Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for alignment to the CCSSM. In Gateway 1, the instructional materials meet expectations for focus by assessing grade-level content and spending at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade, and are coherent and consistent with the Standards. In Gateway 2, the instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, but they partially meet expectations for practice-content connections.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
16
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
32
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for focus and coherence. The materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which they should be introduced, spend approximately 86% of class time on the major work of the grade, and are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for assessing grade-level content. The materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced. 

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for assessing grade-level content.

Materials include Mid-Mission Assessments for Missions 1, 3, 4, and 5 and End-of-Mission Assessment Tasks for Missions 1-6. Both assessments include problems from different topics throughout the Mission. A performance task rubric for each Mid-Mission Assessment and End-of-Mission Assessment is provided. Examples include:

  • Mission 1, Mid-Mission Assessment Task, Topic C, Numbers to 5 in Different Configurations, Math Drawings, and Expressions states, “(Put 5 loose cubes in front of the student.) Whisper-count as you put the cubes into a line. How many cubes are there? (Move the cubes into a circle.) How many cubes are there? (Scatter the cubes.) How many cubes are there? Please show this (show 2 + 1) using your cubes. (Have the student explain what he does. We might expect the student to make a linking cube stick of 3 and break it into two parts.).” (K.CC.5)
  • Mission 2, End-of-Mission Assessment Task, Topic A, Two Dimensional Flat Shapes states, “(Hold up a rectangle. Use different shapes for each student.) Point to something in this room that is the same shape, and use your words to tell me all about it. How do you know they are the same shape? (Place several typical, variant, and distracting shapes on the desk. Be sure to include three or four triangles.) Please put all the triangles in my hand. How can you tell they were all triangles? (Hold up a rectangle.) How is a triangle different from this rectangle? How is it the same? (Place five typical shapes in front of the student.) Put the circle next to the rectangle. Put the square below the hexagon. Put the triangle beside the square.” (K.G.4)
  • Mission 3, End-of-Mission Assessment Task, Topic G, Comparison of Numerals states, “(Present a set with 7 cubes and a set with 5 cubes.) Put these objects in lines to match and compare them. Which number is more? Less? (Write the numerals 8 and 4.) Use the words more than to compare these two numerals.” (K.CC.7) 
  • Mission 4, Mid-Mission Assessment Task, Topic A, Compositions and Decompositions of 2, 3, 4, and 5 states, “(Put 4 toy animals in the whole’s place on the number bond. Orient the whole toward the top.) Tell me a story about part of the animals going here (point to part of the number bond) and part of the animals going here (point to the other part of the number bond). Move the animals as you tell your story. (Turn the number bond mat so that the parts are on top. Put 3 connected linking cubes and 2 connected linking cubes in the parts of the number bond.) Use these linking cubes (present the tub) to complete this number bond. (Students should put 5 linking cubes into the whole’s place.) Replace your cubes with numbers.” (K.OA.1)
  • Mission 5, Mid-Mission Assessment Task, Topic A, Count 10 ones and some ones states, “Count 10 straws into a pile. Whisper while you count so I can hear you. Count 6 more straws into a different pile. Count 10 straws and 6 more straws the Say Ten way (Pause.) How many straws do you have? (If the student says the number the Say Ten way, ask the student to also say it the regular way.)” (K.NBT.1)
  • Mission 6, End-of-Mission Assessment Task, Topic A, Building and Drawing Flat and Solid Shapes states, “(Place all the straws and formed clay balls in front of the student.) Build a square. (Place solid shapes in front of the student.) Choose one object that has the shape you just built. (Place pattern blocks template in front of the student horizontally.) The star is the beginning. Point to the third shape. Point to the seventh shape. (Turn the template vertically.) The star is the beginning. Point to the first shape. Point to the ninth shape.” (K.G.5)

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for students and teachers, using the materials as designed, devoting the majority of class time to the major work of the grade. The materials spend approximately 86% of class time on the major work of the grade.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade.

  • The approximate number of missions devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 4/6, which is approximately 67%.
  • The number of lessons devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 128.5/162, which is approximately 79%.
  • The number of minutes devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 7670/8925, which is approximately 86%. 

A minute level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials because it takes into account Digital Activities, which are a 10-minute station, following the Daily Teacher-Led Instruction part of the lesson. As a result, approximately 86% of the instructional materials focus on major work of the grade.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for being coherent and consistent with the Standards. The materials connect supporting content to enhance focus and coherence, are consistent with the progressions of the standards, foster connections at a single grade where appropriate, and include extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for supporting content enhancing focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

Supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic B, Lesson 5, Lesson, students classify items into three categories, determine the count in each, and reason about how the last number named determines the total. The materials state, “Today, we are going to do another sorting activity, but this time we are going to look for three different groups to sort things into. We’re going to play a game called Where Do I Belong? I will call one of you up to choose a picture from this bag while the rest of us whisper-count together to 10. (The counting keeps the lesson moving along and speeds the students’ decision times.) You decide if your picture belongs with the sun, the rain, or the snow. After you tell us why you made that choice, we will put it on the board underneath its weather type. Great job! I wonder how many sunny pictures we found? Let’s count them. (Number each picture as it is counted.) How many sunny pictures?” This activity connects the supporting work of K.MD.3, classify objects in given categories, to the major work of K.CC.5, count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things.
  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 3, Lesson, students sort shapes and non-examples identifying rectangles. As part of the lesson debrief students ”Count how many rectangles you colored. Did your partner color the same number?” This activity connects the supporting work of K.MD.3, classify objects into given categories, to the major work K.CC.5, count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things.
  • In Mission 3, Topic B, Lesson 7, Lesson, students compare linking cube number stairs. The materials state, “Mix up your number stairs on your desk. Find your 5 stick. Look at it carefully. Now, listen to my riddle. We are two different sticks. We are each shorter than the 5-stick, but when you put us together, we are the same length as the 5-stick!” This activity connects the supporting work of K.MD.2, directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to the major work of K.CC.6, identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group. 
  • In Mission 4, Topic F, Lesson 30, Lesson, students represent pictorial decomposition and composition addition stories to 10 with 5-group drawings and equations. The materials state, “Ricky had 10 space toys. He had 7 rockets and 3 astronauts. Erase your board. Work with your partner to draw 10 in the 5-group way, and decide how to separate it into two groups. Make two different number sentences about your new picture.” This activity connects the supporting work of K.MD.3, classify objects into given categories, to the major work of K.OA.2, solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10.
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 3, Lesson, students use flat squares to construct a cube, “In our last lesson, you made some great shapes out of your straws! I want to use some of the squares you constructed to make a new shape like one of our solids. Does anyone have any ideas? Look at the cube we already have. (Hold it up.) How many squares will I need to use? Let’s count together.” Once the cube is constructed, the class counts the number of faces and edges and determines whether the faces are squares or rectangles. This activity connects the supporting work of K.G.2, correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size, to the major work of K.CC.5, count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things.

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that the amount of content designated for one grade-level is viable for one year. 

The Kindergarten Overview PDF outlines the number of missions, number of lessons in each mission, and estimated number of weeks needed for each mission based on teaching four lessons per week. As designed, the instructional materials can be completed in 152 days or 36 weeks.

  • There are six missions with a total of 152 lessons.
  • There are a total of 10 Mid-Mission and End-of Mission Assessments, which adds 10 instructional days.
  • According to the Recommended Schedule PDF, Daily Teacher-Led Instruction requires 30-45 minutes divided into three lesson parts to build number sense with concrete manipulatives, pictorial representations, and discussion: Fluency (5-10 minutes), Word Problems (5-10 minutes), and Lessons (20-30 minutes). Following the Teacher-Led Instruction, students split into two groups for practice. Station one is Digital Activities (10 minutes) where students play online games to build number sense and are given the goal of completing four activities per week. Station two is Problem Sets (10 minutes) where students work through Fluency, Word Problems, problems from the lesson, or Problem Sets with the teacher. In Missions 5 and 6, students fill out a Paper Exit Ticket after completing both stations.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for being consistent with the progressions in the Standards. The instructional materials clearly identify content from prior and future grade-levels and use it to support the progressions of the grade-level standards. Students are provided extensive work with grade-level problems.

Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards and content from prior or future grades is clearly identified in the and related to grade level work. Each Mission and Topic Overview provides information about standards covered and how they are connected to prior and future learning. Examples include:

  • The Mission 2 Overview states, “In Mission 1, students began the year observing their world. What is exactly the same? What is the same but…? They matched and sorted according to criteria sequenced from simple to complex. Their perceptions evolved into observations about numbers to 10. ‘4 is missing 1 to make 5.’ ‘4 plus 1 more is 5.’ ‘There are the same number of dogs and flowers, 6.”
  • In Mission 3, Topic A, Comparison of Length and Height states, “In Mission 2, students observed, analyzed, and categorized geometric shapes by focusing on their attributes; they now launch into the process of recognizing and comparing these attributes. In Mission 3, comparisons of length, weight, and volume transition into comparisons of numbers: longer than, shorter than, as long as; heavier than, lighter than, as heavy as; more than, less than, the same as. For example, ‘8 is more than 5. 5 is less than 8. 5 is the same as 5.’”
  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Compositions and Decompositions of 2, 3, 4, and 5 (K.OA.1,3,5) states, “In Mission 1, students found embedded numbers and experienced decomposition by finding hidden partners. Topic A formally teaches composition and decomposition using number bonds as students explore the relationships between numbers to set the foundation for addition and subtraction.”
  • The Mission 6 Overview states, “Composition and decomposition of geometric figures reinforce the idea that smaller units can combine to form larger units. This concept underlies not only area concepts but also the base ten number system. Students leave this mission and the kindergarten year prepared to tackle the mathematical concepts of Grade 1 and beyond.”
  • In Mission 6 Overview, Notes on Pacing and Differentiation states, “Addressing ordinal numbers and relative position may not be a standard in some states or districts. Using ordinal words to describe a procedure is included in Lesson 1 and parts of Lesson 5, as well as the Word Problems in Lessons 4, 5, and 6. Consider omitting pertinent lessons partly or entirely. The fluency activity ‘If You’re Happy and You Know It’ in Lesson 1 might be omitted as well, since it prepares students to work with that content.”

Materials give students opportunities to engage in extensive work with grade-level problems. Students engage in grade-level work during Fluency Practice, Word Problem, Lesson, and Problem Set activities. Examples include: 

  • In Mission 1, Topic B, Lesson 6, Fluency Practice, Happy Counting within 5, students count up or down and when told to stop have to remember the last number they said within 5. During the lesson students sort treasures in a bag into groups and count the number of objects in groups of 2, 3, or 4 and based on the number total they count put it in a treasure box numbered 2, 3, or 4. The Problem Set has students look at groups of objects and color groups of 2 red, groups of 3 blue, and groups of 4 orange. All three of these activities in Lesson 6 provide extensive work with KCC.2, count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence.
  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Fluency Practice, Make a Shape, students use a craft stick to create a shape that has three points. During the Word Problem, students draw a pizza, divide it into slices and describe the shape of the slices to a partner. During the lesson, students use geoboards to create different triangles. All three of these activities in Lesson 2 provide extensive work with K.G.4, analyze and compare two- and three- dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, and parts.
  • In Mission 3, Topic B, Lesson 5, Fluency Practice, Show Me Longer and Shorter, students use their hands to show longer and shorter. During the lesson, students use a string and find objects in the classroom that are longer and shorter than the string. During the Problem Set, students cut out a string at the bottom of their worksheet and use it to find pictures on the page that are longer than the string. All three of these activities in Lesson 5 provide extensive work with K.MD.2, directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more or less of” the attribute, and describe the difference.
  • In Mission 4, Topic B, Lesson 13, Fluency Practice, Dot Cards to 6, students are shown a card of dots, state how many dots they see, and break the dots into two parts. In the Word Problem, students solve, “4 silly seals were splashing in the water. Show the silly seals with your linking cubes. 2 more silly seals came to splash. Show the new seals. How many silly seals are splashing in the water now?” The Problem set has students look at a group of objects and fill in number bond sentences, “There are 6 cornstalks. 5 cornstalks are in the first row. 1 cornstalk is in the second.” All three of these activities in Lesson 13 provide extensive work with K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way. 
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 1, Fluency Practice, 5-Group Flashes: Partners to 5, students are shown a card with dots, state how many dots they see, and tell how many more dots would be needed to make 5. During the lesson, students investigate various bags of materials and count how many using an egg carton to see if there are enough to make 10. During the Problem Set students circle groups of pictures that show 10 ones. All three of these activities in Lesson 1 provide extensive work with K.CC.1, count to 100 by ones and by tens.

Materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. Each Mission and Topic Overview provides information about standards covered and how they are connected to prior learning. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic E, Working with Numbers 6-8 in Different Configurations states, “As in previous topics, students will count objects and match their count with a digit card to reinforce that the last number said when counting tells the number of objects. Lesson 18 extends the counting of larger numbers by having students count 6 out of a larger set and order numbers 1–6 based on their knowledge that each number represents a quantity of objects. This calls their attention to the concepts of part and whole. Their 6 beans are within the larger amount. Students might say they disappeared or are hiding. They are there, but no longer a distinct set.”
  • In Mission 2, Topic B, Three-Dimensional Solid Shapes states, “The lessons of Topic B replicate concepts taught in Topic A but with solid shapes. Lesson 6 begins with students finding solid shapes in their environment. They might find bottles of paint, tissue boxes, balls, or crayons and describe these objects to their neighbor using informal language. ‘My ball is round, and it bounces! This tissue box has a lot of pointy corners.’ Some students might even use the flat shape vocabulary they learned in Topic A to describe their solid shape. ‘There are a lot of rectangles on my tissue box, too.’”
  • In Mission 4, Topic B, Decompositions of 6, 7, and 8 into Number Pairs states, “Topic B advances the work of Topic A, building students’ skill with number pairs for 6, 7, and 8, which is cultivated and maintained throughout Topics B and C during Fluency Practice. In the first three lessons of this topic, students decompose 6, 7, and 8. These decompositions are modeled as put together situations and represented as addition expressions (C = + ), as opposed to the take from decomposition type (C – B = ), which is taught in Topic D.”
  • The Mission 5 Overview states, “Students have worked intensively within 10 and have often counted to 30 using the Rekenrek during Fluency Practice. This sets the stage for Mission 5, where students clarify the meaning of the 10 ones and some ones within a teen number and extend that understanding to count to 100. In Topic A, students start at the concrete level, counting 10 straws.”
  • The Mission 6 Overview states, “As in Mission 2, students explore the relationship between flats and solids, this time using flats to build solids. ‘I made my square into a cube. First, I made another square the same size. Second, I attached the two squares with four straws the same length.’ They also apply their knowledge of ordinal numbers to describe the relative position of shapes within a set. ‘The yellow circle is first, and the red square is tenth.’”

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Grade Kindergarten meet expectations for fostering coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards.

The instructional materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic E, Lesson 20, Lesson Objective states, “Reason about sets of 7 varied objects in circular and scattered configurations. Find a path through the scattered configuration. Write numeral 7.” (K.CC.A,B)
  • In Mission 2, Topic B, Lesson 8, Lesson Objective states, “Describe and communicate positions of all solid shapes using the words above, below, beside, in front of, next to, and behind.” (K.G.A)
  • In Mission 3, Topic F, Lesson 21, Lesson Objective states, “Compare sets informally using more, less, and fewer.” (K.CC.C)
  • In Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 14, Lesson Objective states, “Represent decomposition and composition addition stories to 7 with drawings and equations with no unknown.” (K.OA.A)
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 6, Lesson Objective states, “Model with objects and represent numbers 10 to 20 with place value or Hide Zero cards.” (K.NBT.A and K.CC.A) 
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 3, Lesson Objective states, “Compose solids using flat shapes as a foundation.” (K.G.B)

The instructional materials include problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic D, Lesson 15, Lesson, students group objects randomly displayed in a circle into categories, and count to find how many. The materials state, “We are going to play Count, Wait, and Say How Many. Count how many there are in the group I point to. Wait for my magic snap, and then say how many. (Repeat until students demonstrate fluency in counting the groups.)” This activity connects K.CC.A, know number names and the count sequence, to K.CC.B, count to tell the number of objects. 
  • In Mission 2, Topic C, Lesson 9, Lesson, students sort an assortment of flat shapes and solids. The materials state, “Do you think we could sort all of the things on your desk? Take a few minutes to look at all of your objects and think about what things they might have in common. (Allow time for thought and experimenting.)” This activity connects K.G.B, analyze, identify and describe shapes, to K.G.A, identify and describe shapes. 
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 4, Lesson, students count straws the Say Ten Way to 19 making groups of 10. The materials state, “At recess, 17 students were playing, 10 students played handball, while 7 students played tetherball. Draw to show the 17 students as 10 students playing handball and 7 students playing tetherball.” This activity connects K.NBT, numbers and operations in base ten, to K.CC, counting and cardinality.
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 5, Lesson, students make flat shapes by combining pattern blocks. The materials state, “Place the squares on your personal white board. See if you can make a different rectangle from your squares. (Pause.) Tell me about your work.” This activity connects K.G.A, identify and describe shapes, to K.G.B, analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

In Gateway 2, the instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for rigor and practice-content connections. The materials meet expectations for conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application, and the materials reflect the balances in the Standards. The materials partially attend to practice-content connections by attending to the full meaning of most of the mathematical practices. The materials do not attend to the full meaning of MP4 and MP5. The materials do assist teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for rigor. The materials help students develop and demonstrate conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency, spend sufficient time working with engaging applications, and treat the three aspects of rigor together and separately.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings.

Materials include problems and questions that develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade-level. The Daily Teacher-Led Instruction portion of the lesson provides opportunities for students to explore, engage in, and discuss conceptual understanding of mathematical content. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic E, Lesson 18, Lesson, students count beans in a bag. The materials state, “You have beans in your bag! I wonder how many? Does anyone want to wonder with me? Could you count them without taking them out of your bag? I’d like each of you to take out 4 beans. (Pause.) Now, put them back in the bag. What happened to the 4 beans? We might not be able to see them, but are they still part of the group? This time, take out 4 beans and put them in your cup. Put your hand on top of your cup, and shake them up. Shake harder! Pour them into the circle on your work mat like this. (Demonstrate.) Let’s count how many are inside your circle.” This activity supports conceptual understanding of K.CC.4, understand the relationship between numbers and quantities. 
  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Lesson, students identify triangles and learn their attributes and classifications. The materials state, “We are going to look at some more shapes today to see what else you notice. (Put a triangle on the classroom board.) Tell me about this shape. We call this shape a triangle.” This activity supports conceptual understanding of K.G.2, correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size. 
  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 4, Lesson, students represent decomposition story situations with drawings using numeric number bonds. The materials state, “Let’s pretend today! Pretend that you have 5 apples. Show me with your cubes how the group of 5 apples would look on your mat. I’m going to draw the linking cubes into this number bond on the board, just like you put them in your whole. Now, pretend that 3 of your apples are red and 2 are green. Show me with your other set of cubes how that would look on your mat. Good! I’ll draw those cubes in the number bond, too. Look carefully at your groups of cubes. Let’s show how they would look in the number bond if we used numbers instead. Take your cubes off, and write the number with your marker as we have done before. Who would like to tell me how to fill in our numbers?” This activity supports conceptual understanding of K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way.
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 4, Lesson, students count straws the Say Ten way to 19 making a pile for each ten. The materials state, “(Place a linking cube on each of your fingers.) How many cubes do you see? (Ask your helper to place a cube on her right pinky finger.) Now, how many cubes do you see? You’re all correct! Eleven is 10 and 1. I’m going to teach you to count the Say Ten way! (With a linking cube on each finger, raise your hands again.) How many linking cubes is this? Every time Lucy adds another cube to her fingers, we’ll say, ‘Ten’ (show your hands) and the number of ones you see on her fingers. Ready? Excellent! Now, go back to your seats, and we’ll practice counting the Say Ten way using straws.” This activity supports conceptual understanding of K.NBT.1, compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones.
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 3 Lesson, students build solid shapes using flat shapes. The materials state, “Look at the cube we already have. (Hold it up.) How many squares will I need to use? Let’s count together. What if I trace one of the squares on my paper and cut it out? (Demonstrate.) I will attach it to one of the squares. (Cover one side of the skeleton (cube) with the paper to create a face, and hold the shape up for observation.) What do you notice?” The teacher continues to trace squares, cut them out, and attach them to the skeleton of a cube. This activity supports conceptual understanding of K.G.5, model shapes in the world by building shapes from components.

Materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade. The online Daily Activities provide opportunities for students to practice conceptual understanding independently. Examples Include:

  • In Digital Activities, Number to 10, Next Stop Top 8-9, students see ten frames with random configurations of eight or nine, students hit the “Freeze!” button and one of the configurations is displayed along with a number bond. Students use the ten frame to finish filling out the number bond. For example, after hitting “Freeze!” the student may see 5 purple discs and 3 red discs to help fill out the number bond 5 + ___ = 8. Students demonstrate conceptual understanding of K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 15, Make and Break 11-15, students use a ten frame, a five frame, and a stack of counters to build teen numbers. For example, students are provided with a filled ten frame and are told to “Make 11.” Students must drag the appropriate number of counters to the five frame. Then students fill out a number bond and an equation after building out the ten frame and five frame, “One part is 10, the other part is 1, what is the whole?” Students demonstrate conceptual understanding of K.NBT.1, compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 10, Make and Break 10, students are shown a ten frame that is partially filled and then asked to “Make 10.” Students drag the needed counters into the ten frame to make 10. Next students are given a number sentence, “5 and 5 make ___,” and fill in the total. Students demonstrate conceptual understanding of K.OA.4, For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 10, The Counting Train 1-10, students are shown several hot air balloons, pick one, and several animals fall out. Students must count the number of animals and place them in the correct number car of the train. Students demonstrate conceptual understanding of K.CC.4, understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 10, Make and Break 6-7, students are shown a partially completed ten frame and asked to “Make 6.” Students drag counters to correctly fill the ten frame. Then students are given a number sentence, “5 and 1 make ___,” and fill in the total. Students demonstrate conceptual understanding of K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way.

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for attending to those standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.

The instructional materials develop procedural skill and fluency throughout the grade-level. Each lesson begins with three Fluency Practice Activities and development of procedural skill occurs during the Lesson. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic A, Lesson 4, Fluency Practice, Finger Flashes, students are shown a number of fingers by the teacher and students state how many fingers are shown. The materials state, “Concentrate heavily on 5. Use a similar sequence, but interject 5 frequently and repetitiously. Students will be delighted at their ability to instantly recognize the group of 5.” This activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.CC.5, count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things.
  • In Mission 2, Topic B, Lesson 7, Fluency Practice, Show Me Shapes, students analyze solid shapes and objects scattered on the rug to gain fluency with recognizing attributes and using geometric vocabulary. The materials state, “Look at the shapes that are on the rug. I will ask you to find a certain kind of shape. When you find it, hold it up. Ready? Show me shapes that have points. Yes. Put them back on the rug, and listen to what I want you to find next. Show me shapes that have no points. Yes. Now, show me shapes that have a curve.” This activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.G.2, correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
  • In Mission 3, Topic C, Lesson 10, Lesson, students practice the procedural skill of using a balance to determine which item is heavier. The materials state, “I have nothing on my balance, what do you notice? (Place a pencil on one side and a marker on the other side of the balance.) Which is heavier, this pencil or this marker? How do you know?” This activity provides an opportunity for students to develop the procedural skill of using a balance to compare items, K.MD.1, describe measurable attributes of objects such as length or weight.
  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 1, Fluency Practice, Make 5 Matching Game, students practice seeing if two numbers make 5. Directions state, “Shuffle and place the cards face down in two equal rows. Partner A turns over two cards. If the total of the numbers on both cards is 5, then she collects both cards. If not, then Partner A turns them back over in their original place face down. Repeat for Partner B.” This activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.OA.5, fluently add and subtract within 5. 
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 7, Lesson, students practice the procedural skill of using number bonds. The materials state, “Our number bond is not complete! We haven’t shown the parts! What number parts are made by the two colors.” The sample response provided is “10 ones and 5 ones.” This activity provides an opportunity for students to develop the procedural skill using number bonds to decompose numbers, K.NBT.1, compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones.

Following the Daily Teacher-Led Instruction, students split into two groups for practice. The Digital Activities portion of the stations provides games for students to independently practice fluency. Examples include:

  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 5, Sum Snacks Increasing to 5, students count apples to feed animals. The materials state, “Give tiger 2 apples, give lion 4 strawberries, and give fox one apple.” This digital activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.CC.1, count to 100 by ones and by tens.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 10, Next Stop Top 3-5, students hit freeze and a number appears with two connecting bubbles. One bubble states a number such as 3 and students have to select the number that when added to 1 makes 3. Students are also given the two connecting number bubbles and must determine the total. This digital activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.OA.5, fluently add and subtract within 5.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 15, Hop, Skip, Splash! 10-12, students see lily pads with consecutive numbers on them and one of the lily pads is missing a number. For example, “8, 9, 10, __, 12, 13.” Students type in the missing number. This digital activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.CC.2, count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 5, The Counting Train 1-5, students select a balloon, animals drop from the balloon and students count to determine how many animals dropped from the balloon. Then students select the train car with the correct number to match the written number with the number of animals from the balloon. This digital activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.CC.4, understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 5, Make and Break 2-5, students are given a five frame and a stack of counters. They are asked to make a number and use the counters to fill the five frame. For example, students are instructed to “Make 2.” Then students are given a number sentence and must fill in the total, “1 and 1 make ____”. This digital activity provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics. Engaging applications include single and multi-step problems, routine and non-routine, presented in a context in which the mathematics is applied. 

The instructional materials include opportunities for students to engage in routine application of mathematical skills and knowledge of the grade-level. Examples include:

  • In Mission 3, Topic H, Lesson 29, Word Problem, students directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common. The materials state, “Demoss had a very small carton of orange juice. His mom poured it into a very tall glass without spilling any juice. Close your eyes, and think about what that might look like. Draw the little carton of juice. Now, draw the juice after she poured it into the big glass. Does Demoss have more or less juice, or does it look different?” This problem allows students to apply mathematics of K.MD.2, directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of” or “less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. 
  • In Mission 4, Topic D, Lesson 24, Word Problem, students use their personal white board to solve, “Robin had 8 cats in her house. 3 of the cats went outside to play in the sunshine. Draw her cats. Use your picture to help you draw a number bond about the cats. How many cats were still in the house? Can you make a number sentence to tell how many cats were still inside? Share your work with your partner. Did he do it the same way?” This problem allows students to apply mathematics of K.OA.1, represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 5, Word Problem, students draw pictures of flutes with holes covered to solve, “Pat covered 16 holes when playing the flute. She covered 10 holes with her fingers on the first note she played. She covered 6 holes on the next note she played. Draw the 10 holes. Draw the 6 holes. Use your drawing to count all the holes the Say Ten way.” This problem allows students to apply mathematics of K.CC.5, count to answer “how many” questions about as many as 20 things.
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 7, Word Problem, students draw a cake and use a ruler to divide the cake into shareable pieces. The materials state, “Pretend you are having a party. Draw a big rectangle on your personal white board to show a delicious pretend chocolate cake. Now, use your ruler, and draw lines to show how you would slice it to share the cake with the party guests. Where would you draw the lines? How many pieces did you make? Compare your cake to your partner’s. Did you both do it the same way? Who has more pieces?” This problem allows students to apply mathematics of K.MD.2, directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of” or “less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. 

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate the use of mathematics flexibly in a variety of contexts. Examples include:

  • Mission 1, Topic F, Lesson 28, Problem Set, students count and add to solve word problems, "Bobby picked 4 red flowers, Then he picked 2 purple flowers. How many flowers did Bobby pick?" This problem set allows students to apply mathematics of K.OA.2, solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10.
  • Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 3, Problem Set, students independently engage in solving a non-routine application problem, "Look at the picture. Tell a story about the birds going home to your neighbor. Draw a number bond, and write the numbers that match your story. This problem set allows students to apply mathematics of K.OA.2, solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10.
  • Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 16, Problem Set, students independently solve addition word problems, "There are 4 snakes sitting on the rocks. 2 more snakes slither over. How many snakes are on the rocks now? Put a box around all the snakes, trace the mystery box, and write the answer inside it." This problem set allows students to apply mathematics of K.OA.2, solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10.
  • Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 17, Problem Set, students independently solve addition word problems, “Listen and draw. Charlotte is playing with pattern blocks. She has 3 squares and 3 triangles. How many shapes does Charlotte have?” This problem set allows students to apply mathematics of K.OA.2, solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10.

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. 

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout the program materials.

Instructional materials attend to conceptual understanding independently throughout the grade-level. Examples include:

  • In Mission 3, Topic F, Lesson 20, Lesson, students compare different length linking cubes. The materials state, “Yes! (Demonstrate.) The 7-stick is longer than the 3-stick, and the 3-stick is shorter than the 7-stick. How did you know? (Discuss comparison strategies. Did they line them up in their minds? Did they mentally match one-to-one? Did they estimate?) Let’s count the cubes on each side. (Count chorally, and write the numbers on the board.) What do you notice about the numbers 7 and 3? Which is more?” This activity provides the opportunity for students to develop conceptual understanding of K.CC.6, identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group.
  • In Mission 4, Topic B, Lesson 8, Lesson, students model decompositions of 7 using shapes from a bucket and write number bonds. The materials state, “Find 4 shapes with three straight sides and three corners, and put them in front of you. You have a set of 4 . . .? Now, find 3 shapes with no corners, and put them in front of you. You have a set of 3. . .? push both of your sets together. How many shapes are in front of you?” This activity provides the opportunity for students to develop conceptual understanding of K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way.

Instructional materials attend to procedural skill and fluency independently throughout the grade-level. Examples include:

  • In Mission 5, Topic C, Lesson 10, Fluency Practice, Counting, students count forward from a given number. The materials state, “Count by ones from 11-20, changing the directions both the Say Ten way and the regular way.” This activity provides the opportunity for fluency practice of K.CC.2, count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence.
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 6, Fluency Practice, Sprint: Make 10, students practice making 10, “Take out your pencil and one crayon of any color. For this Sprint, you are going to write the missing number needed to make 10. (Demonstrate one example if needed.)” This activity provides the opportunity for fluency practice of K.OA.4, for any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number.

Instructional materials attend to application independently throughout the grade-level. Examples include:

  • In Mission 4, Topic B, Lesson 8, Word Problem, students represent raisins using balls of clay. The materials state, “Ming has 5 raisins. Represent her raisins with the clay. Dan has 2 raisins. Represent his raisins, too. How many raisins are there in all?” This problem provides the opportunity for students to apply the mathematics of K.CC.5, count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things.
  • In Mission 5, Topic C, Lesson 10, Word Problem, students solve, “Ms. Garcia is painting her fingernails. She has painted all the nails on her left hand except her thumb. How many more nails does she need to paint? How many does she have left to paint after she paints her left thumb? Draw a picture to help you.” This problem provides the opportunity for students to apply the mathematics of K.OA.4, for any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number.

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students’ mathematical understanding of a single topic/unit of study throughout the materials. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 3, Lesson, students determine the attributes of a rectangle. The materials state, “We are going to talk about another type of shape today. Look at the shape on the board. Use your math words to tell about it. (Place an exemplar rectangle on the board.) This shape is called a rectangle. (Write Rectangle on board, and affix the shape beneath it.) (Place another rectangle on the board.) Tell about this shape. Hmmm. I wonder if we will have another pattern today. Let’s put this over by the other rectangle. How about this shape? (Place a square on the board.) So, this is a rectangle, too? (Yes.) This special rectangle, in which all the sides are the same length, is called a… How about this one? (Affix to board.) Is this a rectangle? It has straight sides and four corners.” The teacher puts a rhombus and several other shapes on the board asking the students if the shape is a rectangle. This activity develops conceptual understanding and procedural skill of K.G.2, correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
  • In Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 18, Lesson, students solve both addends unknown word problems to 8 to find addition patterns in number pairs. The materials state, “Listen to my silly story: The students were playing with 7 balls on the playground. They accidentally kicked some of the balls into a big puddle, and now, some are muddy! What is one way the balls might look now? Turn and talk to your partner about your ideas. (Allow time for discussion.) Let’s make a math problem about my silly story. Draw 7 balls on your personal white board. (Demonstrate drawing empty circles.) Make some muddy. (Do not draw mud on any of the circles. Let students develop partners on their own.) Student A, show us your drawing. How many of your balls got muddy? Could we make a number sentence for Student A’s picture?” Students continue showing combinations of 7 and writing number sentences. This activity provides the opportunity to apply the mathematics and practice the procedural skill of K.OA.3, decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way.
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 6, Word Problem and Lesson, students solve the Word Problem using pictures and linking cubes. The materials state, “There are 18 students: 10 girls and 8 boys. Show the 18 students as 10 girls and 8 boys. Have one color of your cubes represent the boys and another one the girls from the story in the Word Problem. Show me the boys and girls that were in school. When you are done, check your partner’s work to be sure you agree. Everyone hold up the stick that represents the girls. Hold up the stick that represents the boys. How many girls are there? How many boys are there? Put the boys together with the girls. Count with your partner the Say Ten way to see how many students you have.” This activity provides the opportunity to apply the mathematics and conceptual understanding of K.OA.1, represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
8/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations for practice-content connections. The materials attend to the full meaning of most of the mathematical practices, but the materials do not attend to the full meaning of MP4 and MP5. The materials assist teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics and explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations for identifying the Standards for Mathematical Practice and using them to enrich mathematics content within and throughout the grade-level.

Mathematical Practices are identified in each Mission Overview. MPs are identified in a purple bracket within the lessons. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, Mission Overview, Focus Standards for Mathematical Practice states, “MP6, Attend to precision. Students use position words to clearly indicate the location of shapes. Also, when Kindergarten students are analyzing and defining attributes such as ‘3 straight sides,’ they are attending to precision.”
  • In Mission 3, Mission Overview, Focus Standards for Mathematical Practice states, “MP2, Reason quantitatively and abstractly. Students compare quantities by drawing objects in columns and matching the objects one to one to see that one column has more than another and draw the conclusion that 6 is more than 4 because 2 objects do not have a match.”
  • In Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 17, Lesson, MP1 is identified within brackets states, “Let’s add our equal sign. Now, put a mystery box at the end of your number sentence, like we did yesterday, so that we have a place to show how many shapes there are in all. How could we figure out our total number of shapes? You are right! Those are good ideas. Let’s count the shapes. Help me finish the number sentence. 3 + 3 is? Let’s write it together: 3 + 3 = 6. Show your partner how you wrote your number sentence! (Circulate to ensure accuracy and understanding.)”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 5, Lesson, MP7 is identified within brackets states, “(Hold out both hands, palms out to show 10. Then, show your right hand with the pinky extended.) The Say Ten way? Perfect. (Show 10 again, and then show 2 on your right hand with the pinky and ring finger.) Yes! (Continue this way up to ten nine.) What comes after 19? (Flash 2 tens.)” 

In some instances the Mathematical Practices are not identified and/or not connected to content. Examples include:

  • Mathematical Practices are not identified in the daily Digital Activities. MPs are not identified on the student’s game interface or in the Digital Activities links list in the teacher’s materials.
  • The Kindergarten Overview provides a list of the Mathematical Practices. For example, MP4 states, “Model with mathematics.” The MP is identified in the Overview, but there is no clarity on how it is connected to the content.

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations for carefully attending to the full meaning of each practice standard. 

Materials attend to the full meaning of most MPs. Examples include:

  • MP1: In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 7, Lesson, students follow directions to solve a puzzle turning simple shapes into a larger shape. The materials state, “Mix up your puzzle pieces! Now, trade your puzzle pieces with your partner. Try to put his square back together. Use the frame on your paper to help you. (Allow time for practice and experimentation. Circulate to listen to the mathematical language being used. Encourage students to describe unfamiliar shapes focusing on the number of sides and corners.) Tell me about your work.” If students can’t solve the puzzle teachers are prompted to ask students, “Could you move the triangle to make it fit? Think about another way to move it. you needed to flip it! I like how you kept trying until you found a way to solve the puzzle.”
  • MP2: In Mission 1, Topic F, Lesson 24, Lesson, students strategize to count 9 objects. The materials state, “Take out 5 counters. Count out 4 more. Put them all in your plastic cup. Shake them 9 times, and pour them onto your desk. Count your objects. How many? How many counters are left in your bag? Say the name of what we are counting. Look at your friend’s objects, and compare his group to yours. How are they alike? How are they different? (Allow time for observation.)” 
  • MP6: In Mission 2, Topic B, Lesson 6, Lesson, students find and describe solid shapes using informal language, not names. The materials state, “(Hold up the cube.) Look at this solid. Find the one that looks like it on your desk. How is it different? (Continue examining the solids until students have had a chance to describe them all. Encourage the students to use language such as edges, corners, sides, points, and curves in their discussion.” 
  • MP7: In Mission 5, Topic C, Lesson 10, Word Problem and Lesson, students build a rekenrek to 20 to solve a story problem. The materials state, “Ms. Garcia is painting her fingernails. She has painted all the nails on her left hand except her thumb. How many more nails does she need to paint? How many does she have left to paint after she paints her left thumb? Draw a picture to help you. Continue the pattern of painting one more fingernail and making the statements that describe how many have been painted and need to be painted. Have the students work independently as soon as they can. Once they have finished the first pair of hands, have them use the second pair of hands for Ms. Garcia’s daughter’s unpainted nails. Have them put the beads on her fingers, counting and making statements as they go. Engage them in counting all beads, analyzing how many are red and how many are white, how many are on the left hands, and how many on the right hands.” 
  • MP8: In Mission 4, Topic E, Lesson 26, Lesson, students model decompositions of 9. The materials state, “Take off 1 red cube. Do you still have 9 cubes in all? What are the parts now? Draw the number bond on your board. (Demonstrate.) Now take another cube off your long stick, and put it together with the 1 cube. Do we still have 9 cubes? What are your new parts? Great! Let’s make a number bond with the new parts. (Continue the exercise with new situations and number bonds, removing 1 cube at a time until students end with 1 and 8.) Did anyone notice a pattern while we did this with your cubes or with the number bonds?”

The materials do not attend to the full meaning of MP4, Model with Mathematics. In many lessons identified as MP4, the full intent is not met because students are not modeling with mathematics to problem solve. Examples include:

  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 6, Lesson, students use objects to model numbers 10 to 20. The materials state, “Watch this magic. Here is my 10. Here is my 8. I push them together, and I have ten 8. This is how we write ten 8. (Pull the cards apart, and push them together a few times.) Talk to your partner. What happened to the 0 of the 10 ones? Yes! It is hiding. I’m going to write the number without the cards. (Write 18.) It is like there is a 0 hiding under this 8. I want each of you to write this number on your personal white board. When I say to show me your board, show me.” This activity is identified as MP4, model with mathematics; however, students do not apply the math they know to solve everyday life problems.
  • In Mission 5, Topic D, Lesson 18, Fluency Practice, Teen Number Bonds, students reinforce their part-whole relationships within teen numbers. The materials state, “(Project the number bond with parts of 10 objects and 6 objects.) Say the larger part. Say the smaller part. Count the whole or total with me.” Students start counting at 1 to 16. The materials state, “Continue with the following possible sequence: 10 and 7, 10 and 3, 10 and 1, 10 and 8, 10 and 4.” This activity is identified as MP4, model with mathematics; however, students do not apply the math they know to solve everyday life problems.
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 2, Lesson, students use clay and stir sticks to make shapes.. The materials state, “That’s right. We are going to make more flat shapes today. Yesterday, we made special rectangles that had equal sides. What did we call them? Today, use your sticks and your clay to create another type of rectangle: one that has corners like an L but whose sides are not all the same length. (Pause.) You may cut one or two of your sticks if you need to. (Allow time for students to plan and create the shape. Circulate to support students who might need it.) Hold up your rectangles! How do you know they are rectangles? Take three sticks that are the same length. Now, use those sticks to make a closed shape with three straight sides. (Allow time for students to experiment.) Hold up your shapes? What do we call this shape?” This activity is identified as MP4, model with mathematics; however, students do not apply the math they know to solve everyday life problems, they are creating shapes with clay.

MP5 is identified in five lessons. The full intent is not met because there are limited opportunities for students to choose appropriate tools strategically and sometimes students are told which tools to use. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic A, Lesson 2, Fluency Practice, Hands Number Line to 3, students learn to count left to right starting with their left hand. The materials state, “Show me which fingers have beans. Use your mat to help you. (Circulate and support.) Let’s count on fingers from 1 to 2. Ready? Put another bean on the very next finger. How many fingers have beans on them now? Show me which fingers have beans. Use your mat to help you. (Circulate and support). Let’s count on fingers from 1 to 3. Ready? Very good! See if you can do it without looking at the mat. Close it up (show closed first). Ready? Stay here at 3. Now, count back down to 1. Ready?” In this activity students are told to use a mat, beans, and their hand as tools.
  • In Mission 1, Topic B, Lesson 5, Fluency Practice, Birthday Candles, students roll a die and place that number of candles on the cake. The materials state, “Assign partners, and remind students to take turns. If needed, model how to play the game with one student beforehand. 1. Roll the die. 2. Touch and count the dots. 3. Put that many ‘candles’ (crayons) on the birthday cake. 4. Without removing the crayons, the next person rolls the die and then adjusts the ‘candles’ to match the roll.” In this activity students are given candles and a die as their tool.
  • In Mission 3, Topic A, Lesson 3, Lesson, students make a series of longer than and shorter than comparisons. The materials state, “Here is a popsicle stick. Take one of your objects, and compare its length to the popsicle stick. (Select a pair of students to demonstrate. Model and have students repeat. Correct longer than and shorter than language, if necessary.) Student A, what do you notice? Student B? Take out another object and compare it to the popsicle stick. Tell your partner what you observe. (Allow time for students to compare the rest of the objects in the bag with the stick.) How could we use the popsicle stick to help us sort these objects?” In this activity students are given a popsicle stick as a comparison tool.
  • In Mission 4, Topic H, Lesson 41, students break a ten linking cube stick into two parts. The materials state, “You have so many different ideas. Now it is your turn to share them! You have a big piece of paper and some markers. You have a linking cube stick, too. (Pass out a linking cube stick to each student.) When I say to start, break your stick into two parts! Then, use as many ideas as you can to show your students and visitors different ways you think about your 10-stick and its two parts. Write or draw all of them on your poster. Then, you will get a chance to share the work you did on your poster with someone else. You will be the teacher!” In this activity students are told to use linking cubes. 

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics. 

Materials consistently prompt students to construct viable arguments. Examples include: 

  • In Mission 3, Topic B, Lesson 6, Lesson, students compare the length of a linking cube stick to various objects. The materials state, “Find your 10-stick. Look at the items from your mystery bag. Point to something that you think might be shorter than your 10-stick. Now compare the length of your 10-stick with the length of your object. Test your guess. Were you correct? (Allow time for discussion and comparison of the lengths.) This time, point to something that you think will be longer than your 4-stick. Test your guess. Were you correct?”
  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 1, Word Problem states, “Julia went to the beach and found 3 seashells. Her sister Megan found 2 seashells. Draw the seashells the girls found. How many did they find in all? Talk to your partner about how you know.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 8, Word Problem states, “Peter drew a number bond of 13 as 10 and 3. Bill drew a number bond, too, but he switched the 10 and 3. Show both Bill’s and Peter’s number bonds. Draw a picture of thirteen things as 10 ones and 3 ones. Explain your thinking to your partner about what you notice about the two number bonds” 

Materials consistently prompt students to analyze the arguments of others. Examples include:

  • In Mission 3, Topic B, Lesson 4, Word Problem states, “Write the following sentence frame on the board and then read it to the students. I am taller than _____. I am shorter than _____. Draw two things on your paper that would make your sentence true. Tell your sentence to your partner. Does he agree that it is true?”
  • In Mission 3, Topic C, Lesson 9, Word Problem states, “Put the following sentence frame on the board, and then read it to the students. I am lighter than _______, but I am heavier than _______. Draw two things on your paper that would make this sentence true for you. Show your pictures to your partner. Does he or she agree with you? How much do you think you weigh?” 
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 9, Word Problem states, “A Pre-Kindergarten friend named Jenny drew 15 things with 1 chip and 5 more chips. Draw 15 things as 10 ones and 5 ones, and explain to your partner why you think Jenny Made her mistake.”

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for assisting teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

Materials assist teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments. Examples include: 

  • In Mission 3, Topic B, Lesson 4, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “For enrichment, encourage students to explain and defend their placement of shorter than/longer than linking cube sticks to a partner.”
  • In Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 16, Note: Multiple Means of Representations states, “Help students, especially English Language Learners, to have meaningful conversations with each other by teaching them to ask questions, such as ‘Do you agree?’ and ‘Why did you do that?’ Teaching students to ask meaningful questions of each other extends their sharing and holds them accountable for sharing their thinking.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 2, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “Deepen students’ understanding by asking them to explain strategies for identifying one more. Then, have them apply their strategies through practice with a partner. Ask students: Could you use the same strategy for solving two more and three more?” 

Materials assist teachers in engaging students to analyze the arguments of others. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic B, Lesson 5, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “For enrichment, students who would benefit from an extension of this lesson could play the role of teacher. The new teacher puts pictures in the appropriate column, but one is incorrect. The teacher asks how many are in the column, and then asks if the pictures are correct. ‘Do you agree with me?’ Have children explain their reasoning.”
  • In Mission 3, Topic A, Lesson 1, Lesson, students watch a mock magic show analyzing the teacher’s mathematical thinking regarding measurement. The materials state, “I have two pencils. (Show students pencils of differing lengths.) This pencil is shorter than the other one. Now, close your eyes. (Place the pencils in your fist so that they appear to be equal.) Abracadabra! Look at the pencils now. They are the same length! It’s magic! (Varied responses.) Student C, come look at my pencils, and tell the class what you see. (Have Student C observe the pencils.) You are right. The endpoints of the pencils need to be in the same place for us to compare them fairly. Now, you will get a chance to be the magicians. You and your partner will have two strips of paper. Compare to see which one is longer.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic C, Lesson 14, Student Debrief, students try different arrangements of objects to determine which method makes counting easier to track. The materials state, “(Show objects in a circle configuration, and have students count how many. Then, slide the objects to change the circle into a line.) How can you prove that the number is still the same? Tell your partner. Did he prove it to you? What are some ways you proved it? Which ways were the most convincing?”

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for explicitly attending to the specialized language of mathematics.

Materials provide explicit instruction in how to communicate mathematical thinking using words, diagrams, and symbols. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Lesson, students identify shapes as triangles. The materials state, “Yesterday, when you were telling me about your shapes, you used a lot of math words to describe them. What were some of the things you noticed? We are going to look at some more shapes today to see what else you notice. (Put a triangle on the classroom board.) Tell me about his shape. We call a shape like this a triangle. (Write the word Triangle on the board, and affix the shape beneath it. Choose another triangle outline.) Tell me about this shape. (Affix the shape to the board under the first triangle.) I am beginning to see a pattern! How many corners does each shape have? (Three.) How many sides? (Three.) What do the sides look like? So, a triangle has three straight sides and three corners?”
  • In Mission 4, Topic D, Lesson 20, Lesson, students use linking cubes to demonstrate 5 take away 3 leaves 2. The materials state, “Yes, 5 take away 3 is 2. There is a special Math Way to write what we just did. We had 5 cubes. I will write the number 5 to show all of the cubes together. (Demonstrate.) There is a special sign we can use when we want to show that we are removing some cubes. It looks like this. (Write the minus sign.) How many did we take away?” Later in the lesson students are instructed to read 5 - 2 = 3 as 5 minus 2 equals 3.
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 1, Student Debrief states, “Any combination of the questions below may be used to lead the discussion. What words did we use to help us complete our problems in order? Look at the triangles and squares you drew. Are all the sides equal in length? Find someone who drew a shape with equal length sides; find someone who drew a shape with unequal length sides. How did the words first, second, and third help us be good builders today? Can you think of a time when order is important? What would happen if we put our shoes on first and our socks on second? Can you think of other ways that we use words like first, second, and third?”

Materials use precise and accurate terminology and definitions when describing mathematics, and support students in using them. Examples include:

  • In Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 14, Lesson states, “Let’s write 5 + 2. Put your cars together on the track. What number equals 5 + 2? Let’s look at our number sentence. What does the 5 tell us? What does the 2 tell us? What does the 7 tell us?” The suggested student response states, “The 7 tells us about the total number of cars on the track.” 
  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 3, Student Debrief states, “Guide students in a conversation to process the lesson and to debrief the Problem Set if you used it. Look for misconceptions and misunderstandings that can be addressed in the Debrief. Any combination of the questions below may be used to lead the discussion. What is a part? What is the whole? How do they work together?”
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 1, Lesson states, “Allow time for sharing and discussion. If students build shapes with five sides, or more than six sides, casually mention the name of the shape. Five sides is a pentagon. Seven sides is a heptagon. Eight sides is an octagon. Nine sides is a nonagon. Ten sides is a decagon.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Kindergarten meet expectations for being well designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The instructional materials distinguish between problems and exercises, have exercises that are given in intentional sequences, have a variety in what students are asked to produce, and include manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that the underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.

Materials engage students in both problems and exercises through the grade level. Problems where students learn new mathematics are typically found in the Lesson and Word Problem of the Daily Teacher-Led Instruction. Examples include:

  • Mission 2, Topic B, Lesson 6, Word Problem states, “Have students work with a partner. Give each set of students a small ball and a cube. We are going to do a test. Take turns with your partner. Roll the ball back and forth between you a few times. Watch the ball carefully as it rolls. Now, try to roll the block between you. Talk to your partner about what happens. Why do you think the objects behave so differently? What would be the best way to get the block to your partner? Why don’t cups that have a circle on the bottom roll off the table? Note: This Word Problem requires students to start thinking about the differences between balls and cubes in preparation for today’s lesson.”
  • Mission 3, Topic D, Lesson 14, Lesson, students explore conservation of volume by pouring. The materials state, “In the last lesson, we talked about the capacities of our containers. I wonder what the capacity of this bowl is. How could I find out? Tell me when to stop! (Use a spoon to fill the bowl.) There. Let me draw how the rice looks in this bowl on my recording sheet. (Demonstrate.) look at this bottle. I wonder if the capacity of the bottle is more or less than the capacity of the bowl. How could we find out? Good idea! I will use this funnel so I don’t lose any. (Pour the rice into the bottle.) What do you notice? Hmmm. I didn’t spill any. What do you think happened? Yes. The capacity of the bottle is more than the capacity of the bowl. Let me draw how the rice looks in the bottle. (Draw.) What will happen if I pour the rice back into the bowl?”
  • Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 15, Lesson, students represent decomposition and compositions addition stories to 8. The materials state, “We are going to play the gravity game today! Let’s pretend my cubes are space rocks. Help me count how many rocks I am putting into my cup. I have 8 space rocks in my cup. This side of the tapes is the land (point). I will use gravity and my magic tape line to help me find some number sentences about 8. How many space rocks fell on land, and how many fell into the ocean? Let me shake it 8 times, and then, I will pour it out to see what happens! (Demonstrate and pour the cubes onto the surface.) What happened? Can we make a number sentence about our picture? Write the number sentence on your personal board. Did anyone think of a different number sentence that tells how our cubes look right now? (Allow time for sharing and discussion.)”

Exercises where students apply learning to build mastery are typically found in the Fluency portion of the daily, Teacher-Led Instruction and the Digital Activities and Problem Set during Two Stations. Examples include:

  • In Mission 4, Topic G, Lesson 33, Fluency Practice, Core Fluency Differentiated Practice Sets states, “This activity assesses students’ progress toward mastery of the required fluency goal for kindergarten: Add and subtract within 5. Distribute Practice Sets A, B, or C based on student performance in Lesson 30. Students who correctly answered all questions on a Practice Set in the previous attempt should move to the next practice Set. All other students should try to improve their scores on Practice Set A. Students complete as many problems as they can in 96 seconds or the time allotted. Assign a counting pattern and start number for students who finish early, or have them play an independent game like the Make 10 Memory Game (Lesson 28). Collect and correct any Practice Sets completed within the allotted time.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 5, Problem Set, “Direct students to circle 10 objects and check the extra ones. Have them count the total using the Say Ten way. Watch to see that they count the 10 ones within the circle first from left to right, row by row. They then match the drawing to its numerical representation.”
  • In Digital Activities, Numbers to 15, Sum Snacks 10-15, students see an animal with a basket of fruit. The materials state, “Frog has 10 apples. Give him 1 more.” Students continue adding fruit to the animal’s baskets as directed.

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that the design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.

Lesson activities within each Mission are intentionally sequenced developing student understanding and leading towards mastery of the content. In each lesson students explore concepts, create concrete and pictorial representations, and participate in math discussions. Following the lesson, students participate in Stations. Digital Activities are designed to build number sense, and Problem Sets are designed to provide practice of lesson concepts and fluency.

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that there is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions; but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.

While engaged in lessons and Problem Sets during Two Stations, students are prompted to produce both oral and written answers. Students work in whole groups, small groups, and with partners during lesson instruction and are prompted to produce arguments and explanations. Example include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic B, Lesson 6, Lesson, students find and describe solid shapes using informal language without naming. The materials state, “I have something new for you to explore today! You will be working with your partner. Please take everything out of your bag. I will give you a few minutes to look and talk with your partner about what you notice. Place your things on your desk. Stand up and look down at them as though you were a bird. What do you notice? Now pretend you are an ant. Bend down and look from eye level across the top of your desk. When we did this with your flat shapes, you said you couldn’t see them anymore. What happens this time? You’re right. They are not flat. We call these solids. Find the solid that looks like this. (Hold up the sphere.) Tell me about this solid. (Hold up the cube.) Look at this solid. Find the one that looks like it on your desk. How is it different? (Continue examining the solids until students have had a chance to describe them all. Encourage the students to use language such as edges, corners, sides, points, and curves in their discussion.) Put your shapes back in the bag. Take out your detective materials. You and your partner are going to hunt for these shapes around our classroom. When you find one, draw it on your paper. (Allow students five minutes to identify some of the solids in the environment.) Please return to your seats. Would anyone like to show and share about what they found?”
  • In Mission 4, Topic E, Lesson 28, Word Problem states, “Use your clay to make 10 tiny grapes. With your marker, draw a pretty plate on your personal white board. Now, put some of the grapes on the plate. How many grapes do you have in all? How many grapes are on the plate? How many are not on the plate? Draw a number bond about your work.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 5, Fluency, Finish Line states, “(Distribute linking cubes as 10-sticks.) How many cubes do you have? (Give students time to count if necessary). Pretend that your 10-stick of cubes is a little train. (Have students orient their trains the same way by giving them a point of reference in the classroom.) Put your finger on the first cube. Let’s use our number order words as we touch each cube. Ready? Good. Now, break apart your cubes so none are connected. (Give students a moment to do this.) This time, I want you to pretend that they are little people running in a race! The start line is the edge of your personal white board. The finish line is the opposite side of your board. Watch me make my people run. (Demonstrate how to make cubes run.) On your mark, get set, go! (Allow about 10-30 seconds for students to participate.) Stop! The race is over. (Do not allow students to change the position of the cubes at this point.) Get out your marker. Listen carefully to what I want you to do. Circle the first runner. Mark an X next to the tenth runner. Underline the fifth runner. Now, point and show your partner who is first, second, and so on.”

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods. 

Digital Activities provide online tools and virtual manipulatives to enhance learning. Each Mission’s Lesson provides a detailed list of which materials are needed for the Fluency activity, Word Problem, and Lesson. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic C, Lesson 8, Word Problem, Materials Needed states, “Counters in a bag.” Manipulatives are used to help students learn “that the total count is not changed when objects are arranged in different orientations.”
  • In Mission 3, Topic E, Lesson 16, Lesson, Materials Needed states, “My square recording sheet (Template), 1 four-inch square of construction paper, 1 four-inch diameter paper circle, 20 one-inch paper or plastic square tiles, 1 small bag of large flat beans, my square recording sheet (Template).” Students use manipulatives to make informal comparisons of area. The materials state, “I wonder how many beans you would need to cover your square? (Various responses.) Work with your partner to put as many beans as you can on your square without piling them. (Allow time for experimentation and discussion.)”
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 9, Fluency, Grouping Teen Numbers into 10 Ones, Materials Needed states, “Bag with about 20 small objects and work mat. Note: The bags should have a variety of objects between 11 and 20.” Students use manipulatives to “Practice separating and counting objects as ten ones and some ones” to solidify understanding of teen numbers.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten have a visual design (whether in print or online) that is not distracting or chaotic and supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The font size, graphics, amount of directions, and language used on student pages and in Digital Activities is appropriate for students in Kindergarten. Problem Set Worksheets and Fluency Templates can all be printed from the online platform. Teachers are encouraged to read all directions aloud to students.

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Kindergarten partially meet expectations for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The instructional materials support planning and providing learning experiences with quality questions and contain ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content. The materials partially include a teacher’s resource that contains adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons and partially contain explanations of the grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for supporting teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students’ mathematical development.

Each Lesson contains questions for teachers to guide instruction in the Fluency Practice, Lesson, and Student Debrief sections. These sections guide instruction by providing teacher questions and possible student responses. Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities provides questions to support Digital Activities. Examples of provided instructional support include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 5, Fluency Practice, Groups of Shapes states, “Choose a shape, and then meet me at the rug. Look at your shape. Raise your hand if you know the name of your shape. When I give the signal, whisper the name of your shape to yourself. Ready? Look around the room. Do you see signs with pictures of shapes? Do you see your shape? When I start the music, I want you to calmly walk to the sign that has the same shape as yours. When I point to your group, say the name of your shape. (Point to the group of triangles.)”
  • In Mission 3, Topic A, Lesson 2, Student Debrief states, “The Student Debrief is intended to invite reflections and active processing of the total lesson experience. What did you notice as you compare each object to the string? Did you do anything different as you compare the lengths? What did you need to be sure to do? Why? Does it matter which way you compare two objects? Why? How did you compare the string and the door?”
  • In Mission 4, Topic E, Lesson 25, Lesson states, “There were 9 bears in the forest. Some bears went to sleep in their caves, and some left to find a honey tree. Use your counters to show the bears. How many bears were there in all? Could we show this story in a number bond? How many bears are there in all? What number should go in the whole? What are our parts? Did anyone think about the story in another way?”
  • In Mission 5, Topic C, Lesson 11, Lesson states, “Show me a tower of 10 cubes using one color. How many cubes are you holding? How many more cubes do you need to put on your tower to make 11? And how do we say 11 the Say Ten way?”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities To Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 1, Questions to support student understanding in The Counting Train, “Can you count aloud for me while solving the next problem?, How can you use the train to help? Was there a particular configuration of 5 objects that you found more challenging to count than others?”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities To Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 3, Questions to support student understanding in Sum Snacks, “What are you doing in this problem? After giving more fruit, how many pieces are there total? What is one way you can make 10? Can you think of another? If you have 8 pieces of fruit, how many more do you need to make 10?”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities To Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 5, Questions to support student understanding in Next Stop Top, “How does the use of color help you solve the problem? What does the number at the top of the bond represent? How did you complete the bond during ‘lights out?’”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. The materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Each Lesson contains informational annotations and suggestions in side box notes labeled Multiple Means of Engagement, Multiple Means of Representation, Multiple Means of Action and Expression, Multiple Means of Action and Representation, and Multiple Means of Expression. Useful annotations and suggestions for Digital Activities are found in Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding. Examples of informational annotations and suggestions include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Expression states, “Open the Student Debrief with turn and talk to your neighbor: Allow students to try out their ideas with a partner before speaking to the whole class.”
  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Representation states, “English Language Learners may benefit from having the words curved, straight, pointy, round, sides, and other attributes introduced before the lesson so that they can participate in the discussion with the class.  After introducing them, post the vocabulary on the word wall with visuals so that students can refer to them.”
  • In Mission 3, Topic A, Lesson 3, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Representation states, “For enrichment, challenge students by extending the task. Ask them, individually or in teams, to order the objects in their mystery bags from shortest to longest. Also, ask them to find objects in the classroom that can be added to everyone’s mystery bag.”
  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “For students with processing or memory issues, place cards faceup to play the game. Students can match partners of 5 without the added memory requirement.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 5, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “Give students who need extra support more time to practice counting. They may benefit from working with the cards one at a time while you move more rapidly through the cards with the rest of the class.”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 2, The Counting Train, 4 Activities, “Look for students who try to use the train to count by clicking each car as they count and remind them to only click on the car that represents the total count of objects. Consider giving these students something they can use to count on such as a left hand mat or a number path.”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 4, Sum Snacks, 10 Activities, “Look for students who, when asked to name the total number of pieces of fruit, start back at the beginning of the counting sequence, as opposed to simply naming the total with a single number (pay close attention to problems that start with 10 objects, as the visual representation is more challenging for students to see all 10 objects). This tells you that this particular student has not made the move from one-to-one correspondence to cardinality (i.e., they have yet to master the idea that the last name said names the total number of objects and, if the last number is known, there is no need to recount the objects).”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 6, Hop Skip Splash, 3 Activities, “Look for students who struggle to accurately complete the problems, as this might indicate he/she has not mastered the counting sequence. Consider providing students additional time to practice counting.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations for containing a teacher’s edition (in print or clearly distinguished/ accessible as a teacher’s edition in digital materials) that includes full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Mission and Topic Overviews provide an explanation of what is being taught in each topic and lists focus standards, and teacher notes within the lesson explain how to engage learners. However, within the lessons, the teacher materials do not provide explanations or examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. 

Examples of the Topic Overviews include:

  • Mission 3, Topic A, Comparison of Length and Height, K.MD.1, K.MD.2, “In Mission 2, students observed, analyzed, and categorized geometric shapes by focusing on their attributes; they now launch into the process of recognizing and comparing these attributes. In Mission 3, comparisons of length, weight, and volume transition into comparisons of numbers; more than, less than, the same as. For example, ‘8 is more than 5. 5 is less than 8. 5 is the same as 5.’” 
  • Mission 5, Topic C, Decompose Numbers 11-20, and Count to Answer “How Many?” Questions in Varied Configurations, K.CC.4b, K.CC.4.c, K.CC.5, K.NBT.1, K.CC.3, K.CC.4a, “Topic C opens in Lesson 10 with students building a Rekenrek to 20, which they use to count and model numbers for the balance of the year. They deepen their understanding of the composition and decomposition of teen numbers as 10 ones and some more ones (K.NBT.1) by showing, counting, and writing (K.CC.3) the numbers 11 to 20 using a variety of configurations: vertical towers, linear, array, and circular configurations. In each configuration, students count to answer “how many?” questions (K.CC.5) and realize that whatever the configuration, a teen number can be decomposed into 10 ones and some ones. 

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials contain a teacher’s edition (in print or clearly distinguished/ accessible as a teacher’s edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.

Materials do not provide a scope and sequence or progressions section explaining connections of grade-level mathematics to previous and future mathematical learning. Some Mission Overviews and Lesson Notes provide context of how current learning fits in the context of the entire mathematics curriculum. Examples include:

  • The Mission 2 Overview states, “The Kindergarten year closes in Mission 6 with another geometry unit.  By that time, having become much more familiar with flats and solids, the students compose new flat shapes and build solid shapes from components.” 
  • In Mission 5, Topic E, Lesson 21, Note: Standards Alignment states, “In this lesson, students decompose teen numbers into two parts with blocks and hide one of the parts.  After guessing what the hidden part is, they then see a number sentence with a hidden part such as $$12= 10 +$$ ___. This bridges to Grade 1 content (1.OA.8).”
  • The Mission 6 Overview states, “Students leave this mission and the Kindergarten year prepared to tackle the mathematical concepts of Grade 1 and beyond.”

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten provides a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher’s edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter, and unit (i.e., pacing guide).

Each Mission contains an Overview of Mission Topics and Lesson Objectives. Topics are listed with standards and student objectives. Materials do not provide a pacing guide. The Recommended Schedule for Kindergarten states, “Every day, teachers lead Fluency, Word Problems, and Lessons from Teacher materials. Teachers may choose to deliver instruction in stations or as a whole group. Daily Teacher-Led Instruction builds number sense with concrete manipulatives, pictorial representations, and discussion. ... Fluency 5 - 10 min; Word Problems 5- 10 min; Lesson 20 - 30 min. ... After Teacher-Led Instruction, students split into two groups for practice (Digital Activities, 10 min, and Problem Sets, 10 min). After independent practice, teachers guide students in conversation in the Student Debrief. In Missions 5 and 6, students then complete Paper Exit Tickets, available in Teacher Materials.”

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten contain some strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

At the Zearn.org website a section titled Parent/Caregiver Packs provides step-by-step instructions, which are available in English and Spanish. A webinar provides information on how to set up student accounts and contains a Frequently Asked Questions section. A troubleshooting section for parent and student login help and account set-up is available. There is also a video explaining the Zearn mathematics program.

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten contain some explanations of the instructional approaches of the program but no identification of  research-based strategies. Examples include: 

  • In Mission 1, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states,  ‘Any time a new manipulative is introduced, provide children an opportunity to freely explore (play) with it for a few moments before asking them to do anything constructive with it.  Students at this age are very excited to use new materials.  Allow them to satisfy their curiosity first before focusing their full attention on the academic task.”
  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “Scaffold the Word Problem for students who struggle by giving directions one at a time and waiting until students complete the task they were given before giving them the next direction. For example, say, ‘Draw a large pizza pie.’ After students comply, continue with, ‘Use your crayon to cut the pizza into slices for two friends.’”
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 7, Note: Multiple Means Of Representation states, “Help English Language Learners discuss their work with a partner by providing their work with a partner by providing them with sentence starters, such as, ‘I have more pieces because…’ The sentence starters not only can help students communicate, but they can also hold students accountable for staying on topic.”

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
7/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Kindergarten partially meet expectations for offering teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the standards. The instructional materials provide strategies for identifying and addressing common student errors and misconceptions but do not provide strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge. The materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice with feedback and offer ongoing formative and summative assessments, but they do not provide suggestions for follow-up. 

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten do not meet expectations that materials provide strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge within and across grade levels.

The materials do not provide a way to gather prior knowledge information about students.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for providing strategies for teachers to identify common student errors and misconceptions.

The Mid-Mission and End-of-Mission Assessments contain rubrics with “A Progression towards Mastery” showing different levels of student understanding for a standard, and many of the Multiple Means of … boxes provide strategies for addressing common errors and misconceptions. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Mid-Mission Assessment, Topic A, K.MD.3, “Step 1: Student shows little evidence of identifying or explaining similarities or differences. Student is almost non-responsive. Step 2: Student shows evidence of beginning to identify similarities and differences but is unable to explain those similarities or differences using words. Step 3: Student correctly identifies both sets of bears but provides a partial explanation of how the bears are similar or different. OR Student can explain the similarities and differences but cannot identify one of the sets of bears. (ELLs may point to express their insights.) Step 4: The student correctly *identifies the two large bears as being identical. *identifies similarities by attribute (size, color, type, etc.) *Explains, in words, how the two bears differ based on either size or shade.”
  • In Mission 1, Topic F, Lesson 26, the Multiple Means of Representation box states, “Because understanding the number 10 deserves special attention, support students by using different representations of 10 (fingers, pennies, ten frames of different objects, pictures, and other visuals of 10 objects scattered and on 5-group mats) if they are struggling to master this important milestone.”
  • In Mission 3, End-of-Mission Assessment, Topic E, K.OA.3, “Step 1: Student: *Writes random or no numbers in the number bonds. *Is unable to represent the story using cubes or a number tool. Step 2: Student: Writes two numbers that are close but an incorrect number pair for 10 in the number bond. *Represents the story incorrectly with cues and the number bond. OR Student performs one of the tasks correctly with some teacher response. Step 3: Student: *Writes a correct number pair for 10 in the number bond. OR *Represents the story correctly using cubes or a number bond. Step 4: Student correctly: *Writes a number pair for 10 in the number bond. *Represents the story using cubes and a number bond.”
  • In Mission 5, End of Mission Assessment, Topic D, K.CC1, K.CC.2, “Step 1: Student shows little evidence of counting ability or understanding. Step 2: Student shows evidence of beginning to understand counting by 10s and 1s but skips or repeats numbers often, resulting in an inaccurate count. Step 3: Student is unable to perform one of the tasks. Step 4: Student correctly: *Counts up by 10s using the Say Ten and regular ways. *Counts the dots from 11 to 20 the Say Ten way. *Counts from 28 to 34 the regular way. *Counts a number between 11 and 20 the regular way.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.

Each lesson starts with an opportunity for ongoing review and practice through the Fluency Practice portion of each lesson. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Fluency Practice, Groups of Six, “This maintenance fluency activity helps students gain efficiency in counting objects in varied configurations.” The teacher plays music and when the music stops students find a corner. Each corner can only have six people in it. 
  • In Mission 4, Topic H, Lesson 38, Fluency Practice, Building 1 More and 1 Less Towers states, “Students practice counting up and down by 1 more or 1 less to support the addition of 1 using 5 groups and equations.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 2, Core Fluency Sprint B states, “Write in the missing number, 1. $$2-1= \square$$ 2. $$4-1= \square$$.” 

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments, clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized. 

Beginning in Mission 5, most lessons provide an Exit Ticket which assesses the learning of new content addressed in the Lesson portion of the lesson and state standards assessed. Examples include: 

  • In Mission 3, End-of-Mission Assessment, Topic G, Item 3, “(Write the numerals 8 and 4.) Use the words more than to compare these two numerals.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic C, Lesson 14, Exit Ticket, “Count the stars. Write the number in the box. Whisper count and draw in more dots to match the number.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 7, Exit Ticket, “If you drew two straight lines inside the gray rectangle, what shapes might you find? Circle them.”

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations that materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments, which include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Teachers are provided information for interpreting student performance on the summative assessments but no suggestions are given for follow-up. Formative assessments do not include correct answers or information for interpreting student work. 

In the summative assessments teachers are given a “Progression to Mastery” but no suggestions for follow-up. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, End-of-Mission Assessment, Topic A, K.G.1, K.G.2, K.G.4 states, “Step 1: Student: *Is unable to select, position, or describe indicated shapes. *Takes considerable time to complete tasks, looks to the teacher for help often. Step 2: Student: *Sorts indicated shapes randomly, resulting in some correct and some incorrect shapes in the group. *Struggles to select, position, and describe indicated shapes. Step 3: Student: *Identifies a shape from the environment but is unable to discuss its attributes. *Sorts most of the indicated shapes. *Correctly selects both of the indicated shapes but places them in the wrong position. Step 4: Student correctly: *Identifies and describes several attributes of the shape from the environment that match the shape being shown to him. *Sorts all indicated shapes from several typical, variant, and distracting shapes. *Selects indicated shape and positions this shape below, next to, or beside another indicated shape.”
  • In Mission 4, End-of-Mission Assessment, Topic C, K.OA.1, K.OA.2 states, “Step 1: Student shows little evidence of understanding the addition expression or addition equations and is unable to complete most of the tasks. Step 2: Student: *Incorrectly states some or all of what each number represents. *Writes incorrect numbers in the blanks or puts the correct numbers in the wrong places. *Write an incorrect addition sentence for the story. Step 3: “Student requires teacher support to correctly answer the questions and/or misses one out of the three questions. Step 4: Student correctly and independently: *States what each number in the number sentence refers to. *Writes all the correct numbers in the blanks: $$5 + 3 = 8$$. *Writes an addition sentence to match his own story, for example, $$7 = 3 + 4$$.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, K.NBT.1, K.CC.1 states, “Step 1: Student shows little evidence of counting ability or understanding. Almost non-responsive. Step 2: Student shows evidence of beginning to understand counting beyond 10 but counts the quantity incorrectly (lacks organization, inconsistent 1:1 correspondence, etc.). Step 3: Student correctly counts 10 straws into a pile and then 6 straws, but is unable to count to 16. Step 4: Student correctly: *Counts 10 straws into a pile, and then 6 straws. *Counts from 1 to 16. *Counts the Say Ten way starting with the group of 10 (ten, ten 1, ten 2, ten 3, ten 4, ten 5, ten 6).”

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten do not encourage students to monitor their own progress. Opportunities for students to reflect on their learning are not found in the assessments. 

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
11/12
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Kindergarten meet expectations for supporting teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades. The instructional materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence and scaffold lessons, provide strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners, embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations, provide support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations, and provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics. The instructional materials partially provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.

Each Mission Organizer contains Notes on Pacing for Differentiation. Some lessons include a Multiple Means of Representation side box in the Teacher’s Full Mission PDF that provides scaffolding strategies. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, Overview, Notes on Pacing for Differentiation states, “If pacing is a challenge, consider omitting lessons 5 and 8. Instead, embed experiences with position words in other content areas and throughout the students’ day. It is not essential that students be introduced to position words through the context of shapes.”
  • In Mission 3, Topic A, Lesson 3, Note: Multiple Means of Representation states, “Students who are struggling to make comparisons may benefit from extra practice. Determining what objects are longer than or shorter than helps to prepare students for comparing two different lengths with a third object in this lesson.”
  • In Mission 5, Overview, Notes on Pacing for Differentiation states, “If writing numbers 21-100 overwhelms students, omit the Problem Sets in Lesson 15, 16, and 17. Instead, complete the verbal counting activities in the lessons that prepare them for numeral writing to 100 as required in Grade 1. This allows for completion of these three lessons in just one or two days. Lesson 19 is exploratory in nature and addresses some standards beyond the level of Kindergarten. It works well as an extension lesson if students are advancing quickly, but if pacing is a challenge, it could be omitted.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “Scaffold understanding of ordinal numbers by modeling them for students who may need additional support. Ask students to get up one at a time to demonstrate first in line, second in line, and third in line. While pointing to each corresponding student, have students practice saying who is first, second, and third in line.”

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners. Both the Multiple Means of Representation side boxes in the Teacher’s Full Mission PDF and Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding provide strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners. Examples of strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “For enrichment, ask questions that engage thinking at higher levels. ‘What would that shape look like if it was not flat? Can you make a picture of that shape but make it so that it is sticking up?’”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 1, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “For enrichment, challenge students by providing extensions to the Word Problem such as: 1. If Marta had 15 peanuts to start with, how many does she have left? 2. How many more peanuts does Marta need to have 10 in her hand? 3. Draw a picture to show Marta’s peanuts.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 6, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “Students who need additional support may benefit from extra practice creating a variety of three- and four-sided shapes. Give them extended time with a geoboard.”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 1, Hop Skip Splash! 10 Activities, Multiple Means of Engagement, “This intentional limited use of language allows students to focus on the mathematics without having to overcome any language barriers. Offer sentence frames such as “I knew to count forward because…” or “When the first number in the sequence was not 1, I had to…”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 3, Sum Snacks, 6 Activities, Multiple Means of Engagement, “The prompts used in Sum Snacks are deliberately short, and the combination of on-screen text and on-screen pictures of the animals and fruit will help ELLs with language development, both mathematical language and everyday language. Offer sentence frames such as “I know to stop adding fruit when…” or “I found the total by…” or “I need more to make ten.”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 5, The Counting Train, 6 Activities, Multiple Means of Engagement, “In order to further support language development, consider using the guiding questions above to encourage students to make connections between representations and language. Offer sentence frames such as “I found the total by…” or “The train helped me see that…”

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for embedding tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.

Within the lesson, Word Problems and Problem Sets provide opportunities for students to solve using multiple entry-points. Examples include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Word Problem states, “It’s pizza time! On a piece of paper, draw a large, round pizza pie. Don’t forget your favorite toppings! With your crayons, show how you would cut the pizza into enough slices for your family. Compare your slices to those of a partner. Are they alike? Carefully describe the shape of a slice to your partner. Note: The purpose of this problem is two-fold; first, to have the students create three-sided figures, and second, to set up a potential non-example for use later in the lesson. The curved edge of the crust in their drawing means that the slices are not actually triangles.”
  • In Mission 4, Topic C, Lesson 15, Word Problem states, “You are having a party! You get 8 presents. 2 presents have stripes, and 6 presents have polka dots. Draw the presents, and write the number sentences two different ways on your personal white board. Note: Decomposition and composition of the number 8 serves as an anticipatory story context for this lesson.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 5, Lesson states, “Find two squares in your pattern block box. How do you know they are squares? (S: They each have four sides.The sides are all the same length. They have corners like an L. They look like the face of a cube!) Place the squares on your personal white board. See if you can make a different rectangle from your squares. (Pause.) Tell me about your work.”

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations for suggesting support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics.

Many lessons include a Multiple Means of Representation side box in the Teacher’s Full Mission PDF that provides strategies for meeting the needs of English Language Learners. Examples of strategies provided for English Language Learners include:

  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 2, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “Support English Language Learners’ capacity to discuss how the shapes they made on their geoboards are examples of triangles by providing them with sentence frames such as, ‘My shape is a triangle because it has . . .’ to use as discussion starters with their partners.”
  • In Mission 3, Topic D, Lesson 15, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “Scaffold the lesson for English Language Learners by using motions. For example, hold up the scoop when directing students to count the scoops it takes to fill their containers, and hold up the funnel when directing students to use the funnel if they need it.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic A, Lesson 5, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “Support English Language Learners by using gestures during the lesson. Flash 10, and gesture with your hands for the word. Flash 1. Gesture again for the word. This engages students to figure out the intent and bypasses potential confusion in oral directions.”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 2, The Counting Train, 4 Activities, Multiple Means of Engagement, “The Counting Train was specifically designed to limit the use of language, allowing all students, including English Language Learners, greater access. There are no on-screen directions for students to read, and the activity remains constant: select the number that represents the total number of objects. This intentional limited use of language allows students to focus on the mathematics without having to overcome any language barriers.”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Using Digital Activities to Support Each Student’s Developing Math Understanding, Mission 4, Sum Snacks, 10 Activities, Multiple Means of Engagement, “It is common for ELLs to struggle with numbers 11 to 19 as their names do not make their meanings clear nor is there a clear language pattern from 11 to 19. Hearing these numbers read aloud while also having a visual representation on screen will help students master the numbers 11 to 19. Offer sentence frames such as “I know to stop adding fruit when…” or “I found the total by…”
  • Kindergarten Guide to Using Digital Activities, Mission 6, Make and Break, 5 Activities, Multiple Means of Engagement, “To help support K students still learning to read, including English Language Learners (ELLs) and other students of special populations who would benefit from extra audio support, Make and Break uses audio prompts to direct students. Make sure your students know that they can replay the directions by pressing the read aloud button on each screen. The prompts used in Make and Break are deliberately short, and the combination of on-screen text, color, and the on-screen five frame will help ELLs with language development, both mathematical language and everyday language.”

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten partially meet expectations for providing opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

There are lessons that include Multiple Means of Representation side boxes in the Teacher’s Full Mission PDF, which provides strategies for meeting the needs of advanced students, and there are also instances where advanced students do more problems than their classmates or are presented above-grade-level content. In Zearn Math for Kindergarten under Digital Activities, the materials state, “After completing the progression, students should revisit activities for additional practice while continuing to learn the full Zearn Math for K curriculum with their class,” and in Transitioning from Zearn Math K to G1, the materials state, “If you and your students have finished the Zearn Math for K curriculum, a group of students should make the shift to 1st grade at the same time to support this model.”

Examples of strategies for meeting the needs of advanced students from the Multiple Means of Representation side boxes include:

  • In Mission 3, Topic C, Lesson 11, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “For enrichment, ask students what would happen if you placed both clay balls on one side and placed the building blocks on the other side. Would the two sides of the balance scale be equal? Ask them to explain why they balanced (or did not balance) the scale.”
  • In Mission 5, Topic B, Lesson 9, Note: Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “Challenge students by extending the Word Problem and asking, ‘If Jenny made the same mistake representing 18, how might she show it?’ and ‘How many more chips does Jenny need to correct her mistake?’”
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 6, Note: Multiple Means of Engagement states, “For enrichment, give students pattern blocks to use in creating different shapes. Challenge them by asking them to be sure to use at least one of each of the pattern blocks (including the orange square and the tan rhombus) and to make sure not to leave any gaps in their design. Have them describe their designs with a partner.”

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten meet expectations that materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

The materials have very few graphics of adults and children. When seen, a variety of demographics and personal characteristics are presented. A variety of names are used in word problems. Examples include:

  • In Mission 4, Topic A, Lesson 1, Word Problem states, “Julia went to the beach and found 3 seashells. Her sister Megan found 2 seashells. Draw the seashells the girls found. How many did they find in all? Talk to your partner about how you know.”
  • In Mission 4, Topic B, Lesson 12, a picture of a female student with brown skin is shown to represent the relationship between 5 and 10. The materials state, “A student demonstrates 7 as 5 on the top and 2 on the bottom.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic B, Lesson 7, Fluency Template, a picture of a clipart, female, coach with brown skin is shown at the top of the My Sprint Progress Log.

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Students have opportunities to work as a whole class, in small groups, with a partner, and independently. Examples include:

  • In Mission 1, Topic D, Lesson 16, Fluency, Take the Cake states, “Working with a partner, have students put the birthday cake cards in order from the baby’s cake to the six-year-old’s cake. Partner A closes his eyes. Partner B takes one of the cards (or turns it over). Partner A opens his eyes, and counts to determine which card is missing. Switch roles, and play again.”
  • In Mission 2, Topic A, Lesson 5, Fluency, Groups of Shapes states, “Choose a shape, and then meet me at the rug. Look at your shape. Raise your hand if you know the name of your shape. When I give the signal, whisper the name of your shape to yourself. Ready? Look around the room. Do you see signs with pictures of shapes? Do you see your shape? When I start the music, I want you to calmly walk to the sign that has the same shape as yours. When I point to your group, say the name of your shape.”
  • In Mission 6, Topic A, Lesson 2, Exit Ticket, students work independently to “First, draw a triangle so all of the sides are different lengths. Second, draw a triangle with your ruler that has 2 sides that are about the same length.”

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Math Kindergarten do not encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning. 

Connections to words in students’ home languages are not present in the program. Additionally parent letters do not exist introducing parents to Zearn in any language.

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Zearn Kindergarten integrate technology in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices. The digital materials are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers and include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills. The digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students and can be easily customized for local use. The instructional materials do include opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The digital instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Mathematics Kindergarten are web-­based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. For example, the digital materials allow for the use of tablets and mobile devices including iPads, laptops, Chromebooks, MacBooks, and other devices that connect to the internet with an applicable browser.

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Mathematics Kindergarten include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology. For example, teachers have the capability of analyzing student work from the Digital Games, by tracking student activity to determine the number of activities completed by a student.

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The digital materials reviewed for Zearn Mathematics Kindergarten include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students. Adaptive technology is not provided by digital materials. However, teachers are able to set individual student starting points in the Digital Activities, such as Numbers to 5, Numbers to 10, Numbers to 15, and Numbers to 20 based on readiness level.

The digital materials reviewed for Zearn Mathematics Kindergarten can easily be customized for local use. Digital materials provide limited customized online materials for teachers to assign to students. For example, teachers are able to assign the numbers within which students work in the Digital Games, such as, Numbers to 5, Numbers to 10, Numbers to 15, and Numbers to 20. 

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Zearn Mathematics Kindergarten do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Zearn Mathematics Kindergarten integrate technology including interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices. Examples include:

  • Digital Activities includes interactive technology games available to all students and teachers.
  • According to Curriculum, Our Approach, Teaching Kindergarten, Recommended Schedule, Digital Activities, “Each student works through Digital Activities that build number sense with the goal of completing four Digital Activities each week.”
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Report Published Date: 2021/03/11

Report Edition: 2018

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Zearn Math Kindergarten Teacher Edition 978‑1‑949023‑13‑8 2018 Zearn 2018

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Math K-8 Review Tool

The mathematics review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complements the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations