters’ Feelings and Motivations in a Literary Text, the teacher guides children, in small groups, as they read-aloud and discuss, “The Monster Under the Bus”.  Students build an understanding of vocabulary terms and characters. The teacher asks, “What words does Tic use to describe or tell about, The Blob?” Student suggested answer, rotten monster. “What does rotten mean?”
  • In Unit 6, Lesson 7, page 75, Teacher’s Guide, students analyze the text structure of the poem, “Toc’s Chicken Pox”. The teacher asks, “Is this page written as a poem?” and “How can you tell?”. Students are also asked to analyze vocabulary in the poem, “Toc gets a chill, which means she feels cold. Which word on this page means the opposite of cold?”
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, page 28, Adventures of the Superkids Teacher’s Guide, students are asked to discuss patterns in a literary text in the story, “The Very Best Gift!”. Students discuss the pattern, how the pattern helps you know what is next in a text, and how the pattern changes at the end of the story.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 2, page 21, Teacher’s Guide, students read, “In Case of Rain” to analyze vocabulary. The teacher asks, “Drizzly describes the kind of day it is, what does drizzly mean and “Look at the pictures and show me how to ‘scrunch down'”. The text is a sequenced how-to book and many questions are asked about the sequence of the steps. For example: “What step do you do first to make the holes in a paper bag?”, “What do you do next?”, “What is the first step in leapfrog?”, and “When does the game end?”
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 2, page 22, Teacher’s Guide, students read, “For the Birds” and analyze key details in the story. The teacher asks, “What money will the kids use to buy seeds?”, “Are they spending the money on just one kid, or something all the kids will do together?”, “What do you think a club bank is?”, and “Who does the money belong to?”
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 7, page 74, More Adventures of the Superkids Teacher’s Guide, students are asked to understand idioms in the story, “That was Yesterday”. Students are asked, “Alf tells Frits, ‘You missed me by a mile.  Do you think Frits was really a mile away from Alf when he tried to tag him? What does Alf really mean?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The instructional materials contain questions for both during and after reading; however, students are not asked to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across multiple texts. Text-based questions that lead students through the comprehension and main ideas of the text are only provided during the actual reading of the text.

There are very few tasks that ask students to demonstrate knowledge gained from a text or across multiple texts. Additionally, the major tasks are not always text-based. Students respond to their readings with self-to-text connections and write about topics without text support. Some questions involve higher-level analyzing skills, although the level of questioning varies greatly.

Examples of sequenced questions asked include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, students read, “What Can You Get With a Nickel?" in guided reading groups with the teacher. During the After-Reading Discussion, the teacher leads questioning to help determine the problem and solution in the story by asking, “Did Frits have a lot of choices of things he could buy for Doc?”, “Why not?”, “How was he able to get a nice gift?”, and “How else could Frits have solved his problem?”. These questions require students to analyze this text only.
  • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, students use a Venn Diagram to compare two poems, “Super Scrub-a-matic” and “Super-Duper Golly”.  In Lesson 5, page 48, following the reading of “Taking Care of Zoo Animals”, the teacher asks students the following question, “Do you think Zoos are good places for animals? Why or why not?”  
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 7, while reading, “It’s a Pickle” the teacher asks a coherently sequenced set of text dependent questions including, “What is Cass’s problem?”, “How does Cass feel about her problem?” and “How can you tell?”
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 2, the teacher and students discuss characters. The teacher asks, “What does Doc’s list tell the Superkids?”, “What is Lily’s job?”, “What will Sal’s act be?”, “Why isn’t Ettabetta helping get ready for the show?”, “What does she do instead?, Use picture clues” and “How does it look like Ettabetta is feeling about being left off the list?”.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 7, the lesson focus is to teach drawing conclusions using a literary text. The teacher asks students, “What is silly about Hot Rod’s parents going on the Lucky Ducky?”, “Do you think his parents were upset to be on the ride? How can you tell?”, “Who gets dizzy?” and “Why do they get dizzy?”. To help students understand vocabulary, the teacher asks students, “If you go lickety-split, are you going very fast or slow? What makes you think that?”, “What other words tell how fast The Streak goes?”, “How do you think the kids feel riding The Streak? Why do you think that?”. To help students draw conclusions, the teacher asks, “Why are the kids yawning or sleeping?” and “Why do you think they will always remember this day?"
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 7, to help students summarize using a Literary Text, the teacher asks students, “What happened in this chapter?”, “How did Sal and Carmen help save her family from a disaster?”, and “How do Carmen and Sal together help save Carmen’s family?”
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 7, after reading, “That was Yesterday” the teacher asks students, “What do you think about how Frits and Alf behaved when they were playing tag?”, “Have you ever gotten into a fight with a friend?”, “How did it make you feel?”, and “What did you do to make up and be friends again?”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 do not meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The teacher is prompted to ask questions before, during, and after reading to monitor student comprehension. Mini-books, Reader Responses, Practice Pages and Comprehension pages provide opportunities for students to display knowledge through writing, speaking, and listening; however, culminating tasks are not present in the instructional materials for students to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics. Tasks are extensions of the unit theme and focus mainly on speaking by retelling and vocabulary work rather than supporting students' demonstrating knowledge. 

Examples include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 10, students read Super Duper Magazine article, “Bubbles” and discuss comprehension. Students make bubbles to test some of the facts they read about in "Bubbles". Instructional materials do not provide directions for discussing or writing about bubble observations.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 10, students read anchor text, “Happy Land”. Students make posters about a ride or activity at Happy Land. The teacher tells students to write, “Have Fun at Happy Land!” along the top of their poster. Next, students draw a picture of a ride or activity at Happy Land and write a sentence to tell about it. Students also read Super Duper Magazine article, “Making Waves” and complete Practice Page 38. Students complete the comprehension page for, “Making Waves” after they read the text. Students read sentences and match them to a vocabulary word and picture. Students also take an end of unit assessment found on page 111. Tasks on the assessment include word recognition, fluency, and reading comprehension of a passage unrelated to “Happy Land”.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 7, students write a descriptive paragraph describing a fun activity they would have done or would like to do. In Lesson 10, page 113, Teacher’s Guide, the instructional materials provide information about the End of Unit Assessment. This assessment will measure the understanding of skills taught in Unit 12 by reviewing work from the Word Work Book, Independent Activities, and Backpack pages.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 10, students read Super Duper magazine article, “Friends and Fights” and do culminating task on Practice Page 87. Students complete the comprehension page for, “Friends and Fights” after they read the text. On page 104, two students act out a conflict in front of the class showing what happens if they let their conflict grow. The teacher asks the class for ideas about what the two students should do next. Students give tips for how the friends should talk and listen to each other and suggest things each friend could say. The teacher helps students brainstorm ideas for things the friends can do that would end their fight.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

Instructional materials provide year long vocabulary development. Specific vocabulary words are listed for each unit and Words to Know cards are provided with a picture and word for each vocabulary word. Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words. Often, different vocabulary words are emphasized in the Super Smart, Student Book and Library Book lessons within the same unit. Questioning associated with the vocabulary words help to build academic vocabulary, although academic vocabulary is not strengthened across multiple texts. Some guidance for the teacher to use the Student Readers to build vocabulary through discussion is provided during vocabulary introduction lessons before reading the text. Follow up lessons are provided for some vocabulary words. Some assessments do not include a vocabulary section.

Assessments with vocabulary sections do not cover the Words to Know or most of the story vocabulary, but is more focused on patterns such as adverbs, antonyms and synonyms. Vocabulary is repeated before texts, in texts, and after texts, but lacks support across multiple texts or units.  Reading and speaking support vocabulary learning, but most writing tasks do not explicitly support building vocabulary skills.

Examples of how vocabulary development is year-long, but lacks consistent instruction include, but are not limited to:

  • Program Guide, page 9, Words to Know Cards feature important Tier II words used in the texts students read in the Superkids Program. The cards offer repeated exposure to key vocabulary words. Three to five Words to Know cards are in each unit and explicitly taught as vocabulary. The words are selected from: Super Smart, Super-Duper, or Reader stories read in the unit. The Words to Know for a unit are introduced in Lesson 1 using picture cards helping children understand and remember the meanings of the words. Lessons 5 and 10 review the words again through discussion and simple oral activities. In addition to the Words to Know, other vocabulary words and skills are taught as part of the instruction with different texts read in the program.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, the teacher introduces Unit 8 Words to Know using the Words to Know Cards. The teacher discusses the Words to Know Cards saying the word and having students repeat it. The teacher provides the definition and a context sentence, calling attention to these words when they are used or could be used in the classroom.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Words to Know are puzzled, collapse, steep, system. On page 11, the Words to Know Cards are used and discussed. The teacher reads the word and students repeat it. The teacher provides a definition and a sentence using the word in context. The teacher and students talk about the picture and word calling attention to the words when each is used or could be used in the classroom. For example, the vocabulary word is puzzled. The teacher reads the definition and uses it in a sentence, “very confused, often because of some kind of problem: The girl was puzzled because her sock was not where she had left it.”. The teacher asks, “What the boy in the picture is doing and why he looks puzzled and explains that the boy is holding a VHS tape, which is something people used to use to record TV shows or movies. The teacher asks students if they would be puzzled if they saw a VHS tape.
  • Unit 13, Lesson 4, during Small-Group Reading, the teacher introduces the text, and reads the title aloud with children. The teacher and students discuss what they know about robots. The teacher previews the Reading Warm-Up List and reads the Sound-Out Words with the students. The teacher reads each Story Word and students repeat it.
  • In Unit 15, Lesson 4, the teacher uses the Challenging Library Book, “On the Root of the World.” The teacher previews the Reading Warm-Up List and reads the Sound-Out Words with students. The teacher reads each Story Word and has students repeat it. The teacher explains Nepal is the name of a country and discusses the meanings of gear, scale, slopes, and bitterly.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

The instructional materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level and writing instruction supports student growth over the school year. Materials include lesson plans with teacher modeling; however, protocols are not in place for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. Student expectations are not explicit and are often inferred by the teacher.  Many lessons focus on conventions, rather than craft.

Writing rubrics lack detailed indicators to determine next steps in order to improve student writing development. Writing tasks do not always require students to reference the text, therefore, students do not gain a substantive understanding of texts through writing. Materials do include supports for students working above and below grade-level expectations.

Examples of how materials include instruction aligned to standards, but do not monitor writing development nor consistently require students to reference texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, the final writing expectation is three sentences with a matching illustration about something students did. Using the writing rubric on page 11, a student is proficient if they “told about something child has done with some details.”
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 7, the unit focuses on narrative writing, with student focus on daily narrative writing. A story planning chart graphic organizer is provided to help students organize their writing. The teacher reviews how to plan a story using the graphic organizer and students choose story topics. The teacher reminds students they should write about one time they did something. Students share their story plans in a small group. The teacher models writing the story using the planner and then the students begin writing their stories.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 4, the teacher models how to plan a how-to text using a graphic organizer. In Lesson 5, pages 55-56, the teacher models how to use the graphic organizer to write the rough draft, then students use the provided template to write their rough drafts. Students take turn sharing their writing so far. In Lesson 8, page 88, the teacher reviews editing and the students use the editing checklist to edit their writing.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 8, students add an opinion and reasons to their review. The teacher tells students to reread the book review they started in Lesson 6 and reminds them the beginning should tell the title of the text and what it is about. The teacher tells students to write their opinion of the text and at least two reasons why they like the text. The teacher reminds students to look at the reasons they marked on their web and copy words from those reasons. Students can also look at the teacher review to help them think of sentences they could write. If students do not finish writing all their reasons today, they will get more time in the next lesson to complete their writing.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 7, students revise their stories. The teacher provides tape and extra handwriting lines cut from resource page 14.  The teacher tells students to look over their stories and decide if they can add anything to the beginning, middle, or end to make their story better. Resource page 13 is displayed as a reminder of what students can add. The teacher explains they need to add at least one new sentence to their story. Students are told to write a sentence on extra handwriting lines and then tape the strip of paper to the outer edges of the draft, as the teacher modeled. If there’s room, students can write the new sentence above or below sentences in their drafts.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

While there is evidence to support a progression of writing projects that scaffold writing skills, encourage students to develop knowledge, and understanding of a topic, there is insufficient evidence of students engaging in shared research and writing projects utilizing texts and other source materials throughout the school year. Most tasks involve the use of one text, even though students may have options of multiple text from which to choose. The materials provide writing instruction, but there is a lack of evidence to support explicit writing instruction in shared research, writing skills, and tasks. No evidence was found to support research projects being built into contexts and culminating tasks. The materials do not provide opportunities for both short and long projects.

Examples of how research and writing projects use one text, are not culminating tasks, and lack support for teachers include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 7, the teacher models how to write a research question and then the students practice writing a research question. In Lesson 8, pages 78-79, the teacher writes the research questions on chart paper from the previous lesson and reads the nonfiction article, “Yaks”, modeling how to answer the research questions. A model is provided for teacher modeling. In lesson 9, pages 89-90, the teacher models how to write informative writing using the information they researched and writes two facts and draws a picture. Next, partners tell about the facts they will write. Finally, the students write facts about yaks and draw a picture.
  • In Unit 7, Lesson 10, the students and teacher discuss a sequence of events from an informational text. The teacher uses Super-Duper Magazine Article, “Vroom!”. On a chart, the teacher writes, “What the drivers do First, Next, Then, and Last”. On page 106, the teacher discusses why sequence is important. The students do not complete a follow up task with this lesson. The writing lesson is writing an email, which is unrelated to the article.
  • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, students are introduced to a how-to text by comparing a how-to text with a list of facts. In Lesson 2, the teacher models writing a how-to text. An example is provided for the teacher. In Lesson 3, the students brainstorm a list of things they know how to do and choose a topic for their how-to text. In Lesson 4, the teacher models planning a how-to text. In Lesson 5, the teacher models how to draft a how-to text based on a plan and then, students begin their how-to draft. In Lesson 6, the teacher models how to revise by adding details. The students revise their drafts. The teacher directs them to add at least one new detail to their directions. In Lesson 7, the teacher models how to add an ending and students talk about endings they could add to their writing. In Lesson 8, the teacher goes over the editing checklist. In Lesson 9, the teacher models how to illustrate each step in a how-to text, students then illustrate their texts.
  • In Unit 11, Lesson 6, the teacher and students make a list of texts they have recently read or heard in class. The teacher discusses an example of a book review. Students decide which text they want to review and write one to two sentences to tell what the text is mostly about. In Lesson 7, students use Resource page 3 to complete a web about what they like about the text. In Lesson 8, students learn how to add an opinion and reasons to a book review. In Lesson 9, students write the ending. In Lesson 10, students edit their book reviews. This review requires the use of only one text from a list of texts they have read.
  • In Unit 13, Lesson 9, students edit their books using the Editing Checklist. The teacher tells students to check their stories for each of the things on the checklist and make corrections as needed. Students complete the front cover by writing a title, and their name as the author and illustrator. Students talk with a partner if they need help coming up with a title. Once the cover is complete, students draw pictures on the inside pages to show the important parts of the story. In Lesson 10, students finish and then share their books. Students who are not finished editing and illustrating their books will complete this work and pair with another student when finished. Partners read their books aloud to each other and then write feedback on the back cover of their partner’s book. The teacher reminds students to use quotation marks around their words and include their name after their comments.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Superkids Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Throughout the lessons, there is evidence to support independent reading. The instructional materials support independent reading and aid both teachers and students with occasional built in supports and scaffolding opportunities to foster independence; however, there is a lack of evidence to support students reading across a wide span of texts. Most texts are not organized with built in supports and scaffolds to foster independence. The materials lack opportunities to support a balance between in-class and out-of class time for independent reading. Procedures are not found in lessons for consistent independent reading besides an occasional mention of students reading Readers independently. There is not a system for the teacher or student to monitor and track independent reading.   

Examples of how materials do not include independent reading opportunities nor teacher supports include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Superkids Program Guide, page 37, the publisher suggests “encouraging more independent reading” with the Library Books. “As an independent activity, children can read, reread, or listen to Library Books from previous units. Allow children to follow their interests and select books from any of the levels, regardless of their reading abilities.” On page 41, it suggests for independent activities, “children can reread the part of a Reader story or Super-Duper that they read in their small group, or finish reading their Library Book for the unit. They can also reread texts from previous units.” On page 60, it shows the online parent portal where students can reread the Interactive Library books from the week or any previous weeks, if the parent creates an account. This is an independent reading option at home, although there is no accountability measure in place.
  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, students reread “The Best Sandbox Ever” several times with a partner. Students can read, reread, or listen to the Library Books from previous units. Students can also play a game, read a story alone, or read with the narrator. During Small-Group Reading throughout Lessons 1–5, students read the story aloud with a partner as an Independent Activity and at home with their families using the Backpack Page. In Lesson 4, during Small-Group Reading the teacher monitors independent reading of the Library Book. Small groups started with a Unit 4 Library Book, appropriate for each group’s reading abilities. The teacher introduces the book, monitors student reading, and asks comprehension questions. The teacher will listen to each student read as others in the group read independently. If a group does not finish the book during small-group time, students will finish it as an Independent Activity.  After students have finished reading and while the teacher is meeting with other groups, students complete a Practice Page.
  • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, students reread “Lily’s Little Boat” several times with a partner. During Small-Group Reading, the teacher guides fluency practice with a literary text using Reader pages 169–171. While the teacher meets with a group, students complete Independent Activities. Throughout Lessons 1–5, students practice reading the story aloud with a partner as an Independent Activity and at home with their families using the Backpack Page.
  • In Unit 9, Lesson 9, students reread or listen to “Homer” after listening to the teacher read it aloud. Students can read, reread, or listen to Library Books from Unit 9 or previous units.
  • In Unit 12, Lesson 4, during Small-Group Reading, the teacher monitors independent reading of the Library Books. The teacher listens to each student read as others in the group read independently. If a group doesn’t finish the book during small-group time, students will finish it as an Independent Activity. After students have finished reading and while the teacher is meeting with other groups, students complete a Practice Page for their book.
  • In Unit 14, Lesson 6,  students read the story aloud with a partner as an Independent Activity and at home with their families using the Backpack Page.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 04/15/2019

Report Edition: 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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