Alignment: Overall Summary

The Odell Education High School Literacy Program Grade 11 materials meet the expectations of alignment to the Common Core English Language Arts (ELA) standards. The materials include instruction, practice, and authentic application of reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language work that is engaging and at an appropriate level of rigor for the grade.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
31
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
15
22
25
24
22-25
Meets Expectations
16-21
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality and Complexity and Alignment to the Standards with Tasks and Questions Grounded in Evidence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations for high-quality texts, appropriate text complexity, and evidence-based questions and tasks aligned to the standards. The Odell Education High School Literacy Program uses authentic texts and appropriately balances exploration of literary and informational texts, as required by the standards. Texts are appropriately complex for the grade level, with scaffolds and supports in place for texts that fall above the Lexile stretch band. The progression of complexity increases within each unit. Paired selections and text sets include texts of varying genres and complexity. Students read a variety of text types and have choice in their independent reading selections. The program promotes the use of student agency to choose texts, set pacing, and prepare discussions during which students report their independent reading findings and understanding of topics directly related to the unit of study. Oral and written text-specific and text-dependent questions and tasks support students in making meaning of the core understandings of the texts being studied. Materials support teachers with planning and implementing text-based questions. The Academic Discussion Reference Guide includes protocols for a variety of academic discussions. Teachers model academic vocabulary and syntax during student speaking and listening opportunities. Speaking and listening instruction includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. Students demonstrate what they are reading through various speaking opportunities, including opportunities that require students to utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and/or sources. Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing with writing opportunities in each mode required by the standards. Process writing includes opportunities for students to revise their work. Students have opportunities to address different modes of writing, reflecting the distribution required by the standards. Students have opportunities to write about what they are reading, including opportunities to support their analyses and claims using evidence from texts and/or sources. Although students have standards-aligned practice opportunities, materials rarely include explicit instruction of grade-level grammar and usage standards. Opportunities for authentic application in context are limited. Materials include structures to support students with building vocabulary knowledge in various contexts, and within and across texts.

Criterion 1a - 1e

Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.

14/14
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations for text quality and complexity.  Materials include high-quality, complex texts that advance students towards independent reading at grade level, advance students’ literacy skills, and develop students’ knowledge of a topic. Materials appropriately balance informational and literary texts as required by the standards. Texts are appropriately complex and the progression of text complexity increases within each unit.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of high quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1a.

The central texts for this grade level are high quality, worthy of careful reading, and include a variety of text genres, formats, and topics to meet a range of student interests within an appropriate level of complexity and rigor for the grade level. The texts include renowned classic and contemporary works by critically-acclaimed authors, high interest technical articles that are relatable and help students to build specialized knowledge, a variety of multi visual texts, and strong links between topics that support vertical alignment throughout the grade. The materials offer additional optional texts for students to continue to build knowledge and for extension purposes. Core texts in Grade 11 include, but are not limited to, poetry, novels, documentaries, essays, articles, speeches, and films.

Anchor texts are of high-quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests. Some examples include:

  • Anchor texts in the majority of chapters/units and across the year-long curriculum are of high quality.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read texts worth careful reading such as “The Declaration of Independence,” “The Preamble to the Constitution,” and “The 14th Amendment.” These texts are high-quality texts because of their importance and complex language.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 5, students examine the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and explore points of connection to “Why the Americans Are So Restless in the Midst of Their Prosperity,” an excerpt from Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville. Both texts are of appropriate complexity and worthy of instructional time and attention as students develop grade-level proficiency. 

  • Anchor texts consider a range of student interests.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, students begin reading the narrative nonfiction text Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students in this grade level will engage in the text because of the relatable topic.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 4, students read a variety of text types, including the poems “One-Way Ticket” and “The South” from “The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes” by Langston Hughes. Students read other texts throughout the unit, including, but not limited to, narrative nonfiction, The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, and two articles published by The Chicago Defender, “Where We Are Lacking” and “Some Don’ts.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 3, Lesson 1, students watch “How Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Was Animated” and discuss the film Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. Both of the materials are engaging, and the video “How Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Was Animated” gives students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of the techniques used to construct the animated film. 

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, in the Text Overview tab of the Unit Overview, the materials state, “We will use inquiry questions to find sources that help us answer our Central Research Question. These sources can range from print texts to web-based texts, multimedia, interviews, and texts from units explored earlier in the year.” This indicates that students choose their text based on their interests.

  • Anchor texts are well-crafted and content rich, engaging students at their grade level.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 3, students engage in contemporary commentary on the historical documents “The Declaration of Independence,” “The Preamble to the Constitution,” and “The 14th Amendment” by reading and/or listening to “The 14th Amendment and the History of Birthright Citizenship in the U.S” by Ari Shapiro and Martha Jones.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Sections 1–4, students read Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger and a collection of tandem texts throughout the section’s lessons. In Section 2, Lesson 2, students read “Unchecked, Unchallenged and Unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?” by Ivey DeJesus and in Section 3, Lesson 2, “Who Says Girls Can't Play Football? Certainly Not 13-Year-Old Auburn Roberson” by Melissa Isaacson. These texts offer students a variety of interests such as race, gender, and other cultural perspectives on high school, community, and sports. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 1, students engage in a careful study of the text The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. The text includes rich language and is appropriate for the grade level.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 6, students read the article “Flick Chicks: A Guide to Women in the Movies” by Mindy Kaling. This text is a humorous first-person narrative that outlines the complexities of women in film. The humorous and engaging topic is appropriate for the interest of students at this grade level.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 2, students examine “Why Owning a Home Is the American Dream” by Anthony Depalma and an excerpt from “Detached Houses: The Dream of Home Ownership,” a chapter in The American Dream: A Short Story of an Idea that Shaped a Nation by Jim Cullen. Students begin an examination of homeownership and the American Dream.

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 2, students use inquiry questions to find their own sources to answer a Central Research Question: “These sources can range from print texts to web-based texts, multimedia, interviews, and texts from units explored earlier in the year.” An example of a core text students analyze when exploring the concept of credibility and how to assess it is “The False Promise of Homeownership” by Marissa Chappell from The American Dream of Homeownership unit.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Materials include a sufficient balance of informational and literary texts with many opportunities for students to read across genres throughout the academic year. The Foundation Unit and each Development Unit include a variety of texts to explore a central question, and throughout the units, students read a mix of information and literary texts as well as multiple text types, including articles, poems, and books. Examples of text types and genres include, but are not limited to, journalism, letters, essays, short stories, art, myth, and narrative nonfiction. Each unit includes independent reading, which further expands students' experience with multiple text types. 

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Materials reflect the distribution of text types/genres required by the grade-level standards.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does it Mean to Be an American?, students read a variety of nonfiction informational texts, including historical documents, interviews, essays, and speeches. In Section 1, Lesson 2, for example, students read “The Declaration of Independence” and an article from The Atlantic titled “What Makes an American?” In Section 1, Lesson 3, students read the founding documents The Preamble to the Constitution and The 14th Amendment.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students engage in a study of the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald that includes various text types such as articles, essays, and poetry.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, students begin reading the narrative nonfiction Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students also read a collection of articles dealing with social and cultural issues such as “The Case Against High-School Sports” by Amanda Ripley in Section 4, Lesson 3, and “Baseball for Life” by Sara Corbettin Lesson 4.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, students study informational texts and literary works, such as narrative nonfiction The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, an essay “The Migration of Negroes” by W.E.B. DuBois, and the poem “Between the World and Me” by Richard Wright.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students read a variety of literary and nonfiction texts in the form of movies, documentaries, interviews, personal narratives, and essays. In Section 2, Lesson 6, for example, after students watch Blackfish, they read the informational text “Flick Chicks: A Guide to Women in the Movies” by Mindy Kaling. 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students read “Harlem,” an excerpt from The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes by Langston Hughes; excerpts from “Legacy of the Great Migration” by Isabel Wilkerson; and excerpts from Act 2 of A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry.

  • Materials reflect a 70/30 balance of informational and literary texts. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does it Mean to Be an American?, there are 15 core texts, with all being informational/nonfiction. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, there are seven core texts, with all being informational/nonfiction.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, there are eight core texts, with five being literary and 13 informational/nonfiction. 

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students read a total of five core informational texts and an undetermined number of readings collected during their independent research project.

Indicator 1c

Core/Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Documentation should also include rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1c. 

Texts fall within an appropriate range for the grade level according to the demands of the core, the culminating tasks are appropriately complex, and the activities students complete with the texts during the unit provide opportunities for close reading and tools to support students when working with these texts. The Application Unit provides an opportunity for students to explore an inquiry question: “Students review texts and topics they have encountered throughout the year and choose a text or topic they want to explore further.”

Most anchor texts fall within the appropriate range for the grade level in the Current Lexile Band (1215L–1355L for Grade 11). The texts add layers of complexity through their use of rich academic and figurative language, the need to understand background knowledge, and the use of varying perspectives and points of view. While some texts are above the suggested Lexile band, the tasks and instructional supports scaffold student access to these materials. Texts that fall below the Lexile band are topically appropriate for students at this grade level, and associated tasks enhance the level of complexity for students to develop literacy by deeply analyzing the text and/or creating new texts. For example, The Great Gatsby falls below the grade-level band qualitative measure; however, quantitatively, the text's meaning, especially its historical and cultural significance, creates an appropriate level of complexity for students. Students return to the texts presented in the materials to analyze and evaluate the texts, which adds to the complexity of the materials' readings. 

The publisher includes qualitative analysis for some core texts in the Text Overview, including details relating to the text structure, language features, meaning, and knowledge demands. Quantitative analysis of the core texts with available qualitative documentation indicates that texts will continue to challenge and develop students’ skills throughout the year.

Core/Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Documentation should also include a rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Anchor/core texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 1, students analyze sections of Chapter 2 in The Great Gatsby (1010L) and focus on the valley of ashes and the billboard of T.J. Eckleberg. Students work in pairs to answer the following questions: 

      • Which words and phrases stand out as powerful or important?

      • What does the language cause you to see or feel?

      • What images stand out and create vivid pictures or evoke strong feelings?

      • How do the author’s word choices develop atmosphere, mood, or meaning?

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 5, students read “Why the Americans Are so Restless in the Midst of Their Prosperity,” an excerpt from Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville (1310L), and compare the text to The Great Gatsby to synthesize what Tocqueville’s perspective would be on Fitzgerald’s perspective of Americans. These questions add to the complexity of analyzing the text, which will be a part of the culminating task at the end of the unit.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students read Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger (1220L). The text’s quantitative measure falls within the grade level band, and the text structure and language features are moderately complex, while the meaning and knowledge demands are very complex. Students read the text in its entirety, “analyzing specific themes through close reads and synthesizing information with related texts.” The culminating task allows students to write an expository essay: “Choose one of the aspects discussed in class—fandom, race, gender, and values—as your focus for describing Bissinger’s portrayal of high school athletics in Friday Night Lights.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read the complex text Chapter 5: “Detached Houses: The Dream of Home Ownership,” and return to the text multiple times to analyze the text’s meaning. For example, students receive bibliography information about the author to expand their understanding of the text. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students read Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. The text structure and language features are moderately complex, and the meaning and knowledge demands are very complex. The quantitative measure of the text is 1220L, which is within the grade level band. Students read the text in its entirety, “analyzing specific themes through close reads and synthesizing information with related texts.” The culminating task allows students to write an expository essay: “Choose one of the aspects discussed in class—fandom, race, gender, and values—as your focus for describing Bissinger’s portrayal of high school athletics in Friday Night Lights.”

  • Anchor/Core texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and a rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, students read “The Declaration of Independence” by the Second Continental Congress with a Flesch-Kincaid score of 14. The quantitative measure of the text is slightly above the grade level band. Qualitative analysis indicates the text structure and purpose are slightly complex. The language features and knowledge demands are exceedingly complex. The Text Overview states, “Students use this text to begin to develop a common understanding of one of the founding documents of the United States.” Also, “[g]iven the complexity, this text is read aloud or supported by appropriate scaffolded activities and materials in the unit.” The overall complexity of the text is appropriate for Grade 11 students.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, the materials provide a text overview that provides a rationale for the text presented in the unit. When reviewing The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson (1160L) the materials explain that although the reading falls below the quantitative grade level complexity band, the qualitative attributes of the text in terms of structure and purpose, as well as the tasks that students perform, contribute to its complexity enhance the complexity of students’ experience with the texts.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 2, students read the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Lexile level for the novel is 1010L, which is below the range for this grade level; however, the topic and knowledge demands enhance the complexity of the text, allowing this text to be grade appropriate. Students spend time analyzing the structural elements of the novel, including the author’s use of imagery, symbolism, and idealization of the past, purpose, and perspective. The knowledge demands of the text are very complex, and students work through the demands with complex tasks, providing them with an appropriately rigorous experience.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students read “Flick Chicks: A Guide to Women in the Movies” by Mindy Kaling. The materials include a qualitative analysis of the text. The text structure and language features are slightly complex. The meaning is very complex, and the knowledge demands are moderately complex. A rationale is available for placement in the grade level: “This piece helps students distinguish well-developed characters from caricatures and stereotypes, and tacitly raises important questions about sexism and racism in the film industry.” 

  • Both the rationale and the analysis present accurate information.

    • The Text Overview provides accurate information relating to the texts’ qualitative features consistently for the grade level, and the Lexiles available on Metametrics indicate an appropriate quantitative level of complexity for Grade 11.

Indicator 1d

Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1d.  

The program provides appropriate texts to support students’ literacy growth over the year, and the Foundation, Development, and Application Units allow students to access complex texts with appropriate scaffolds during the learning process. The materials are designed to help students grow their literacy skills from the Foundation Unit to the Application Unit. The flexibility of the program allows choice in which units to include in the course. As students move through the Foundation Unit and complete two or more Development Units, the selections should support growth in their literacy skills to achieve grade-level proficiency. The collection of texts is arranged to deepen students’ literacy skills and understanding by participating in a variety of text-based tasks. Students return to core texts throughout the until with an increased level of complexity through analysis and application of concepts learned. Additional ancillary texts curated to support the individual unit themes promote student growth from the over the course of each unit and across the school year. In tandem with the texts, the assessments and tasks are varied and increase in complexity, allowing students to deepen their reading skills. As tasks become more complex, the materials provide scaffolding material to help teachers support student learning.

Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • The complexity of anchor texts students read provide an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 11, students read “President Barack Obama’s Inaugural Address” by Barack Obama, one of several texts in the unit worthy of students’ time and attention. The Flesch-Kincaid score for this text is 8.2. Other examples of varied texts throughout the grade level include, but are not limited to, narrative nonfiction Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger (1220L) and an article “Want to Measure a Film’s Diversity? Try ‘The DuVernay Test’” by Victoria Massey (1610L–1800L). 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 1, students read The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1010L), which is below the range of complexity for this grade level but provides an entry point for students at the beginning of this grade level.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, the culminating task asks students to choose a thread that Wilkerson, the author of The Warmth of Other Suns (1160L), uses to describe the Great Migration. To complete the task, students develop their ability throughout the unit by reading and analyzing a variety of texts: In Section 2, Lesson 1, for example, students read informative texts on the Great Migration and apply what they learned to the works of W.E.B. Du Bois and Richard Wright. Students see the differing perspectives of the Great Migration, helping them perform better on the culminating task. 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 9, students read “Home Not-So-Sweet Home” by Paul Krugman and examine the text over a series of activities that increase in complexity. For example, students begin by annotating the text and then breakdown the text using the Delineating and Evaluating Arguments tools. 

  • As texts become more complex, appropriate scaffolds and/or materials are provided in the Teacher Edition (e.g., spending more time on texts, more questions, repeated readings, skill lessons).

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does it Mean to Be An American?, students begin the unit by carefully exploring “The Declaration of Independence” (1410L). Though this text falls above Grade 11 complexity, students are supported by a variety of scaffolded activities and other unit texts, such as “The Preamble to the Constitution” and “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen, which build toward the central question: What Does it Mean to Be an American?  Students read and analyze changes in perspective since the writing of the Preamble and discuss how the concept of we has changed since its inception.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 2, Lesson 5, students read “The White Flight from Football” by Alana Semuels (1260L), a complex text for the grade-level band. Students engage in a close reading of the text, annotate, and use a Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool to respond to a question about how race impacts youth sports. Teaching strategies include collecting “this tool at the end of the lesson as an opportunity to observe students’ ability to comprehend complex text, analyze the text, draw evidence from the text, and interpret the text to identify the author’s claims without your support.” The materials also offer suggestions to support students to work in small groups when identifying the author’s claims. Additional notes are available to assist educators with information about the author, concept, text, and topic as students build to answer the unit question “How do high school athletics reflect American Society?” This progression demonstrates the continuation of exploration as introduced in The Foundation Unit, What Does it Mean to Be An American? and continues to develop student knowledge leading to their own development and choice of study in The Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 2, provides a list of vocabulary words, including denigrates, propensity, and moral acumen with teacher support on how to examine the language with students using the Word Map tool. This activity supports students in reading the text “The Trouble with Nick: Reading Gatsby Closely,” which has complex language.

Indicator 1e

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year, including accountability structures for independent reading.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1e.  

The Program Guide indicates that all students will “access and analyze grade-level texts with the help of effective scaffolding and support, regardless of reading ability,” and the Grade 11 materials provide a wide volume of texts of various types, lengths, and complexity levels to build student independence throughout the school year and to support students to reach grade-level proficiency. Each unit provides a range of texts, including novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and informative texts. In addition, the publisher provides a partial text overview and complexity document as well as a list of suggested independent reading texts. 

Independent reading opportunities are available throughout the course of the year and provide choices for students. The Text Overview and Unit Text List provide suggestions for independent reading for each Foundation and Development Unit with texts grouped by topic, theme, or genre.  To assist students to build reading stamina and to persevere when navigating complex text, students encounter a number of meaningful topics and engaging texts that deepen their understanding of the subject matter covered in the units and expand students’ literacy skills such as comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary to equip them to be successful independent readers. 

Each unit includes specific procedures and accountability measures for independent student reading to ensure students are continually working toward independence. Materials include independent reading lessons, including suggestions on how to incorporate student reading into the classroom, at the end of each section in the Foundation and Development Units. In addition, each unit section contains a structured lesson for students to create an independent reading plan and to set their pacing. Students are accountable for text selection, connecting their independent readings to units of study, and creating a product based on their independent reading.

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year, including accountability structures for independent reading. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of text types and genres.

    • In The Foundation Unit, What Does it Mean to Be an American?, students use tools provided in each of the designated Independent Reading Lessons to support them with their independent reading. Tools include but are not limited to Analyzing, Attending to Details, Character Note-taking, and Evaluating Ideas. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students read a variety of texts from novels to informational texts with supports such as Setting Note-Taking Tools, Analyzing Relationships Tool, and Mentor Sentence Journals. In Section 1, Lesson 8, students begin an Independent Reading Program in which they select the texts they will read independently throughout the unit. At this point in the unit, students have examined the Central Question and a few anchor texts and apply their learning thus far to their independent reading. Students select their independent reading text from the list of suggested texts for the unit and develop an independent reading plan. The list of independent reading texts includes nonfiction texts such as the play, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry and the novel, Jazz by Toni Morrison.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students read “Attributes and Aptitudes,” an excerpt from The Power of Film by Howard Suber as well as essays, such as “‘Review: ‘Hidden Figures’ Honors 3 Black Women Who Helped NASA Soar” by A.O. Scott. Students also explore filmic text, including excerpts from The Hate U Give by George Tillman, Jr, and study an interview “Theodore Melfi: Hidden Figures” by The Movie Times. Independent reading options to accompany the unit include, but are not limited to, “101 Things I Learned in Film School” by Neil Landau and Matthew Fredericks, The Power of Film by Howard Suber, and A Killer Life by Christine Vachon.

    • In The Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students engage in one activity per section to plan and pace their independent reading and commence their Independent Reading Program in Section 1, Lesson 9. Core and Optional texts are explicitly written into the unit, including, but not limited to, historical, biography, song, interviews, and essays.

  • Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in a volume of reading.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 13, students choose texts to read independently: “We will learn how to choose texts, what activities we may complete, about the final task, and about any materials we will use as we read our independent reading texts.” Students use note-taking tools to analyze important textual elements.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 5, students use the Character Note-Taking and the Analyzing Relationships tools to independently examine Tom’s and Myrtles apartment scene from Chapter 2 of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. In Section 3, Lesson 2, students use the techniques of text analysis discussed in class to read Chapter 7 of The Great Gatsby for homework. Students continue to foster their independence by reading the text on their own.

    • In The Development Unit, Telling Stories With Film, Section 2, Lesson 5, students read a movie review of Blackfish to learn more about the language of film criticism, and in the next lesson students read an essay titled “Flix Chicks: A guide to Women in the Movies” by Mindy Kaling. The materials offer students an opportunity to closely examine films and pair with texts to support students in thinking critically about films they view. The student facing materials guide students through the process.  

  • There is sufficient teacher guidance to foster independence for all readers (e.g., independent reading procedures, proposed schedule, tracking system for independent reading).

    • The program plans and builds lessons for independent reading into the curriculum materials for teachers to follow and implement. Materials include teacher notes on strategy and decisions are included in the teacher edition of the materials.

      • In The Foundation Unit, What Does it Mean to Be an American?, students encounter a series of four structured lessons, one from each section, building to the culminating task in the fourth activity. Each of the units in Grade 11 follow this procedure. In Section 3, Lesson 8, the materials provide a lesson overview in which students “share the analyses we have made about our independent reading texts and make connections to the unit. We will plan a final product to share our experiences from reading independently and the knowledge we have gained.” Activities follow to guide students as they discuss, write, and read independently to achieve the lesson goals.

      • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 1, students read the first part of Chapter 7 in Friday Night Lights to analyze the text and how Bissinger approaches the concept of gender roles in high school athletics. Students answer text-dependent questions and write down takeaways in their Learning Log. Teaching notes provide guidance about the author, concept, text, and topic: “...Bissinger uses examples of how females are treated and the experiences of students to exemplify his perspective of gender roles at Permian and in the community.”

      • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 10, the materials outline tools to assist students’ independent reading suggesting that teachers "[p]rovide students with access to a list of texts to read independently and briefly explain how the suggested texts are related to the reading they will do in the unit.”

      • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 5, Lesson 9, students follow teacher-created procedures for sharing their learning from their independent reading. Teacher notes for the lesson indicate “[d]epending on expectations around independent reading and the final product, you might direct students to conduct a culminating presentation, where they share the knowledge and understanding they have gained from their independent reading text.”

      • In the Application Unit, Section 3, Lesson 1, teaching notes provide additional guidance for student support and differentiation: “If students have independently chosen nonwritten resources, you might help them connect those sources with written texts (e.g., a written review of the film they have chosen to use).”

    • While a proposed schedule is not clearly stated in the materials, the Foundation and Development units consistently include an independent reading lesson at the end of each section; there are four sections in the Foundation Unit and four or more sections in each Development Unit. The Program Guide shares, “[l]essons are designed to span 45–90 minutes, but the total length of the lesson depends on how many activities the teacher chooses.” Materials promote the use of student agency to choose texts, set pacing, and prepare discussions with peers to report independent reading finds and further expand their peers’ knowledge and breadth of understanding on topics directly related to the unit of study. Students choose from the Text Overview or Unit Text List and follow the lesson to connect their learning, while building knowledge around similar topics and/or themes. 

      • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, students return to their independent readings in Section 1, Lesson 10; Section 2, Lesson 8; Section 3, Lesson 9; Section 4, Lesson 9; Section 5, Lesson 7;  and Section 6, Lesson 7. Within the unit, this progression creates a schedule for students to select a text, record information from a text, discuss a text, make connections between the independent reading and the unit of study, and create a product based on the independent text read.

      • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 12, students plan their schedule for Independent Reading. The materials provide teacher guidance for students to select appropriate plans and pacing.

    • Students design their own tracking systems for their reading and are kept on pace and tracked through teacher-designated assessment for the activities within each Independent Reading lesson found in each section of the unit. The Program Guide states, “[s]tudents are encouraged to use the same tools and close-reading practices they use during instruction. Teachers can choose how to assign and collect those tools in order to monitor students’ reading comprehension.” Unit lessons include instructions and independent reading procedures consistently across the grade level. 

      • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 10, students track their independent reading by using the Attending to Details, Analyzing Relationships, Evaluating Ideas, Extending Understanding tools as well as a Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool, a Summarizing Text Tool, or a Character (or other) Note-Taking Tool. 

      • In The Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership Section 2, Lesson 9, students share their understanding of the texts they have been reading independently. This process continues throughout the unit so that students and teachers can track independent reading.

Criterion 1f - 1m

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

17/18
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations for evidence-based discussions and writing about texts. Materials include oral and written questions and tasks grounded in the text, requiring students to use information from the text to support their answers and demonstrate comprehension of what they are reading. Materials include speaking and listening protocols, and speaking and listening instruction includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing, as well as evidence-based writing, with writing opportunities in each mode required by the standards. Although students have standards-aligned practice opportunities, materials rarely include explicit instruction of grade-level grammar and usage standards; materials miss opportunities for authentic application in context.

Indicator 1f

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and/or text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1f. 

The Grade 11 materials include a focus on text-specific and text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments to deepen students’ knowledge and comprehension throughout each task.

The materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a variety of texts and to mine text for evidence. The questions and tasks in the materials require careful reading of texts over the course of a school year, and most of the questions are grounded in specific textual details to provide meaningful insight into the overarching Central Question for each unit. In addition, text-dependent guiding questions support students as they navigate and engage directly with the texts to draw evidence from what they have read, as well as to make inferences. The materials consistently pose guiding questions across grade levels and “reinforce the importance of leaning into the text itself for answers and clarification.”

The materials provide teacher guidance, including Teaching Notes, to support the planning and implementation of the text-specific and/or text-dependent questions, tasks, and assignments. The teacher notes also offer suggestions for contextualizing, teaching, and supporting students in text-dependent activities. 

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and/or text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Text-specific and text-dependent questions and tasks support students in making meaning of the core understandings of the texts being studied.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 3, Lesson 2, students work in expert groups to participate in a third jigsaw reading of Part 3 of The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. Students respond to guiding questions, including, but not limited to:

      • “Life Prior to Migration: What do you learn about each person’s life prior to their departure from the South? What questions do you have?

      • Immediate Impacts of Migration: What do you learn about the immediate impact of each person’s migration and about their life away from the South? What questions do you have?”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 1, students examine the core concept of how high school athletics represent American society by focusing on gender in Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights. Students answer text-specific and topic-specific questions, including:

      • “Read the sentence in the third paragraph on page 146 that begins “In the hierarchy…” How does this statement support Bissinger’s portrayal of females in the text?

      • After reading page 149, do you think Pepettes have a self-identity similar to the football players? Cite evidence from the text to support your answer.

      • On page 149, the school counselor uses the term programmed to describe the female students at Permian. Why do you think she chose this word? Who programs the female students? Why?”

    • In The Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 5, Lesson 5, students complete a Section Diagnostic challenging them to synthesize meaning from four texts in this unit. The Section Diagnostic states, “[w]e will participate in a formal discussion on the topic of how and why authors construct histories, citing examples from The Warmth of Other Suns as well as at least three print and non-print texts we have read.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 2, students read Act 2, Scene 3 from A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry. Students answer text-dependent questions such as, “How does this scene from the play relate to what you have been studying about the American dream of homeownership?” to broaden their understanding of how the text reveals the obstacles some Americans face when seeking homeownership. These questions prepare students to answer the unit’s Central Question: How viable is the American dream of homeownership?

  • Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-based questions and tasks. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be American, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read and annotate the Preamble to the Constitution by the Framers of the US Constitution. Students deepen their understanding of the text by answering text-dependent questions, specifically:

      • “Focus on the first phrase, ‘We the People of the United States.’

        • Who are ‘we?’

        • Who do you think would have been included in ‘we’ in 1776?

        • Who is ‘we’ now?”

    • The Teaching Notes provide specific guidance to teachers outlining various purposes to consider when having students annotate text, including, but not limited to:

      • attending to details about plot, character, and the author’s craft

      • making inferences

      • making connections among different parts of the text, other texts, and students’ own lives

      • asking questions about points of confusion

      • defining unknown words and phrases

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 4, students use the Understanding a Movie Tool to compare and discuss the film Blackfish and a film they watched independently with a partner. The Teaching Notes suggest the teacher find film reviews for students to use in this discussion. The Notes also suggest the use of less text-specific questions for those students struggling to engage:

      • “How does a movie tell a true story? 

      • How does a movie tell a fictional or fantastical story?”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 2, students read “Why Owning a Home is the American Dream” by Anthony Depalma. Students consider questions, such as:

      • “According to the author, what are the motivations for owning a home? In 1988, what was the ‘essential motivation?’ Cite evidence from your text to support your answer.”

    • The Teaching Notes provide notes about author, concept, text, and topic: “The author introduces his thesis early on with the statement: ‘For most families, a house is the centerpiece and predominant part of the household wealth.’ He uses examples, statistics, and testimonials to support his advocacy for homeownership.” The notes provide the following suggestions to support the implementation of text-based tasks. 

      • Rereading the text multiple times using guiding or text-specific questions, each with a different purpose (see the guiding questions in the Questioning Reference Guide for examples of additional text-dependent questions)

      • Using a Reading Closely Tool, such as the Attending to Details Tool

      • Walking through a model analysis of a passage from the text

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 2, students practice assessing a text using the Potential Sources Tool. The Teaching Notes guide teachers to set up the Potential Sources Tool practice and to assess students’ ability to access the text independently.

Indicator 1g

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1g. 

As stated in the materials Program Guide, the instructional activities for this grade level engage students in both formal and informal speaking and listening activities and discussions throughout the units, and the materials offer students support in developing these listening and speaking skills. Section Diagnostics and Culminating Tasks include formal activities, such as Socratic seminars, philosophical chairs discussions, and presentations. Also, informal speaking and listening activities recur throughout the program as students engage in collaborative peer-to-peer, small- and whole-group discussions to analyze texts, discuss group norms, and peer review their projects. 

The Academic Discussion Reference Guide provides protocols for a variety of academic discussions, and materials provide  teacher guidance for modeling academic vocabulary and syntax during speaking and listening opportunities. Materials include guidance on modeling effective discussion techniques through the use of teacher-composed scripts, sentence starters, and vocabulary instruction to support students in incorporating new words and academic phrases into their discussions. Students build upon the protocols from previous lessons and activities to participate in more sophisticated speaking and listening activities throughout the year.

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for speaking and listening. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials provide varied protocols to support students' developing speaking and listening skills across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to be an American, Section 2, Lesson 4, students engage in a Socratic Seminar. Before students participate in the discussion, the materials include several protocols for students to follow to appropriately engage in the seminar. The teacher edition offers guidance for teachers to help students develop their speaking and listening skills, such as “[w]hen a student speaks, they toss the object in the center of the circle. This kind of self-monitoring tool will enable more vocal students to be critical about what they share and allows time for less-vocal students to think and participate.” Students use the Discussion Tool to help organize their notes during a Socratic seminar, create norms with their classmates, and write open-ended questions in preparation for the discussion. Materials provide question frames to support students, including “[w]hat about this perspective do you agree or disagree with? What significance is this to __? If is true, then ___?”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 1, students listen to the NPR podcast “American Dream Faces Harsh New Reality” by Shapiro and complete a peer discussion. Student-facing directions instruct students to “[l]isten to the podcast and follow along with the transcript text on the site. With a partner, discuss the presenter’s ideas and the following questions.” Questions include: “Shapiro references The Great Gatsby and its early representation of a form of the American Dream—six years before James Adam coined the term. What other connections between the ideas of the podcast and the themes of the novel do you see?” Student-facing directions instruct students to “[u]se a Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool, consider and respond to the final question above with your partner. Join another pair and compare the claims and evidence you have identified.” This tool is available for use and support throughout the academic year. In Lesson 9, students participate in a formal fishbowl activity as part of the Section Diagnostic. Students join discussion groups based on characters they select, and with teacher supervision, answer text-based discussion questions. Students in the inner circle discuss the questions and present evidence from the text. Students in the outer circle take notes, submit written questions to the discussion group, and evaluate the contributions of their classmates. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, students begin the unit by utilizing the Academic Discussion Reference Guide, which provides information to assist with a variety of academic discussions. Students work in small groups to discuss what they learned about H.G. Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights as preparation for a larger, whole-class discussion. The Teaching Notes in the teacher edition suggests that teachers “might also quickly highlight a few elements and norms from the Academic Discussion Reference Guide to support productive discussions.” Student-facing directions for the whole-class discussion include, “[a]s you listen attentively to other groups, ask questions to help the groups clarify and explain their thinking.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 4, Lesson 7, students perform a dramatic reading of a character sketch they have created to small groups. In this activity, the materials provide speaking protocols for the dramatic reading, such as “[u]se your voice, as well as the descriptions in your sketch, to make the character’s story come alive.” The materials also include student protocols for listening during the activity. Students keep track of what is memorable about the character and ideas for improvement to share during a discussion after each dramatic reading.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 5, students synthesize understanding of the section texts and the relationships among their ideas during a whole-class discussion. Student-facing prompts include “[w]hat connections do you notice between the video and the Du Bois article? Between the video and the maps? Between the video and the Lee article? Between the video and Wilkerson’s stories of Ida’s, Robert’s, and George’s experiences?” Materials direct students to use the Academic Discussion Reference Guide and sentence starters as needed. 

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students present their research ideas to the class and receive feedback for the class following the discussion protocols. The student materials outline specific protocols for students to consider to develop their speaking skills, such as “share the overarching question or problem that will guide your research[;] invite the class to ask questions about anything that is unclear.” The materials also provide students with protocols to increase their listening skills, such as “[w]hen another team is presenting, do the following: listen intently to their Central Research Question[;] candidly and respectfully share your questions and responses.” In Section 5, Lesson 5, students confer with a teacher to receive feedback and to ask questions as they plan, draft, and revise their presentations. Students use a Culminating Task Checklist, which includes Speaking & Listening Goals as students organize work, communicate effectively, and publish their findings. Questions for consideration include, but are not limited to: “In the section or aspect of our presentation that I’ve created, how well do I use language and themes that are relevant and appropriate for our audience? How well do I share my research findings with my learning community in a way that is clear, logical, engaging, and appropriate for my audience?”

  • Teacher guidance includes modeling of academic vocabulary and syntax during speaking and listening opportunities.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 6, students discuss belief and disbelief, truth and fiction, and how these concepts play out in various movies. As a class, students discuss questions, such as “[d]o you think the documentary Blackfish presents a true and accurate story? Why or why not?” The instructions include making a list of evidence to support their opinion, “either evidence of truth in the movie or of distortions of truth.” Students engage in a respectful debate relating to the topic. Teaching Notes are available in the teacher edition with prompts to model the use of academic language in a discussion, including “[s]cript what students say during the discussion, focusing on strong examples of academic vocabulary and discussion stems.” 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 1, the materials outline resources for teachers to model academic vocabulary and syntax throughout the lesson and unit, specifically the word viable and what it means in relation to the American dream of homeownership. The Odell Education Literacy Toolbox and reference guides within the toolbox offer teacher guidance on ways to model for and support students. In Section 3, Lesson 3, students participate in a discussion about their research on trends in US homeownership. The teacher edition provides explicit protocols and ideas for modeling academic vocabulary and syntax for students to use during the discussion, such as “[y]ou might encourage students to practice using literary terms, academic language, and the vocabulary they have been exposed to in this unit or in prior units. Using the language of the discipline and topic is a powerful and empowering practice for all students.”

Indicator 1h

Materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1h. 

The Grade 11 materials focus on evidence-based discussion opportunities and standards-based questions as well as other instructional supports to help students grow in their speaking and listening skills throughout the school year, including opportunities for students to listen and speak during teacher-led discussions and when working with peers. All discussions require students to go directly back to the text, reference evidence or engage in repeated reading and analysis, and in many cases, the materials provide instructors with possible student responses for additional support.

Students have multiple opportunities throughout each unit to participate in various speaking and listening activities, such as small-group and whole-class discussions, Socratic Seminars, and Four Corners protocols, to discuss texts read. Most lessons and activities include standards-based guiding questions and tools to ensure students utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and other sources. Presentation of ideas and research opportunities are available through formal speaking and listening tasks and informally during the peer-to-peer discussions and sharing ideas. Students have the opportunity to participate in a variety of listening and speaking activities. The materials require students to use evidence to support their reasoning in class discussions.

Facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers are embedded within the student-facing materials as well as specific guidance in the Teacher Edition. The materials offer teachers support on facilitating Socratic Seminars and how to use tools to monitor student progress. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide additional guidance to facilitate discussions, and various tools, such as the Discussion Tool, the Delineating Arguments Tool, and the Academic Discussion Reference Guide, support student growth and developing proficiency in these skills.

Materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Speaking and listening instruction includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students select research teams and decide collaboratively how best to work in a group. In the Teacher Edition, materials direct teachers to consult the Academic Discussion Reference Guide for opportunities to support the diverse needs of their students: “There are several ways to have students select their research teams. You could assign students heterogeneously, based on their demonstrated reading, writing, and presenting skills. You could have each student write down their top two choices on index cards and assign groups from their choices, or you could have students select their own groups.” In Section 2, Lesson 9, students participate in a Socratic Seminar as part of the Section Diagnostic. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition offer instructional support for the teacher and explains the protocol for a Socratic Seminar. The Teaching Notes also offers questions to further student discussion and suggests that teachers direct students to the Discussion Tool resource to help them participate in the Socratic Seminar. 

  • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 2, students participate in a small-group discussion to discuss their initial impressions of the first five pages of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Students organize their ideas using the Attending to Details Tool and engage in a discussion of their findings with a partner. The Teacher Edition provides facilitation, monitoring, and instructional support for teachers with specific guidance such as, “This is the first time that students will debrief their responses to a close-reading tool in this unit. You might want to guide their conversations by suggesting that they start at the bottom of the tool and report first what they have concluded.” 

  • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, students participate in a whole-class discussion on what they learned from the preface about the city of Odessa; the author, H.G. Bissinger; and the reasons he wrote Friday Night Lights. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide instructors a list of evidence from the preface to help facilitate the group discussion.

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 3, students discuss the poems, “The Lynching” by Claude McKay and “Between the World and Me” by Richard Wright. Students explore connections between key ideas by participating “in a whole-class discussion to analyze the relationships between these two poems and the unit texts.” Students respond to questions, such as, “What do these poems suggest about the relationship between the end of slavery and the Great Migration?” Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide guidance for instructors to model academic language in the discussion, by: “[scripting] what students say during the discussion, focusing on strong examples of academic vocabulary and discussion stems,” and to direct students to the Academic Discussion Reference guide by “[prompting] them to use the reflection checklist to monitor and assess their own participation.”

  • Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading through varied speaking and listening opportunities.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 9, students organize themselves into the appropriate groups for the first fishbowl discussion and debate. Students share their claims about Gatsby’s character and his role in response to questions, such as, “Is Gatsby a character to be admired or pitied? Why?” The student instructions direct students to “Complete a personal reflection and self-assessment about your participation in the fishbowl discussion, using the self-assessment reflection portion of the Discussion Tool.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 1, students review the Central and Framing Questions for the unit, including, “How do ideas about gender and gender roles impact student sports culture? Students discuss questions with a partner or small group and consider what they have read in Chapters 1-6 of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students will then “share insights gleaned from the discussion with the whole class.” In Section 4, students participate in a variety of speaking and listening activities that lead to the Section Diagnostic in which students engage in a whole-class discussion. In Lesson 3, students engage in a whole-class discussion to discuss ethos, logos, and pathos and to share examples found in popular culture. In Lesson 5, students use the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool as a group to record evidence from the reading “Baseball is Life” by Sara Corbett to address whether young athletes are being prepared for the real world. In Lesson 8, students prepare for and perform the Section Diagnostic, a formal academic discussion that focuses on guiding questions, such as, “How do Bissinger’s perspectives compare to those of the authors of other section texts?” 

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 3, students begin a series of jigsaw group discussions, working in small groups to learn about the characters in The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. To keep track of their thoughts and to guide their discussions, students complete the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool. After students work with their “expert groups” to learn about the specific character, students return to their “home groups” to share their findings.

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 3, Lesson 7, students create and present a three-to-five-minute oral movie review and present their review to a four-to-five member student review team. After students show their movie review, group members pose questions and reflect on the concept of the movie, how the movie represented high school life, and what they learned about the movie’s style.

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 4, Lesson 1, students participate in a class discussion in which they delineate and discuss the argument in “The False Promise of Homeownership” by Marissa Chappell. For the discussion, students are instructed to “Compare and discuss your analyses of the argument’s structure.” 

  • Speaking and listening work requires students to utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and/or sources.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 4, Lesson 5, students engage in a group discussion addressing the unit's central question: What does it mean to be an American? Guiding questions ask students to incorporate evidence from texts they read in the unit, specifically:

      • “How did the texts in this unit help you understand or think about the Central Question?

      • What about this text or topic do you still want to know?

      • Was there any particular topic or text that captured your attention? Why?”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 1, students listen to and discuss the podcast “American Dream Faces Harsh New Reality” by Ari Shapiro and make connections to The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Students work in pairs to discuss their findings, responding to guiding questions that require students to pull evidence from the podcast and the novel such as: “Shapiro references The Great Gatsby and its early representation of a form of the American Dream—six years before James Adam coined the term. What other connections between the ideas of the podcast and the themes of the novel do you see?”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 3, Lesson 1, students reread the article “Disney+ adds disclaimer about racist movie stereotypes” and use the Vocabulary in Context Tool to determine the meaning of unknown words. Students work with a partner to use context clues to determine the meaning of words that have enough context in the passage to provide the meaning, noting their thoughts in the Learning Log, and then discussing their thoughts with the class.  

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 4, students study “Mapping Segregation” by Matthew Block, Amanda Cox, and Tom Giratikanon. Student groups share and compare observations and interpretive claims formed in response to equations, such as, “To what extent has the city you examined been able to respond to the Fair Housing Act’s expectation that communities will move toward desegregation?” Students also share a claim-based summary with the class.

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students work in collaborative groups to “use the research portfolio you have built over the course of the unit to develop a presentation for your learning community that shares your findings and conclusions.” In Section 2, Lesson 6, student groups read another team’s Research Frame Tool: “Analyze and assess the inquiry paths and inquiry questions. Consider the following questions and provide feedback to help improve the research frame: 1. How effective is their use of language in conveying their Central Research Question? Is it clear what they are looking to solve or answer in their research?” Student groups complete the Credibility and Richness of Sources row on the Research Evaluation Checklist by looking at sources and texts read throughout the unit and the year, as this is the final unit of the year. In Section 3, Lesson 4, students work with a partner to make claims based on evidence from closely read texts. Students use the Claims Reference Guide to review the Claim Types and Purposes section, they review the primary inquiry questions for an inquiry path they have identified in the previous lesson, and choose a claim type that best responds to the inquiry questions before sharing their examples with the class.

Indicator 1i

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1i. 

Writing tasks center student learning around a common topic or inquiry by clarifying and deepening understanding of the text; exploring the essential question of each unit, section, or lesson; and helping students to prepare for a Culminating Activity. Overall, these tasks include long assignments with multiple drafts, short assignments for in class responses, focused projects, and other short answer responses. Section Diagnostics prepare students for the writing and presenting tasks they complete during unit Culminating Tasks that emulate one of the following: short story, personal narrative, explanatory essay, literary analysis, argumentative essay, or research essay.

The Grade 11 materials include activities for students to connect writing to texts and incorporate many opportunities for students to engage in on-demand writing (e.g., completing digital pdf guides such as the Delineating Arguments Tool and Theme Reference Guide to help them engage in various writing activities including constructing paragraphs based on claims found in texts read) and process writing that is formal or informal (e.g., journaling using an individual Learning Log). Process writing engages students in multiple steps to develop final drafts of their writing; lessons include prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing activities and provide multiple layers of instructional support for teachers and students. During process writing activities, students develop ideas and construct writing projects over a series of lessons, including revisiting writings to revise and edit their work from previous units. The materials also include multiple opportunities for students to receive a year’s worth of instruction for on-demand writing opportunities such as reflections and quick-writes. These on-demand writing assignments, including shorter, more focused writing projects, occur throughout all units in the grade level.

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Materials include on-demand writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be An American?, Section 1, Lesson 2, teachers have the option of having students listen to “A July 4 Tradition: NPR Reads the Declaration of Independence” by Thomas Jefferson read by NPR staff and write a response to the following question: “How does hearing the Declaration of Independence being read aloud by a variety of people help your understanding or modernize the declaration?”

      • In Section 1, Lesson 6, students study mentor sentences and then choose one or two of the mentor sentences to mimic in an on-demand piece of writing. Students answer the following prompt: “Use your deconstruction analysis of your chosen sentences to write your own, mimicking what the author does in terms of structure, style, grammar, and punctuation.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 6, students prepare for a discussion and for the Section Diagnostic by composing a quick-write in response to discussion questions, such as:

      • “What were the most significant factors that impacted the lives of African Americans in the South between 1915 and 1975?

      • How do the texts from this section enhance our understanding of the decision to migrate?”

    • In Section 3, Lesson 2, students complete a quick-write based on their reading of The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. To develop their quick-writes, students respond to prompts, including: “What is the relationship between the epigraphs that began this section and what you learned about your focus figure during the reading?”

  • Materials include process writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction. Opportunities for students to revise and edit are provided.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 5, Lesson 1, students demonstrate their understanding of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and other paired texts by writing a multiparagraph literary analysis and critical argument in response to the Central Question: How do perceptions, illusions, and dreams influence our lives? Students take a position, develop claims, gather evidence to support their analysis, draft, revise, and edit the essays before publishing. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 2, Lesson 1, students have an opportunity to read and annotate the text, write a portion of a literary analysis response concerning the author’s use of tone to impart perspective, and then peer review and revise their answers in the next portion of the lesson before presenting their ideas to the class. 

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students complete a Culminating Task to develop an original pitch for their own feature film. In Section 2, Lesson 7, students brainstorm two or three possible ideas and use a series of prompts to develop these ideas, including:

      • “What type of movie might it be?

      • In general, what might the story and film be about?

      • What might be the moral, meaning, or theme that the movie adds up to?”

    • In Section 3, Lesson 4, students use the Movie Planning section of their Learning Log to develop a concept for their own movie describing the setting, style, and mise-en-scene. In Section 4, Lesson 3, students develop the backstory and arc of their central characters by “listing key events, experiences, and changes that your central character might face, both before and within the story you intend to tell in your movie.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 4, Lesson 1, students begin preparing for the Culminating Task to write an argumentative response to the Central Question: How viable is the American dream of homeownership? Throughout the process of developing their arguments, students complete various instructional steps to build their writing skills. In Section 4, Lesson 3, for example, students work with a partner to review the argument they have developed by answering guiding questions such as, “How likely is it that the argument will meet most of the criteria from the Evaluating Arguments Tool.”

  • Materials include digital resources where appropriate. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 8, students plan their writing using the digital resource Organizing Evidence Tool, which helps students to develop claims by answering prompts such as, “Explain how the evidence supports the supporting claim and the central claim or thesis.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 5, Lesson 1, students begin preparing for the Culminating Task to write an argument addressing the Central Question: How viable is the American dream of homeownership? Students draw on notes from texts and digital resources they have analyzed throughout the unit, including, but not limited to, “The Rise of Suburban Areas during 1950s” by AP US History Resources, “Federal Housing Administration (FHA)” by Marie Justine Fritz, and “Home Sweet Home. Still.” by the Pew Research Center. 

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students utilize a set of digital resources, including a digital Culminating Task Checklist, Evaluation Plan, Presentation Guide, and Research Plan, to aid their research products. In Section 2, Lesson 1, students use the Potential Sources Tool and Assessing Sources Reference Guide to help them assess the credibility of sources and determine relevance. In Section 4, Lesson 2, students discuss their research frames and researched materials to determine relevance, coherence, and sufficiency. Students complete a revision of their Research Frame Tool to reflect the new information and questions that have emerged from their research.

Indicator 1j

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1j.

Grade 11 materials provide sufficient opportunities across the year for students to engage in argumentative, informative/explanatory, and narrative writing that connects to the texts students read and analyze. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Mentor texts model the various writing types, and instructional activities include opportunities within and across units for students to develop writing based on anchor texts and text sets. Students write after each reading or viewing experience, and most writing experiences distill distinct elements of the overall writing process, which may be completed as stand-alone products, or as part of a larger task or learning experience. Across the entire school year, students write six process essays, including short story, personal narrative, explanatory essay, literary analysis, argumentative essay, and research essay, that reflect a deep understanding of the Central Question and genre study within each unit. The multiple modes, genres, and types of writing practiced in informal and formal writing tasks, including the unit Culminating Tasks, as well as the support and scaffolding in place, should help students to meet grade-level proficiency by the end of the year.

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:  

  • Materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Different genres/modes/types of writing are distributed throughout the school year. 

    • Students have opportunities to engage in argumentative writing. 

      • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 5, students complete the Culminating Task to write an argumentative essay. The materials prompt students to “use a collaborative, criteria-based writing process to produce a final written argument, or alternatively, an argumentative presentation, that addresses a key subtopic issue and question.” For this argumentative essay, students “take a position and write an evidence-based argument in response to a controversial issue about homeownership in America.”

        • In Section 5, Lesson 1, students “Draft a paragraph that introduces and explains your position. Consider your purpose and intended audience as you determine the tone and language you will use.” Students also review the Mentor Sentence Journal and include at least one technique when writing their responses.

        • In Section 5, Lesson 2, students review and finalize claims and counterclaims to the position paragraphs drafted in Section 5, Lesson 1. This preparation for the Culminating Task can also be a stand-alone argumentative writing assignment.

        • In Section 5, Lesson 3, students develop drafts of their Culminating Task addressing the Central Question: How viable is the American dream of homeownership? Students base their draft on the following subtopics:

          • “The American Dream: Should homeownership still be an important component of ‘making it’ in America?

          • The Role of Government: What role, if any, should government take in relation to supporting homeownership, funding affordable housing, and enforcing the Fair Housing Act?

          • The Dream Deferred: Has the expectation of a decent home and suitable living for every American family been a false promise? Should our society take responsibility for the history of discriminatory housing practices that continue to cause disparity of opportunities for Black Americans?

          • Future Aspirations: Should you and other members of Gen-Z aspire to or reject the traditional American dream of homeownership? Why?”

  • Students have opportunities to engage in informative/explanatory writing. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section students write a literary analysis based on the following prompts:

      • “What does The Great Gatsby ultimately suggest about human perception, illusions, and dreams—and potentially about the American Dream?

      • As a narrator, is Nick Carraway the novel’s ‘most important character’ (Mellard), a judgmental ‘snob’ (Donaldson), or an ‘unreliable’ voice (Boyle)? What is your own reading of Nick’s character and role in the novel?”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 2, Lesson 1, students address the unit Central Question: How do high school athletics reflect American society? The unit Culminating Task prompts students to write an expository essay analyzing how Bissinger portrays high school athletic culture using the non-fiction narrative Friday Night Lights and articles concerning race and gender issues. This activity can act as a stand-alone expository writing task and can also deepen student thinking about the culminating writing task.

      • In Section 5, Lesson 2, students consider, “How do high school athletics reflect American society?” as they draft support paragraphs using their Note-Taking Tools and preparatory notes, collaborating with elbow partners during the drafting process as needed. The student materials direct students to “[f]inish drafting the support paragraphs of your essay and be ready to share and receive feedback in a peer review in the next lesson.”

  • Students have opportunities to engage in narrative writing. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 4, Lesson 2, students write a multiparagraph reflective narrative describing their research process and explaining their “strengths and areas of growth as a reader, writer, collaborator, and presenter” as part of the Culminating Task.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students develop an idea for their own original feature film and then develop “a description that tells the film’s story and gives some details of its style, visual effects, and sounds.”

      • In Section 2, Lesson 9, students write an essay comparing the levels of realism in Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite to another film of their choice.

      • In Section 4, Lesson 3, students finish imagining and describing internal and external traits about their central characters. This stand-alone activity is also part of the Culminating Task to create an original idea for a feature film and create a package to “pitch” the idea. 

      • In Section 5, Lesson 5, students complete their final pitch for a proposed film. In their film pitch packet, students “Present a vivid synopsis of the movie’s three acts, highlighting its storyline and beats and how it develops from exposition, to complication, to a climax and resolution.” 

  • Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets (either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports).

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, the materials provide students with writing opportunities connected directly to texts and text sets as prompts and anchors. In Section 2, Lesson 2, for example, students read “The Migration of Negroes” by W.E.B. Du Bois and respond in their Learning Logs to a series of prompts, including:

      • How do the ideas and information in the text relate to what you already think and know about the topic?

      • According to the article, what are three immediate causes of migration?

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories With FIlm, students view film excerpts to help develop their own ideas for characters in an original feature film. Excerpts focused on developing character’s attributes include, but are not limited to, excerpts from Hidden Figures by Theodore Melfi, Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite, Rushmore by Wes Anderson, and The Hate U Give by George Tillman, Jr. 

      • In Section 2, Lesson 6, students create lists of evidence supporting their claims of either proof or distortion of truth in the documentary Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite. Questions students consider and respond to include, but are not limited to:

        • “Can any movie tell a complete, true story? Or is it impossible for any movie, documentary or not, to present every fact and perspective in an objective way?

        • Do you think the documentary Blackfish presents a true and accurate story? Why or why not?”

  • Materials include sufficient writing opportunities for a whole year’s use.

    • The materials for this grade level, in particular, the unit Section Diagnostics and Culminating Tasks, provide sufficient writing opportunities across the year. In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American, Section 1, Lesson 11, for example, students write a multi-paragraph essay about what it means to be an American. Similarly, in the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students compose expository paragraphs for point of view, characterization, literary devices, and scene analysis as part of the unit Section Diagnostics. These expository writing opportunities help prepare students for the literary analysis they construct for their Culminating Task.

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students choose to further research one of the topics and text sets they have studied in a previous unit to complete the Culminating Task to answer a self-developed inquiry question using research-based claims and explaining how the process of investigation led to said conclusions and discoveries. Students can consider and research privilege in Alexis de Tocqueville, “Why the Americans Are So Restless in the Midst of Their Prosperity” and how it connects to F. Scott Fitgerald’s The Great Gatsby and to Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students use literary analysis skills practiced in the Development Units, The Warmth of Other Suns or The Great Gatsby, as well as expository writing opportunities developed throughout the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, to explain how privilege is presented in American Literature. 

      • Throughout the unit, students develop a research portfolio and presentation connecting to a self-selected topic of inquiry that presents “a clear, engaging narrative of your research process, communicating the evolution of your critical thinking and learning, reflecting on the challenges and successes you experienced, and using details to help your audience understand the context and conclusions of your work.” In Section 3, Lesson 5, students develop claims about their inquiry question or research problem. In Section 5, students apply writing skills developed over the year and connect to texts and topics they have studied closely. In Section 5, Lesson 8, students reflect on what they have learned and evaluate their skills and knowledge by completing the Culminating Task Progress Tracker prompt: “Add or refine any skills and content knowledge required for the Culminating Task. Evaluate how well you are mastering skills and knowledge required for the Culminating Task.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1k.

The Grade 11 materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in short writing responses, argumentative writing tasks, and synthesis of ideas, as well as allow students to connect their writing to various texts they read and analyze across the year. Materials provide tools to guide students in completing writing tasks, such as diagnostic checklists, including student self-assessment of their writing goals, and an Organizing Evidence Tool to guide students in explaining how the evidence supports the supporting claim and the central claim or thesis.

Students learn and practice skills before applying them in their writing. Students revisit texts when responding to questions and cite evidence to support their positions, create claims and support those claims with textual evidence, review and revise claims, and consider whether additional evidentiary support is necessary. Supporting their ideas with evidence from the texts, students write literary and rhetorical analyses, as well as argumentative and informational responses throughout the year. Additionally, each unit ends with an extended writing Culminating Task that requires students to review across texts and genres and to support their claims and arguments with evidence from multiple texts. Students write to practice and apply writing standards that require them to write with a task, purpose, and audience in mind, to delineate and evaluate arguments, and to develop a short research response.

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 3, students practice using evidence in their writing by analyzing a character from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The following guidance to direct students’ practice is outlined in the Teacher Edition:

      • “Students should do the analysis individually, unless you believe that they need additional support, in which case you can have them work with a reading partner, with a team, or with the class as a whole. This is an opportunity to see how well they can analyze a passage and develop an evidence-based claim on their own.”

    • In Section 2, Lesson 8, students complete the Section 2 Diagnostic by using evidence to develop their responses. The following information in the student-facing materials guide students to apply their skills:

      • “We will write our Section 2 Diagnostic responses using materials from the unit. We will respond to questions about contrasting elements and literary devices, using evidence from the novel to support analytical claims.”

    • In Section 4, Lesson 5, students read an excerpt from “Unreliable Narration in The Great Gatsby” by Thomas E. Boyle and answer the following writing prompt using textual evidence from the article:

      • “How is Boyle interpreting the final lines of the novel? What is unusual or ironic about the author’s interpretation of Nick’s final comment that ends the narrative? How is Boyle’s perspective similar or different to how you previously interpreted this comment?”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 5, students read Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger and annotate Part 3 of Chapter 3. To complete the task, students gather evidence using the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool and develop a claim that answers the guiding question: “How do the backgrounds of Boobie and his uncle, L.V., shape Boobie’s self-image as he enters adulthood?” The student-facing materials provide guidance, such as, “Forming an evidence-based claim, the last activity on the tool, is the most important task. This claim should answer the guiding question using evidence from the text.”

      • In Section 1, Lesson 9, students create an independent reading plan for the unit and utilize helpful note-taking tools, such as the Analyzing Relationships Tool, Attending to Details Tool, and Character Note-Taking Tool.

      • In Section 2, Lesson 2, students practice using the Analyzing Relationships Tool when reading the unit core text, Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students read Part 4 of Chapter 5 and use the Analyzing Relationships Tool to answer the question: “How does Bissinger convey a suspicious tone regarding the true motivation for the desegregation of Odessa’s schools?” Students address this question using the tool to identify key details, analyze the relationships between the details, and explain how the details contribute to their analysis of Bissinger’s suspicious tone. 

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 9, students review and edit their comparative essays, which connect the text Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite to a self-selected filmic text. The student-facing materials provide a reminder to “draw evidence” from the texts. Students also utilize the Section 2 Diagnostic Checklist as an opportunity for self-evaluation of their writing goals when answering questions, such as: “How well do I develop and clearly communicate meaningful and defensible claims that represent valid, evidence-based analysis?”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 3, Lesson 4, students practice identifying and developing claims before they apply them to their research project. Working in groups, students review the Claims Reference Guide to select a claim type and develop an inquiry question satisfied by that claim type. Students then practice developing claims that answer their inquiry question. Students also review the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools to analyze a resource that addresses the group-developed inquiry question, to assess what type of claim is needed for that particular inquiry question, and to revise claims as needed. Finally, students use their claim to complete the Organizing Evidence Tool by providing evidence and analyzing the evidence. 

  • Writing opportunities are focused around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with texts and sources to provide supporting evidence.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, from the Foundation Unit Pathway Texts, students select texts based on the inquiry questions they developed as a group and complete their Evaluating Ideas Tool. Students then use the Evaluating Ideas Tool to record evidence from the text, to analyze the author’s point-of-view, to assess the credibility of the information presented, and to evaluate the position, argument, and/or value of the text. 

      • In Section 3, Lesson 9, students summarize and share their analyses of their independent reading texts. The student-facing materials prompt students to “[b]e sure to give a brief summary of your text so that your audience understands any analysis and unit connections that you communicate.” Students also review their notes collected in the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools and revise their claims “to produce more formal statements that express” their analysis.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 6, with a partner, students closely read and paraphrase sections of the text “Flick Chicks: A Guide to Women in the Movies” by Mindy Kaling prior to participating in a group discussion of the text.

      • In Section 4, Lesson 1, students return to Kaling’s text and discuss and compose a paragraph about their “thoughts regarding character stereotypes and caricatures in the movies. Then write about characters you might create in your own original movie—and how you might use or avoid tropes, caricatures, or stereotypes.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 8, students write their analysis of Part 1 and Part 2 of The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. The student-facing materials include the following directions to guide students: “Based on Part 1 and Part 2 of The Warmth of Other Suns, we will write responses to demonstrate how well we understand Wilkerson’s use of sources, organization, and structure and how they relate to her purpose and perspective.” Within the directions for this task, the materials specify that students should support their writing with evidence from the text.

      • In Section 5, Lesson 1, students complete Part 5 of The Warmth of Other Suns with a quick write in response to text-based guiding questions such as, “What is the relationship between the epigraphs that began this section and what you learned about your focus figure during this reading?”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 3, Lesson 3, students synthesize their understanding across multiple sources. Students work collaboratively in teams to determine revisions to the Research Frame Tool. The student-facing materials direct teams to “Determine what kind of revisions or refinements you might need to make to your Research Frame Tool.” The student facing materials provide questions for consideration, including, but not limited to: “Which inquiry question best summarizes each inquiry path? What are the primary, or most important, inquiry questions for each inquiry path?”

Indicator 1l

Materials include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards, with opportunities for application in context.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1l. 

Materials provide some opportunities for the instruction of the Conventions of Standard English to demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking and demonstrating command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. Students apply grade-level skills in context as they explore grammar, syntax, and usage in texts they study. Explicit instruction is limited, and teachers have an option to address the skills in more depth. The Program Guide shares that “Grammar is examined with the goal of improving students’ reading and writing skills. Understanding how language functions at the paragraph and sentence level helps students comprehend text with more clarity, enabling them to produce writing that is more effective, precise, and clear.” Materials include other tools to support grammar and syntax, such as the Mentor Sentence and Language Use Handouts, Working with Mentor Sentences Tool, and Reference Guides. 

Materials provide teachers with opportunities to introduce concepts, and students can practice locating these examples in context and then practice synthesizing sentences at the end of a lesson. Materials rarely include explicit instruction of grade-level grammar and usage standards; the text makes suggestions, but the instructor chooses where to focus instruction. The student-facing instructions do not explicitly reference the Reference Guides, but these are available in the Teaching Notes of the Teacher Edition. Materials include some opportunities for students to demonstrate application and improve fluency language standards through practice and application. Materials provide the opportunity to learn or practice discrete conventions and grammar skills within the context of their readings throughout the year; most opportunities for in-context practice are in writing.

Materials rarely include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards, but include some opportunities for authentic application in context. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Students have opportunities to apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read and annotate “The Preamble to the Constitution” to focus on the usage of the word we. The Teacher Edition provides the following information to specify the point of the lesson activity. “It is important for students to recognize that the concept of ‘we’ has changed since the inception of the Constitution.”

      • In Section 1, Lesson 5, students encounter the highly complex text, “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen. Students engage deeply with the language of the text and examine vocabulary in context that may have changed subtly since the writing of the article. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 4, students read excerpts from Scott Donaldson’s “The Trouble with Nick: Reading Gatsby Closely” and pay attention to verb tense used by highlighting the passage and discussing the following questions with a partner:

      • “What do you notice about the verbs Donaldson uses?

      • Does the verb tense remain consistent?”

    • The Teacher Edition’s Teaching Notes explain the importance of students being able to understand the reasons authors make choices in usage: “Understanding the why and how helps students to emulate those choices in their own writing practice. They are then more likely to feel comfortable taking risks in writing (such as trying new strategies or an unconventional structure) and stretching their skills to becoming better overall writers.” 

  • Students have opportunities to resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, Garner's Modern American Usage) as needed. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 5, students encounter the highly complex text, “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen. Students use various strategies, including dictionaries, and vocabulary tools to determine the meaning of complex and contextual language in the article.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 1, students consult references using the Telling Stories with Film: Film-making Glossary. For example, student-facing materials provide the following guidance: “Return to the Filmmaking Glossary and read the second paragraph of the entry for character. With a partner, discuss what the concepts external attributes and internal attributes mean. Add these characterization terms to your Vocabulary Journal.” Students consult the reference guide to find the definitions of specific terms, not resolve issues of complex or contested usage.

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 1, Lesson 3, students develop basic questions about their Central Research Questions to determine their viability. Materials include a reference to Merriam-Webster, which defines viable as “capable of working, functioning, or developing adequately.” Students conduct pre-searches to determine viability, and answer questions, including but not limited to: “2. Where did it originate? 3. What is its history?”

  • Students have opportunities to observe hyphenation conventions. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 3, students use the Working with Mentor Sentence Tool to focus on dialogue from pages 10–15 in Chapter 1 of the Great Gatsby and how the dash is used. Students consider the following questions in their analysis:

      • “What do you notice about the conversations between the characters and what their words and interactions reveal about them?

      • When Fitzgerald uses a dash to punctuate a statement from a character, what is usually happening?

      • What effect does this punctuation have on the rhythm and flow of the conversations?”

    • In Section 2, Lesson 7, students review and analyze the questions for the Section 2 Diagnostic and begin preparing their notes and responses. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition suggest referring struggling students to the Claims Reference Guide and Conventions Reference Guide for additional help. The Conventions Reference Guide includes a table with the convention and definition and an example of the convention in a sentence, such as the following: “Despite his best attempt, the well-intentioned waiter failed to get the orders right.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 6, students work with hyphenation by analyzing and emulating the following mentor sentence: “A place still rooted in the sweet nostalgia of the fifties – unsophisticated, basic, raw – a place where anybody could be somebody, a place still clinging to all the tenets of the American Dream, however wobbly they had become. (p. 33)” 

  • Students have opportunities to spell correctly. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, Activity 7, students build vocabulary with various strategies. Some strategies, such as the Vocabulary Journal, could aid in spelling development. 

      • In Section 3, Lesson 5, students begin working on their Section 3 Diagnostic, which involves writing an expository text-based response to a prompt. Students must spell correctly, as outlined in the Section Diagnostic Checklist: “How well do I apply correct and effective syntax, usage, mechanics, and spelling to communicate ideas and achieve intended purposes?”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 2, students read and analyze the Culminating Task. They identify the specific knowledge they are expected to learn throughout the unit and the specific skills they will need to succeed on the Culminating Task. The Culminating Task Checklist includes that they will write an essay in which “you explain how the thread impacts Wilkerson’s account of the Great Migration and what would be lost in her examination if that thread were removed.” A writing goal is to use conventions to produce clear writing: “How well do I apply correct and effective syntax, usage, mechanics, and spelling to communicate ideas and achieve intended purposes?”

      • In Section 3, Lesson 6, students use The Warmth of Other Suns: Section 3 Diagnostic Checklist to help finalize their presentations. The Section 3 Diagnostic Checklist emphasizes the use of conventions to produce clear writing through the following question: “How well do I apply correct and effective syntax, usage, mechanics, and spelling to communicate ideas and achieve intended purposes?” Students must evaluate whether they fall below, meet, or exceed these expectations. 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 7, students review and revise their interpretive explanations. Students utilize the Section 2 Diagnostic Checklist. Student-facing materials include the following guidance: “Make any necessary revisions or edits to improve the communication of your ideas. Proofread your draft for the grammar or usage errors you have been focusing on. Make edits to correct any errors.” The Section 2 Diagnostic Checklist includes the expectation of students communicating their analysis clearly with minimum usage errors. Students self-assess their ability to use conventions to produce clear writing, including spelling.

Indicator 1m

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 1m. 

The Grade 11 materials provide a Program Guide that details the structure of the program and how vocabulary is incorporated into both instruction and student work, noting that “While the program prioritizes Tier 2 language, students are exposed to Tier 3 language as well.” The materials offer instructional guidance in outlining and using year-long vocabulary development tools and activities to support student vocabulary development across the school year, and the Teacher Edition and student-facing materials provide specific structures to help students build vocabulary knowledge within and across texts by including specific opportunities for students to connect their understanding of words in multiple contexts and situations.

Academic vocabulary acquisition and use are prioritized within and across the units, as students identify essential vocabulary and apply it to their reading, speaking, and writing tasks. The materials provide opportunities for students to learn new academic and domain-specific terms as students encounter vocabulary in a series of contexts before, during, and across texts, and opportunities for students to determine the meaning of vocabulary words using context clues are consistent. The materials attend to content vocabulary essential to understand each text and to analyze the purpose of word choices. Vocabulary instruction and practice accompany the core program's selections to build vocabulary knowledge and improve students’ abilities to access complex texts.

Students apply their vocabulary skills to reading tasks utilizing tools, such as the Vocabulary in Context Tool, to assist them in understanding the meaning of unknown words and that words may have multiple meanings. In addition, students have regular opportunities to record vocabulary throughout the units using tools, including Word Maps and Vocabulary Journals, to note and define words throughout the unit. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide definitions and suggestions on implementing the Vocabulary Journals. Materials also prompt students to incorporate vocabulary during speaking opportunities and utilize tools, such as the Discussion Tool, to consider language used during classroom discussions. 

Materials include a cohesive year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year-long vocabulary development component.

    • The Program Guide outlines a philosophy and structure regarding vocabulary noting that “vocabulary is essential to comprehension” and that “the program contains a variety of tools to help students build a robust body of vocabulary and incorporate vocabulary into their own writing and speech.” The materials contain Critical Thinking & Analytical Tools, including the Vocabulary in Context Tool, Word Map, Vocabulary Journal, and Vocabulary Lists, to utilize during instruction and support vocabulary development. Also, Reference Guides, including the Arguments Reference Guide and Claims Reference Guide, “define English language arts concepts and equip students with content terminology used to explain their analysis of text.” Other guides, including the Narratives Reference Guide, Style Reference Guide, and Symbolism and Motifs Reference Guide contain “explanations of key literary elements and syntax techniques.”  Additionally, Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition embed guidance within the lesson activities throughout the year by suggesting specific instructional strategies and supports for academic and content-specific vocabulary development and practice before and during text examination. 

    • In The Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 1, Teacher Notes in the Teacher Edition provide the following guidance for the Vocabulary in Context Tool:

      • “Throughout the unit, students also interact with the Vocabulary in Context Tool. The purpose of the Vocabulary in Context Tool is twofold: 1. Students build vocabulary and develop a strategy for determining the meaning of unknown words and phrases when there is contextual information and when there is not. 2. Students metacognate on their process for determining the meaning of unknown words, determine the effectiveness of that process, and articulate a plan for using it in future texts.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, students identify and define important vocabulary in the Prologue of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide the following guidance:

      • “Explain to students that in a text, there will be some words that can be defined using context and some that cannot. If appropriate, you might model how to use the Vocabulary in Context Tool in this activity.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 1, students encounter words from the Vocabulary List. The student-facing materials prompt students to engage in this aspect of year-long cohesive vocabulary development as follows:

      • “For this activity, you will use a Vocabulary Journal, which you will maintain for the entire unit. In other activities, you might use a Vocabulary in Context Tool for words you can decipher from the text; for others, you might use morphology to decipher the meaning, or a reference resource to check if your meaning is accurate. For some words, your teacher might present you with definitions.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 3, Lesson 1, students analyze a clip viewed from the film, Hidden Figures directed by Theodore Melfi. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition issue guidance to provide additional support to students by using the Filmmakers Glossary to help them discuss the conventions used in the excerpt. 

  • Vocabulary is repeated in contexts (before texts, in texts) and across multiple texts.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be An American?, Section 1, Lesson 2, students define the terms declaration and independence in their Vocabulary Journals and add examples and nonexamples of each term prior to reading and discussing the Declaration of Independence. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include this prompt: “By paying attention to the Tier 2 vocabulary in the title, students become anchored to the rest of the text without giving away the content.” 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 2, students prepare to read The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and encounter the vocabulary word repressive, which is repeated in the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 1, when students read “Legacy of the Great Migration” by Isabel Wilkerson.

      • In Section 2, Lesson 1, Activity 3, students review the Vocabulary List before reading Section 3 of the novel, The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, and encounter the vocabulary word resilient. Previously, students encountered and examined the term resilient in the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, when reading “Immigration & Civics: What Every American Should Know” by The Aspen Institute.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 4, students complete a close reading of “‘Hidden Figures’ Is a Subtle and Powerful Work of Counter-History” by Richard Brody to “identify its perspective and the central claims of its critical responses to the movie Hidden Figures.” The student-facing materials direct students to note new or unfamiliar vocabulary in their journals and to use the Vocabulary in Context Tool to determine the meaning of unknown words, including: ambient, dilapidated, and bureaucracy

      • In Section 2, Lesson 1, students use the Filmmaking Glossary to support a class discussion of the definition of a movie concept. Students then apply the term to their own films to be developed as part of the unit Culminating Task by writing a few sentences addressing the following considerations in their Learning Logs:

        • “what the story might be

        • the world in which it might take place

        • the idea or premise that the movie might develop (the ‘What if…’)”

      • Students then watch the Pixar video “Story Spine,” and “As a class, discuss the concept of a movie’s story spine and its beats, referring to the entries in the Filmmaking Glossary.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 1, students encounter the word dilapidated when reading Paragraph 13 of Excerpts from “Legacy of the Great Migration” by Isabel Wilkerson. Students establish an understanding of the Great Migration, its impact on American history, and its relationship to homeownership by reading and forming claims during the lesson. A unit vocabulary list calls attention to the academic vocabulary and students utilize this as a reference throughout the unit.

  • Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words (e.g., words that might appear in other contexts/content areas). 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 2, as students encounter new vocabulary words, such as declaration, Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition offer the following guidance:

      • “To cement understanding, it is important to have students interact meaningfully with new words. Walk students through an understanding of the noun declaration, which is a form of the verb ‘to declare.’ You might tell students the word declare means something is said in a solemn and emphatic manner. In other words, the speaker is serious and forceful. Share with students examples and nonexamples of what it means to declare something.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 1, students use the Friday Night Lights: Vocabulary List provided at the beginning of the unit and their Vocabulary Journals to construct Word Maps of vocabulary from Chapter 11 of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger to see how the vocabulary is used in context. Students use the maps to define the terms; to locate antonyms, synonyms, and examples from the text; to use the terms in sentences; and to provide characteristics and/or facts about the terms.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 1, students complete their reading of “Why Owning a Home Is the American Dream” by Anthony Depalma. Students encounter the academic word transient in the Vocabulary List for the unit prior to reading the word in the context of the text. The term transient is listed as a Tier 2 academic word.

      • In Section 1, Lesson 2, Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide the following guidance to help students understand academic words:

        • “Make these terms the first ones you add to a class Word Wall, which can be maintained as a visual classroom reference throughout the unit.”

  • Students are supported to accelerate vocabulary learning with vocabulary in their reading, speaking, and writing tasks.

    • In the Development Unit The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 1, students use vocabulary words to accelerate their analysis of the first five pages of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. To support students’ use of vocabulary to accelerate their learning, the student-facing materials prompt students to “Use your Vocabulary Journal to support your reading as well as to write down new and interesting words you encounter.”

      • In Section 1, Lesson 4, Activity 2, student-facing materials direct students to:

        • “Select three words from your Vocabulary Journal that you wrote down for the previous lesson’s homework. Determine the meaning for each of the words and identify the vocabulary strategy (e.g., context, morphology, reference resource) you used to determine its meaning. Use the Vocabulary in Context Tool to support your analysis.”

    • Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition prompt teachers to assign a particular dictionary to help vocabulary development and to have students use the three vocabulary words they chose in their own writing in response to the questions in Activity 3.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 8, students prepare for the Section Diagnostic by completing Part 1 of the Discussion Tool. Student-facing instructions direct students to use significant words from their Vocabulary Journals as follows:

      • “Review your Vocabulary Journal and the Discussion Stems in the Academic Discussion Reference Guide. Record words and stems you want to use during the discussion.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 6, students use vocabulary in speaking and writing tasks. The Teacher Edition includes several activities for students to deepen their vocabulary knowledge on the activities, including the following: “Have students reword sentences to use the new terms. Respond to true and false statements that use the words. Use the words in a discussion.”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students work towards the unit Culminating Task using the Potential Sources Tool to evaluate which resources should be used in their pathway groups. The Accessibility and Interest section of the Potential Sources Tool supports students to consider vocabulary as a key part of their reading and research using the following guiding questions:

      • “Am I able to read and comprehend the text?

      • What background knowledge do I need to understand the terminology, information, and ideas in the text?”

      In Section 6, Lesson 1, students revise their presentation rough drafts into final drafts utilizing the Culminating Task Checklist to consider how well they use language and themes that are relevant and appropriate for the audience to ensure effective communication. Students incorporate vocabulary acquired throughout the research process into their final product.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for building knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. Texts are organized around a central theme and related guiding questions that connect to the unit topic. As students closely read and analyze literary and informational texts, students respond to coherently sequenced questions that build to Section Diagnostics, which may be oral or written in nature. Section Diagnostics build to the end-of-unit Culminating Task. Culminating Tasks integrate multiple literacy strands, allowing students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of a topic. Writing lessons are cohesively designed so that students apply and expand the skills they learn from previous lessons as they progress through the units. Materials include guidance, protocols, models, and support for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. Short and long research projects are sequenced and include a progression of standards-aligned research skills. The program utilizes a Monitor, Diagnose, Evaluate practice that closely links instruction and assessments. Standards-aligned instruction builds to text-based questions and Section Diagnostics and Section Diagnostics build to end-of-unit Culminating Tasks. The Foundation and Application Units are recursive and cover the majority of grade-level standards, with the exception of most Reading: Literature standards. Development Units revisit grade-level standards addressed in the Foundation Unit and address Reading: Literature standards. Although suggested implementation schedules align to core learning objectives, the Model Yearlong Paths cannot reasonably be completed, based on the suggested minimum number of 45 minutes per lesson and the number of units suggested for the year. Optional tasks are meaningful and support core learning.

Criterion 2a - 2f

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

24/24
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for building knowledge. Grade-level texts are organized around a central theme and related guiding questions that connect to the unit topic. Students complete high-quality, coherently sequenced questions and tasks as they analyze literary elements, such as craft and structure, and integrate knowledge and ideas in individual texts and across multiple texts. Section Diagnostics and end-of-unit Culminating Tasks integrate reading, writing, speaking and listening, or language and connect to the texts students read. The year-long writing plan allows students to participate in a range of writing tasks that vary in length, purpose, and difficulty. The Foundation and Application Units are designed to allow students to "investigate a topic through recursive and iterative cycles of inquiry." The program utilizes a Monitor, Diagnose, Evaluate practice that closely links instruction and assessments. Standards-aligned instruction builds to text-based questions and Section Diagnostics and Section Diagnostics build to end-of-unit Culminating Tasks.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a cohesive topic(s)/theme(s) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2a.

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for texts are organized around a cohesive topic(s)/theme(s) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.  Each unit is organized around a central theme and related guiding questions that connect overall to the unit topic. The texts, tasks, and materials for this grade level are grouped so that students investigate a Central Question when moving through the Foundation and Development units using the information they gather from analyzing the various texts to perform the culminating tasks. Throughout the process of analyzing multiple texts, students broaden their vocabulary and knowledge, strengthen reading comprehension, and develop independent-thinking skills as they dig into unit content and apply their learning to new readings they encounter. The course capstone includes an Application Unit in which students drive their investigation with an inquiry question of interest. The Program Guide provides additional information for teachers relating to the selection of classic and contemporary texts within each unit: “Text sets guide and focus student learning and knowledge development by examining a diverse body of authors, perspectives, and genres. While students develop strands of knowledge in units, they also extend their understanding across units in their year, and across all four years, of high school.”

Texts are connected by cohesive topics/themes to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Texts are connected by a grade-appropriate cohesive topic/theme/line of inquiry.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to be American?, students read multiple types of texts, including primary sources written by the founding fathers, speeches to discuss American principles, and articles to deepen student learning. The Central Question: “What Does It Mean to Be American?,” is explored in depth in Section 1, Lesson 1, in which students analyze the question in preparation for studying the unit and preparing for the culminating task. For the culminating task, students collaborate with group members to research how the pathway topic enhances their understanding of what it means to be an American. With the use of complex texts throughout this unit, students build their comprehension and vocabulary skills in order to navigate texts independently and proficiently.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students explore the Central Question: “How do perceptions, illusions, and dreams influence our lives?” Examples of texts students study to explore a common line of inquiry include, but are not limited to, “The Trouble With Nick: Reading Gatsby Closely,” an excerpt from Fitzgerald and Hemingway: Works and Days, and “Why the Americans Are so Restless in the Midst of Their Prosperity,” an excerpt from Democracy in America.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, the texts are built around a central theme: “How do high school athletics reflect American society?” Students read core text that connects to this theme, such as in Section 2, Lesson 5, students read “Unchecked, Unchallenged and Unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?” by Ivey DeJesus and “The White Flight from Football” by Alana Semuels. Both texts highlight the central theme of how high school athletics reflect American society. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, students investigate the Central Question: “How do we construct the story of a complicated history?” Examples of texts students study to explore a common line of inquiry include, but are not limited to, the narrative nonfiction The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and the poem “The South” from The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes by Langston Hughes.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students investigate the Central Question: “How viable is the American dream of homeownership?” Complex texts students read to examine the coming line of inquiry include, but are not limited to, these Grade 11 appropriate texts: “Why Owning a Home is the American Dream” by Anthony Depalma and “The Civil Rights Law We Ignored” by Walter Mondale.

  • Texts build knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to read and comprehend complex texts across a school year.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, texts are focused around a central theme: “What does it mean to be an American?” Texts that reflect this theme include historical documents such as “The Declaration of Independence,” “The Preamble to the Constitution,” and “The 14th Amendment.” The unit also included contemporary speeches from President George W. Bush and Barack Obama. 

    • In The Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students focus on the question, “How do perceptions, illusions, and dreams influence our lives?” The unit supports the common theme and exploration of the American Dream with cross-cultural and multi-genre texts to prepare students for the culminating task of a literary analysis essay about human illusions and the American Dream. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students read the narrative nonfiction book Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger throughout the unit. The rich vocabulary, complex meaning, and moderately complex structure of this text allows students to build their knowledge, vocabulary, and comprehension for other reading tasks throughout the school year. Students complete a series of tasks throughout the unit that help shape their understanding of the Central Question. Students write an expository essay for the culminating task to answer the Central Question.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students develop their knowledge to closely watch and understand film by watching excerpts from Hidden Figures and using materials like Telling Stories with Film Filmmaking Glossary and Video Note-Taking Tool. 

    • In The Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students answer “How viable is the American dream of homeownership?” For the culminating task on this theme, students will write an evidence-based argument in response to one of the controversial issues of homeownership they have explored through the volume of reading during the unit.

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students develop knowledge and vocabulary to conduct their own independent research through the use of plans, checklists, and guides. For example, in Section 4, Lesson 2, students use a Research Frame Tool to map out their inquiry process with the resources they collect. This helps them build knowledge and comprehend the sources they are collecting.

Indicator 2b

Materials require students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft, and structure within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high-quality questions and tasks.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2b. 

Grade 11 materials provide opportunities for students to analyze the author’s word choice, structure, and point of view development as delineated in the grade-level craft and structure standards. Additionally, each unit in the Grade 11 materials includes guiding questions that students track throughout the unit; these questions are present throughout each lesson and within the written materials and tasks. In the independent reading lessons, students read texts related to the anchor texts and use the guiding questions to present their findings on how the texts relate to each other.

Students build knowledge by investigating a topic or anchor text through organized text sets in each unit. Throughout this process, students cite textual evidence and examine themes and complex characterization according to grade-level standards. To support student learning and literacy development, as students develop their projects they examine key ideas and details from texts, use texts to craft definitions of key concepts and themes through close examination of language used by the authors of the core texts read, examine choices made in film adaptations of literature and how these choices affect the overall meaning of the texts, and embed their learning into final products that take key details and structure into account as they compose their final drafts. 

The Foundation Unit provides data for teachers to make decisions about the support necessary in future development units and whether students might need additional guidance or differentiation. The scaffolding for students is consistent to support students in grade-level proficiency by the end of the year and to support comprehension of grade appropriate complex texts. By the end of the year, analysis of key ideas, details, craft, and structure are embedded into student tasks and routines.

Materials require students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft, and structure within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently-sequenced, high-quality questions and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • For most texts, students analyze key ideas and details and craft and structure (according to grade-level standards).

    • The materials contain coherently sequenced questions and tasks that address key ideas and details.

      • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be An American?, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read and discuss the Preamble of the Constitution and the 14th Amendment to answer questions on key ideas and details from the text. As students read the Preamble of the Constitution, they answer the following questions: 

        • “Who are ‘we’?

        • Who do you think would have been included in ‘we’ in 1776?

        • Who is ‘we’ now?”

        Students examine the 14th Amendment by answering questions such as: 

        • “According to Section 1 of the 14th Amendment, who is a citizen of the United States?”

        These questions focus on central ideas found in the text and students make inferences based on what they read. 

      In Section 2, Lesson 4, students read and annotate “What Makes an American” by Raoul de Roussy de Sales. Students analyze key ideas and details using the Attending to Details Tool to examine the texts for specific ideas and details that help them answer the Central Question: “What does it mean to be an American?” Students cite evidence and develop claims using the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool. Later in the lesson, students apply these skills to analyze their independent reading texts.

    • In The Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students focus on the question: “How do perceptions, illusions, and dreams influence our lives?” The unit supports the common theme and exploration of the American Dream with cross-cultural and multi-genre texts to prepare students for the culminating task of a literary analysis essay about human illusions and the American Dream.

      In Section 1, Lesson 3, students begin to analyze and discuss characterization and dialogue from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Examples of questions for consideration include:

      • “What features of Daisy captivate Nick the most? Why?

      • How would you describe Daisy’s relationship with her daughter?”

      In Section 2, Lesson 4, students interpret important developments and relationships among the characters in Chapter 4. To guide their annotation, students answer questions such as: 

      • “What do we learn about Gatsby and his relationship with Daisy in this section?”

      In Section 2, Lesson 6, students read “I, Too” by Langston Hughes. After analyzing the theme of the poem and the language on a phrase by phrase level, including asking “Is the ‘darker brother’ the poet himself, or someone else?”  Students answer:

      • “How does the perspective of the voice in the poem compare to Nick’s perspective in The Great Gatsby?

      • How does the tone of the poem’s language compare to the tone of Nick’s descriptions?”

      In Section 3, Lesson 2, students consider the following prompt:

      • “Analyze character relationships: What do we learn about the characters and their perceptions, interactions, and conflicts?”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 3, Lesson 1, students connect sources they have collected to their inquiry path using the Potential Sources and Research Note-Taking Tools. Students use these tools to identify the relevance of the resource to their topic by examining key ideas from the text and cite strong evidence to support their inquiry process. 

  • The materials contain coherently sequenced questions and tasks that address craft and structure.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 2, Lesson 1, students analyze how the author’s craft and structure contribute to the meaning of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students answer a series of text-specific questions that focus on craft and structure elements of Chapter 5, including how the author’s specific word choice and description of varying characters’ perspectives contribute to the meaning and tone of the text. 

      In Section 4, Lesson 1, students read and discuss the beginning of Chapter 11 from Friday Night Lights to explore key ideas presented in the text surrounding the concept of values. Students answer questions that focus on how this concept is presented in the craft and structure of the text:

      • “Reread the fourth paragraph on the first page of Chapter 11. Discuss Bissinger’s description of Odessa and Midland. Why is this description so impactful? What language does he use to make it impactful?

      • Why does the author begin Part 2 of Chapter 11 with the anecdotes he uses? What purpose does this have in his writing?

      • On page 236, Bissinger states that people like Giebel want to ‘build an empire, a lasting monument.’ Why are these phrases important? What do they say about the citizens? Why does he use the terms empire and monument?”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 2, students utilize a Structure Note-Taking Tool while reading The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. Students work in pairs or trios to deepen their understanding and to answer questions, such as:

      • “How does the organization of the ideas and information in this section enhance my understanding of the text?”

      In Section 2, students read a series of poems by Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, and Claude Mckay, authors referenced and included in the anchor text, The Warmth of Other Suns, to prepare to answer the guiding question for Section 2: “What is the relationship between the end of slavery and the Great Migration?” To support their capacity to answer this question, in the preceding lessons students develop an understanding of both the end of slavery and the Great Migration. Students also use the Attending to Details Tool to explore the poems, noting words, phrases, and sentences that frame their thinking.

      In Section 3, Lesson 3, students continue to track Wilkerson’s structure and sources in Part 3 using the same tool. Students answer questions to establish understanding and deepen understanding. 

      In Section 5, Lesson 2, students revisit the Structure Note-Taking Tool during Part 5 and the Epilogue. Students document their thinking throughout the unit to develop their understanding and to prepare for the Culminating Task to “Choose one of these threads [Wilkerson utilizes to weave together her telling of the history of the Great Migration] and write an essay in which you explain how the thread impacts Wilkerson's account of the Great Migration and what would be lost in her examination if that thread were removed. Be sure to support your claims with relevant textual evidence.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 3, Lesson 1, students watch the opening sequences from Rushmore and The Hate You Give and analyze the filmmakers' storytelling choices. For example, students explore the films using the concept presented by screenwriter Neil Landau: “Make setting a character.” Students examine Rushmore and The You Give and how setting influences the mood and atmosphere of the films. 

  • By the end of the year, these components (language, word choice, key ideas, details, structure, craft) are embedded in students’ work rather than taught directly.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students complete a culminating activity to create a five-page “pitch-packet” of a film they imagine creating that focuses on the details and style of the film and address questions, such as “How will you use filmmaking and storytelling techniques to create a film that brings your ideas and vision to life?” In Section 5, Lesson 5, students put this final pitch together using the Filmmaking Glossary, which emphasizes details, craft, and structure of a film, such as point of view, exposition, subplots, and subtext. Students use these concepts in the glossary to compose their final draft of their pitch packet. 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 7, students utilize the Attending to Details Tool to note key details as they read Chapter 5: “Detached Houses: The Dream of Home Ownership,” an excerpt from The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea that Shaped a Nation by Jim Cullen. Examples of questions students respond to include:

      • “What details does the author present to explain why his parents chose to move from the city to the suburbs?

      • What details does the author present to explain why he feels a sense of shame about his upbringing in the suburbs?”

      In Section 2, Lesson 1, students read and form claims about the article “Legacy of the Great Migration” by Isabel Wilkerson. Students note and analyze key details using a copy of the Attending to Details Tools to form an evidence-based observation and to discuss the question: “How has the Wilkerson article expanded or challenged your understanding of the Great Migration?”

      In Section 5, students complete a culminating task that “respond[s] to a complex ethical question by researching information, identifying perspectives, delineating arguments, developing a personal perspective and position, and writing an evidence-based argument.” By this point in the unit, students are familiar with the evaluation process and were guided in preparing their research and returning to guiding questions encountered in the unit. Students follow a Culminating Task Checklist and rubric to support their planning, pacing, and accountability to embed the required components within their work to demonstrate mastery of unit skills and standards.

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research, students apply the skills they have learned about analyzing language, word choice, key ideas, details, structure, and craft to complete a research assignment. Direct instruction is not provided because students are expected to apply the knowledge they have gained from previous lessons; rather, each component is embedded throughout the tasks and guiding questions students use to prepare their research presentations. Students use the Research Note-Taking Tool to analyze potential texts for their research; a column titled “Notes” requires students to note key ideas and details from the texts and discuss how they relate to the central ideas for their research.

Indicator 2c

Materials require students to analyze the integration of knowledge within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high-quality text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2c. 

The Grade 11 materials include questions and tasks to support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas via sets of coherently sequenced higher-order questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, knowledge, and ideas within a text or texts to make meaning and to build an understanding of a text or a topic.

Throughout the year, students read a variety of selections for analysis and annotation while investigating a topic. The sequences of text-specific and/or text-dependent questions support students in their ability to analyze across multiple texts and within single texts. The materials juxtapose texts strategically to build student knowledge around a common topic or theme. Lessons build to a unit culminating task or project through which students demonstrate understanding of the core body of knowledge and skills built into the unit. By the end of the year, integrating knowledge and ideas is embedded in student work. 

Materials require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently-sequenced, high-quality, text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Most sets of questions and tasks support students’ analysis of knowledge.

    • Sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze within single texts.

      • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American, Section 2, Lesson 2, students select a common seed text from the Foundation Unit Pathway Text and determine the perspective, credibility, and relevance using the Evaluating Ideas Tool. Students respond to questions such as:

        • “What are the author’s central ideas or views?

        • How do the author’s language choices indicate his or her perspective?

        • What does the author of the text leave uncertain or unstated? Why?

        • How does this text help my understanding of what it means to be an American?”

      • In The Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students focus on the question: How do perceptions, illusions, and dreams influence our lives? The unit supports the common theme and exploration of the American Dream with cross-cultural and multi-genre texts to prepare students for the Culminating Task, a literary analysis essay about human illusions and the American Dream.

        • In Section 3, Lesson 1, students analyze key scenes from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. At this point in the unit, students are prepared to examine how the author develops the conflicts, tension, suspense, and thematic threads that lead to the climactic events of the novel. As students read and analyze the text, they consider a series of Scene Analysis Questions, including:

          • “Examine the narrative point of view: How is the scene presented, and how do its narrator’s perceptions and descriptions influence your reading?

          • Evaluate effects: How do description, imagery, symbolism, or dialogue contribute to the mood, atmosphere, and meaning of the scene?

          • Interpret meaning: What theme or themes of the novel does the scene develop? What do you think Fitzgerald is suggesting?”

        • In Section 4, Lesson 1, students listen to Ari Shapiro’s podcast “American Dream faces Harsh New Reality” and respond to the prompt: Shapiro references The Great Gatsby and its early representation of a form of the American Dream—six years before James Adam coined the term. What other connections between the ideas of the podcast and the themes of the novel do you see? What do you think the novel says about the American Dream through its depiction of Gatsby and his dreams?

    • Sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze across multiple texts.

      • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students complete a culminating activity where they look at the text Friday Night Lights, by H. G. Bissinger, through a cultural lens. Students analyze a series of texts representing social issues, such as fandom, race, gender, and values.

        • In Section 2, Lesson 3, students read “Unchecked, Unchallenged, and Unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?” by Ivey DeJesus, and answer a series of text-specific questions such as: 

          • “The author states,’Under the proverbial Friday night lights that shape so much of a young person’s high school experience, racism seems to be courting a foothold on the field and court—unchecked, unchallenged and unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?’ This seems to be the author’s main claim, or her thesis statement. How does this statement relate to what we have read in Friday Night Lights?”

Both the question and task are examples of students analyzing multiple texts within the unit as they read the text on racism in high school sports and connect ideas presented to Friday Night Lights.

  • In Section 3, Lesson 5, students complete the Section Diagnostic in which they answer the following questions to analyze multiple texts:

    • “How does Bissinger portray the impact of gender on the students and athletic culture of Permian High?

    • How does Bissinger’s perspective compare to those of the authors of the other section texts?”

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 2, students listen to a reading of “The Migration of Negroes” by W.E.B. Du Bois and consider the Question Set in relation to this text. Students analyze the following quote from the text: “There is a silent influence operating in the hearts of the growing class of intelligent Negroes that the insurmountable barriers of caste unnecessarily fetter the opportunities to which every living soul is entitled, namely, a fair chance to earn an honest living and educate his children and be protected by the laws,” by unpacking any unfamiliar language before answering the prompt:

    • “How do the speaker’s choice of words and the sentence structure of this quotation help to convey his point of view about the situation faced by so many in the South?”

Student knowledge acquired through the analysis of “The Migration of Negroes” and subsequent questions develop students’ understanding of the key ideas and details in The Warmth of Other Suns.

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read a series of reviews on the film Hidden Figures and complete a jig-saw activity to analyze the reviews and complete the Understanding a Movie Tool. 

In Section 4, Lesson 3, students read texts to build knowledge and understanding of “the new lives waiting for and experienced by those who left the South in hopes of a better quality of life.” As students track Isabel Wilkerson’s structure and sources in The Warmth of Other Suns, students respond to a series of questions to deepen understanding such as:

  • “What stylistic elements stand out in this section of the text?

  • How does the style enhance my understanding?” 

Students continue the lesson by reading and analyzing the newspaper articles, “Where We Are Lacking” and “Penalties of Migration” answering discussion questions connecting to the migration experience such as:

  • “How did life in the North and West compare to life in the South for the migrants?

  • How did reality compare with the fantasy of a new life? What were the impacts and effects of the single decision to migrate?”

  • By the end of the year, integrating knowledge is embedded in students’ work.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 5, Lesson 4, students integrate knowledge from the texts they have read in the unit to create their own movie. To support student planning, students complete the Understanding a Movie Tool with embedded instruction on integrating knowledge; for example, students use what they have learned about how an author conveys mood to explain how they will create the mood of their movies.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 4, students study data infographics for American cities that indicate continuing racial segregation patterns. Students develop claims about the patterns and consider these while reading, analyzing, and delineating the argument in Vice President Mondale’s 2018 op-ed essay “The Civil Rights Law We Ignored.” Students utilize the Delineating Arguments Tool as they respond to a series of questions, including:

      • “Given his background and the ideas he presents, what seems to be Vice President Mondale’s perspective in this essay?

      • What information and claims about the past and recent history of the Fair Housing Act are presented by Mondale in support of his contention that it has been ignored?”

    • Student tasks and close analyses of texts around the Central Question “How viable is the American dream of homeownership?” prepare students to demonstrate their “knowledge and perspective with a culminating argumentative essay addressing an aspect of a specific issue surrounding homeownership.”

      • In Section 5, students complete the Culminating Task to “develop a perspective and argumentative position in response to a complex issue about homeownership in the United States...supported by a series of evidence-based claims, including at least one counterargument to an opposing perspective or position.” By the end of the year, the students choose and prepare their own topic of study, returning to guiding questions encountered in the Foundation Unit and throughout the Development Units. Students follow a Culminating Task Checklist and rubric to support their planning, pacing, and accountability to embed the required components within their work to demonstrate mastery of unit skills and standards.

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students complete a culminating task where they complete an interest-based research project. The task asks students to do the following:

    • “Share your Central Research Question and tell the story of why you became interested in the question and how you arrived at your current understanding of your research topic.

    • Present a clear, engaging narrative of your research process, communicating the evolution of your critical thinking and learning, reflecting on the challenges and successes you experienced, and citing evidence from a wide range of perspectives to help your audience understand the context and conclusions of your work.

    • Tailor your final presentation to your audience, using auditory, visual, and digital aids, as well as public-speaking techniques that will keep them engaged.

    • Respond to questions from your audience respectfully and knowledgeably by citing your sources and expressing your conclusions.”

Students integrate their analysis of single and multiple texts throughout the unit using tools such as the Research Evaluation Checklist to analyze the credibility of sources along with the relevance of the information presented for their selected inquiry pathway.

Indicator 2d

Culminating tasks require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a unit's topic(s)/theme(s) through integrated literacy skills (e.g., a combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2d. 

The Grade 11 materials include multimodal and summative unit Culminating Tasks that provide various ways for students to communicate their understanding to smaller peer groups and to the larger learning community. Unit Culminating Tasks are varied and include the following: Narrative Essay/Group Presentation; Fictional, Personal, or Historical Narrative; Literary Analysis; Explanatory Essays; Argumentative Essay; and Portfolio/Group Presentation. Session Diagnostics at the end of each unit section provide formative opportunities to assess student readiness of the discrete skills required to complete each Culminating Task. According to the Program Guide: “Written diagnostics tasks span a range of task types, including literary analysis, argument, narrative, and expository. Oral diagnostics may be tasks done by an individual (e.g., participation in a Socratic Seminar) or in groups (e.g., presentation of an analysis with teammates).”

Culminating tasks require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a unit’s topic/theme through integrated literacy skills. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Culminating tasks are evident across a year’s worth of material and they are multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level. Culminating tasks are varied across the year and provide students the opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics through integrated skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening).

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, students complete the Culminating Task, a presentation and reflection incorporating speaking, listening, reading and writing skills to address the Central Question:  “What Does It Mean to Be an American?” and to share their team’s inquiry questions, investigative findings, claims, and specific textual evidence. Over the course of the unit, students develop their findings and claims, state important aspects of their research process, and submit possible questions for additional investigation. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 9, students participate in a formal fishbowl discussion for the Section Diagnostic. Student-facing materials in the Lesson Overview of Section 4 direct students as follows:

      • “We will communicate an evidence-based claim that takes a position about one of the two characters and his significance in the novel.”

This task requires students to demonstrate mastery of several standards, including developing strong claims and counterclaims, establishing and maintaining a formal style, using precise and academic language, using strong evidence from the text to support inferences, and demonstrating an understanding of literary elements, devices, and terminology. 

  • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, students utilize reading and writing skills to complete the Section 3 Diagnostic, a written response based on their understanding of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger and other Section 3 texts that answers the questions:

    • “How does Bissinger portray the impact of gender on the students and athletic culture of Permian High? 

    • How does Bissinger’s perspective compare to those of the authors of the other section texts?”

The Culminating Task Connections notes on the Section 3 Diagnostic read:

  • “This prepares students to analyze how the issues of gender in high school sports impact the student-athletes’ perspectives on American society. The comparison of two issues prepares students to think about a topic critically.

  • Students also demonstrate their ability to respond in writing to questions about the text. This prepares students to explain how high school sports reflect American society.”

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section Diagnostics provide opportunities for students to engage in class discussions, formal presentations, and writing responses in preparation for the unit Culminating Task, an explanatory essay addressing the Central Question: “How do we construct the story of a complicated history?” In Section 2, Lesson 6, for example, students engage in the Section Diagnostic, a class discussion addressing the questions:

    • “What is the relationship between the end of slavery and the Great Migration?

    • What were the most significant factors that impacted the lives of African Americans in the South between 1915 and 1975?

    • Which of these weighed most heavily on Ida’s, George’s, and Robert’s decisions to leave the South?

    • How do the texts from this section enhance our understanding of the decision to migrate?”

In Section 3, Lesson 7, students complete the Section 3 Diagnostic, a formal presentation that explains which panel of Lawrence’s The Migration Series best represents and connects to the history Wilkerson constructs in her text. To complete this task, students demonstrate knowledge by integrating reading, writing, and speaking skills and by using their textual analysis to support and deliver their presentations.

In Section 4, Lesson 7, students complete the Section Diagnostic, a written response that focuses on one of the characters from The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and addresses the prompt:

  • “How was the person’s life affected, altered, or impacted as a result of the decision to migrate?

  • Write a response identifying the individual, and explain how the person’s life changed because of the decision to migrate.”

Over the course of the unit, students examine the “threads” Wilkerson utilizes to weave together her telling of the history of the Great Migration in the text, The Warmth of Other Suns, including: push and pull factors, the legacy of slavery, the impact of a single decision on the trajectory of life experiences, and the long-term effects of decisions to leave the South. To complete the unit Culminating Task, student-facing materials direct students as follows:

  • “Choose one of these threads and write an essay in which you explain how the thread impacts Wilkerson's account of the Great Migration and what would be lost in her examination if that thread were removed.”

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 9, students complete the Section Diagnostic, a movie analysis comparing the levels of realism between Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite and a more fictionalized movie. In the Section 3 Diagnostic, students complete an evaluation of a movie, including a 3-5 minute oral review. These tasks prepare students for the Culminating Task, a film proposal in which students develop an idea for their own original feature film and create a “pitch packet.” The various tasks provide students with multiple opportunities to demonstrate understanding of the texts and unit theme via reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills.

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 5, students work towards the Culminating Task, an argumentative essay addressing the unit Central Question: “How viable is the American dream of homeownership?” Students-facing materials provide a set of standards-based requirements for completing this task, specifically:

    • “Develop a clear position supported by a series of evidence-based claims.

    • Include at least one counterargument refuting an opposing position.

    • Support your claims with evidence from multiple credible sources and include proper citations.

    • Organize your claims and evidence into a well-reasoned argument for a specific audience and purpose.

    • Use effective diction, syntax, and tone.”

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 5, Lesson 1, students work with their research groups to develop an action plan to address the Culminating Task, a presentation to their learning communities that addresses a group-developed inquiry question. Students collaborate in teams to develop and deliver a presentation of their findings to their learning community. Students use the Culminating Task Checklist to assist their completion of the task, which includes the following categories for assessment: Reading & Knowledge Goals, Writing Goals, and Speaking & Listening Goals. Students complete the checklist by answering prompts, such as: “How well does our presentation use visual media and technological tools in an effective way, building the audience’s interest and illuminating our findings?” 

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 1, Lesson 7, students submit the team’s research materials for the completion of their Diagnostic Task. This allows for the teacher to give direct feedback after assessing the student’s preparedness to complete the Culminating Task. For this diagnostic task, students employ speaking and listening skills in group research, reading skills in the assessment of sources for their research, and writing skills in the submission of their ideas on their research.

  • Earlier text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks are coherently sequenced and will give the teacher usable information about the student's readiness (or whether they are “on track”) to complete culminating tasks.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read and annotate “The Preamble of the United States Constitution” and “The 14th Amendment” by the United States Congress. The student-facing materials provide a coherent series of questions including:

      • “Who are ‘we’?

      • Who do you think would have been included in ‘we’ in 1776?

      • Who is ‘we’ now?

      • What do you know about the Civil War and Reconstruction?

      • According to Section 1 of the 14th Amendment, who is a citizen of the United States?”

The various readings and lessons students complete provide questions for consideration that will prepare students for the Culminating Task, an oral address in which they collaboratively research, create, and deliver a presentation about American identity area and write an individual reflection on their research process. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition share, “It is important for students to recognize that the concept of ‘we’ has changed since the inception of the Constitution.” Teachers can use these opportunities to inform instructional decisions and assess student understanding of the texts throughout the unit.

  • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students complete the Culminating Task, a multi paragraph literary analysis and critical argument that states an interpretive position and supports the response with text-based claims. Students have the option of answering one of the following prompts:

    • “What does The Great Gatsby ultimately suggest about human perception, illusions, and dreams—and potentially about the American Dream?

    • As a narrator, is Nick Carraway the novel’s ‘most important character’ (Mellard), a judgmental ‘snob’ (Donaldson), or an ‘unreliable’ voice (Boyle)? What is your own reading of Nick’s character and role in the novel?”

Students prepare for this Culminating Task throughout the lessons and activities within the unit, and teachers have the opportunity to assess students’ readiness for the task ahead. In Section 2, Lesson 8, for example, students practice literary analysis in the Section Diagnostic as they write a one-paragraph analysis addressing a series of questions, such as:

  • “How does Fitzgerald describe and contrast characters, settings, and scenes in Chapters 2–4? Analyze a set of contrasting characters or settings and scenes to explain the impact on your reading and your understanding of the novel.”

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 4, Lesson 1, students read the article “Flick Chicks: A guide to Women in the Movies." by Mindy Kaling and answer the following questions:

    • “In what ways is Kaling’s character type an example of a caricature, a stereotype, or a trope?

    • Thinking about the problems with movie stereotypes, how do you feel about the portrayals of women that Kaling satirizes?”

Students respond by completing a short-write in their Learning Logs, which provides teachers the opportunity to monitor student preparedness for the Section Diagnostic during which students “Write, and be prepared to read dramatically, a detailed character sketch of your movie’s protagonist, including his or her relationship to the antagonist in the movie.” The activity prepares students for this diagnostic task by helping students avoid writing their female characters as stereotypes, caricatures, and tropes. Writing and developing these characters also support student readiness for the unit Culminating Task to develop an idea for an original feature film and create a five-page "pitch packet." 

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 5, Lesson 1, students begin the unit Culminating Task, an argument that addresses the question: How viable is the American dream of homeownership? Student-facing materials prompt students as follows:

    • “Based on the texts you have read in this unit and your own research, write an argumentative essay that establishes and supports a position in response to a current issue related to homeownership.”

In earlier sections of the unit, students prepare for the Culminating Task by completing formal and informal writing tasks in response to coherently sequenced guiding questions and prompts. In Section 1, Lesson 1, for example, the student-facing materials outline the following information to prepare students in advance of the unit theme and Culminating Task:

  • “We will begin our examination of homeownership and the American Dream by considering the following question: Why has homeownership been considered part of the American Dream? We will see how the mythology of owning a home has been built through songs such as ‘Home, Sweet Home,’ written in 1823, and learn about the post–World War II building boom that made owning a home accessible to many, but not all, Americans.”

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2e. 

The Grade 11 materials provide writing tasks across the grade level that increase in complexity. The program’s design provides practice through Section Diagnostics to allow teachers to monitor student progress of grade appropriate writing activities and to prepare students for completing the unit summative tasks. The program also offers a final Application Unit as a capstone in which students can follow a self-selected topic of inquiry and apply writing skills they acquire and practice throughout the year. The student-facing materials include guidance as students complete writing tasks, and the teacher-facing materials provide additional support for scaffolding, including opportunities for modeling and using exemplar or model texts students read during the unit. A Literacy Toolbox includes Reference Guides and Tools to support student writing tasks. These tools are incorporated purposefully throughout the course materials.

Students encounter a Culminating Task at the beginning of each unit and perform a series of formal and informal writing activities addressing grade-level standards to build their knowledge and writing skills over the course of each unit. The materials provide students a wide range of writing tasks, including short-response questions, guiding questions, and formative writing opportunities throughout the year. Writing tasks vary in length and purpose and help students to develop their analytical, argumentative, informational, and narrative writing skills. The lessons provide a cohesive design so that students apply and expand the skills they learn from previous lessons to perform on later lessons throughout the units. Culminating tasks walk students through each stage of the writing process and allow students to monitor their progress with rubrics, checklists, and graphic organizers. Writing instruction and assignments scale up in difficulty throughout the year. Writing instruction supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the year.

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Materials include writing instruction that aligns to the standards for the grade level and supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students complete the Culminating Task, an expository essay addressing the prompt, “How does Bissinger portray high school athletic culture at Permian High School?” Writing guidelines direct students to:

      • “Write an expository essay in which you state your response and logically and sufficiently support your response with claims. Support your claims with relevant textual evidence, including direct quotations with parenthetical citations. Apply correct and effective words, phrases, syntax, usage, and mechanics to clearly communicate your analysis.”

Unit lessons and activities are designed to support student development of writing skills.

  • In Section 1, Lesson 3, for example, students answer the Section 1 Question Set of text-dependent prompts, including:

    • “Why does Bissinger make the statement about political parties on page 42, Paragraph 3?

    • What is his perspective on the political leanings of Odessa?

    • How do you know?” 

In Section 1, Lesson 7, students write an expository response to demonstrate their understanding of the first four chapters of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. For this writing assignment, students analyze the text and respond in writing to prepare them for further writing throughout the unit and across the school year.

In Section 5, Lesson 1, students use the Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool to answer framing questions such as, “How do the lessons student athletes learn about values impact their perspective of American society?” 

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, after reading The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and other related texts, students complete the Culminating Task, an essay to “explain how the thread impacts Wilkerson's account of the Great Migration and what would be lost in her examination if that thread were removed.” Students practice developing their writing through Section Diagnostics with the unit.

In Section 1, Lesson 8, for example, students complete the Section Diagnostic in which they write a response to the following questions:

  • “What do you notice about Wilkerson’s choices regarding sources, organization, and structure?

  • How do those choices help her achieve her purpose and convey her perspective on the subjects she writes about?”

Lesson Goals for this activity include writing standards that require students to:

  • “Form Claims: How well do I develop and clearly communicate meaningful and defensible claims that represent valid, evidence-based analysis?

  • Develop Ideas: How well do I use devices, techniques, descriptions, reasoning, evidence, and visual elements to support and elaborate on coherent and logical narratives, explanations, and arguments?

  • Gather and Organize Evidence: How well do I gather and organize relevant and sufficient evidence in order to demonstrate understanding of texts and topics, support claims, and develop ideas?

  • Use Conventions to Produce Clear Writing: How well do I apply correct and effective syntax, usage, mechanics, and spelling to communicate ideas and achieve intended purposes?”

In Section 2, Lesson 6, students compose a quick-write in response to guiding questions, such as: “How do the texts from this section enhance our understanding of the decision to migrate?” The student-facing materials prompt students to use the Sources Note-Taking Tool and Vocabulary Journal from the previous lesson. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition offer additional guidance to support students, including:

  • “It is important that students receive your feedback on their Section Diagnostic performance as soon as possible. Providing timely academic feedback is crucial to students’ literacy development and understanding of their own proficiency.”

Throughout the unit, the writing tasks align to the standards for the grade level, provide opportunities for teachers to assess student readiness, help students to achieve proficiency with the Culminating Task, and support students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year.

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students complete the Culminating Task during which they develop an argumentative position addressing the unit Central Question, “How viable is the American Dream of Homeownership?” Students develop their writing throughout the unit through a series of informal and formal writing opportunities and use a series of data, information, and examples from the materials to compose an argumentative thesis.

In Section 1, Lesson 10, for example, students write expository paragraphs in response to what current research data suggests about homeownership. The student-facing materials prompt students to use materials they have already created in preparation of the diagnostic assessment, including the Vocabulary Journal and Mentor Sentence Journal, as follows: “Identify a significant word or words and at least one sentence writing technique that you would like to use in your response to the Section Diagnostic.” 

The materials indicate that the teacher will review drafts to assess student understanding and skills at this point in the unit. The activities also include an opportunity for students to reflect on their work and self-assess their skill readiness.

In Section 2, Lesson 4, students consider their own positions on fair housing and desegregation based on texts read in the section and compose “a paragraph that presents and explains your perspective and position. Include references to texts or websites we have examined.” 

In Section 4, Lesson 3, students compose a synopsis of their argument using the following set of guidelines:

  • “Specifically explain the issue, subtopic, and question you will focus on, your purpose for writing the argument, and the audience you are intending to address.

  • Clearly communicate and explain the argument’s central position and each of its supporting claims, including at least one counterclaim.

  • Overview the reasoning and organizational plan you intend to use to present the argument.

  • Overview and explain how you will use evidence to develop the argument, identifying the main sources you intend to cite.”

These formal and informal activities are cohesively sequenced to help students prepare for the unit Culminating Task by allowing them to develop and refine their argumentative thesis. 

  • Instructional materials include a variety of well-designed guidance, protocols, models, and support for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students complete the Culminating Task, “a multi-paragraph literary analysis and critical argument in which you state your interpretive position, and logically and sufficiently support your response with text-based claims.” Throughout the unit, the writing tasks provide opportunities for teachers to assess student readiness and support them to achieve proficiency with the Culminating Task.

In Section 2, Lesson 1, for example, students examine a mentor sentence from Chapter 2 from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, analyzing how structure and use of literary devices contribute to the novel’s meaning. The student-facing materials guide students through the process and support them to perform tasks independently via prompts, such as:

  • “Explain the final image and phrase: ‘men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air.’”

Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include additional instructions to share with students, such as

  • “Remind students to keep a collection of mentor sentences in their Mentor Sentence Journal, so they have a robust writer’s toolbox to consult for their responses on their Section Diagnostic and Culminating Tasks.”

In Section 2, Lesson 2, teachers model text analysis using the Character Note-Taking Tool and Analyzing Relationships Tool in which students identify detail about characters and locate supporting evidence. Students then use these tools to “Identify key details about Myrtle that contrast with Daisy, and use a Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool to make a claim about Myrtle and how she presents a counterpoint to Daisy in the novel.” To help students develop their writing throughout the unit, teachers use a collection of guides and tools to support student practice of the analysis required for the unit Culminating Task.

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 8, students “write a multi-paragraph synopsis of the movie we independently watched and analyzed that provides background information about the movie, summarizes its storyline and its central characters’ story arcs, and analyzes its use of filmmaking techniques, its overall style, and the filmmakers’ message.” The Teacher Edition provides support for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development by providing guidance such as:

    • “Work together as a class to make one or more revisions to the weak model based on the answers to the questions. Review the revised model and ask students to explain how the revisions improve the support and development of ideas.”

Indicator 2f

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2f. 

Grade 11 materials build skills throughout the year, including opportunities for collaborative research, evaluating sources, synthesis and analysis of texts, and applying those skills in a unit-long research project as a capstone for the course. The Program Guide provides details relating to active learning through inquiry: “In the Foundation and Application units, students investigate a topic through recursive and iterative cycles of inquiry in which they work in learning communities to explore significant issues and topics, refine research questions, find and assess sources for relevance and credibility, and present their research in various forms.” Students compile comprehensive research on specific questions during the final Application Unit and present their findings to their learning community. The student-determined text set during the final unit provides students with an opportunity to explore topics they have been learning more deeply and demonstrate the research skills they acquire.

The materials reviewed for this grade level include a progression of research skills according to the grade level standards by providing various opportunities for students to engage in online research and discussion of unit topics and to cite evidence from multiple sources in the Lesson Activities, Section Diagnostics, Culminating Tasks, and Independent Reading Presentations. Students also have the opportunity to synthesize work and analyze content through a variety of tools provided in the materials and are given opportunities to complete research projects of varying lengths. Materials sequence research projects throughout the year to help students progress in their research skills. At the beginning of the year, students begin to practice working in groups in the Foundation Unit with focused guidance from the instructor, and during the Application Unit at the end of the year students work collaboratively in self-directed teams with the instructor acting as coach or facilitator. Materials support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge of different aspects of a topic. The materials provide guidance and support to teachers, including but not limited to, questions to prompt student thinking, graphic organizers to assist students, and an option for teachers to provide various scaffolds for students.

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Research projects are sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills according to grade-level standards. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 4, students explore the question, “How do perceptions, illusions, and dreams influence our lives?” Students deepen their knowledge and skills to read and analyze texts through guiding questions and close examination of the text, “The Trouble With Nick: Reading Gatsby Closely,” an excerpt from Fitzgerald and Hemingway: Works and Days by Scott Donaldson. The student-facing materials prompt students to consider the following questions:

      • “What is a new claim the author makes to further develop his analysis of Nick as a snob?

      • What evidence from the text does Donaldson cite to support his claim?”

  • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 7, students engage in a progression of research skills. For this lesson, students use their notes to answer the question, “How do the fans in Odessa impact the players of the Permian football team?” Subsequently, in Section 3, Lesson 5, students use their research to answer two questions that represent a progression from the question in Section 1: “How does Bissinger portray the impact of gender on the students and athletic culture of Permian High? How does Bissinger’s perspective compare to those of the authors of the other section texts?”

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, in the Culminating Task in Section 6, students gather ideas and information from multiple resources to write a response to the prompt:

    • “How do we construct the story of a complicated history? Wilkerson utilizes a number of threads to weave together her telling of the history of the Great Migration. Choose one of these threads and write an essay in which you explain how the thread impacts Wilkerson's account of the Great Migration and what would be lost in her examination if that thread were removed. Be sure to support your claims with relevant textual evidence.”

Students utilize a graphic organizer in their planning, adding thoughts on the thesis, the main idea in evidence from a variety of sources, and concluding thoughts. Lessons within the unit provide students with a wealth of information on The Great Migration to pull from in order to complete this writing task. 

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students use the Grade 11: Application Unit Potential Topics Tool they have been developing throughout the entire year to reach consensus on ideas to explore in their research teams. In Section 1, Lesson 1, students review the Application Unit Potential Topics Tool and answer the following questions:

    • “What topic, angle, or text from this unit interested you most? Why?

    • What questions do you have about this topic that remain unanswered?

    • What topic, angle, or text from this unit do you want to explore further?

    • Are there any books, articles, websites, or movies about this topic that you would like to read, watch, or explore more? If so, list them here.

    • Are there any sites you would like to visit or people you would like to interview to help you learn more about this topic? If so, list them here.

    • What are some of your most interesting insights about this topic?”

  • Materials support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge of different aspects of a topic via provided resources. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 2, students examine texts they wish to use in their research pathways and record their research notes as a group. The Teacher Edition Teaching Notes suggest:

      • “In order to give adequate feedback early on in the research process, be aware of each team’s individual note-taking system so that you can catch any misconceptions, leave constructive criticism, and provide positive reinforcement.”

Students use the Foundation Unit Pathway Texts to develop their pathway inquiry questions. As students read the first text they select, they answer:

  • “What are the author’s central ideas in this text?

  • What details support those ideas?

  • How does this text help my understanding of what it means to be an American?”

When students select their second resource, they complete the Evaluating Ideas Tool using the following questions as a guide:

  • “What are the author’s central ideas or views?

  • How do the author’s language choices indicate his or her perspective?

  • What does the author of the text leave uncertain or unstated? Why?”

  • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 5, Lesson 8, students engage in a sustained recursive inquiry process as they conduct research to complete the Culminating Task, a multi-paragraph literary analysis and critical argument that states an interpretive position, and logically and sufficiently supports the response with text-based claims. The instructional materials provide a Culminating Task Progress Tracker to help students develop research and note-taking skills, reflect on what they have studied, and consider potential inquiry questions for the final Application Unit. Teachers may use the Culminating Task Progress Tracker to conference with students and guide their questions when monitoring readiness both for The Great Gatsby unit Culminating Task and in the initial planning stage of the Application Unit end of year research project.  

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 6, Lesson 6, students collaborate in groups to discuss their understanding of the novel, including thematic connections to other units of study and possible questions and ideas to explore for the longer Application Unit research task at the end of the year. The materials also provide an Application Unit Potential Topics Tool for students to capture their reflections, and the teacher materials provide questions and prompts for teachers to support students, such as: 

    • “What about each text or topic do you still want to study? What questions do you still have? Write these down in the Questions or Subtopics to Explore column.

    • How would you begin to research each text or topic?”

Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide additional guidance relating to the Tool and the purpose of the project, for example:

  • “It provides a space in which students can capture their reflections about what they found intriguing in a unit and might want to explore further in the Application Unit.

  • It serves as a repository of leads they might research when they arrive at the Application Unit.”

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 4, students examine different aspects of realism present in a movie of their choice to prepare for the Section Diagnostic, an essay that compares the levels of realism between Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite, studied in class, and a more “fictionalized” movie that students watch and analyze independently. Student-facing materials prompt students to “Consider how the filmmakers for both movies use visual techniques, effects, and storytelling choices to make each movie feel realistic or fantastic, true or untrue.” To support students' knowledge and skill development in the completion of these tasks, the instructional materials include a Section 2 Diagnostic Checklist, Filmmaking Glossary, and Understanding a Movie Tool.

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students build an initial research frame by generating and grouping inquiry questions to build inquiry paths that will further guide their investigations. To support students in this process, the materials provide a Research Evaluation Checklist and a Research Frame Tool. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide the following rationale and guidance to support students:

    • “The Research Frame Tool urges students to further refine their inquiry. Framing inquiry through inquiry paths allows students to have a plan for comprehensively exploring a topic. At every step of the investigation, students should go back to their research frame and ask themselves what they have learned, what questions they have answered, and what questions they should investigate next based on the results of their investigation at that point.

    • It is important to make it clear that the research frame is not meant to be static. Questions within the inquiry paths might change, become obsolete, or be replaced by new questions. Entire inquiry paths might need to be abandoned or added as well. Even the framing of the Central Research Question might evolve, as students might revise their angle of investigation.”

  • Materials provide many opportunities for students to synthesize and analyze content tied to the texts under study as a part of the research process. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 10, students use their research skills to synthesize and deepen their understanding of unit content by sharing analyses of their independent reading and the connections to unit texts studied in class. Student-facing materials prompt students as follows:

      • “Review the notes and claims you have already made and use Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools to produce more formal statements that express your analysis. You can also use an Organizing Evidence Tool to note your primary and supporting claims and supporting evidence.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students analyze a film that they select to watch from Part 2 of the Movie Viewing List and the documentary Blackfish by Gabriella Cowperthwaite. In their analysis, students consider the following:

      • “Summarize the storylines and major character arcs for each movie.

      • Analyze the level of realism of each movie, presenting specific examples of techniques and choices used by the filmmakers to develop the atmosphere, mood, and realism of the film.

      • Present, explain, and support evidence-based claims about the style and message of the documentary Blackfish and the movie you viewed independently.

      • Compare the movie you watched independently with the documentary Blackfish, focusing on the realism, believability, style, and apparent messages of the two movies.

      • Present and defend a claim about the technical and storytelling differences between documentary films and more ‘fictionalized’ movies, as exemplified by the two films you watched and analyzed.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 2, students learn how to delineate an argument or informational source by considering its perspective, position, supporting claims, and use of evidence. The student-facing materials prompt students as follows:

      • “Based on your previous discussions, use a copy of the Delineating Arguments Tool to summarize and write down what you have learned about the issue, perspective, and position presented in ‘Why Owning a Home Is the American Dream.’ Consider what the author’s purpose might have been in writing the article and whether there is a controversy or question about the issue that he is addressing.”

Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provides the following additional guidance to teachers:

  • “Students will use this tool throughout the unit to analyze others’ arguments and to plan their own, so modeling and practicing its use at this early state is important.”

The activity connects to students developing skills to draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

In Section 2, Lesson 6, students research and analyze texts to better answer the Culminating Task prompt:

  • “Based on the texts you have read in this unit and your own research, write an argumentative essay that establishes and supports a position in response to a current issue related to homeownership, choosing from one of the subtopics.”

  • Students choose to argue a position on homeownership from four subtopics. Students read a variety of material within the unit on all of the subtopics and then decide which to use as sources for their subtopic and argumentative position, including but not limited to, “Mapping Segregation” by Matthew Bloch, “Redefining the Multifamily Challenge” by Ben Carson, and the optional excerpts from Act 2 of A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry. Students analyze and then synthesize the various sources to answer the prompt and develop their position and support it with evidence-based claims, use at least one counterargument refuting an opposing position, and support their claims with evidence from multiple credible sources. 

  • Students are provided with opportunities for both short and long projects across the course of a year and grade bands.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 3, students work in research teams to establish their understanding of a specific subtopic and generate a set of questions that are related to what it might mean to be an American. To begin investigation, student teams read, analyze, and evaluate common seed texts. This short research activity builds toward the unit Culminating Task, a longer research project in which students collaborate in research teams to create a 5–7 minute presentation about one of the following pathways: culture and American identity; democracy, civic engagement, and American identity; immigration and American identity; race, ethnicity, and American identity; religion and American identity; and war and American identity.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, as part of the unit Culminating Task, students compose an expository essay responding to the central question, “How does Bissinger portray high school athletic culture at Permian High School?” Students examine this question through the themes of fandom, race, gender, and values. To prepare for this longer task, students explore these topics through shorter research opportunities earlier in the unit. In Section 2, Lesson 3, for example, students examine the article “Unchecked, Unchallenged and Unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?” by Ivey DeJesus by answering text-specific questions, such as:

      • “The author states, ‘Under the proverbial Friday night lights that shape so much of a young person’s high school experience, racism seems to be courting a foothold on the field and court—unchecked, unchallenged and unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?’ This seems to be the author’s main claim, or her thesis statement. How does this statement relate to what we have read in Friday Night Lights?”

In Section 3, Lesson 5, students respond to the following questions as part of the Section Diagnostic:

  • “How does Bissinger portray the impact of gender on the students and athletic culture of Permian High?

  • How does Bissinger’s perspective compare to those of the authors of the other section texts?”

These activities allow students to practice researching and analyzing the themes of race and gender and how each relates to Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger in preparation for the unit Culminating Task. 

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 1, Lesson 1, students discuss the importance of a researched perspective and the research process. Students form small research teams and begin developing their research topics. The teacher discusses each phase of the Research Plan and the Research Portfolio Description section. In Section 1, Lesson 2, students begin the first section of a shorter research project using the Exploring a Topic Tool to identify one or two potential Central Research Questions that may lead to valuable questions and problems to explore for the longer research project that will complete the unit and the grade level materials. Students may choose from any of the prior units: What Does It Mean to Be an American?, The Great Gatsby, Friday Night Lights, The Warmth of Other Suns, Telling Stories With Film, and The American Dream of Homeownership and from all of the texts and topics within these units. 

The Application Unit provides students with an opportunity to self-direct their research process, build a research portfolio, and develop a presentation for their learning community that shares their research findings. Tools and Reference Guides students utilize in previous units are available for students in the Literacy Toolbox throughout the unit-long project.

Criterion 2g - 2h

Materials promote mastery of grade-level standards by the end of the year.

6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for coherence. While suggested implementation schedules align to core learning objectives, the provided Model Yearlong Paths cannot reasonably be completed. The suggested number of minutes per lesson, as well as the number of units suggested for the year, do not seem practical for teachers and students to complete. Optional tasks are meaningful and support core learning.

Indicator 2g

Materials spend the majority of instructional time on content that falls within grade-level aligned instruction, practice, and assessments.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 2g. 

The instructional sequence begins with a Foundation Unit, followed by teacher-selected Development Units, and concludes with an Application Unit. Materials include Model Yearlong Paths as suggested guidance. The Foundation Unit serves as the starting point of student-led inquiry; instructional content addresses a large number of the Reading: Informational Text, Writing, Speaking & Listening, and Language standards. The Development Units include opportunities to revisit these standards and also address the Reading: Literature standards. The Application Unit is the recursive conclusion to students’ inquiry, and instructional content revisits the standards addressed in the Foundation Unit. 

As part of the program’s Monitor, Diagnose, Evaluate practice, instruction and assessments are closely linked. Instruction is coherently sequenced, preparing students to respond to standards-aligned, analytical questions and tasks based on the complex texts of study. Questions and tasks are coherently sequenced and prepare students for Section Diagnostics. Each Section Diagnostic builds to the end-of-unit Culminating Task.     

Materials spend the majority of instructional time on content that falls within grade-level aligned instruction, practice, and assessments. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Over the course of each unit, the majority of instruction is aligned to grade-level standards.

    • The CCSS Alignment document illustrates coverage of each standard strand. During all three model pathway options, materials address the majority of Reading: Literature, Reading: Informational Text, Writing, Speaking & Listening, and Language standards. 

  • Over the course of each unit, the majority of questions and tasks are aligned to grade-level standards. 

    • As students closely read and analyze complex text, they respond to standards-aligned, text-based questions. Questions and tasks require students to cite textual evidence and draw upon the text to infer what is not explicitly stated. Questions and tasks build to and prepare students for the Section Diagnostic and end-of-unit Culminating Task.  

  • Over the course of each unit, the majority of assessment questions are aligned to grade-level standards. 

    • Section Diagnostics and the end-of-unit Culminating Task align to grade-level standards. Each lesson includes standards-aligned explicit instruction, as well as questions and tasks, that prepares students for the corresponding Section Diagnostic. Each Section Diagnostic prepares students for the Culminating Task.  

  • By the end of the academic year, standards are repeatedly addressed within and across units to ensure students master the full intent of the standard.

  • The instructional sequence begins with the Foundation Unit, progresses through three to four Development Units, and ends with the Application Unit. Instruction and assessments within the Foundation Unit and Application Unit address a large number of the Reading: Informational Text, Writing, Speaking & Listening, and Language standards. Development Units revisit these standards and address Reading: Literature standards.

Indicator 2h

Materials regularly and systematically balance time and resources required for following the suggested implementation, as well as information for alternative implementations that maintain alignment and intent of the standards.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2h. 

Materials suggest educators begin with the Foundation Unit, choose from five Development Units, and end with the capstone Application Inquiry Unit. The Course-at-a-Glance includes Model Yearlong Paths that contain the following guidance: “These model yearlong paths are only suggestions; teachers and curriculum coordinators should make decisions based on their own expertise.” Materials identify Core Lessons and Optional Lessons. The Optional Lessons enhance core instruction and help students deepen their understanding of each unit's topic and themes. Local districts must select the Development Units strategically to ensure that all standards are addressed across the grade level with a balance of informational text and literature. The Program Guide provides details relating to Choice & Flexibility: “Teachers choose from a variety of Development Units to use throughout the year. Teachers can use the curriculum as written, selecting lessons and activities that meet the needs of their students.” Materials provide additional guidance to educators in the Teaching Notes of the Teacher Edition to make decisions relating to instruction and to provide additional scaffolding when necessary. 

With some diligence in planning, the suggested implementation schedules and alternative implementation schedules align to core learning and objectives. For teachers with a traditional class period and typical number of instructional days, the Model Yearlong Paths are not reasonable to complete, based on the suggested minimum number of 45 minutes per lesson and the number of units suggested for the year. 

Materials sometimes systematically balance time and resources required for following the suggested implementation, as well as information for alternative implementations that maintain alignment and intent of the standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Suggested implementation schedules and alternative implementation schedules align to core learning and objectives. 

    • In the Grade 11 Course-at-a-Glance, materials offer three pathways for instruction: “A,” “B,” and “C.” Each pathway recommends the teacher implement the Foundation Unit: What Does It Mean to Be an American? and the Application Unit: What Do I Want to Research? The other pathways switch between Development Units with an Independent Reading option which focuses on the core text from the missing Development Unit in the pathway. For example, in pathway “B” students do not cover the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, but the materials recommend assigning the unit as independent reading through the year. Despite differing Development Units, each pathway aligns with core learning and objectives. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lessons 1–13, materials clearly label the Core and Optional Lessons. For example, Lesson 8 is Optional and states, “We will determine the meaning of unknown words, and we will develop strategies for determining when to use a vocabulary strategy.” Lesson 10 is a Core Lesson during which students analyze a portion of Anna Quindlen’s text to determine how she defines the national character. During Section 1, students read the Preamble to the Constitution, the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, and Anna Quindlen’s “A Quilt of a Country” to build foundational knowledge on what it might mean to be an American. The program design requires the teacher to implement Core Lessons, as these lessons align to core learning and objectives. Optional Lessons are not required; however, if selected for implementation, these lessons also support the learning objectives of the unit. 

  • Suggested implementation schedules may not be reasonably completed in the time allotted. 

    • In the Grade 11 Course-at-a-Glance, materials provide three Model Yearlong Paths as suggestions. For example, Model Yearlong Path A includes the following units: Foundation: What Does It Mean to Be An American?, The Great Gatsby, The Warmth of Other Suns, The American Dream of Homeownership, Application: What Do I Want to Research?, and the Development Unit Friday Night Lights assigned as independent reading throughout the year. Lessons are designed to span 45–90 minutes, with time contingent on the number of activities a teacher chooses to include. Due to the number of Core Lessons following the Model Yearlong Path A, a teacher would not be able to reasonably complete these or add Optional Lessons in a typical class period and instructional days in the school year. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, the unit includes five sections. Section 3 contains five Core Lessons, a Section Diagnostic, and an Independent Reading lesson. Each lesson includes an average of 3–4 activities. If each core activity represents a day of instruction time, it will take three weeks for students to complete the Core Lessons, not including time for the Section Diagnostic, Independent Reading, optional activities, or time for reinforcing learning. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, the Culminating Task is an explanatory essay, the only unit that contains this mode of writing. The Model Yearlong Paths in the Course-at-a-Glance recommend completing either of the following Development Units, Friday Night Lights or The Warm of Other Suns, as the latter contains a literary analysis task for its Culminating Task; however, the Development Unit, Great Gatsby, also contains a literary analysis Culminating Task. The Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, consists of 40 lessons, four of which are considered Optional. This unit, including all Optional Lessons, can reasonably be completed in a nine-week grading period. 

  • Optional tasks do not distract from core learning. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 3, Lesson 7, students “reread a selected excerpt from one of the texts we have read to analyze the author’s use of language.” Within this lesson, students focus on the author’s word choice and use of conventions. This optional activity deepens students’ understanding of the text and aligns with grade-level standards.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 4, Lesson 6, students have the option to develop their Section Diagnostic response through a series of writing and discussion Activities. For example, students engage in a whole-class discussion using the following questions:

      • “What went well for you during the completion of this task?

      • With what did you struggle during the completion of this task? How did you push through those struggles?

      • What are your priorities for your Section Diagnostic based on the feedback that you received?”

This activity focuses on developing the Section Diagnostic and does not distract from the core learning taking place within the Section. 

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 4, during an Optional Lesson, students read an additional, more challenging movie review of Hidden Figures to learn more about the language of film criticism and to examine and emulate mentor sentences from the review. This lesson supports students in their understanding of the text and aids them during the Section Diagnostic, during which they write a multiparagraph synopsis of the movie they independently watched and analyzed.

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 4, Lesson 4, Activity 5 is an optional activity during which students compose a draft of their team’s invitation and then get feedback from another research team. This activity serves to enhance the instruction and goals of the lesson and cover Common Core Speaking and Listening Standards. 

  • Optional tasks are meaningful and enhance core instruction.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 8, during an Optional Lesson, students review feedback on the Section Diagnostic in which they write a response to the following question: “1. How do the fans in Odessa impact the players of the Permian football team?” Students complete the Section Diagnostic after reading the first four chapters of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. The Optional Lesson supports students with making revisions and improving their work, and helps prepare them for the Culminating Task, during which they write an expository essay that considers how Bissinger portrays high school athletic culture at Permian High School.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 3, Lesson 6, students continue preparing for the Section Diagnostic by following the guidance provided in the student-facing materials: “We will continue to develop, plan, rehearse, and receive feedback on our presentations in order to prepare for the Section Diagnostic.” This lesson enhances core instruction as it allows students to spend extra time improving their presentations for the next lesson.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 3, Lesson 3, students have the option to work in teams to analyze Pew Research Data on homeownership: “Work with your expert group to examine one of the following research-based articles about recent trends in American homeownership:

      • ‘Having a Secure Job Replaces Homeownership as the Key to Being Middle-Class,’ Pew Research Center, August 9, 2013.”

Students then annotate and analyze the research they select and address the following questions:

  • “What is the overall focus area of the article, and how does it relate to the topic of homeownership in the US?

  • What are the research methodology and data source for the article? How credible does that make the data it presents?”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for instructional supports and usability. Materials include annotations in each lesson to support and guide teachers with enacting the curriculum. Materials explain complex concepts and include explanations of cross-curricular content beyond the current course, when necessary. Materials use the language of the CCSS in learning objectives but do not explain the role of the standards in the context of the series. Materials provide some strategies for informing stakeholders about the ELA program but do not contain suggestions for how parents or caregivers can help support student progress and achievement. The Program Guide includes detailed descriptions of instructional approaches that relate to all strands of the standards and references a host of reading research. Materials include a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support the instructional activities. Materials include a publisher-provided standards correlation document that identifies the CCSS at the unit level and for each Section Diagnostic and Culminating Task. Each unit contains an Evaluation Plan, which outlines how instructors can monitor, diagnose, and evaluate student performance. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide suggestions for monitoring student performance, including next steps for students’ literacy skill development. Materials utilize various modalities and item types, including written tasks and oral presentations; and discussion questions, constructed response questions, project-based tasks, and research portfolios. While the font size can be increased on assessments, materials do not provide guidance on the use of this accommodation. Materials include embedded instructional supports and differentiation strategies to support students in special populations. Differentiation Strategy sections include questions that extend above grade-level students’ thinking about the texts they read and develop their ideas in a more advanced way to maximize their learning experiences. The program design allows students to make choices about their learning and research. Students and teachers can monitor student learning through formative and summative assessment opportunities, including peer reviews and discussions, teacher feedback on Section Diagnostics, and self-reflection on the culminating tasks. Materials utilize various grouping strategies for students, including individual work with the teacher, pairs/partners, small groups, research teams, and whole group; and include teacher guidance on grouping students in a variety of formats. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide options and strategies for supporting English learners. Student-facing materials include embedded supports. Students have frequent opportunities to engage in peer discussions using Tier 2 academic vocabulary. Most materials and assessments depict individuals of different genders, races, ethnicities, and other physical characteristics. Materials offer a wide variety of texts and topics that balance information of different demographics. Materials work to maintain a balance of positive portrayals in representation to prevent the prevalence of negative stereotypes harmful to students. Materials do not provide suggestions and strategies to use the home language to support students in learning ELA. Teacher materials do not include guidance on how to garner information that will aid in learning, including the family’s preferred language of communication, schooling experiences in other languages, literacy abilities in other languages, and previous exposure to academic or everyday English. Although materials specify assets that should be leveraged, materials do not provide sufficient opportunities for teachers to draw upon student home language or for students to develop home language literacy. Materials miss opportunities to capitalize on the diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students. Learning goals and instructional activities do not consistently leverage students’ cultural and social backgrounds. Opportunities for students to feel acknowledged during tasks based on customs of other cultures or sections of the materials provided in multiple languages are lacking. Materials include teacher guidance on how to engage culturally diverse students in the learning of ELA. Materials include a Remote Learning Guide with details to assist educators, including but not limited to: monitoring student learning, establishing a remote classroom culture, and technology solutions to facilitate virtual instruction. Local customization for asynchronous and synchronous learning is available. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition and student-facing materials include guidance when teachers and students collaborate using digital tools. Materials largely use Google Docs for collaboration and the Remote Learning Guide also references digital technology, such as Zoom, Padlet, and FlipGrid, that offers opportunities for collaboration and helps facilitate discussions. The visual design of the materials is not distracting and should support student learning and engagement. The layout of the materials is consistent across units and grade levels. Organizational features (Table of Contents, glossary, index, internal references, table headers, captions, etc.) in the materials are clear, accurate, and mostly error-free. The Teacher Edition, and when applicable the Teaching Notes, provide guidance on the use of technology to support and enhance student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

8/9
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for teacher planning and learning. Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials to support students’ literacy development. Materials contain adult-level explanations of the more complex grade-level concepts, as well as concepts beyond the current course, supporting teachers with improving their own knowledge of the subject. Materials use the language of the CCSS in learning objectives but do not explain the role of the standards in the context of the series. Materials provide some strategies for informing stakeholders about the ELA program but do not contain suggestions for how parents or caregivers can help support student progress and achievement. The Program Guide explains the instructional approaches of the program and references research-based strategies utilized throughout the program. Materials include a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support the instructional activities.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials to support students' literacy development.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3a.

Across the school year, the Teacher Edition includes guidance in the Teaching Notes. Teaching Notes address the following categories: Teaching Strategies and Decisions; About the Author, Concept, Text, Topic; and Student Support and Differentiation. Materials include a Literacy Toolbox  for students and teachers. This resource provides both teachers and students support and scaffolds for teaching and growing literacy development and includes a wide range of Reference Guides and Tools, including, but not limited to, Annotating and Note-Taking Reference Guide, Delineating Arguments Tool, and Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tool. The Program Guide details the Guiding Principles, Program Design, Unit Components, Instructional Approaches, Support for Students with Diverse Learning Needs, Bias & Sensitivity, and Website Guidance. The Course-at-a-Glance also provides a descriptive snapshot of the program’s overall structure with several suggestions for yearlong pathways. 

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials to support students' literacy development. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials provide comprehensive guidance that will assist teachers in presenting the student materials and ancillary materials.

    • In the Program Guide, materials explain the function of the Teaching Notes section, “All units contain robust teaching notes that support teachers by providing important content and pedagogical information. The teaching notes are organized into three categories, About the Author, Concept, Text, Topic; Teaching Strategies and Decisions; and Student Support and Differentiation.” Materials offer content and pedagogical information. For example, in the Application Unit, Section 1, Lesson 1, the Teaching Notes provide insight into the importance of vocabulary instruction for ESL learners:

      • These opportunities provide students, particularly English learners, a tremendous chance to increase their cognitive academic language proficiency (CALP). Often, students, particularly English learners, employ basic interpersonal communicative skills (BICS).

Materials present opportunities for teachers to expand their knowledge of what these skills are and how they can support them in the classroom.

  • In the Program Guide, materials provide teacher guidance on the Reference Guides available to students. Student-facing materials include reminders to utilize the Reference Guides, and these reminders are also included in the Teaching Notes. One example includes Reference Guides that support writing, such as Connecting Ideas, Conventions, Integrating Quotations, Organization, and Style. The guides “include definitions, descriptions, and examples of sundry conventions and language usage concepts. For example, the Connecting Ideas Reference Guide includes descriptions of the purpose and effects of transitions and a table highlighting ‘Transition Words and Phrases.’ The Integrating Quotations Reference Guide offers students examples of how to incorporate, and respectively credit, the work of others into their own writing.” 

  • Materials include sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions that are presented within the context of the specific learning objectives.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 2, students read and analyze a second text for their pathway. The Teacher Edition includes Teaching Notes on Teaching Strategies and Decisions, such as “Students will now move from primarily using the Attending to Details to the Evaluating Ideas Tool. These two tools are very similar in organization; moving from a question to the noting and analyzing of key details and finally to the development of a text-based observation or explanation.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 7, students prepare to respond to the Section Diagnostic prompt. Teacher guidance for this lesson includes working with students mastering new vocabulary, supporting students in mastering new sentence styles, and a list of activities the teacher can utilize to assist students in using the new vocabulary before taking the Section Diagnostic. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 5, students read Part 2 of Chapter 3 in Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. Students consider the following question: “1. How do the backgrounds of Boobie and his uncle, L.V., shape Boobie’s self-image as he enters adulthood?” The About the Author, Concept, Text, Topic Teaching Notes include the following guidance: “In the remaining parts of Chapter 3, Bissinger continues to describe Boobie and his life. Part 2 describes how Boobie came to live with uncle, L.V., as well as some background about L.V. himself. All of this information provides the reader with important details about the development of Boobie’s self-image.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 4, students work in expert groups using the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool. The Teaching Notes include several look-fors and extensive guidance. Materials suggest teachers evaluate students' background and cultural knowledge and remediate when appropriate, sharing guidance for students when they are struggling to determine the central and supporting ideas.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 3, Lesson 8, students share the texts they are reading independently and their understandings gained from the reading of those texts. The teacher-facing materials support teachers and students with this lesson by suggesting that teachers meet one-on-one with students, so they can share their ideas. Materials suggest which tools (i.e., Reading Closely Tools and Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools) support the students as they work independently.

    • In the Application Unit: What Do I Want to Research?, Section 3, Lesson 4, students learn how to provide parenthetical citations for the sources of information and quotations they use. The Teaching Notes addressing Student Support and Differentiation include: “If students struggle citing evidence, consider modeling different citation examples with a model source and text.”

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3b.

The explanation and examples help build teacher understanding to ensure teachers provide the necessary support for students throughout the lessons. Materials offer guidance on the use of external resources to address complex concepts, such as using polling data to drive learning, and explain the pedagogical importance of annotating a text. Materials also include teacher guidance on film analysis to support students with this concept, and provide guidance that is applicable across multiple grade bands and content areas.

Materials provide a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples, when necessary, of the more advanced concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade/course-level concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 3, students complete visual analysis of the cover art of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Teacher Edition includes the following adult-level explanations to support teacher understanding, “You can direct them to carefully examine details as they use the Visual Analysis Tool. They might make any and all of the following observations or claims: the eyes are Daisy’s; the figures reclining in the eyes are Myrtle’s body; the reflections are from Daisy looking through the windshield; the light blue streak is Daisy’s tears; the image at the bottom depicts New York City, Coney Island, Gatsby’s party, or the scene of the accident.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 1, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include an analysis of chapter 11 from the book Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger and explain how “[...] excess would impact the children, young adults, and the football players in these cities.” Additional guidance includes, “While Bissinger does not explicitly state this, it is inferred. Students might need your assistance to recognize this.” 

  • Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 1, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include this guidance, “Free online survey tools, such as Survey Monkey and Google Forms, can help with homework (and potentially protect anonymity), for students to select survey information addressing the question, “What does being American mean?”  

In Section 1, Lesson 2, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition explain the pedagogical importance of annotating a text:

  • “attending to details about plot, character, and the author’s craft

  • making inferences

  • making connections among different parts of the text, other texts, and students’ own lives

  • asking questions about points of confusion

  • defining unknown words and phrases

  • summarizing or paraphrasing what is happening in the text

  • writing any thoughts or emotions the text elicits.”

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 2, students read “The Migration of Negroes” by W.E.B. Du Bois. The Teacher Edition provides adult-level explanations of the author and the text and includes a suggestion for an external source to further learning, “This essay is found in NAACP’s June 1917 issue of Crisis Magazine and discusses the reasons behind the migration of African Americans, which includes a map of migration patterns. While the text is available in the Unit Reader, you might have students read it online in its original publication, where it is set in its historical context. The issue can be found on the marxist.org website.”

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 1, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition explain the significance of the films being read in the unit; introduce terms, such as camera angles, visual elements, storytelling, narrative style, sound effects, and music; and explain how they impact the telling of a story in film. The materials state: “Just as you would closely read and analyze a text before teaching it with your students, we encourage you to view each of the films, film clips, and supporting videos prior to showing them in the classroom.”

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 3, students read a text from Khan Academy to develop their understanding of the history of suburban migration and homeownership in the 1950s and beyond. The Teacher Edition includes the following explanation: “Prior to the discussion of the homework reading, students will read two texts to provide additional background knowledge on the topic to enrich the discussion. The two short texts are overviews of the historical phenomenon of suburbia and its dark side and were developed as resources for Khan Academy’s unit on postwar American history.”

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 3c. 

The Program Guide includes detailed descriptions to assist teachers and students in understanding the program structure, unit types (Foundation, Development, and Application), and assessments. Materials demonstrate coherence between instruction and assessment; teachers can make connections between the skills students are developing and applying over the year to local standards. Materials do not label Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts specifically, nor do materials address the role of the CCSS in the context of the overall series. Each lesson in the student-facing materials includes a Lesson Goal that incorporates the language of the CCSS but does not explicitly cite the CCSS.

Materials provide a teacher’s edition that includes standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Correlation information is present for the ELA standards addressed throughout the grade level/series.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 4, Lesson 1, students present their pathway findings to the class. The Culminating Task Checklist includes the following evaluation criteria: Reading & Knowledge, Speaking & Listening, and Writing. For example, the Speaking & Listening Goals include the following Reflect Critically goal: “How well do I think about and evaluate personal and group development?” Teachers can correlate the language of the Lesson Goals to the CCSS. Materials do not specifically cite CCSS. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 3, an example of a Lesson Goal includes, “Can I recognize and interpret important relationships among the settings and characters in Chapter 3?” The student edition contains Lesson Goals in “Can I?” statements to support students with self-evaluating at the end of each lesson. Teachers can correlate the language of the Lesson Goals to the CCSS. Materials do not specifically cite CCSS.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 5, students utilize a Diagnostic Checklist as they compose a response to the following questions based on their reading of Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger and other texts: “How does Bissinger portray the impact of gender on the students and athletic culture of Permian High School? How does Bissinger’s perspective compare to those of the authors of the other section texts?” The Section Diagnostic provides learning goals, such as Reading & Knowledge Goals for the Determine Meaning and Purpose focus, “How well do I use connections among details, elements, and effects to make logical deductions about an author's perspective, purpose, and meaning in texts?” Teachers can correlate the language of the Lesson Goals to the CCSS. Materials do not specifically cite CCSS.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 4, Lesson 2, guidance encourages students to use the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool during their fourth jigsaw reading while working in expert groups to learn about an assigned focus figure for the first half of Part 4 of The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. This lesson includes the following goals: “Can I recognize and interpret important relationships among ideas and events within The Warmth of Other Suns?” and “Can I formulate and use questions to establish and deepen my understanding of The Warmth of Other Suns and the Great Migration?” Teachers can correlate the language of the Lesson Goals to the CCSS. Materials do not specifically cite CCSS.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 5, an example of a Lesson Goal includes, “Can I explore and reflect on the narrative tools filmmakers use to shape a story?” The student-facing materials include Lesson Goals in student-friendly language. Teachers can correlate the language of the Lesson Goals to the CCSS. Materials do not specifically cite CCSS.

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 5, Lesson 6, students “engage in a peer presentation and review of our arguments, then submit them to our teacher.” As a final activity for the unit, student teams or pairs present their final argument to answer the Central Question, “How viable is the American dream of homeownership?”, or participate as the audience by listening attentively to the other teams’ presentations and taking notes. Student grading utilizes items from the Culminating Task Checklist, including Reading & Knowledge and Writing goals. One such goal in the Reading & Knowledge section asks students to compare and connect, “How well do I recognize connections among informational sources and arguments to make logical comparisons and build knowledge in my subtopic?” Teachers can correlate the language of the Lesson Goals to the CCSS. Materials do not specifically cite CCSS.

  • Explanations of the role of the specific grade-level/course-level ELA standards are present in the context of the series.

    • No evidence found.

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide some strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

The Program Guide includes, “Prior to starting each unit, teachers are encouraged to initiate a conversation with students, parents and guardians, explaining the unit’s particular aspects of diversity (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender and gender identity, and sexual orientation) and prime students to engage in brave conversations about topics that may be challenging.” While materials include a Remote Learning Guide that outlines several ways teachers can communicate and monitor students, the materials do not outline strategies that inform stakeholders how they can help support student progress and achievement.

  • Materials contain strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA program.

    • In the Program Guide, materials provide general ideas for informing students, parents, or caregivers: “Educators might also engage parents, counselors, and other respected community advisors in conversations about the texts and topics students are studying. Teachers are encouraged to create a kind, open, and safe environment for students to engage with multiple perspectives and grow as individuals.” Materials do not explicitly mention specific strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers. 

    • In the Remote Learning Guide, materials include various ways in which teachers can communicate with students. For example, the Remote Learning Guide includes that, “A major concern for educators in remote learning is how to diagnose, monitor, and evaluate student progress in reading, writing, and speaking. In synchronous learning sessions, this type of monitoring can be done in much the same way as in the brick-and-mortar classroom—via entry tasks, discussion check-ins, polling, group work, and exit tickets.” Materials do not include a thorough explanation of how instructional information is communicated with various stakeholders.

  • Materials do not contain suggestions for how parents or caregivers can help support student progress and achievement.

    • In the Program Guide, materials outline an end-of-year activity: “At the end of the year, each class's learning community presents newfound knowledge about timely and relevant issues to a forum made up of students’ school, guardians, and local community.” Materials do not provide concrete actions for parents or caregivers to support student progress and achievement during this task. 

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 5, Lesson 1, students select one of three options to present their Culminating Task: in-class, school-wide, or community-based presentations. In Section 5, Lesson 6, the Teacher Edition provides a few different ways for students to share their research with the larger community. The following example is listed in the Teacher Edition: “Option 1 is a community celebration, where students’ families, friends and other teachers are invited, as well as their peers. This would be an opportunity for the students to celebrate their hard work on a sustained, independent research project in a broader, more interesting forum for their concluding question and answer session.” While this option provides an opportunity to involve stakeholders during the presentation of students’ work, neither the Teacher Edition Teaching Notes or the student-facing materials specifically mention how parents or caregivers can support student progress and achievement as students work to complete this task.

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3e.

Materials include a Program Guide with a detailed description of Instructional Approaches that relate to the following content: Questioning, Reading, Writing & Presenting, Vocabulary, Grammar & Syntax, Speaking & Listening, and The Literacy Toolbox. The Program Guide also includes an Appendix E: Tools section that lists Instructional Areas and corresponding Tools, such as the Attending to Detail Tool to correspond with Reading Closely. Other notes in Appendix E include information relating to Writing and Organizing, Analyzing Arguments, Research, Vocabulary, and Evaluation.

References for Reading include but are not limited to: Fisher and Frey’s Rigorous Reading: 5 Access Points for Comprehending Complex Texts (2013) and Wiggins’ Understanding by Design (2005). References for Speaking & Listening include Walqui’s Scaffolding the Success of Adolescent English Language Learners (2010) and Zwiers’ Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk that Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understanding. References for Support for Students with Diverse Learning Needs include but are not limited to Cervetti’s Conceptual Coherence, Comprehension, and Vocabulary Acquisition: A Knowledge Effect?, and Fisher and Frey’s Enhancing RTI: How to Ensure Success with Effective Classroom Instruction & Intervention (2010).

References for the Teaching Notes include but are not limited to: Bransford’s How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School (2000) and Reeves’ Transforming Professional Development into Student Results (2010). References for Writing & Presenting include but are not limited to Dornan’s Within and Beyond the Writing Process in the Secondary English Classroom (2003) and Vermont Writing Collaborative’s Writing for Understanding: Using Backward Design to Help All Students Write Effectively (2008).

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials explain the instructional approaches of the program.

    • In the Program Guide, materials include a description of Questioning as an approach to secondary literacy instruction. The program uses “questions to frame students’ initial reading, guide students through analysis, and initiate inquiry.” Materials provide additional information relating to the Central Questions, Assessment Questions, Guiding Questions, Student-Generated Questions, Metacognitive Reflective Questions, and Supporting Questions.

    • In the Program Guide, details relating to Writing include supporting students' writing skills “not only by analyzing text to develop their own ideas, but also by analyzing and mimicking the writing of others.” Throughout the program, materials consistently include Mentor Sentences and ongoing journals for students to identify exemplars they can emulate and  strategies they can incorporate into their own pieces.

    • In the Program Guide, materials include a description of Vocabulary in the list of Instructional Approaches. The Program Guide states that this curriculum uses vocabulary for high school literacy development “by providing opportunities for students to expand their word knowledge that they can call on in speech and writing.” Additional information is available relating to the Supporting Vocabulary: Tools & Reference Guides, Critical Thinking & Analytical Tools, and Reference Guides.

    • In the Program Guide, materials list Grammar & Syntax under the Instructional Approaches. The Program Guide states that through the high-school literacy instruction, “students are given opportunities to explore and mimic grammar, syntax, and usage in text.” The Program Guide also states that Grammar & Syntax are examined in context, and “Grammar is examined with the goal of improving students’ reading and writing skills.” Materials further note, “Students are given opportunities to deconstruct, examine, and mimic grammar, syntax, and usage they see in a text.” The Program Guide includes the following headings under Grammar & Syntax: Mentor Sentences;, Supporting Grammar & Syntax: Tools & Reference Guides; Critical Thinking & Analytical Tools, which include the Language Use Handouts and Working with Mentor Sentences Tool; and various Reference Guides, which include the Connecting Ideas Reference Guide, and Integrating Quotations Reference Guide. 

    • In the Program Guide, materials list Speaking and Listening as an Instructional Approach included in the high school literacy program. The Program Guide states, “Throughout the units, students speak to, and hear from, their peers formally and informally.” The Program Guide also notes, “Academic conversations are linchpins in literacy development.” Materials include Academic Conversations in many lessons throughout the course. Students and teachers can access Supporting Speaking & Listening: Tools & Reference Guides and Critical Thinking & Analytical Tools, including the Philosophical Chairs Discussion Tool and an Academic Discussion Reference Guide.

  • Materials include and reference research-based strategies.

    • In the Program Guide, materials emphasize the importance of students reading “for depth and breadth, allowing for students to build the stamina to read one text deeply, critically, and closely or several texts to build a robust body of knowledge.” The Program Guide includes detailed descriptions of the following: “Depth: Closely Reading for Nuanced Understanding” and “Breadth: Wide Reading for Content and World Language.”

    • In the Program Guide, materials include details relating to tools available, as well as the use of scaffolding, drawing on research to support student performance during academic discourse. The materials state, “Students are provided a suite of tools, materials, and resources to support their learning, including sentence frames and conversation starters.” The tools students use, such as the Academic Discussion Reference Guide in the Literacy Toolbox, provide a number of Discussion Stems that students can use based on their role in the discussion. These include, but are not limited, to stems when exploring a topic, opinion, or argument and stems when encouraging others to share their thoughts: “How did you come to that idea? We haven’t heard you share yet. Do you agree or disagree with _____?” Materials identify scaffolding as a best practice when teachers work with students who are learning English as an additional language.

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

1/1
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3f.

The Literacy Toolbox includes a comprehensive list of Reference Guides and Tools needed to complete activities throughout the course. Student-facing materials and Teacher Edition Teaching Notes also reference these tools and guides throughout the unit. The Materials tab for each unit, section, and lesson, includes a list of materials. The Text Overview tab includes a comprehensive list of texts needed for the unit.

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials include a tab titled Materials throughout each unit, section, and lesson. According to the Program Guide, the Materials tab includes a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities: “The Materials tab houses documents specific to the unit, including the Evaluation Plan, Text Overview (teacher-facing), Unit Text List (student-facing), Culminating Task Checklist, and any other relevant documents.”

  • Materials include a Text Overview at the beginning of each unit which provides a comprehensive list of texts that will be used throughout the unit. The Program Guide includes the following note regarding the Text Overview: “The Text Overview tab contains the unit’s Text Overview (PDF), which identifies the texts used in the unit and includes recommendations for independent choice reading texts.”

  • Materials include a Literacy Toolbox for each unit which contains a list of Tools and resources that teachers can use to support student learning for each unit. TheProgram Guide includes the following information to describe the contents of the Literacy Toolbox for each unit: “Key to HSLP instruction is the Literacy Toolbox, composed of graphic organizers (tools), rubrics, checklists, and reference guides, carefully designed to support student success throughout the learning process in all units. Each unit has content or text-specific materials to support reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities pertinent to the unit’s text or topic, as well as instructional sequences.” 

  • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 13, materials listed include the What Does It Mean to Be an American: Text Overview, a list of readings, including independent reading options, for the unit. 

  • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 1, materials listed include: Section 4: Question Set, Theme Note-Taking Tools, World Map, Academic Discussion Reference Guide, Vocabulary Journal, and Mentor Sentence Journal to analyze Chapter 11 of H.G. Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 4, students use the provided Understanding a Movie Tool to discuss the conflicts and central themes found in the movie Blackfish directed by Gabriella Cowperthwaite.

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

Narrative Evidence Only

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

Narrative Evidence Only

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for assessment. Materials include a system of assessments that provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards. Materials include a publisher-provided standards correlation document that identifies the CCSS at the unit level and for each Section Diagnostic and Culminating Task. Each unit contains an Evaluation Plan, which outlines how instructors can monitor, diagnose, and evaluate student performance. Materials utilize various modalities and item types. While the font size can be increased on assessments, materials do not provide guidance on the use of this accommodation. 

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3i. 

Materials incorporate Common Core State Standards (CCSS) language teachers can identify and correlate to local standards. The publisher-provided standards correlation document identifies CCSS at the unit level and for each Section Diagnostic and Culminating Task. Materials provide teachers with opportunities to examine and assess student growth on the Learning Goals in each unit, including opportunities for formative assessment, Section Diagnostics, and unit Culminating Tasks. Assessment rubrics and supporting materials, such as the Culminating Task Checklists, provide general descriptions and categories (Exceeds Expectations, Meets Expectations, or Below Expectations) relating to student performance in Reading & Knowledge Goals, Writing Goals, and Speaking & Listening Goals.

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials consistently identify the standards and practices assessed for formal assessments.

    • The publisher provides a CCSS alignment spreadsheet to identify standards addressed in each unit’s Section Diagnostic and Culminating Task.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 3, Lesson 6, students refine and revise their Section Diagnostic to demonstrate how their understanding of what it means to be an American has expanded or changed after reading additional texts. The Section Diagnostic Checklist includes Reading & Knowledge Goals, such as:

      • “Compare and Connect: How well do I recognize points of connection among texts, textual elements, and perspectives to make logical, objective comparisons?”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 9, students have the opportunity to revise their Section 1 Diagnostic by responding to teacher comments, evaluation, and feedback. The Section Diagnostic Checklist includes Reading & Knowledge Goals, such as:

      • “Gather & Organize Evidence: How well do I gather and organize relevant and sufficient evidence to demonstrate an understanding of Chapters 2-4 and to support analytical claims about characters or scenes in the novel?”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 5, Lesson 2, students begin planning their Culminating Task essays. Students utilize a Culminating Task Checklist that includes Reading & Knowledge Goals, such as:

      • “Analyze Perspective: How well do I analyze how Bissinger’s perspective influences the position, purpose, and ideas of Friday Night Lights?”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 4, Lesson 2, students “identify any additional evidence that may be needed in order to fully develop our arguments and their claims, then incorporate the new information into our arguments’ organizational structure.” Teacher Notes in the Teacher Edition prompt teachers to use this work as an assessment opportunity as follows:

      • “Consider using their sentence-level writing as formative data that you can build on in the next section.”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 2, students explore the concept of credibility and how to assess for it using a common text. Students review the article “The False Promise of Homeownership” by Marissa Chapell and utilize the Potential Sources Tool. In the Teaching Notes of the Teacher Edition, the following guidance is available:

      • “As students work in pairs, you might move among teams and answer questions and provide support. Use your knowledge of your students to determine whether they are ready to assess sources independently.”

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3j.

The Teacher Edition and unit materials include guidance on the assessment system. Materials also include assessment guidance in documents such as the unit Evaluation Plan, which outlines how instructors can monitor, diagnose, and evaluate student performance. Each unit includes multiple formative assessments, such as Section Diagnostics, and summative assessments in the form of Culminating Tasks. Each Section Diagnostic provides ongoing opportunities for student reflection, and both the Section Diagnostics and Culminating Tasks include tools which students can use to track their performance. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide suggestions for monitoring student performance, including next steps for students’ literacy skill development.

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Assessment system provides multiple opportunities to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance.

  • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be American?, Section 1, Lesson 11, students read and analyze a text for the Section Diagnostic. The Teacher Edition provides guidance for teachers on how to interpret and use the information from the Section Diagnostic: “This Section Diagnostic is the year’s pre-assessment and is meant to be informative, not evaluative. In addition to the common texts students will have read, analyzed, and discussed, they will read and analyze a new grade-appropriate text and complete an on-demand writing task. This diagnostic provides an early data of students’ reading and writing skills for Grade 11.”

  • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 5, students work on the Section Diagnostic. The Teacher Edition provides guidance for teachers on interpreting and using the information from the Section Diagnostic: “The Section 3 Diagnostic is more complex than the previous Section Diagnostics. First, students are required to analyze, compare, and synthesize from the three texts used in this section. They will then use an analysis of Friday Night Lights to compare how Bissinger addresses two themes, again comparing and synthesizing information, this time in a single text.”

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 3, students use The Warmth of Other Suns: Section 2 Diagnostic Checklist to self-assess their progress in developing the knowledge and skills needed to complete the Section Diagnostic successfully. Students use the Checklist to assess whether they are below expectations, meeting expectations, or beyond expectations for a series of Reading & Knowledge and Speaking & Listening goals. Students use this Checklist in Lessons 1, 5, 6, 7, and 8 to prepare for, complete, and reflect on their Section Diagnostic task. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition also guide instructors on how to best use this tool with students. In the Program Guide, guidance includes, “Teachers review students’ work using Section Diagnostic Checklists to determine students’ progress and diagnose learning needs.” For example, in Section 3, Lesson 5, the Teaching Notes state, “You can review quick-writes to identify students who might benefit from additional support or guidance.”

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Unit Overview, Materials Tab, the Evaluation Plan provides guidance for using the Culminating Task Rubric to assess students: “The Culminating Task Rubric is a holistic rubric that uses a four-point scale. The checklists and rubric are intended to be used along with student exemplar responses. Through benchmarking, teachers select student exemplar responses that illustrate the various performance levels on both the checklists and rubric. This process ensures reliable scoring and establishes a common standard by which all student responses are measured. Scoring notes are provided for the Section Diagnostics and the Culminating Tasks. The scoring notes provide plausible responses and supporting evidence for the tasks. Note that while illustrative, the notes might not include all possible responses.”

  • Assessment system provides multiple opportunities to determine students' learning and suggestions to teachers for following-up with students.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students complete a Culminating Task in which they write a literary analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Throughout the unit, students complete Section Diagnostics that help them prepare for the Culminating Task. For example, in Section 2, Lesson 8, students use the Culminating Task Progress Tracker to evaluate their skills and knowledge needed to complete the unit’s Culminating Task. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition suggest instructors use the Section Diagnostic Checklist to assess student performance:

      • “If the whole class has struggled in a particular area, you might conduct a brief mini-lesson or model the use of one of the tools with the entire class. There is an optional lesson at the end of the section that provides students the opportunity to revise their Section Diagnostic response based on teacher feedback.”

The Teaching Notes also suggest instructors use the Evaluation Plan as it “highlights upcoming lessons and activities that provide students with opportunities for continued or expanded practice.”

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students use a Culminating Task Project Tracker throughout the unit:

    • “Note what knowledge is required on the Culminating Task and how prepared you are for each aspect of the task. Use ✓+ if you feel you have mastered the content, ✓ if you think you have a good understanding of the content, and ✓- if you do not quite understand the content.”

Students fill out this form in each section of the unit, and the Teacher Edition Teaching Notes guide instructors through the process. For example, in Section 3, Lesson 1, as students fill out their Culminating Task Project Tracker for sub-topics they are selecting for their research project, the Teaching Notes suggest:

  • “Based on your students and your class situation, you might choose to add other subtopics, allow individual students to propose and pursue an additional subtopic of interest to them, or reduce the number of options to one or two choices so that you can work more easily with the class as a whole.”

  • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 6, students participate in a conference with the teacher about their progress on the research assignment so far. Students share their source list and research questions with the teacher for review. The Teacher Edition provides guidance for teachers to determine student learning and provide follow-up to students: “At this point, they are working with a wide variety of sources, and even very advanced, engaged students can benefit from extra guidance about how to keep their work process relevant to the Culminating Task. You might push teams to strategically eliminate any research paths and potential sources that are not helpful in answering their Central Research Question.”

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3k. 

Materials utilize various modalities and item types for student assessments. Section Diagnostics and Culminating Tasks in the Foundation and Development Units range in modality from written tasks to discussions to oral presentations. Item types include discussion questions, constructed response questions, project-based tasks, and research portfolios. Section Diagnostics and the Culminating Task in the Application Unit use the same modalities and item types across each grade level— a problem-based research portfolio and an oral presentation. 

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and shifts across the series. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, students complete three Section Diagnostics which lead to the end-of-unit Culminating Task. During the Section 1 Diagnostic, students write a multi-paragraph expository response “about what it means to be an American using the information gained from texts in this section to support your perspective.” Students use textual evidence to support their response to the following questions: “What does it mean to be an American? How has the notion of being an American changed over time?” During the Section 2 Diagnostic, students use evidence from “What Makes an American” by Raoul de Roussy de Sales, as well as other texts read during the unit, as they participate in a Socratic Seminar centered on the following questions: “How has the notion of being an American changed over time? What are some of the enduring ideas about what it means to be an American?” During the Section 3 Diagnostic, students revisit their Section 1 Diagnostic and revise their expository response by “refining your claims, adding new information, omitting irrelevant information, and expanding your explanation of what it means to be an American by adding in a counter perspective.” During the Culminating Task, students work in groups to “Collaboratively research, create, and deliver a presentation about change agents.” Afterwards, students individually write a narrative in which they reflect on their research process.

  • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, students complete four Section Diagnostics which lead to the end-of-unit Culminating Task. During the Section 1 Diagnostic, students write a one-paragraph literary analysis in response to “questions about point of view and character development in Chapter 1 of The Great Gatsby.” During the Section 2 Diagnostic, students write a one-paragraph literary analysis in response to “questions about the use of contrasting scenes or characters and about how literary devices are used to develop themes in Chapters 2–4 of The Great Gatsby.” During the Section 3 Diagnostic, students write an evidence-based, multi-paragraph literary analysis “that analyzes a key scene from the novel, focusing on its presentation, development, meaning, and significance.” During the Section 4 Diagnostic, students participate in a Fishbowl Debate focusing on the following questions: “How have literary scholars and critics analyzed Fitzgerald’s development of point of view, characters, and themes in The Great Gatsby? How do they support their positions about the importance of their chosen character in the novel?” During the Culminating Task, students write a literary analysis in response to one of the following questions: “What does The Great Gatsby ultimately suggest about human perception, illusions, and dreams—and potentially about the American dream?” or “As a narrator, is Nick Carraway the novel’s ‘most important character,’ a judgmental ‘snob,’ or an ‘unreliable’ voice?”

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students complete four Section Diagnostics which lead to the end-of-unit Culminating Task. During the Section 1 Diagnostic, students use the Understanding a Movie Tool as they “Independently watch and analyze a movie from a recommended list.” Afterwards, students write a multi-paragraph movie analysis and synopsis that “provides background information about the movie, summarizes its storyline and its central characters’ story arcs, and analyzes its use of filmmaking techniques, its overall style, and the filmmaker’s message.” During the Section 2 Diagnostic, students “Independently watch and analyze a film from Part 2 of the Movie Viewing List” and use their completed Understanding a Movie Tools for their selected movie and for the documentary Blackfish to “analyze and compare the two movies,” focusing on levels of realism during their comparative analysis. During the Section 3 Diagnostic, students select a film set in a high school and complete an Understanding a Movie Tool to “evaluate how the filmmaker’s techniques and storytelling choices shaped the film’s atmosphere and level of realism,” as they watch their selected film independently. Students then give “a 3–5 minute oral review for your movie, in the style of YouTube movie reviews, and present the review to a team of other student reviewers.” During the Section 4 Diagnostic, students use their previously developed Movie Character Tools to “write and present a character sketch that tells the character’s story (backstory and character arc) and also includes descriptions of the character’s traits, wants and needs, obstacles and conflicts.” During the Culminating Task, students “Develop an idea for your own original feature film and create a ‘pitch packet’ for your idea.”

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students complete four Section Diagnostics which lead to the end-of-unit Culminating Task. During the Section 1 Diagnostic, students write an evidence-based claim and explanatory response to the following question: “What does current research data suggest about the state of homeownership in the United States?” During the Section 2 Diagnostic, students read “Disarming the Great Affordable Housing Debate” and “delineate and evaluate its argument.” During the Section 3 Diagnostic, students select a subtopic related to homeownership and use the Delineating Arguments Tool to “outline a plan for your proposed argument.” Students also present their proposal to their research team, provide peer feedback, and use the feedback to revise their arguments. During the Section 4 Diagnostic, students write a synopsis of their proposed argument. During the Culminating Task, students “Take a position and write an evidence-based argument in response to a current issue about homeownership in America.”

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 include assessments that offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Students can increase the font size of text within the digital materials by clicking on the delta arrows on the right side of the text box; however, materials do not provide guidance on the use of this provided accommodation.

  • Materials offer accommodations that ensure all students can access the assessment (e.g., text-to-speech, increased font size) without changing the content of the assessment. Materials do not include guidance for teachers on the use of provided accommodations.

    • In the Program Guide, Website Guidance, Activity Pages, the Student Directions section includes the following note, “This section provides student-facing directions, which can be expanded to increase the font size for better readability. For activities that contain more than one step, segmenting is used. Activity segments are indicated by horizontal bars across the top of the directions pane.” Materials do not explain how students can increase the font size.

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for student supports. Materials are designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level content. Teacher- and student-facing materials include embedded instructional supports and differentiation strategies to support students in special populations; students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level; and English learners. The program design allows students to make choices about their learning and research. Students and teachers can monitor student learning through formative and summative assessment opportunities. While materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics, materials do not provide sufficient opportunities for teachers to draw upon student home language or for students to develop home language literacy. Materials also miss opportunities to capitalize on the diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level content and to meet or exceed grade-level standards that will support their regular and active participation in learning English language arts and literacy.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3m. 

The Program Guide includes detailed guidance for teachers when supporting diverse learning needs. Materials include supports that assist students with accessing grade-level content. Examples of supports embedded into instruction include Reading Closely and Note-Taking Tools. The program consistently provides Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition with strategies to support students and differentiate when necessary. Reference Guides also “provide centralized resources for literacy concepts and processes and offer vocabulary, sentence starters, and other writing support.” 

Materials regularly provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level content and to meet or exceed grade-level standards that will support their regular and active participation in learning English language arts and literacy. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials regularly provide strategies, supports, and resources for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in grade-level literacy work.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students annotate the text as a homework assignment, using an inquiry question to guide their reading. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide opportunities for student support and differentiation by posing questions for the teacher to reflect on and use to make instructional decisions and assist students who might struggle with comprehension, including, but not limited to: “Are students struggling with the length of the sentences or syntax? If so, would they benefit from chunking sentences into easily understandable parts?” 

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 1, students use the Understanding a Movie Tool and Filmmaking Glossary as they watch and analyze movies and filmmaking throughout the unit. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide student support and differentiation guidance around the suite of tools and resources students will utilize: “These tools help students develop and internalize analytical processes. Since they are scaffolds, they can be assigned at your discretion, or students might develop their own system for using them if they encounter difficult sections of text.” Materials emphasize the importance of students learning to “draw on tools from the Literacy Toolbox as they learn to recognize their own proficiencies and needs for specific supports, given the specific demands of text or tasks.” 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 1, students examine the concept of mood in chapter two of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald by answering a series of guiding questions:

      • “Which words and phrases stand out as powerful or important?

      • What does the language cause you to see or feel?

      • What images stand out and create vivid pictures or evoke strong feelings?

      • How do the author’s word choices develop atmosphere, mood, or meaning?”

    • The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition suggest that if students struggle with determining connections between details found in the text, they should use the Analyzing Relationships Tool for Question 4.

Indicator 3n

Materials regularly provide extensions to engage with literacy content and concepts at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3n. 

The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include sections dedicated to student support and differentiation, including considerations for working with students performing above grade-level expectations. These sections include questions that extend students’ thinking about the texts they read and develop their ideas in a more advanced way to maximize their learning experiences. 

Materials regularly provide extensions to engage with literacy content and concepts at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Materials provide multiple opportunities for advanced students to investigate the grade-level content at a higher level of complexity. Materials are free of instances of advanced students doing more assignments than their classmates.

    • In the Program Guide, materials explain, “Student work may reflect the need for extended instruction for many reasons, including that the student may identify as gifted and talented.” The Program Guide provides examples of how this is offered to students:

      • “Students are encouraged to experiment with their own writing styles and structures on assessments.

      • Students are given opportunities to lead small groups and teams.

      • Students are encouraged to make metaphorical connections for newly acquired vocabulary.

      • Students are encouraged to make concrete and conceptual connections between texts or topics in one unit, to text and topics in different units, and across other disciplines.

      • Students are encouraged to develop their own note-taking habits and styles if they no longer need the support offered on tools.

      • Students can draw on tools from the Literacy Toolbox as they learn to recognize their own proficiencies and needs for specific supports, given the specific demands of text or tasks.

      • Students are encouraged to pursue their own interests at their own pace in the Foundation and Application units.

      • Students are encouraged to pursue independent reading options with texts written at a complexity level above the grade-level expectation.”

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students annotate a text they chose from the Foundation Unit Pathway Texts list. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition suggest questions students can use when completing the Attending Details Tool explaining, “Some students who demonstrate advanced competency might benefit from an additional challenge.” Guiding questions include: 

      • “Would students benefit from being asked how this text or topic connects to another text or topic they have read in another unit?

      • Would students benefit from creating analogous relationships?

      • Would students benefit from a task that requires them to discover the symbolic connection between the text and another concept they have learned in this course or elsewhere?

      • Would students benefit from explaining their expertise about the text to a group of novices? (e.g., How would you explain this text to a five-year-old?)”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 2, Lesson 8, students continue reading their independent reading texts and taking notes using either the Reading Closely Tools or Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include the following guidance for students who may be ready to move beyond the Reading Closely Tools: “Others might be ready to make analytical claims about the text. They might use Forming Evidence-Based Claims Tools to assist in such an analysis.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 4, Lesson 11, students share an analysis of their independent reading texts. The Teacher Edition includes the following guidance to extend learning for those who are performing above grade level: “If students are confident and comfortable, they might engage in a whole-class discussion to share how their independent reading texts relate to the unit. They might prepare and participate in groups.” 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 3, Lesson 2, students write responses to guiding questions from Part 3 of The Warmth of Other Suns. The Teacher Edition outlines ways to extend student learning for students who may be performing above grade level. One example includes: “Students who demonstrate more sophisticated writing skills might benefit from having time to complete a more extensive revision of their work, or experimenting with a unique organizational structure or stylistic technique.”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 3, students continue conducting research for their Culminating Task by using the Research Frame Tool, Potential Sources Tool, and the Assessing Sources Reference Guide. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition suggest teachers vary research expectations for students, as “Some might be ready to search for several potential sources across two or more inquiry paths” while others “might need to focus on practicing the process of using keywords and inquiry questions to search for sources.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning. 

The program design allows students to make choices about their learning and research. Approaches to presentation and demonstration of learning vary. Students work with partners, present with small groups, and complete individual tasks to demonstrate learning. Students share their thinking in various contexts, including multi-modal opportunities during which students investigate and problem-solve with peers. Materials leverage multiple formats for students to deepen their understanding and ability to explain and apply literacy ideas. Students and teachers can monitor student learning through formative and summative assessment opportunities, such as peer reviews and discussions, teacher feedback on Section Diagnostics, and reflection on the culminating tasks. The program offers students frequent opportunities for self-reflection, and they can self-evaluate their progress on their ability to successfully meet the learning goals. 

  • Materials provide multi-modal opportunities for students to question, investigate, sense-make, and problem-solve using a variety of formats and methods. Materials leverage the use of a variety of formats and methods over time to deepen student understanding and ability to explain and apply literacy ideas.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 4, Lesson 1, students present their pathway findings around the Central Question, “What does it mean to be an American?”, to the class. Students choose from the following pathways—culture and American identity; democracy, civic engagement, and American identity; immigration and American identity; race, ethnicity, and American identity; religion and American identity; and war and American identity—and create a 5–7 minute presentation considering how their pathway topic enhanced their understanding of what it means to be an American. 

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, students form research teams to explore an inquiry question they develop themselves. The Program Guide shares, “Students expand their learning community as they develop a presentation for the larger school community. The Application Unit includes independent and collaborative reading, writing, discussion, and presentation.” In Section 5, Lesson 6, students rehearse their presentations with the research team and receive peer feedback to refine their work. The student facing-materials include guidance such as, “As you listen to the other team’s presentation, use the Peer Review Culminating Task Checklist to guide your feedback to the team to help them refine their work after the rehearsal. If needed, refer to the Presentation Creation Process, Presentation Structure, and Presentation Written Components sections of the Application Unit Presentation Guide to inform your thinking and feedback.”

  • Students have opportunities to share their thinking, to demonstrate changes in their thinking over time, and to apply their understanding in new contexts. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 3, Lesson 3, students work in jigsaw groups to share their thinking and apply the changes in their thinking before presenting to another group and revising their claims. Students discuss their learning with their home groups: “Each expert (A, B, and C) shares their learning about their assigned focus figures (Ida, George, and Robert) with their home groups, using the guiding questions on the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool to guide the content shared.” Then, students apply their learning by revising their claims: “By revising claims, we will continue to synthesize our understanding of the push-and-pull factors influencing each focus figure’s decision to leave the South.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 3, Lesson 5, students work in research teams to share their thinking and discuss how their thinking has changed over time in order to develop a strong argument for the Section 3 Diagnostic. Students reconsider their thoughts by completing activities such as the following explained in the student-facing materials: “Reconsider the reading and research you have previously done in light of the position statement you just drafted. Consider the following questions: Which texts and sources might contain information that you can use to develop and explain your position? Which arguments, if any, align with your position and might be used as models to build from? Which arguments, if any, oppose your position and might be countered?” Students then apply their thinking to different contexts while drafting their arguments and sharing them with their peer-review team: “To be successful on the Section 3 Diagnostic, in which they will present their plan to a peer-review team, students will need to have their arguments laid out, including a position statement and a series of supporting claims.”

  • Materials provide for ongoing review, practice, self-reflection, and feedback. Materials provide a clear path for students to monitor and move their own learning. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 8, students reflect on their learning throughout the unit to prepare for the Culminating Task at the end of the unit. The teacher edition describes how students monitor their learning in this lesson: “As students become more aware of their own performance, they learn how to more accurately predict their future performance on a range of other tasks. By identifying and self-evaluating initial mastery levels, students can focus on the skills and knowledge they need to build.” Students answer the following reflection questions listed in the student-facing materials. 

      • “What new knowledge do you have in relation to the Central Question?

      • What are you still curious about in relation to the Central Question?

      • What is the relationship between the question and the texts you have read so far? How do the texts shed light on the question? How does the question help you understand the texts?

      • How has your response to the question evolved, deepened, or changed?”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 8, students engage in a formal academic discussion to synthesize their understanding of the unit texts and the values in high school athletics. Students utilize a Discussion Tool as they work with their peers to take notes. Student-facing materials include the following guidance: “The tool provides space for you to note the claims other students make and the evidence they use to support their claims. There is also a space in which you can summarize the discussion, including the points of agreement and disagreement.” 

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lessons 9–10, students write essays comparing the levels of realism between Blackfish and a more fictionalized movie. Materials include opportunities for students to self-reflect on their work on the Diagnostic and assess their progress toward being able to successfully complete the Culminating Task. For example, students respond to questions in their Learning Logs, such as: “3. What did you struggle with during the completion of this task? How did you push through these struggles?” Students also review the Culminating Task Progress Tracker to evaluate their skills and knowledge to determine readiness for the Culminating Task.

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Students have opportunities to work one-on-one with the instructor; in pairs, small groups, and research teams; and as a whole-group during various activities throughout the materials. The Teaching Notes of the Teacher Edition include a range of choices and details to assist teachers with implementation. Materials include guidance as to when teachers can change group activities, such as altering the implementation of jigsaw activities, opening up the activity to the whole group, and individualizing and designing groups as they see fit. Student-facing materials provide guidance and descriptions for student group interactions. Materials offer students guiding questions, norms, criteria for discussion, and other necessary information to complete the activities successfully. 

  • Materials provide grouping strategies for students. Materials provide for varied types of interaction among students.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 1, students work with a partner to share their revisions and additions to their Notice and Wonder table, what they expect to be doing in the unit, and how this task supports their efforts in accomplishing the unit’s Culminating Task. In Lesson 3, students work with a partner to analyze the poem “The Lynching” by Claude McKay and answer a series of discussion questions such as, “What is the speaker's perspective on the poem's topic?” and “How does the speaker's word choice develop the tone and convey his perspective?” Students then participate in a whole-class discussion based on their responses. 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 3, Lesson 1, students join discussion teams to discuss subtopics identified in their Culminating Task Checklist that interest them before switching to new teams that chose other subtopics. In Lesson 4, students join research teams to write a one-paragraph overview of where they believe their questions may lead, as they continue their research projects. Students then share their findings with the class. 

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 3, students work in pairs to determine the central claim of a text. The student-facing materials include the following guidance: “We will work in small groups to determine the central claim of ‘Women and Men in Sports: Separate is Not Equal.’ We will complete a copy of the Evaluating Ideas Tool, identifying evidence the author uses to support that claim...With your group, discuss the following guiding question: ‘What is the authors’ claim about the role of gender in athletics?’”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 5, Lesson 4, students work in research teams to prepare for their presentations. The student-facing materials include the following guidance: “We will meet with our teams to review all of the written components of our presentations and confirm next steps before we continue to draft our other written components. Our teacher will conference with us, answering questions and advising us as we work... Once all team members have reviewed and provided feedback on each of the components, discuss the following questions as a team to help create a task list for the necessary revisions and additional research.”

  • Materials provide guidance for the teacher on grouping students in a variety of grouping formats.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students begin working in their research teams to determine the best ways to work as a group. The Teacher Edition provides the following guidance for grouping students: “There are several ways to have students select their research teams. You could assign students heterogeneously, based on their demonstrated reading, writing, and presenting skills. You could have each student write down their top two choices on index cards and assign groups from their choices, or you could have students select their own groups.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 1, students have the option to work in pairs or small groups to answer a series of questions, such as, “What is the meaning of the word perception? What influences how people perceive things? In what ways do people’s perceptions influence their lives?”, from Question Set 1.1.  If students work in groups, guidance in the Teaching Notes directs teachers to assign different questions to each group. The Teaching Notes also note: “Some groups might need support in unpacking the Culminating Task prompt and the evaluation criteria. You might check on students individually to probe their understanding of what is being asked of them.” Teacher guidance continues, explaining that bringing the class back to a whole-group discussion can help provide a clear understanding for the task. 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 6, students participate in a group discussion during the Section Diagnostic. As they work in their home groups, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition includes the following guidance:

      • “As students work, you can check on students individually to ensure that they understand the tool and its use and to provide support and challenge.

      • You can reconvene the whole group at the end of the activity to check for understanding about the coming Section Diagnostic and to allow for questions that might impede the coming discussion.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 8, students work in small groups to review the information they have gathered on the Understanding a Movie Tool. The student-facing materials describe the format for the group: “In groups of four, spend 5 minutes each describing the movie you chose for independent viewing. Your teacher will announce it when five minutes are up. Refer to the evidence, ideas, and claims from your Understanding a Movie Tool, including the excerpts of reviews you included.” The Teacher Edition includes additional guidance for teachers: “Depending on your class size and time constraints, consider adjusting the size of the small groups or the time allotted for each informal mini-presentation. If your class is very small, have each student present the information from their Understanding a Movie Tools to the whole class.”

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards to regularly participate in learning English language arts and literacy.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for Indicator 3q.

The Program Guide includes teacher guidance on working with students learning English as an additional language. Materials embed support for English learners within the student-facing materials to help them access complex text and reach grade-level proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition outline options and strategies, such as Reference Guides and sentence starters, that teachers may use to support English learners. Attention to academic and Tier 2 vocabulary is evident in the materials, including the Teaching Notes emphasizing the importance of students learning vocabulary within a meaningful context. Materials provide multiple opportunities for students to engage in discussion with their peers, “often using newly acquired academic and Tier 2 vocabulary with sample discussion stems as support. Through these discussions, English learners are able to strengthen their Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP).”

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards to regularly participate in learning English language arts and literacy. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 2, Activity 2, students read The Declaration of Independence and answer the following questions in their Vocabulary Journal, “What does the word declaration mean? What is an example of declaration? What is a nonexample of a declaration? What does the word independence mean? What is an example of independence? What is a nonexample of independence?” Teacher-facing materials include a note on creating a visual. Materials encourage differentiation and scaffolded support for English learners students: “You might have students draw a picture next to applicable vocabulary and definitions. Mental images and associations can help strengthen students’ understanding of newly acquired vocabulary.”

    • The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include that “To cement understanding, it is important to have students interact meaningfully with new words. Walk students through an understanding of the noun declaration, which is a form of the verb ‘to declare.’ You might tell students the word declare means something is said in a solemn and emphatic manner. In other words, the speaker is serious and forceful. Share with students examples and nonexamples of what it means to declare something.” 

  • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 4, students examine a range of strategies to determine the meaning of words in Chapter 1 of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Students utilize a Vocabulary in Context Tool when working with vocabulary. The student-facing materials include guidance such as, “This tool is used for words you can decipher from the text; for others, you might use morphology to decipher the meaning, or a reference resource to check if your meaning is accurate.” Materials include questions in the Vocabulary in Context Tool to support students with using context to determine the meaning of a word. Questions include, but are not limited to: “What do the words in the sentence that come before the unknown word mean? What do the words in the sentence that come after the unknown word mean?”

    • The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include reminders such as, “Native English speakers might grasp nuances in contextual clues, such as tone or cultural references, while English learners might not understand, making it all the more difficult for them to define the targeted vocabulary word.” Guidance includes additional details and suggestions on providing student support, such as creating mental images and associations.

  • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 4, Lesson 5, students engage in the fifth jigsaw discussion with home groups, using and completing the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include strategies to provide student support and differentiation for students who struggle with using academic language in a discussion. The Teaching Notes provide guidance, such as modeling how to use academic language in a discussion: “Script what students say during the discussion, focusing on strong examples of academic vocabulary and discussion stems. Write sentence starters on the board to help students formulate responses.” Teachers can direct students to the Academic Discussion Reference Guide and provide prompts. A reminder in the Teaching Notes states, “You might offer English learners the option to discuss the topic in their home languages and report their discussion in English.” 

  • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 2, Lesson 5, Activity 4, students use the Working With Mentor Sentences Tool. Guidance in the student-facing materials directs students to read the following mentor sentence aloud. Directions continue as follows: “Unpack any unfamiliar vocabulary using your vocabulary strategies. Then, determine what the sentence is saying, and paraphrase the sentence to convey its meaning based on your initial understanding.” Teacher-facing materials include the following guidance for supporting English learners: “You might also have English learners think about how the construction of a mentor sentence compares to the construction of sentences in their home language, in order to build connections from one language to another.”

  • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 3, Lesson 1, students determine the subtopic that most interests them and write a short explanation of the general perspective or position they might take regarding it. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include strategies for student support and differentiation: “Some students might benefit from using a tool when composing their responses. Sentence frames can also be a useful scaffolding for all students, regardless of ability range, and they are particularly useful for English learners.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

Students have several opportunities to read and view materials and assessments that depict individuals of different genders, races, ethnicities, and other physical characteristics. Materials offer a wide variety of texts and topics that balance information of different demographics. Materials work to maintain a balance of positive portrayals in representation to prevent the prevalence of negative stereotypes harmful to students. Because materials include a multitude of voices and perspectives, students have the opportunity to see themselves succeed based on the representation of characters in the text they read throughout the units.  

  • Materials and assessments depict different individuals of different genders, races, ethnicities, and other physical characteristics.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be An American?, students read a variety of texts, representing different perspectives and various demographics, on what it means to be American. Selections include “The 14th Amendment’s Tortuous Relationship with American Indians” by Scott Bomboy, “President Barack Obama's Inaugural Address” by Barack Obama, and “What Does it Mean to be an American?” by Amy Pearl & Jennifer Hsu. Materials provide perspectives from the Indian, Asian, and African American communities on the issues surrounding the question, “What does it mean to be an American?”  

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 4, students analyze three characters from The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. Each character represents varying characteristics, including gender and background. The student-facing materials include the following guidance outlining how students will look closely at these characters: “We will continue working in our expert groups to engage in our first jigsaw reading about the three central figures in Wilkerson’s text: Ida Mae Brandon Gladney, George Swanson Starling, and Robert Joseph Pershing Foster.”

  • Materials and assessments balance positive portrayals of demographics or physical characteristics. Materials avoid stereotypes or language that might be offensive to a particular group.

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 6, materials balance the representation of the American Dream discussed in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald with the perspective of African Americans from Langston Hughes’ poem “I, Too.” The poem avoids stereotypes and focuses on the humanity, hope, and patriotism of African Americans: “In light of our examination of the American Dream and character as they relate to The Great Gatsby, we will examine how the novel depicts people from other racial or ethnic backgrounds than those of the main characters and Fitzgerald himself. We will then read and analyze an opposed view of race in America written by African American poet Langston Hughes.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, students examine the central question, “How do high school athletics reflect American society?” Materials balance positive and stereotypical representations as students examine fandom, race, gender, and values in J.D. Bissinger’s Friday Night Lights. For example, in Section 2, Lessons 2 and 5, students explore the issue of race in Friday Night Lights in tandem with “Unchecked, Unchallenged and Unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?” by Ivey DeJesus and “The White Flight from Football” by Alana Semuels. The materials balance the representations in Friday Night Lights with the critical lens found in the accompanying readings by posing questions for students to consider:

      • “The author states, ‘Under the proverbial Friday night lights that shape so much of a young person’s high school experience, racism seems to be courting a foothold on the field and court—unchecked, unchallenged and unabashed: Is Racism in High School Sports Being Tolerated?’ This seems to be the author’s main claim, or her thesis statement. How does this statement relate to what we have read in Friday Night Lights?”

      Rather than avoid stereotypes, materials acknowledge them and create critical discourse for students to discuss and analyze these representations. 

  • Materials provide representations that show students that they can succeed in the subject, going beyond just showing photos of diverse students not engaged in work related to the context of the learning.

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, students create their own pitch for a film as the unit’s Culminating Task. Students take on the role of a director as they explore various representations of film. In Section 5, Lesson 6, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition guide students in using their momentum to extend their learning: “This includes problems within the sea-park industry and man's relationship to nature (Blackfish), police shootings of unarmed Black men and race relations in America (The Hate U Give), and countless other topics explored through the films chosen by students.” The work of George Tillman and The Hate U Give provide a diverse representation of a director, which can show students that they can succeed in filmmaking. 

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, students read several texts on the unit topic the American Dream of Homeownership and  examine homeownership rates among ethnic groups throughout the years. Many of the texts discuss homeownership as relatively elusive for most people of color, especially African Americans. For example, in Section 2, Lesson 1, the student-facing materials include the following introduction regarding homeownership: “We will continue to study the mythology of homeownership in America, recognizing that the American Dream, while compelling, has not been equally accessible to all Americans—a fact that Langston Hughes has referred to as a ‘dream deferred.’ We will examine the imagery in the Hughes poem and read an excerpt from a Smithsonian article by Isabel Wilkerson that overviews the Great Migration, with a focus on the discriminatory housing practices that Black Americans faced when they arrived in northern cities like Chicago. Through our work examining and comparing these texts, we will develop claims that investigate the following question: Why has homeownership been a ‘dream deferred’ for many Americans?” Throughout the unit, texts seem to focus on the challenges people from diverse backgrounds faced.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide insufficient guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

The instructional materials include Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition that occasionally encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning. The Program Guide emphasizes a generalized, asset-based approach to learning across Grades 9–12 for students with diverse learning needs: “All students’ language, literacy, cultural knowledge, communities, and diversity are assets that should be leveraged as they develop and express their understanding in English language arts.” Although materials specify assets that should be leveraged, materials do not provide sufficient opportunities for teachers to draw upon student home language or for students to develop home language literacy.

  • Materials provide suggestions and strategies to use the home language to support students in learning ELA. Teacher materials include guidance on how to garner information that will aid in learning, including the family’s preferred language of communication, schooling experiences in other languages, literacy abilities in other languages, and previous exposure to academic or everyday English.

    • No evidence found

  • Materials rarely present multilingualism as an asset in reading. Students are rarely explicitly encouraged to develop home language literacy and to use their home language strategically for learning how to negotiate texts in the target language.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 4, Lesson 1, Activity 1, students explore the central question, “How do high school athletics reflect American society?” Students engage in a peer-to-peer discussion and complete a Quick Write in response to the following question: “5. If you were to provide an answer to the Central Question today, what would it be?”

    • The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide ideas for support and differentiation using an asset-based lens: “Students are encouraged to bring the knowledge, insight, and curiosity they already have to enhance their experience in the unit. English learners in particular benefit from making connections to their cultural and social backgrounds.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 5, students discuss their learning on how the dream of homeownership manifested itself in America following World War II. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include the following guidance: “Offer English learners the option to discuss the topic in their home languages and report their discussion in English.”

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide insufficient guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Materials miss opportunities to capitalize on the diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students. Learning goals and instructional activities do not consistently leverage students’ cultural and social backgrounds. Opportunities for students to feel acknowledged during tasks based on customs of other cultures or sections of the materials provided in multiple languages are lacking. 

  • Materials rarely make connections to the linguistic, cultural, and conventions used in learning ELA. Materials rarely make connections to the linguistic and cultural diversity to facilitate learning.

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, Activity 7, students use the Vocabulary in Context Tool. Students engage in a word study of the following words: salvation, pandemonium, euphoria, exhortation, and vicarious. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include the following guidance for supporting English learners: “Additionally, if a word under study is a cognate—a word that shares similar spelling, meaning, and pronunciation with a word in another language—in the student’s home language, you might make connections between the cognate and the new vocabulary word. A cognate provides a bridge to the English language for English learners.”

  • Materials rarely include teacher guidance on how to engage culturally diverse students in the learning of ELA.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be American?, Section 1, Lesson 1, students begin thinking about what it means to be an American by participating in anticipatory activities, such as an anticipation guide and a four-corners activity in which students reflect on their thinking. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include the following guidance: “Note that this topic and related topics of citizenship and identity can be an emotionally charged topic for students from immigrant or refugee families, as well as students from families who were born in America. Be sure to create a classroom where respectful disagreements and appropriate discussion protocols are in place.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 1, students engage in a whole-class discussion on The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and accompanying texts. Students address a series of discussion questions, such as “How is the information in the maps related to The Warmth of Other Suns?” and “What conclusions can we draw about the Great Migration?” The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include the following guidance: “Offer English learners the option to discuss the topic in their home languages and report their discussion in English.”

Indicator 3u

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

Narrative Evidence Only

Indicator 3v

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

Narrative Evidence Only

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology (when applicable) with guidance for teachers.

0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for intentional design. Materials include a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology with guidance for teachers. Materials include a Remote Learning Guide with details to assist educators, and local customization for asynchronous and synchronous learning is available. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition and student-facing materials include guidance when teachers and students collaborate using digital tools. The visual design of the materials is not distracting and the layout of the materials is consistent across units and each grade level. Most organizational features in the materials are clear, accurate, and error-free. Materials provide guidance on the use of technology to support and enhance student learning.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

Materials include a Remote Learning Guide with details to assist educators, including but not limited to: monitoring student learning, establishing a remote classroom culture, and technology solutions to facilitate virtual instruction. Unit Readers, as well as digital texts, are available for teacher and student use. The Remote Learning Guide notes that “Students and educators can find the digital texts by using the bibliographic information provided for each text on the Text tabs at the section, lesson, and activity levels in the program.” Students can annotate texts and work collaboratively in a remote setting. Editable tools are available as downloadable Google Docs. Customization at the local level can include consideration of text types and strategies when working asynchronously and synchronously.

  • Digital technology and interactive tools, such as data collection tools, simulations, and/or modeling tools are available to students. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 5, students participate in a Socratic Seminar about the Central Question, “What does it mean to be an American?” Socratic Seminar and Philosophical Chairs Discussion can occur asynchronously or synchronously to engage students in their learning and ensure all students have equity of voice. The Remote Learning Guide includes guidance to support providing these learning opportunities utilizing digital tools. For example, materials suggest the use of Parlay Live Round Table, “an interactive discussion tool that allows educators to set up a Socratic Seminar. It allows tracking of participation and other tools to encourage students.” Materials include additional guidance to support the use of a Conference App and set expectations, protocols, and note-taking in a structured environment.

  • Digital tools support student engagement in ELA.

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 2, students use the Video Note-Taking Tool when watching the video from the Dallas Morning News: “What Does It Mean to Be an American.” The Teaching Notes in the teaching edition state, “It also allows students to code the details they identify and analyze based on what type they are.” Teachers can model the coding of details for students before they continue independently. The Tools also offer opportunities for modeling in asynchronous and synchronous environments. The Remote Learning Guide includes suggestions for modeling and additional guidance to collect evidence when working synchronously: “Share a model of the Google Doc version of the tool via screen share. Model your thinking as you move through the tool, reflecting on the prompts within the tool and the resulting textual analysis.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 2, Lesson 4, students read, analyze, and delineate the argument about the failure to fully implement the 1968 Fair Housing Act in a recent op-ed essay “The Civil Rights Law We Ignored” by Walter Mondale. Students utilize the Delineating Arguments Tool to record their thinking while working with a reading team: “As a team, develop a claim about the essay based on your delineation of its argument.” The Remote Learning Guide includes suggestions for modeling and additional guidance to collect evidence when working synchronously: 

      • “Share a model of the Google Doc version of the tool via screen share. 

      • Model your thinking as you move through the tool, reflecting on the prompts within the tool and the resulting textual analysis.”

      • When collecting evidence, teachers can prompt students to submit Google Docs or if they are using PDFs, they can “send a picture or scan of their completed tool via email or the LMS.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 2, Lesson 1, students examine a mentor sentence from Chapter 2 of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and analyze how its structure and use of literary devices contribute to the meaning of the novel. The Teaching Notes in the teacher edition include the following guidance: “Remind students to keep a collection of mentor sentences in their Mentor Sentence Journal, so they have a robust writer’s toolbox to consult for their responses on their Section Diagnostic and Culminating Tasks.” The Remote Learning Guide includes teacher guidance to support utilizing digital tools during learning opportunities. For example, when modeling in an asynchronous environment, teachers can “[l]ink or embed a short screencast video modeling how to think through the tool or journal.” 

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 1, Lesson 1, students review the Unit Text List to familiarize themselves with the texts they will analyze and discuss throughout the unit. The student-facing materials provide text locations with details for tradebooks, digital access, unit readers, and CD/DVD. For example, “Digital Access: You can find these texts online. Use the information provided in the Unit Text List or on the Materials tab for the activity to conduct a web search for the resource. Digital Access resources include online articles, videos, podcasts, and other web sources.”

  • Digital materials can be customized for local use (i.e., student and/or community interests).

    • The Remote Learning Guide includes guidance for asynchronous and synchronous learning opportunities. When working asynchronously, such as utilizing a video-sharing website and interactive videos, guidance includes, “If the LMS allows, add guiding questions directly to video, or use a third-party app (e.g., EdPuzzle) to insert questions into the video.” Teachers can also use an embed code if the LMS allows: “This will alleviate students from leaving the online classroom and entering another less secure site.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, teachers can use the Remote Learning Guide to support synchronous learning opportunities that use screen share for lessons, including videos, and make digital annotations. The Remote Learning Guide suggests utilizing screen sharing during synchronous learning, which allows the use of digital resources. During asynchronous learning, the Remote Learning Guide includes the following guidance: “Annotate the text with the class, sharing their metacognition or thinking aloud while also writing their thinking directly on the shared document, a whiteboard model, or a PowerPoint slide.” Additional guidance includes, “If permissible, create a Google Docs or Word version of the text. Individual copies will need to be created (the LMS might have an automatic feature for this). Students can use the comment, highlight, and underline features to annotate the text. Consider using a third-party technology resource for annotation (e.g., Hypothesis, NowComment).”

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Students work collaboratively throughout the units. Both the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition and student-facing materials include guidance when teachers and students collaborate using digital tools. One main feature of the materials is the use of Google Docs, which offer opportunities to share drafts and comment directly on student work. This feature provides teachers with continuous opportunities to make individual and group projects collaborative through Google’s sharing capabilities. Materials, particularly the Remote Learning Guide, also reference digital technology, such as Zoom, Padlet, and FlipGrid, that offers opportunities for collaboration and help facilitate discussions.

  • Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other. 

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 2, Lesson 2, research teams determine their note-taking systems as they plan for the unit’s Culminating Task. One suggestion offered by the materials is a Google Doc. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition includes the following guidance: “In order to give adequate feedback early on in the research process, be aware of each team’s individual note-taking system so that you can catch any misconceptions, leave constructive criticism, and provide positive reinforcement.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, Section 1, Lesson 2, students work with a reading partner to reread pages 3–5 to learn additional information about Nick Caraway. To support collaboration, the materials direct students to use the Character Note-Taking Tool, which is a Google Doc in the unit materials. Student-facing materials include the following guidance: “Share with your reading partner what you have written down in your tool. Add new details found by your partner to your tool. Discuss how your first impressions of Nick are developing based on what you have noticed through your close reading.”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 1, Lesson 1, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide teachers with guidance on tools they can use in the unit to facilitate remote or virtual learning:

      • “If you are using this unit in a remote- or virtual-learning context, you might consult two resources: the general Odell Education Remote Learning Guide and the unit-specific Friday Night Lights Remote Learning Guide. The Odell Education Remote Learning Guide provides general guidance for strategies and structures that can be used for synchronous and asynchronous learning, flipped classrooms, and blended learning. The Friday Night Lights Remote Learning Guide provides remote learning suggestions for each lesson.”

      The Remote Learning Guide includes examples of how to facilitate collaboration through “discussion boards and collaboration tools” such as the LMS (Learning Management System), Parlay, or Flipgrid.

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 3, Lesson 2, students work on a collaborative activity in jigsaw groups. The student-facing materials note the need for students to use the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool, which is a Google Doc, during their collaboration: “We will participate in our third jigsaw reading, working in our expert groups and using the Jigsaw Note-Taking Tool to learn about our assigned focus figures in Part 3 of Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns.”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 5, Lesson 2, students work with a partner to read, edit, and discuss their drafts for the argumentative essay they are writing during the Culminating Task. The student-facing materials instruct students to use the Culminating Task Checklist, which is a Google Doc, to guide the collaboration between students in this peer-review process. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include the following guidance: “Students will now move from drafting to reviewing and revising their supporting paragraphs. You can determine what you want them to use as a reference point for their peer reviews and revisions. The expectations on the Culminating Task Checklist provide a list of goals students should strive to achieve.”

    • In the Application Unit, What Do I Want to Research?, Section 2, Lesson 1, students work in research teams to complete their initial research frames using the Research Frame Tool. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition state, “Students can also make revisions to their Research Frame Tool using an electronic copy of the tool in their Google Drive.” 

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 includes a visual design (whether in print or digital) that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

The visual design of the materials is not distracting and should support student learning and engagement. The layout of the materials is consistent across units and grade levels. When appropriate, materials include guidance on locating texts in the student-facing materials and provide reminders for accessing other Tools and Guides to support learning. The student-facing materials and Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition clearly communicate information. The Teaching Notes consistently include headings that signal when support is available for a specific purpose, such as the following sections: About the Author, Concept, Text, Topic; Teaching Strategies and Decisions; and Student Support and Differentiation. The Tools and Guides support student understanding of topics, texts, and concepts. Materials are typically free of errors.

  • Images, graphics, and models support student learning and engagement without being visually distracting. 

    • Materials balance the use of blank space on home and landing pages, as well as in the various Tools and Guides. The landing page design utilizes an abstract art theme. In each grade level, the Unit Homepage contains an abstract art icon for each Foundation, Development, and Application Unit. Program Resources icons also utilize abstract art similar to that of the landing page.

    • Materials consistently use the same icons throughout each grade and unit. Appendix G of the Program Guide contains the key for iconography used throughout the materials. Icons include: Unit Reader Texts, Digital Access Texts, Tradebook, and Multimedia Text. Additional icons, such as an image of a piece of paper with a pencil indicating students can “Download PDF'' and an image of a sheet of paper with the Google Drive symbol in the center indicating students can “Download GDOC,” appear as needed during instructional activities.

  • Teacher and student materials are consistent in layout and structure across lessons/modules/units. Images, graphics, and models clearly communicate information or support student understanding of topics, texts, or concepts.

    • The Program Guide includes guidance on the layout and structure of the materials: “Each grade’s homepage organizes the available units by type—Foundation, Development, or Application—and provides each unit’s title. Also found on each grade homepage are the following program resources:

      • Reference Guides: a downloadable PDF consisting of all of the program’s reference guides

      • Program Guide: this program guide, available as a PDF Purchase 

      • Unit Readers: a link to an external site where users can purchase unit readers and student materials

      • Course-at-a-Glance: an overview of the units available for the grade level.”

    • Each Unit Homepage contains the following tabs: 

      • Unit Overview: The Unit Overview describes the unit and provides links to the sections of the unit.

      • Culminating Task: The Culminating Task provides the unit’s Culminating Task prompt. The Culminating Task Checklist and Evaluation Plan for the unit are available as downloadable PDFs.

      • Text Overview: The Text Overview tab contains the unit’s Text Overview (PDF), which identifies the texts used in the unit and includes recommendations for independent choice reading texts.

      • Materials: The Materials tab houses documents specific to the unit, including the Evaluation Plan, Text Overview (teacher-facing), Unit Text List (student-facing), Culminating Task Checklist, and any other relevant documents.

    • The Program Guide explains the organization of instructional units: “HSLP units are broken down into sections. The navigation bar at the top of the page permits users to easily navigate between sections.”Each Section Page contains the following tabs:

      • Section Overview: This tab provides a brief description of the knowledge, skills, and habits addressed in the section, as well as which major texts are used. Links to the lessons included in the section are also available here. Each lesson link includes the lesson’s overview and is labeled as Core, Optional, Section Diagnostic, or Independent Reading to facilitate navigation and planning.

      • Learning Goals: This tab houses the section’s learning goals, which are derived from the evaluation criteria.

      • Section Diagnostic: This tab provides the Section Diagnostic prompt. It also includes the Culminating Task Connections, which explains what students will do and demonstrate in the formative task, and how it will help prepare them for success on the unit’s Culminating Task. In the case of the teacher version, a description of how the Section Diagnostic helps prepare students for success on the Culminating Task is provided. 

      • Texts: This tab lists the texts for the section, which are divided into core and optional. Each listing includes the text’s title, author, publisher, and date of publication.

      • Materials: This tab lists the materials used in the section, and divides them as tools, question sets, or reference guides.

    • Each section is then broken down into lessons, which users can navigate among using the navigation bar at the top of the page. Each Lesson Page contains the following tabs:

      • Lesson Overview: This tab contains a description of the lesson and links to its activities. The links include four sources of information: the activity number, the foci of the activity (Read, Write, Listen, View, Present, Discuss), whether the activity is core or optional, and a brief summary of the activity.

      • Learning Goals: This tab provides the lesson learning goals, which are expressed as student-facing “Can I…?” questions that reflect the knowledge or skills goals of the lesson.

      • Texts and Materials: This tab follows the same organizational features as the section pages, providing only texts and materials pertinent to the respective lessons.

  • Organizational features (Table of Contents, glossary, index, internal references, table headers, captions, etc.) in the materials are clear, accurate, and error-free.

    • Materials are typically free of errors; however, materials contain some labeling and typographical errors. In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 4, Lesson 6, the Text Unit List and Text Overview lists an article “Want to Measure a Film’s Diversity? Try ‘The DuVernay Test.’” by Victoria Massey as Optional. The reading and related activities take place in a lesson listed Optional. However, the article is listed as Core in the Texts list under the Section 4 Texts tab within the student-facing materials, and the Optional text is listed as Half the Picture by Amy Adrion. A minor typo appears in the Development Unit, The Great Gatsby, under the Materials section for the Text Overview and Unit Text List. Under Independent Reading Options, the materials list “Lorraine Hansbury [sic]” as the author of the play Raisin in the Sun. An additional error appears in the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 2, Lesson 1, Activity 2, in the student-facing materials: “These examples will be wrote [sic] down on chart paper so we can reference them as we read Friday Night Lights.” In the Application Unit, Section 2, Lesson 3, Activity 1, in the Teaching Notes of the Teacher Edition, the heading Student Support and Differentiation is listed, but there is no text underneath with notes to support the teacher.

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

The Teacher Edition provides guidance on the use of technology to support and enhance student learning. In many cases, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition include ideas for extending student learning with technology, such as using specific digitals tools. In other cases, the Teaching Notes provide guidance to support student learning, such as with specific digital tools to help clarify students’ understanding.

  • Materials provide guidance for using embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, where applicable.

    • In the Program Guide, materials explain how texts within the units can be accessed digitally. Students can use the Unit Text List for digital access: “These texts can be found online. The information provided in the Unit Text List or on the Materials tab for the activity can be used to conduct a web search for the resource. Digital Access resources include online articles, videos, podcasts, and other web sources.” 

    • In the Remote Learning Guide, materials include a table of instructional strategies with technology solutions. For example, materials suggest teachers use Pear Deck and EdPuzzle for “interactive tools for videos or slides,” Snagit, Screencastify, Quicktime, and Loom for “modeling and screencasting,” and Hypothesis, NowComment, highlighting and commenting features on Google Docs. or Word for “digital annotating of text.”

    • In the Remote Learning Guide, materials explain the technology used to facilitate digital annotations:

      • “If permissible, create a Google Docs or Word version of the text. Individual copies will need to be created (the LMS might have an automatic feature for this).

      • Students can use the comment, highlight, and underline features to annotate the text.

      • Consider using a third-party technology resource for annotation (e.g., Hypothesis, NowComment).”

    • In the Foundation Unit, What Does It Mean to Be an American?, Section 1, Lesson 2, students continue reading about the Declaration of Independence to gain an overall understanding of the document. Materials provide guidance for the use of technology to support student learning in the Teaching Notes: “The Declaration of Independence can be a difficult text for students. If students are still struggling with comprehending the Declaration of Independence, you might want to have them access this text online: ‘What the Declaration of Independence Really Means.’”

    • In the Development Unit, Friday Night Lights, Section 3, Lesson 2, students watch a video to deepen their understanding of the impact of gender roles on sports. The Teacher Edition explains why the video was selected for the lesson and suggests allowing students to use the Video Note-Taking Tool from the digital Literacy Toolbox: “Consider having students use the Video Note-Taking Tool for this activity. The Video Note-Taking Tool is a two-column note-taking tool. It is used specifically when watching a video, film, or documentary to write down and analyze important details presented in video format. The tool includes a timeline to indicate where in the video the detail is presented, a column for writing down key details, and a column for analyzing or commenting on those details. It also allows students to code the details they identify and analyze based on what type they are.”

    • In the Development Unit, The Warmth of Other Suns, Section 2, Lesson 1, students use the Visual Analysis Tool, which is accessible as a Google Doc. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition guide the teacher in explaining the significance of the tool to illustrate understanding of a text through text-based observations: “You might model the use of this tool by engaging in a think-aloud as you add information to the tool about the first map. Students might then practice their skills in performing this process with the second and third maps.”

    • In the Development Unit, Telling Stories with Film, Section 1, Lesson 2, students begin learning about the visual and sound techniques used in films. The Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition recommend using a digital article to deepen student knowledge: “If your students are especially interested in how sound and music are used within movies, and if you have decided to listen to parts of the soundtrack, you might have them access and read a supplemental article about Pharrell Williams from the New York Times: ‘Pharrell Williams, Making Noise for “Hidden Figures” Everywhere’ by Dave Itzkoff (2017).”

    • In the Development Unit, The American Dream of Homeownership, Section 1, Lesson 1, the Teaching Notes in the Teacher Edition provide guidance on materials available for virtual or remote learners: “If you are using this unit in a remote- or virtual-learning context, you might consult two resources: the general Odell Education Remote Learning Guide and the unit-specific Homeownership Remote Learning Guide. The Odell Education Remote Learning Guide provides general guidance for strategies and structures that can be used for synchronous and asynchronous learning, flipped classrooms, and blended learning. The Homeownership Remote Learning Guide provides remote learning suggestions for each lesson.” The Remote Learning Guide includes guidance on the use of technology, such as interactive tools like Pear Deck and EdPuzzle, and references other learning management software like Canvas, Google Classroom, D2L, and Schoology.

abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/06/09

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Odell Education High School Literacy Program Unit Readers Grade 11 978‑1‑9750‑7751‑8 Odell Education 2020

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA High School Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations