Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for alignment. The instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1, focus and coherence, by focusing on the major work of the grade and being coherent and consistent with the Standards. The instructional materials partially meet the expectations for Gateway 2, rigor and practice-content connections. The materials partially meet the expectations for rigor by reflecting the balances in the Standards and giving appropriate attention to procedural skill and fluency. The materials partially meet expectations for practice-content connections, however they do not attend to the full intent of the practice standards.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
13
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
12
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
N/A
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet the expectations for Gateway 1, focus and coherence. Assessments represent grade-level work, and items that are above grade level can be modified or omitted. Students and teachers using the materials as designed would devote a majority of time to the major work of the grade. The materials are coherent and consistent with the standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet the expectations that the materials do not assess topics from future grade levels. The instructional materials do contain assessment items that assess above grade-level content, but these can be modified or omitted.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet the expectations for assessing grade-level content. 

Examples of assessment items aligned to above grade-level standards include:

  • Chapter 5, Tests A and B, Question 7, students complete a two-step word problem. Test A states, “You catch 12 fireflies. You lose 4 of them. Your friend catches 16 fireflies and loses some of them. Now you each have the same number of fireflies. How many fireflies does your friend lose?” This aligns with 2.OA.1, use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-step word problems. 
  • Chapter 6, Tests A and B, Question 7, students solve a word problem. Test A states, “A store has 53 masks. A shelf can hold 10 masks. How many shelves can the store fill?”  (4.OA.3)
  • Chapter 7, Tests A and B, Question 8, students solve a two-step word problem with numbers beyond 20. Test A states, “You have 89 crayons. Descartes has 10 fewer than you. Newton has 1 more than Descartes. How many crayons does Newton have?” (2.OA.1)
  • Chapter 8, Tests A and B, Question 8, students solve a two-step word problem. Test B states, “You have 13 songs on your tablet and buy 20 more. Your friend has 35 songs. Who has more songs?” (2.OA.1)

Above grade-level assessment items are present but could be modified or omitted without a significant impact on the underlying structure of the instructional materials.

Examples of assessment items aligned to grade-level standards include:

  • Chapter 1, Tests A and B, Questions 1 and 2, students solve word problems including addition and subtraction situations within 20. This aligns with 1.OA.1. 
  • Chapter 2, Tests A and B, Questions 4-6, students solve equations including addition and subtraction within 20 which include the use of strategies This aligns with 1.OA.6.
  • Chapter 6, Tests A and B, Questions 4 and 5, student represent given tens and ones as a two-digit number. This aligns with 1.NBT.2.

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet the expectations for spending a majority of class time on major work of the grade when using the materials as designed. Time spent on the major work was figured using chapters, lessons, and days. Approximately 73% of the time is spent on the major work of the grade.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade. For Grade 1, this includes all clusters within 1.OA and 1.NBT along with 1.MD.A. 

To determine the focus on major work, three perspectives were evaluated: the number of chapters devoted to major work, the number of lessons devoted to major work, and the number of weeks devoted to major work. 

  • The approximate number of chapters devoted to major works of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 10 out of 14 chapters, which is approximately 71% of the instructional time.
  • The number of lessons devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connect to the major work) is 74 out of 101 lessons, which is approximately 73% of the instructional time.
  • The number of days devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 114 out of 157 days, which is approximately 73% of the instructional time.

A day-level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials because the number of days is not consistent within chapters and lessons. As a result, approximately 73% of the instructional materials focus on the major work of the grade.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet the expectations that the materials are coherent and consistent with the standards. The materials represent a year of viable content. Teachers using the materials would give their students extensive work in grade-level problems, and the materials describe how the lessons connect with the grade-level standards. However, above grade-level content is present and not identified.

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that supporting work enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

Examples of the connections between supporting work and major work include the following:

  • Chapter 11, Lesson 5, Think and Grow, connects supporting standard 1.MD.4 to major work 1.OA.1 when students use data from a table to find “How many more students ride a bus than walk?” “10 - 1 = 9”, “How many students were asked?” “10 + 1 = 11”. 
  • Chapter 11, Lesson 5, Think and Grow, connects supporting standard 1.MD.4 to major work 1.OA.6 and 1.OA.2 when students write addition and subtraction equations and solve to answer questions about the data in the tally chart or picture graph.
  • Chapter 12, Lesson 5, Think and Grow, connects supporting standard 1.MD.3 to major work 1.NBT.1 as students use a number line from 1-12 to count 1-12 on a clock.

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that the amount of content designated for one grade-level is viable for one year.

As designed, the instructional materials can be completed in 157 days with each lesson counting as 1 day. The minimum time per class period is 45 minutes, with the recommended time of 60-70 minutes. A pacing guide can be found in the Teachers Guide. Grade One is divided into 14 Chapters. Please note that Chapter 10, Lesson 7 was not included in the count due to the off grade-level content. The 157 days include the following:

  • 101 days of Lessons
  • 14 days of Lesson Opener Activities - Each Chapter begins with a chapter opener.
  • 28 days for “Connect and Grow” Activities - Two days per chapter are dedicated to these activities which include a performance task and chapter practice on one day and centers on the other day. 
  • 14 days for Chapter Assessments - Each chapter has a final chapter assessment.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet expectations for being consistent with the progressions in the Standards. The presence of above grade-level content distracts from all students engaging with extensive work of the grade. 

The Teacher Edition includes a “Progression Through the Grades” chart which outlines each domain and its accompanying clusters, and which chapters address each cluster. Additionally, tables are provided to identify which lessons address specific standards. The beginning of each chapter includes an overview table “Progressions Through the Grades” that shows the content from the previous and future grade levels. At the beginning of each chapter, the materials provide “Laurie’s Overview” where the math in the chapter is explained and connected to prior and future work of the grade. For example:

  • The "Progression Through the Grades" chart states: Kindergarten “Represent addition and subtraction with various models and strategies. Solve addition and subtraction word problems within 10. Fluently add and subtract within 5.” Grade 1 “Solve addition and subtraction word problems within 20. Fluently add and subtract within 10. Determine the unknown number to complete addition and subtraction equations.“ Grade 2 “Solve addition and subtraction word problems within 100. Solve word problems involving length and money. Solve one- and two-step word problems. Fluently add and subtract within 20.”

The instructional materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions. For example, in the Teacher Edition, Chapter 8, Lesson 1 addresses 1.NBT.4:

  • Explore and Grow: “Find each sum. What do you notice? 13+10__, 39+10__, 52+10=__ . Have students model each of the addition problems with base ten blocks and with the 120 Chart. You can continue to use partners and have them exchange the models as in the 'Dig In'.”
  • Think and Grow, Teaching Notes, Model: “We want to add 27+10. Newton suggests that you think of the hundreds chart and find 27, then move down a row. Tell your partner how moving down 1 is adding 10 on the hundred chart. What number is below 27? Fill in the sum.”
  • Apply and Grow, Practice: “Use mental math. ex. 9- 16+10=__, ex. 15- 10+22=__.”
  • Think and Grow: Modeling Real Life: “There are 33 students on a bus. 10 more get on. How many students are on the bus now?”
  • Practice: additional practice problems are included.

Throughout the instructional materials, above grade-level content is present. This content is not identified as above grade-level, and distracts students from engaging with extensive work with grade-level mathematics to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. For example:

  • Chapter 6, Lesson 1, Show and Grow, students solve a word problem by subtracting numbers beyond 20. “You have 66 rocks. You want 75. How many more rocks do you need?” (2.OA.1) 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 7, Show and Grow, students use a ruler to measure objects to the nearest inch. (2.MD.1) 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 5, Show and Grow, students solve word problems involving length. “Your desk is 7 paper clips longer than your friend’s. Your friend’s desk is 14 paper clips long. How long is yours?” (2.MD.5) 
  • Chapter 11, Represent and Interpret Data, students learn the vocabulary and the visual models of bar graphs, picture graphs, and tally charts. (2.MD.10) 
  • Chapter 11, Lessons 1, 2, 3 and 4, Show and Grow, students work with pennies, nickels, and dimes. (2.MD.8) 
  • Chapter 12, Lessons 5-8, Show and Grow contains at least one problem involving elapsed time. (3.MD.1) 

Each lesson contains an “About the Math” section that connects the math to prior knowledge. In addition, the portion of the lesson titled “Connect and Extend Learning” includes a section titled “Prior Skills” that clearly identifies prior grade content. For example:

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 4 connects learning to prior grade-level content. “The make a 10 strategy is another addition strategy that students were introduced to in Grade 1. Students are working with greater sums and also working towards fluency within 20.”
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 1 connects learning to prior grade-level content. “In Grade 1, students used the hundreds chart to count back from a decade number. Now they learn to start from a non-decade number.”
  • Teacher Edition, Chapter 6, Lesson 1, Laurie’s Notes, Preparing to Teach, “Students will extend their counting today by counting by ones to 120. Counting in Kindergarten culminated in counting to 100. Students used the hundreds chart in Kindergarten, and will now use a 120 chart…”
  • Teacher Edition, Chapter 13, Lesson 1, Laurie’s Notes, Preparing to Teach, “This chapter extends learning on two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes from Kindergarten…”
  • Teacher Edition, Chapter 1, Prior Skills, Exercises 5 and 6: Kindergarten, Understanding and Writing 7, Understanding and Writing 10
  • Teacher Edition Chapter 2, Prior Skills, Exercises 10-13: Kindergarten, Counting 0
  • Teacher Edition, Chapter 3, Prior Skills, Exercise 5: Kindergarten, Comparing Groups to 10 by Counting
  • Teacher Edition, Chapter 5, Prior Skills, Exercise 6: Kindergarten, Composing and Decomposing 10

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards. Overall, the materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings, and they provide problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains when the connections are natural and important.

Examples of learning objectives visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings include:

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 2, Explore and Grow, “Solve to add to word problems.” Students use linking cubes to model a word problem, and write an equation to solve. (1.OA.A)
  • Chapter 4, Lesson 3, Explore and Grow, “Use the count on strategy to find a sum.” Students use a number line to count on to find the answer to a word problem. For example, “There are 8 coins in a piggy bank. You put in 5 more. How many coins are in the bank now?” (1.OA.C)
  • Chapter 4, Lesson 5, Explore and Grow, the learning objective is visibly shaped by 1.OA.C (Add and subtract within 20). For example, Question 5, “Make a 10 and add, 3 + 7 + 10 =___.” 
  • Chapter 12, Lesson 7, Explore and Grow, the learning objective is visibly shaped by 1.MD.B (Tell and write time). The directions state, For example, Question 2, “Write the time.” The clock shown is set to 2 o’clock. 
  • Chapter 14, Lesson 1, Explore and Grow, the Learning Target states, “Identify equal shares in two-dimensional shapes.” Students take a circle, a square and a triangle to show “Equal Parts” and “Unequal Parts”. (1.G.A)
  • Chapter 14, Lesson 2, Explore and Grow, the Learning Target states, “Identify shapes that show halves.“ Students “Build hexagons with the pattern blocks shown. Circle the hexagon that shows 2 equal shares.” (1.G.A)

Examples of problems and activities connecting two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, include:

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 9, Apply and Grow, connects 1.OA.A with 1.OA.B as students show both the related addition and subtraction equations that could be used to solve word problems. For example, Question 2, “You have 9 rings. 7 are green. The rest are orange. How many orange rings do you have? ___ + ___ = ____. ___ - ___=____.”
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 3, Think and Grow, connects 1.OA.C to 1.OA.D as students “Use the get to 10 strategy when subtracting 9.” Students “use counters to find each difference. 15 - 10 = ___ and 15 - 9 = ___.” 
  • Chapter 8, Lesson 7, Explore and Grow, connects 1.NBT.C to 1.NBT.B as students “Use addition to subtract 10.” For example, “Complete each equation. What do you notice?” The examples are “20 + ___ = 50” and “50 - 20 = ___.” Students solve using number lines.
  • Chapter 9, Lesson 1, Show and Grow, connects major clusters 1.NBT.C and 1.OA.A. For example, Question 12, “You do 42 jumping jacks in the morning and 46 at night. How many jumping jacks do you do in all?” The problem includes a space for students to write an addition equation and draw a model.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for rigor and mathematical practices. The materials partially meet the expectations for rigor by reflecting the balances in the Standards and giving appropriate attention to procedural skill and fluency. The materials partially meet the expectations for practice-content connections, they identify the Standards for Mathematical Practices, and attend to the specialized language of mathematics, but do not attend to the full intent of each practice standard.

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for rigor and balance. The instructional materials give appropriate attention to procedural skill and fluency and address the three aspects with balance, not always treating them separately and not always together.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meets expectations that the materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings. 

Cluster 1.NBT.B addresses understanding place value of ones and tens. Some lessons in Chapters 4, 6-9, 11, and 12 explore ways for students to develop and demonstrate conceptual understanding of ones and tens through the use of tens frames, 100 charts, and number lines. Examples from these chapters include:

  • Chapter 4, Lesson 6, Explore and Grow, students use counters to fill in a double 10 frame to show how to make a ten to solve 9 + 5. Students are asked, “Do 9 + 4 and 10 + 3 have the same sum? If so, why?” Supporting Learners states, “Ask students if they added or subtracted any counters when you were finding the sum.” Students must also write an addition sentence that shows that thinking (ex. 9 + 1 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14), 1.OA.6. 
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 3, Dig In, Circle Time, “Students will describe teen numbers as a group of ten and some leftover ones. This will lay the foundation for formalizing place value…Create two large ten frames with tape on the floor so that students can stand or sit in each cell to model the numbers…Every teen number has a group of ten, and some extra ones. Remember that a group of ten is really ten ones that have been put together.” Students color in ten frames to represent numbers and use a picture to circle objects into a group of ten and some more ones as a representation of teen numbers, 1.NBT.2. 
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 5, Think and Grow, students solve “Your teacher has 2 packages of dice and 3 extra dice. Each package has 10 dice. How many dice are there in all?” Students need to understand that two packages represents 20 then add in the three extra die by understanding that the two digits of a two-digit number represents amounts of tens and ones, 1.NBT.2.
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 4, Show and Grow, students circle groups of ten in a picture, write how many “tens” and how many “ones”, then write the number. For example, if a student circles 7 groups of 10 cubes, the students will fill in the sentence “7 tens and 0 ones is 70”. This develops the understanding of numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones), 1.NBT.2c.
  • Chapter 7, Lesson 1, Think and Grow, students see “16 is greater than/is less than 13” as a ten and six ones for the 16 and a ten and three ones for 13. Students circle the “is greater than” after comparing the two models based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, 1.NBT.3.

Cluster 1.NBT.C addresses understanding place value of ones and tens and properties of operations to add and subtract. Some lessons in Chapters 8-9 explore ways to develop and demonstrate conceptual understanding of addition and subtraction using properties of operations as well as place value within 100. A variety of representations are used to help develop the conceptual understanding of place value including models, base ten blocks, quick sketches, 120 charts or hundred chart, and open number lines. Examples include:

  • Chapter 8, Lesson 2, Explore and Grow, teaching notes, “Have students model each of the subtraction problems with base ten blocks and with the 120 Chart. You can continue to use partners and have them exchange the models as in the Dig In.” Example problems, “How did you find the differences? What do you notice about the differences for exercises?” “33 - 10 = ___; 67 - 10 = ___; 82 - 10 = __”. This supports conceptual understanding for 1.NBT.6, because students subtract multiples of 10 using concrete models. In Laurie’s Notes, “To begin Circle Time, explain to students that today they will subtract 10 from a number. Have students tell the strategies they have developed for subtracting 10 from a number. Have them describe what happens to the digits of a number when they subtract.” 
  • Chapter 8, Lesson 3, Explore and Grow (note at bottom of page, bullet 1), “Tell students to use base ten blocks to model the two equations side-by-side in the space above the equations. Have students discuss each question with their partners.” Example problems “Model each problem. How are the problems alike? How are they different? 3 + 2 = ___; 30 + 20 = ___”. This supports conceptual understanding for 1.NBT.4, because students add multiples of 10 using concrete models and strategies based on place value. 
  • Chapter 8, Lesson 3, Explore and Grow, “Which choices match the model?” The choices include a model of “50 using ten rods, the numeral 50, 20 + 30, 2 tens + 3 ones, 1 ten + 4 tens.” This supports conceptual understanding for 1.NBT.2, because students show how to represent two-digit numbers in a variety of ways that show understanding of place value. 

Some opportunities for students to demonstrate conceptual understanding independently are evident. The instructional materials do not always provide students opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade-level. Within the Apply and Grow, and Homework and Practice sections, students have limited opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding. 

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that they attend to those standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. The instructional materials have opportunities to develop procedural skills and fluency throughout the grade-level, and provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate procedural skills and fluency.

Standard 1.OA.6 requires students to add and subtract within 20 demonstrating fluency within 10. Students practice fluency with this standard throughout the materials, for example:

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 9, Think and Grow, “You have 8 markers. 2 are purple. The rest are blue. How many blue markers do you have?” Students fill in a part-part-whole mat and write two different equations (one addition and one subtraction). 
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 7, Show and Grow, students add in any order. Students use different models including number lines. For example, “Your friend collects 4 cans. You and your friend collect 10 cans in all. How many cans do you collect?” Students use a number line to solve. 
  • Chapter 4, Lesson 6, Practice, Problem 1, students “Make a 10 to add. 9 + 3 = ? , 9 + 1 + 2. 10 + 2 = 12. So, 9 + 3 = 12.” 
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 1, Review and Refresh, supports addition within 10, “Problem 11: 6 + 2 = ___. Problem 12: 4 + 3 = ___. Problem 13: 8 + 2 = ___. Problem 14: 5 + 4 = ___.” 
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 4, Think and Grow, students decompose a number leading to 10. “Use the get to 10 strategy to subtract: 15 - 6 = 15 - 5 = 10; 10 -___ = ___ , so, 15 - 6 = ___.” 

The instructional materials present opportunities for students to develop and independently demonstrate procedural skill and fluency, especially as called for by 1.OA.6, Add and subtract within 20 demonstrating fluency within 10, for example:

  • Games included in Chapters 1, 2, 4, and 5 are present both in the Student Edition and online. The games allow students the opportunity to practice procedural fluency with addition and subtraction within 20. Examples of the games include: Three in a Row, Add or Subtract, and Roll and Cover.
  • Online games include Add or Subtract, Chapter 2 (spinners to add or subtract within 10); Three in a Row, Chapter 1 (tic-tac-toe with add or subtract or both within 10); Numberland, Chapter 3 (move piece to add or subtract within 10) 
  • Center activities are included within every chapter. Some centers allow students the opportunity to develop procedural fluency within 20 (1.OA.6) such as in Chapter 4, Doubles Flip and Find cards. “Students place the Doubles Flip and Find cards face down on a desk. Students take turns turning over 2 cards. When two cards have the same value, students keep both cards.”
  • Chapter 1, Lesson 1, Apply and Grow, students use pictures to count to fill in the story problem. For example, “There are 3 (crabs). 6 more (crabs) join them. Now there are 9 (crabs).” 
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 4, Apply and Grow Practice, supports addition within 10 by focusing on adding doubles. For example, “5 + 5 = ___”.
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 5, Apply and Grow, students create equivalent but easier or known sums. “Use the double 3 + 3 to find each sum 3 + 4 = ___, and 3 + 2 =___.” 
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 6, Apply and Grow Practice, supports addition within 10 by focusing on commutative property. “Find the sum. Then change the order of the addends. Write the new addition problem. Ex. 7: 2+6=__ __ +__=__. “

While there are some opportunities for students to demonstrate procedural skill and fluency independently, the instructional materials sometimes direct students on which strategy to use when engaging with procedural skill and fluency. For example:

  • Chapter 2, Chapter Practice, students are directed how to solve each problem. Problems 13-15, “Add doubles from 1 to 5”, Problems 16-18, “Use Doubles”, Problems 21-22 “Count on to Add”, Problems 23-24 “Count Back to Subtract”.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet expectations that the materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics. 

The instructional materials present opportunities for students to engage in routine applications of grade-level mathematics. For example: 

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 9, Show and Grow, includes “put together/take apart with addend unknown” problems. “You have 8 beads. 5 are pink. The rest are orange. How many orange beads do you have?” The students show an addition and subtraction equation they could use to solve the problem.
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 4, Show and Grow, “You and your friend have the same number of flowers. There are 8 flowers in all. How many flowers do you each have?” Students draw a picture and write an equation to solve.
  • Chapter 3, Lesson 4, Show and Grow, Question 1, “Your friend has 7 trading cards. You have 3 more than your friend. How many trading cards do you have?” Students model the problem using a bar model and write an equation to solve. 
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 7, Think and Grow: Modeling Real Life, “You have some stuffed animals. You give 3 away. You have 8 left. How many stuffed animals did you have to start?”  
  • Chapter 8, Lesson 7, Show and Grow, “An art room has 70 bottles of glitter. 30 have been used. How many are left? Model: (students are given a number line), Subtraction equation: ____ bottles.”
  • Chapter 14, Lesson 1, Think and Grow: Modeling Real Life: “You and your friend each design a kite. Your kite has 2 equal shares. Your friends has 2 unequal shares. Draw each kite.”

The instructional materials present few opportunities for students to engage in non-routine applications of the mathematics. Most problems are routine application representing the common addition and subtraction situations in Grade 1.

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. 

The instructional materials present opportunities for students to engage in each aspect of rigor within each lesson, as well as multiple aspects of rigor.  

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 6, Show and Grow, develops conceptual understanding for 1.OA.3. “Although the Commutative Property seems obvious to adults, students still need to test and confirm the property through the exercises… for this reason helping students reason about why the Commutative Property works is as important as finding sums… Some students treat each equation as a separate problem. Help these students reason about a cube tower, and if any cubes were added or removed. If needed build the towers and have them turn the tower around for themselves. Ask if the total number of cubes could have changed.” Students use cubes that change the order of the addends. Students write equations to match.
  • Chapter 4, Lesson 4, Practice, students solve three digit addition problems. For example, Problem 3, “ 3 + 5 + 3 = ____;” and Problem 7, “7 + 8 + 1 = ____.”
  • Chapter 7, Lesson 6, Review and Refresh, Question 8, “You have 17 erasers. Your friend takes some of them. You have 9 left. How many erasers did your friend take?” 

Students have opportunities to engage in multiple aspects of rigor. For example:

  • In Chapter 3 Lesson 7, students practice with application and problem solving skills.  Problem 8, “You have 3 baseball cards. Your friend gives you some more. Now you have 10.  How many baseball cards did your friend give you?”
  • Chapter 8, Lesson 3, Think and Grow, students practice mental addition adding 10. Explore and Grow, “Find each sum. What do you notice? 13 + 10 = ___; 39 + 10 = ___; and  52 + 10 = ___.” Think and Grow: Modeling Real Life, Problem 22, “There are 61 tents at a campground. 10 more are put up. How many tents are at the campground now?” In Laurie’s Notes there is guidance for teachers to develop conceptual understanding, Model: “We want to add 27 + 10. Newton suggests that you think of the hundred chart and find 27, then move down a row. Tell your partner how moving down 1 is adding 10 on the hundred chart. What number is below 27? Fill in the sum.” 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 5, Think and Grow, “Your shoe is 7 color tiles long. Your friends shoe is 9 color tiles long. How many tiles shorter is your shoe?”

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
6/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet the expectations for practice-content connections. The materials identify the practice standards and explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics. However, the materials do not attend to the full meaning of each practice standard and do not provide opportunities to engage students in analyzing the arguments of others.

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout the grade-level. 

The Standards for Mathematical Practice (MP) are identified in the digital Teacher's Edition on page vi. The guidance for teachers includes the title of the MP, how each MP helps students, where in the materials the MP can be found, and how it correlated to the student materials using capitalized terms. For example, MP2 states, "Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

  • "Visual problem-solving models help students create a coherent representation of the problem.
  • Explore and Grows allow students to investigate concepts to understand the REASONING behind the rules.
  • Exercises encourage students to apply NUMBER SENSE and explain and justify their REASONING."

The MPs are explicitly identified in Laurie’s Notes in each lesson, and are connected to grade-level problems within the lesson. For example:

  • Chapter 3, Lesson 6, Think and Grow: Modeling Real Life, MP1 is identified, “There is a lot happening in this story! Let’s take it line by line.” Talk with students about the two expressions individually, discussing “your marbles” first and why the expression should be 7 - 2. Next take “your friend’s marbles” and discuss how the story shows 4 + 3.”  
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 4, Laurie’s Notes, students work with partners to count linking cubes and create towers of 10, then count the towers of ten. MP8, “Tell your partner what connection you see between the decade number and the number of groups of ten.” 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 2, Laurie’s Notes, students solve the problem, “A yellow ribbon is longer than a pink ribbon. The pink ribbon is longer than a blue ribbon.  Is the yellow ribbon longer than or shorter than the blue ribbon?” MP3, “Explain to your partner how you can tell if an object is longer or shorter than another just by using a piece of string. Tell what to do if both objects are longer or shorter than the string.” 

The MPs are identified in the digital Student Dashboard under Student Resources, Standards for Mathematical Practice. This link takes you to the same information found in the Teacher Edition.

  • Chapter 3, Lesson 3, Apply and Grow, Problem 7, “MP: Structure. Circle the equations that match the model.” Students are given 2 red dots and 6 red dots, and a label 8. The equations presented are: 8 - 2 = 6; 6 - 2 = 4; 8 + 2 = 10; and 2 + 6 = 8.
  • Chapter 7, Lesson 3, Apply and Grow: Practice, Problem 9, “MP: Precision. Match each ball with its bucket.” Students are given two buckets, one labeled “Less than 65” and one labeled “More than 65”. Students are given the numbers 58, 67, 62, 64, 73, 68.

There are some instances where the MPs are over or under identified. For example,

  • MP2 is identified in most lessons. 
  • MP8 is under-identified in lessons where students begin to generalize addition and subtraction equations.

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 do not meet expectations that the instructional materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard. 

The instructional materials present few opportunities for student to engage with the full intent of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; MP5: Choose appropriate tools strategically; and MP7: Look for and make use of structure. In addition, there are limited opportunities for students to engage in MP5 and MP8 throughout the materials, so they cannot engage with the full intent of the practice.

MP1 is identified in the instructional materials, however, there are few instances were students need to persevere to find a solution. MP1 is not found in Chapters 1, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 14.

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 5, Apply and Grow: Practice, Problem 5, “MP Number Sense”. “Use the card once to write two addition equations.” The students are not asked to persevere in solving the problem. 
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 8, Think and Grow, “MP1 Make Sense of the Problem”. Students use cubes to represent a two-digit number in different ways. After representing 46 in two different ways, the Teacher Edition directs teachers to “have student explain how they understand what happened between the two models. Then fill in the quick sketch and tens and ones”. Students trace a sketch provided for them.  
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 5, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, “Discuss the word problem line by line to develop the equation. Talk with students about the two expressions individually, discussing 'your lemons' first.” See if students can suggest the expression 12 - 4. Next, take “'your friend’s lemons' and see if the students can suggest 3 + 4.” 

While the Dynamic Student Edition includes tools for students, the instructional materials present few opportunities for students to choose their own tool, therefore, the full meaning of MP5 is not being attended to. MP5 is identified twice in the materials.  MP5 is not found in Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 14.

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 5, Laurie’s Notes, “Have students discuss their strategies for solving subtraction problems, such as drawing, using counters, or thinking of addition.” Students are given linking cubes to use. 

MP7 is rarely identified in the instructional materials. When it is identified students do not look for and make use of structure, nor do they all call for recognition of mathematical structure. 

  • Chapter 10, Lesson 6, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, “MP7 Precision: If time permits, have students measure an object with a partner using color tiles. They should say, ‘The pencil is 8 inches long.'”  
  • Chapter 13, Lesson 5, Think and Grow, “MP7: Are there more lines than these that could be drawn to make two rectangles?”

MP8: The instructional materials do not use words “regularity”, “repeated”, or “reasoning” in the opportunities teachers are encouraged to give the students. MP8 is not found in Chapters 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14. There are a few instances where MP8 is used to engage students with the full intent of the practice.

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 3, Think and Grow, MP8, “Look for and Express Regularity in Repeated Reasoning. Does anyone recognize a pattern when adding and subtracting 1? Will this always be true? Why?” 
  • Chapter 4, Lesson 6, Think and Grow, MP8, “Look for and Express Regularity in Repeated Reasoning. Watch as students work on Exercise 2. Their reasoning will continue to develop as they continue working. Students should develop the pattern of adding one to nine and subtracting one from the second addend.” 
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 4, Laurie’s Notes, “Tell your partner what connection you see between the decade number and the number of groups of ten.” This captures the full intent of MP8 as it involves looking at the connection between the decade number and the number of groups of tens.

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet expectations that the instructional materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics. Additionally, MP3 is not identified in Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9, or 14.

Throughout the materials students are presented with “You be the Teacher” problems, where they analyze errors or different representations. For example:

  • Chapter 4, Lesson 8, Apply and Grow: Practice, You be the Teacher, Problem 8, “Newton has 9 magnets. Descartes has 8 more than Newton. Your friend uses a bar model to show how many magnets Descartes has. Is your friend correct? Show how you know.” The diagram shows a bar with 9, and another with 8. The number sentence reads: “8 + 1 = 9”.
  • Chapter 8, Lesson 8, Apply and Grow: Practice, You Be The Teacher, Problem 9, “Is Newton correct? Explain.” Newton has a thought bubble with the number sentence “36 + 50 = 86.” A diagram is located below the number sentences showing 3 tens, 6 ones, and 5 tens.
  • Chapter 9, Lesson 5, Apply and Grow: Practice, You Be The Teacher, Problem 7, “Is the sum correct? Explain.” Students are given the number sentence "17 + 26 = 79". A number line is located below that shows counting by 1’s from 17 to 19, and then counting by 10’s from 19 to 79. 

The instructional materials present few opportunities for students to construct arguments, however, in some instances, students are asked to explain how they know, rather than construct a mathematical argument. Examples include:

  • Chapter 7, Lesson 5, Explore and Grow, students are given a number line labeled from 40 to 50 with 45 circled. “Circle a number that is less than 45. Underline a number that is greater than 45. How do you know you are correct?” Students do not need to construct an argument to answer the question. 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 2, Explore and Grow, students are presented with two keys. “Use string to compare the keys. Which key is longer? How do you know?" Students can explain, and do not need to construct an argument.
  • Chapter 11, Lesson 2, Explore and Grow, students are presented with two graphs. One graph presents data by tally marks, and the second graph uses circles to represent each data set. Students determine, “How are the graphs similar? How are they different?” Students need to construct an argument on how data is represented, and how those representations are similar and different. 

The instructional materials have missed opportunities to engage students in constructing arguments or analyzing the arguments of others. For example, Chapter 3, Lesson 6, True or False Equations, students determine which equations in a given set are true or false. The materials miss the opportunity for students to engage in MP3 as students do not need to state why an equation is true or false. Nor are they presented with equations that are stated to be true or false and asked to analyze why.

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 partially meet expectations that the instructional materials assist teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

The materials identify MP3 in the Teacher Edition. Laurie’s Notes sometimes include guidance to support teachers to engage students in constructing viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others. For example:

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 4, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 is identified and the materials state, “Have students explain their strategies for finding partner numbers and have others respond if they agree with the strategy.”
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 is identified and the materials state, “Discuss Newton’s thought about subtracting 0 and ask students if they agree with him or not. ‘Will that always be the case? Why?’” MP3 is identified again, and states, “Discuss Descartes’ thought about subtracting all and ask students if they agree with him or not. (You might need to explain what subtracting a number from itself means.) ‘Will that always be the case? Why?’”
  • Chapter 2, Lesson 4, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 example states, “Discuss Newton’s and Descartes’ thoughts. ‘Are they thinking about the same thing? Why or why not?’”
  • Chapter 5, Lesson 2, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 example states, “Ask students to discuss if they think it is easier to model the problem on the number line first and then write the equation, or vise versa. Have them explain why they feel that way.” 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 1, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 example states, “Have students order Newton’s and Descartes’s yarn from longest to shortest and shortest to longest. Defend how they know. Repeat with pencils.” 
  • Chapter 11, Lesson 1, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, “Ask different students to share if the number of roses is greater than or less than the number of daisies. Have them explain how they know. Ask other students to agree or disagree, and how they know.”
  • Chapter 11, Lesson 2, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, “Ask different students to share which way they prefer to organize data and answer questions: tally chart or picture graph, and why.” 

There are occasions where the materials do not provide guidance for teachers to engage students in MP3. Not all explanations require students to construct an argument or analyze the arguments of others. For example:

  • Chapter 4, Lesson 4, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 is identified and states, “‘How did you pick the second number so there would be no regrouping?’ Listen for the sum of the ones must be less than 10. Have students look at all of the sample answers to decide if all of them are correct.” This prompt does not give the teacher any assistance in engaging the students in analyzing the arguments of others. 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 3, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 example states, “Have several students share their explanations for Exercise 6.” 
  • Chapter 10, Lesson 5, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 example states, “Explain why solving a length comparison story is not really different from what we have been doing all year.” 
  • Chapter 12, Lesson 5, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP3 example states, “Explain why an hour later would add 1 hour and an hour earlier would subtract 1 hour.” 

MP3 is not identified in the materials in Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9, or 14.

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Big Ideas Math: Modeling Real Life Grade 1 meet expectations that materials use accurate mathematical terminology. 

In Instructional Resources Grade 1, vocabulary cards are provided for each chapter. Each Chapter begins with a Vocabulary Lesson, vocabulary activity, and vocabulary cards. The following are examples where the materials use precise vocabulary with the students:

  • Chapter 1, Lesson 1, Show and Grow, Question 2, “Write an addition and subtraction equation to match your picture.”
  • Chapter 2, Vocabulary Review, students review the terms “addend”, “sum”, and “difference” by completing a graphic organizer with the terms. “Lay out all of the cards on the floor with the word side up. Students take turns gently tossing a counter onto cards. You read the word on the card that the counter landed on and students repeat the word. A student turns over the card to see the definition and show it to the class. Repeat this process until all of the cards show the definition side.”
  • Chapter 3, Lesson 8, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP6 is identified and states, “What equations can we build from the model? Let’s think about how we write addition problems first. What numbers do we add? Are these parts or wholes? What are the numbers being added called? What is the answer called? Is it a part or a whole?”  This focuses student discussion on the precision of the terms “part” and “whole”.
  • Chapter 6, Lesson 1, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, “Be sure that students do not say ‘one hundred and one,’ but correctly ‘one hundred one’.” “‘And’ means a decimal point in the number.” Materials encourage the teacher to monitor the students’ vocabulary and listen for precise vocabulary.
  • Chapter 11, Lesson 4, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, MP6 is identified and states, “Tell your partner how to make sure your picture graph is correct based on the tally chart.” This encourages students to take note of the precision when transferring data from one organizer to another.
  • Chapter 12, Lesson 8, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, Attend to Precision, “Work with a partner. What is the same and what is different about the clocks?” This encourages students to take note of the precision when using a clock to read time.
  • Chapter 13, Lesson 1, Attend to Precision, “Explain why each shape under closed is really closed. Now tell why each shape under open is really open.” This encourages students to take note of the precision when working with shapes.
  • Chapter 14, Lesson 1, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, Attend to Precision, “Each of the shapes in Exercises 1-4 have the same type of cuts. For example, the squares in two lines that cross each other in the middle. How do you decide which shape has equal shares when the types of cuts are the same?” Answer, “Look at the size of the pieces, not the types of the lines or cuts.” This encourages students to take note of the precision when working with shapes.
  • Chapter 14, Lesson 3, Laurie’s Notes, Think and Grow, Attend to Precision, “Each of the shapes in Exercises 1-4 have the four parts. Why aren’t they all fourths?” This encourages students to take note of the precision when working with partitioning shapes.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
N/A

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
N/A

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
N/A

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
N/A

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
N/A

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
N/A

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
N/A

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
N/A

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
N/A

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
N/A

Criterion 3z - 3ad

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
N/A

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
N/A

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
N/A

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A
abc123

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 12/05/2019

Report Edition: 2019

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
MATH MUSICALS NEWTON AND DESCARTES DAY AT THE BEACH 9781635989007 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
BIG IDEAS MATH: MODELING REAL LIFE GRADE 1 STUDENT EDITION SET 9781635989069 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
BIG IDEAS MATH: MODELING REAL LIFE GRADE 1 TEACHER EDITION SET 9781635989083 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
BIG IDEAS MATH: MODELING REAL LIFE GRADE 1 ASSESSMENT BOOK 9781635989632 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
BIG IDEAS MATH: MODELING REAL LIFE GRADE 1 RESOURCES BY CHAPTER SET 9781635989663 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
BIG IDEAS MATH: MODELING REAL LIFE GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONALRESOURCES 9781635989670 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
BIG IDEAS MATH: MODELING REAL LIFE SKILLS REVIEW HANDBOOK 9781642080155 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019
RICH MATH TASKS GRADES K TO 5 9781642083040 BIG IDEAS LEARNING, LLC 2019

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

Math K-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The K-8 review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

X