Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations of alignment. The materials include high quality texts and tasks that support students' development of literacy skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. The materials are organized to build knowledge of topics and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate integrated skills, although the organization of texts may need revision to support consistent beginning-to-end of year comprehension development. Instruction for foundational skills includes the core components necessary.  While many implementation supports are available, the teacher may need to do extra work to assure lessons are implemented with fidelity.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
55
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
30
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 2 includes high-quality anchor texts that encompass a broad array of text types and genres placed at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade. Texts are accompanied by a partial text complexity analysis.

The texts partially support students’ evolving literacy skills as texts do not consistently grow in complexity over the course of the year. Materials provide both depth and a volume of reading practice.

Text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build within each unit to an integrated, culminating tasks that allows students to demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained through instruction through writing and/or speaking activities. Students are supported in evidence-based discussion of texts through the implementation of protocols to scaffold conversations as students’ oral language skills grow in sophistication. Use of grade-level vocabulary/syntax and appropriate questioning are encouraged during student discussions.

Students engage in a mix of evidence-based writing tasks, including both on-demand and process writing, that incorporate some of the writing types called for in the standards. Students write on-demand for opinion, but do not have opportunities to engage in process writing for opinion pieces. Explicit grammar and conventions instruction is provided with opportunities for students to practice and apply these skills within their writing tasks.

Grade 2 materials provide explicit instruction in phonics, print concepts, text structure, and text features.

Throughout the course of the year, students have frequent opportunities to read on-level text with fluency and purpose. Students have multiple opportunities to apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected tasks through the use of decodable readers and the Literature Anthology. Frequent opportunities are provided throughout the entire program to assess students’ mastery of foundational skills and to progress monitor student growth. Support for differentiation of foundational skills is found throughout the program.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
17/20
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Criterion Rating Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 2 includes high-quality anchor texts that encompass a broad array of text types and genres. Texts are placed at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade and are accompanied by a partial text complexity analysis that describes the quantitative score and qualitative features as well as the reason for the placement of the texts in the unit.

The texts partially support students’ evolving literacy skills as texts do not grow in complexity over the course of the year. Materials engage students in a broad range of reading opportunities to provide both depth and volume of reading practice to achieve grade-level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for  anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

Grade 2 materials include anchor texts that are of high interest and engaging to students. Many cultures are represented within the anchor texts and are varied within content areas as well. The anchor texts are examined multiple times for several purposes and are used to expand topics and essential questions, build vocabulary, and prompt writing.

Texts are of high quality, including rich language and engaging content. Accompanying illustrations are of high quality as well, supporting students' understanding and comprehension of the associated text. Examples of texts that fit this category include, but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read Wolf! Wolf! by John Rocco. This fable has a clear beginning, middle, and end and it also has a problem and solution structure. It is told in the third person. It includes dialogue and the illustrations clarify and add information to the fable.  It is an engaging text with rich language and quality illustrations. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students read Baby Bears by Bobbie Kalman. This expository text is clearly developed. The author organizes the text into several sections. Each section has its own heading. Photos with captions clarify or add information to the text. A diagram with labels shows how cubs grow up. The layout of text and photos with captions varies from page to page. The vocabulary is mostly familiar with some discipline-specific vocabulary (e.g., nurse, the Arctic, omnivore). 
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students read April Rain Song, Rain By Langston Hughes and Elizabeth Coatsworth. This is a free verse poem that relies on a fair amount of repetition. It is structured into three stanzas. There may be a few unfamiliar words in the poems (e.g., gutter, still, pattered, sill). 
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students read Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio. This fiction text demonstrate how U.S. elections work through the story of a grade-school election. The text is moderately complex as the story is told sequentially from the beginning when Grace wants to run for president through the election process to become class president. The text structure includes several unique features, such as text inside boxes that are outlines of individual states, and text in word balloons. These features help break up the text into fun and manageable chunks. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students read A Call to Compost by Author Unknown. This persuasive article is clear and presented early in the text, about whether to compost or not. The text also offers other features of nonfiction text such as sidebars, photos with captions, sections with heads, and a chart. The text also includes  domain-specific vocabulary such as: landfill, food waste, recycle, garbage, compost, fertilizer, pollute, environment, ban, fine, pass.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Genres and text types are varied and represented throughout the school year.  Texts include a mix of informational and literary texts, including poetry and fables. 

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Big Red Lollipop by Rukhsana Khan 
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Wolf, Wolf! By John Rocco
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Brave Bessie by Eric Velasquez
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Dear Primo by Duncan Tonatiuh
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, The Contest of Athena and Poseidon by Author Unknown

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Into the Sea by Author Unknown
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, The Life of a Dollar Bill by Author Unknown
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, The Problem with Plastic Bags by Author Unknown

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. 

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to listen to grade-level appropriate texts during Shared Reading and Literature Anthology. Texts included have the appropriate level of complexity based on their quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and student task. 

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task and anchor texts are placed at the appropriate grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 3, Literature Anthology, Baby Bears by Bobbie Kalman. This text has a quantitative measure 500 Lexile. Students need specific domain knowledge for a full understanding of the text. The text has varying text structures which include question and answer. The graphics and text features are essential to understanding the text, which makes the text more complex. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Literature Anthology, “Mr. Putter and Tabby See the Stars" by Cynthia Rylant. This text has a Lexile level of 580L. The meaning/purpose and structure as moderately complex. Language and knowledge demands are slightly complex.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Literature Anthology, Dear Primo: A letter to My Cousin by Duncan Tonatiuh. This text has a quantitative measure of 600 Lexile. The  knowledge demands are slightly complex. Structure and Language is moderately complex. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 3, Expository Text, Money Madness by David Adler. This text has a quantitative measure of AD500 Lexile. Students need specific domain knowledge for a full understanding of the text. The graphics and text features are essential to understanding the text. Also, the author’s purpose moves from explicit to implicit, which makes the text more complex.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade-level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). 

The materials that students interact with on a daily basis do not increase in complexity throughout the school year to help students develop independence of grade-level skills. Texts that are used for interactive read-alouds are not in the appropriate Lexile band for read-aloud and there is very little increase in quantitative complexity. The same is true for the qualitative features of these texts. They are given complexity levels of slightly complex to somewhat complex throughout the year, with few texts reaching moderately complex. The same is true for Shared Reading and Anchor Texts. While the texts are in the correct Lexile band, the complexity, both qualitative and quantitative, does not grow significantly over the course of the year to help students develop independence of grade-level skills. Although students do gain knowledge throughout the year based on the text selections, accessing more complex, grade appropriate books by the end of the year is not present. 

Interactive Read-Alouds remain around the same Lexile level for the course of the year, as does the qualitative analysis. In addition, the Lexile measures are appropriate for students in Grade 2 to read independently, instead of above grade level, making them inappropriate for complex read-aloud texts. Specific examples of this problem include:

  • In Unit 1, students hear “The New Kid” (no author), which has a Lexile of 550 and qualitative features ranging from slightly complex for meaning to moderately complex for knowledge demands. 
  • In Unit 3, students hear “My New School” (no author), which has a Lexile of 620, and qualitative features ranging from slightly complex for meaning to moderately complex for knowledge demands. 
  • In Unit 6, students hear “A Colorful Problem” (no author), which has a Lexile of 570 and is slightly complex for all qualitative features, with the exception of knowledge demands, which is moderately complex. 

Shared Reading allows the students to participate in the reading of the text, and are typically less complex than interactive read-alouds, which are meant to be above the grade-level complexity band. Examples of shared reading include:

  • In Unit 2, students read “The Boy Who Cried Wolf!” (no author), which has a Lexile of 460 and is considered slightly complex except for knowledge demands, which is considered moderately complex. 
  • In Unit 4, students read “Into the Sea” (no author), which has a Lexile of 650 and is considered slightly to somewhat complex. 
  • In Unit 6, students read “The Life of a Dollar Bill” (no author), which has a Lexile of 660 but is considered slightly complex, with the exception of structure, which is considered somewhat complex. 

Students also hear and read Anchor Texts across the course of the year. These texts also do not vary greatly in complexity levels across the year to support students in achieving grade-level proficiency by the end of the year. Examples of anchor texts include:

  • In Unit 1, students read Help! The Story of Friendship by Holly Keller, which has a Lexile of 410 and is considered slightly complex, with the exception of knowledge demands, which is considered moderately complex. 
  • In Unit 3, students read Mr. Putter and Tabby See the Stars by Cynthia Rylant, which has a Lexile of 580 and has qualitative features ranging from slightly complex with knowledge demands and language to moderately complex with meaning and structure.
  • In Unit 5, students read Brave Bessie by Eric Velasquez, which has a Lexile of 650 and is considered moderately complex, with the exception of meaning, where it is only slightly complex. 

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and the series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis. Instructional materials include a text complexity analysis for most texts; however, not all texts include a text complexity analysis. Quantitative and qualitative measures are provided in the text notes section. A clear rationale for the purpose and placement for texts chosen for the program is not evident. 

Examples include the following, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 3, Literature Anthology, Wolf, Wolf by John Rocco, materials include the following notes on the text; however, a rationale for the placement of this text in this grade level is not included:
    • Qualitative Features - Meaning/Purpose - Slightly Complex: The central idea (that you can change your mind to make a better decision) is clearly developed. Structure- Slightly Complex: This fable has a clear beginning, middle, and end. It also has a problem and solution structure. This fable is told in the third person. It includes dialogue. The illustrations clarify and add information to the fable. 
    • Language - Slightly Complex: Much of the vocabulary is familiar; however, there is some more difficult vocabulary included (“clambering,” “wheezed,” “growled”). Many of the sentences are simple; however, there are also more complex sentence constructions (“His bones creaked and his joints cracked as he slowly made his way toward the voice.”). 
    • Knowledge Demands - Moderately Complex: The genre is fable. Knowledge of the genre (a fable is a made-up short story that often teaches a lesson; it has a beginning, middle, and end) is helpful. Knowledge of the problem-solution structure is also helpful. In addition, children may need help understanding that this fable is an alternate retelling of the fable “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” 
    • Quantitative Features: Lexile 580L. 
    • Reader Considerations: Children will know their purpose for reading the fable (to read an alternate retelling of the fable The Boy Who Cried Wolf). They will be able to identify the problems at the beginning, the steps to the solution in the middle, and the solution (or lesson) at the end. The Teacher Edition provides support in helping children synthesize information from the text to understand the wolf’s actions and feelings. Children will very likely be interested in this retelling and the lesson or message. 
    • Task Considerations: Through the key details in the fable and the illustrations, children will be able to explain how the wolf changes from the beginning of the fable to the end.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Literature Anthology, Brave Bessie, by Eric Velasquez, materials include the following notes on the text; however, a rationale for the placement of this text in this grade level is not included:
    • Qualitative Features - Meaning/Purpose - Slightly Complex: The meaning and purpose of the biography is clear, to demonstrate how a young woman, Bessie Coleman, achieved her goals despite many obstacles. Structure Moderately Complex: The biography is structured chronologically, telling the story of Bessie Coleman’s life from childhood to the establishment of her namesake flight school. The text is not illustrated but does include some photos of  Coleman. There is a timeline of the important events in Coleman’s life. 
    • Language - Moderately Complex: The text is dense, yet interesting and compelling. There are many domain-specific words, though the text and illustrations provide context and clues to their meaning. The text also contains some unfamiliar words (“scrimped,” “inspect,” “reporters,” “confident”) that children may need support to define. 
    • Knowledge Demands - Moderately Complex: Children would benefit from learning more about two of Coleman’s heroes mentioned in the text, Booker T. Washington and Harriet Tubman. Children would also have a deeper understanding of the text with a review of the obstacles to people of color and women in the 1920s. In addition, background knowledge about the novelty of airplane travel and flying during this era would also be enlightening to children. Quantitative Features: Lexile 650L 
    • Reader Considerations: Children would very much benefit from a prior discussion about the obstacles that people of color and women faced in America during the 1920s, and why Coleman was able to learn to fly in France rather than in the United States. A reminder to children about the novelty of air travel during this era would also deepen their appreciation of the biography. 
    • Task Considerations: Children will be able to explain how the author uses Bessie Coleman’s story to show what it means to be a hero.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year. 

The Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for students to engage with a range of texts including nonfiction, realistic fiction, poetry and fables. Throughout the week, students interact daily with two to three texts on the same topic during whole group and small group instruction, including Shared Reading, Paired Selections for small group instruction, Anchor Texts, Interactive Read-Alouds, Leveled Readers, and Literature Big Books. Materials contain lessons and resources for read-alouds, guided reading, and independent reading. Throughout the week students also engage in a close reading of a text. In a typical week, on Day 1, students spend 20 minutes with the interactive read-aloud, 20 minutes with the shared reading, and 25 minutes in small groups, and on Day 2, students spend 50 minutes with the shared read and close reading and 30 minutes in small groups. On Day 3, students spend 40 minutes reading the anchor text and 40 minutes in small groups, and on Day 4, students spend 50 minutes reading the anchor text and 60 minutes in small groups. Finally, on Day 5, students spend 35 minutes rereading the anchor text and 60 minutes in small groups. 

Instructional materials identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading and listening to a variety of texts to become independent readers at the grade level and engage in a volume of reading as they grow toward reading independence. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students engage in reading:
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (fantasy): “The New Kid” (unknown author)
    • Shared Reading (fantasy): “Little Flaps Learning to Fly” (unknown author)
    • Decodable Readers: “Spot and Fran” (unknown author) and “Why Not Grin?” (unknown author)
    • Anchor Text (fantasy): Help! A Story of Friendship by Holly Keller
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, students engage in reading:
    • Anchor Text (expository) “Many Ways to Enjoy Music” (Time Magazine article)
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (expository text): “Why People Drum” (unknown author)
    • Paired Reader: “A Musical Museum” (Time Magazine article)
    • Shared Reader (expository text): “They’ve got the Beat!” (Time Magazine article)
    • Decodable Reader: “Luke’s Tune” (unknown author), The Sounds of Trash by Susan Evento and “Musical Expression” (unknown author) 
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students engage in reading:
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (expository text): “Earth Changes” (unknown author) 
    • Shared Reading (expository text): “Into the Sea” (unknown author) 
    • Anchor Text (expository text): Volcanoes by Sandra Markle 
    • Paired Reader: “To The Rescue” (unknown author)
    • Decodable Reader: “More Fun Than A Hat”, “Just For Fun”, “Cheer Up, Dot”, “Deer, Steer and Ibex” and “Watching and Hearing Animals” (unknown author) 
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students engage in reading:
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (expository text): “Keep the Change” (unknown author)
    • Shared Reading (expository text): “The Life of a Dollar Bill” (unknown author)
    • Anchor Text  (expository text): Money Madness by David A. Adler

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 2 includes text-dependent/specific questions and tasks that build to an integrated, culminating tasks that allows students to demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained through instruction through writing and/or speaking activities. Students are supported in evidence-based discussion of texts through the implementation of protocols to scaffold conversations as students’ oral language skills grow in sophistication. Use of grade-level vocabulary/syntax and appropriate questioning are encouraged during student discussions.

Students engage in a mix of evidence-based writing tasks, including both on-demand and process writing, that incorporate some of the writing types called for in the standards. Students write on-demand for opinion, but do not have opportunities to engage in process writing for opinion pieces. Explicit grammar and conventions instruction is provided with opportunities for students to practice and apply these skills within their writing tasks.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials provide opportunities for students to engage with the texts. Questions and tasks provide opportunities for students to use text-based evidence when answering  questions or completing tasks in correlation to the text they are reading or listening to. These opportunities are included in the Literature Big Book, Shared Read, Interactive Read-Aloud, Reading/Writing Companion and Paired Selections.

Instructional materials include questions, tasks, and assignments that are mainly text-based over the course of a school year. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared Read, Cats and Kittens by author unknown, the teacher reminds students that compare-and-contrast text structures require the reader to notice how the author compares and contrasts characters, settings, and events. Students look at Literature Anthology, Dear Primo, and the teacher asks, "How are Carlitos and Charlie similar?  What are Carlitos and Charlie doing on pages 318-319? How is what they are doing the same? How is it different?" The teacher has the students look at pages 328-329. The teacher prompts the students, “This is the first time the author puts the words of the two cousins across two pages. Why does the author spread the text across both pages?" 
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared Read, Lighting Lives by author unknown, students are asked to read the first paragraph, and  asked, "Which details tell about how people use solar panels? What might be the purpose of this paragraph? Why might this be important?" 
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 5, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Anchor Text, Literature Anthology, Mr.Putter & Tabby See the Stars by Cynthia Rylant, the teacher asks,  "Why does Mrs. Teaberry like to feed Mr. Putter “most of all”? How does the repetition of the word she on page 247 help you understand how Tabby feels about the night?" 
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 8, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Literature Anthology, The Prince’s Frog by author unknown, the teacher asks these questions, "Why does Peter give the frog a dish of water and capture flies? What do these actions tell you about Peter? How do you know how Peter feels about the frog as it eats the flies?"

Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-dependent writing, speaking, and activities. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 6, Reading/Writing Companion, Analyze the Prompt,  the teacher discusses with students, “What is the author asking you to do?” and then rereads sections. Students use evidence from previous notes about characters, settings and events and complete a graphic organizer citing evidence from the words and illustrations in the text.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 6, Literature Anthology, Brave Bessie by Eric Velasquez, the teacher models using the text feature of a timeline to understand the character’s accomplishments. The students use the Reading/Writing Companion to cite text evidence on graphic organizers using the same timeline and text.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

Throughout the program, the materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task. Units are broken into genre studies that extend for two weeks and at the end of the two weeks, students are given the opportunity to reflect on their learning. Each unit has a final performance task, which is called the Weekly Wrap-Up. It is designed to help students demonstrate their understanding of the essential question. Students complete the Weekly Wrap-Up in their Reading/Writing Companion. This culminating task is the same each week.

Some specific examples of what students learn and how they demonstrate their knowledge of the topic at the end of the week include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students learn about poems and animals. On Day 5, students reflect on their learning from the week. Students begin by reflecting on the essential question and discuss what they love about animals. Students  read through their notes, annotations, and responses from each text before responding to the question, “How do the poets of the poems you read help you understand how they feel about animals?” Questions and tasks that support this culminating task, include, “How does each poet show what is special about the animals in the poems? What do we learn about camels in the third stanza? What does the poet tell us about how bats sound in the first and second stanzas?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, students learn about expository texts and music. On Day 5, students reflect on their learning from the week. Students talk with a partner about an image in their Reading/Writing Companion and then respond to the prompt, “From the selections and the Japanese print, I have learned that expressing yourself through music can mean...” Questions to support the culminating task throughout the week include, “Why do all the singers need to keep rhythm? How does the author help you understand what being in the chorus is like for the students? What additional information does the caption give you?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students learn about persuasive texts and rules. On Day 5, students begin by reading the poem, “At the Table,” and discuss how manners are rules for families. Students complete the prompt, “The selections I read and the poem show me that rules are important because...”. Questions and tasks that support this culminating task include, “What two reasons does the author give to support not banning plastic bags? Do you think composting should be a law or a choice?”

In Week 6 of every unit, students complete a spiral review and show what they know from the entire unit versus just the one week. An example of this follows:

  • In Unit 4, students learn about expository texts and poems. After reading the text, “Rivers of Ice,” students demonstrate their understanding by answering, “What makes a glacier move? Which part of the passage helps you understand how glaciers are made?” Students read the poems, “How to Wait” and “Against the Wind,” and answer, “What is the main message or lesson of the two poems? What word in ‘Against the Wind’ means the opposite of nice?”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide students opportunities to engage in evidence-based discussions using academic vocabulary in whole class, small groups, and peer-to-peer. Opportunities are seen throughout the units in the Think-Aloud, Talk About It, Collaborative Conversations, and Vocabulary Picture Cards routines.

For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Days 1-5, Whole Group, Shared Read, Reading/Writing Companion, Maria Celebrates Brazil by author unknown, Academic Language, Visualize, the teacher is prompted to remind students to use the words to create pictures in their minds about the parade. The teacher then models visualizing the photographer using text evidence. The teacher thinks aloud, “I read that Maria saw a woman with a camera. The woman hurries and scurries; those words tell me she is moving fast. Then she takes a picture of Maria. I think she was hurrying to get a picture of Maria before the parade passed." The teacher asks students what other words help them visualize the parade. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, Talk About It, Collaborative Conversations, teachers are prompted to suggest that as children engage in partner, small group, and whole class discussions, they are encouraged to follow discussion rules by taking turns speaking. They are reminded to, "Wait for a person to finish before they speak. They should not speak over others. Quietly raise their hand to let others know when they would like a turn to speak. Ask others to share their ideas and opinions so that all children have a chance to share.”
  • In Unit 2 Week 2, Day 10, Whole Group, Independent Writing, Present Your Work, Reading/Writing Companion, page 25, the students read the Presenting Strategies Checklist, which includes items such as "make contact with the audience and cite the reliable sources you used."  Located within the classroom materials for this lesson is a video about “How to Give a Presentation,” which showcases students giving strategies about speaking and listening. It is not written in the teacher’s instructions, just featured as classroom material. Students are grouped in partners or small groups to rehearse their presentations.  Students are reminded that they will be listening to other students’ presentations. The teacher reviews and models the behaviors of an effective listener. A listening checklist is suggested to the teacher to share with the students.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Whole Group, Shared Read, Reading/Writing Companion, Starry Night by author unknown, Academic Language, the academic language,  moonlight, nighttime, daytime, is introduced by the teacher to the students during the Essential Question. The teacher explains that during nighttime, it is dark outside and the sun does not light the sky, but sometimes there is light from the moon. The students then describe the moon. A sample answer is provided, “Moonlight is the light we see from the moon at night.” 
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Oral Language, the teacher uses the Define/Example/Ask routine to present the oral vocabulary words: exactly, present, report, telescopes, and total. 
    • Define: Exactly means without any mistake. (Cognate: exactamente
    • Example: The clock showed exactly eight o’clock. 
    • Ask: Why would you need to measure your feet exactly? 
    • Define: When you present something, you show or tell about it before an audience. (Cognate: presentar
    • Example: Lillian will present her report about dolphins to the class. 
    • Ask: Show and tell how you would present a new friend to your class. 
    • Define: When you give a report, you tell or write about something you’ve heard. 
    • Example: The class enjoyed listening to Kara’s report about dolphins. 
    • Ask: What would you like to write a report about? 
    • Define: Telescopes make things that are far away seem closer and larger. (Cognate: telescopio
    • Example: Telescopes are useful for looking at the stars. 
    • Ask: Describe what telescopes can help you see. 
    • Define: Total means the whole or entire thing. (Cognate: total
    • Example: Max spent the total amount of his money. 
    • Ask: What is the total number of apples you will buy? Continued on the same day, eight new words are introduced in the mini lesson, “Words in Context,” using the visual vocabulary cards to introduce the words.
  • In Unit 5 Week 3, Day 1, Whole Group, Under Collaborative Conversations, the teacher is prompted to notice that as children engage in partner, small group, and whole group discussions, they should be encouraged to always look at the speaker, listen actively to the speaker, respect the speaker by not interrupting and repeat others’ ideas to check understanding.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The materials provide opportunities for students to partake in listening and speaking activities about what they are reading through responding to evidence-based questions prompted by the teacher, as well as whole group and partner share. Collaborative conversations are encouraged throughout each unit. Students also have opportunities to discuss what they are researching. 

For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 5, Whole Group, Realistic Fiction Expert Model, Reading/Writing Companion, page 26, students discuss with partners, “How does the author shows the characters’ feelings at the end of the story?” Students write their answers to the discussion in their Reading/Writing Companion.
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, Talk About It, Essential Questions, teachers ask, “How is the larger bird different from the smaller one? How are the two birds the same?” The  children discuss these questions in pairs or groups. The teacher models how to use the graphic organizer to generate words that can describe how the two penguins in the picture are alike and different. Small groups then develop ideas by using prior knowledge to discuss baby animals that they have seen or read about. Groups are asked to use as many words from the organizer as possible in their discussion.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Whole Group, Shared Read, Reading/Writing Companion, “Starry Night” by author unknown, on Day 2, for Craft and Structure, the academic language includes  fiction, character, setting, dialogue, and narrator.  The teacher asks the students, “How does the author show that Mr. Cortes feels differently from the class about the homework?" 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Whole Group, Day 1-3, Shared Read, Reading/Writing Companion, A Difficult Decision by author unknown, Academic Language, point of view, character, and dialogue, the children work in pairs to write a few sentences about Wyatt’s point of view and how it changes from the beginning to the middle to the end. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, Introduce the Topic, Talk About It, the teacher reads the essential question, “How do we use money? What goods does your family buy with money? What services does your family purchase?" Students discuss answers in pairs. The teacher models using the graphic organizer to list items a family might buy. The teacher reminds students of the Collaborative Conversation protocol for asking and answering questions. As students engage in partner, small group, and whole group discussions they are encouraged to, “ask questions about ideas that are unclear, wait a few seconds after asking a question to give others time to respond and answer questions using sentences, not one-word responses.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Instructional materials provide students with opportunities for students to write daily. For example, on Days 1 and 2 of a typical week, students are active participants in both shared writing and evidence-based independent writing using the texts from the week. On Days 3, 4, and 5, students work through the writing process where they using practice application of  a writing skill, citing textual evidence, revising, editing, and publishing a piece of writing.

Materials include a mix of both on-demand and process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Write to the Prompt, the teacher guides students to review their notes and plan their writing. The students reread the prompt, “Describe how where Pip lives affects what he does.”  Students write a draft using evidence from the text and making inferences. Students are encouraged by the teacher to use supporting details from the text to tell more about Pam’s plan. Sentence frames are available if needed for the students to use. “Before Pam’s plan, the girls ____. After Pam’s plan, the girls _____.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Independent Writing, Anchor Text, Fun With Maps by author unknown, students write about the anchor text using the prompt, “Why does the author show different kinds of maps? What does this help us to understand about maps?”  Students look for clues in the text and maps and take notes in their Writer’s Notebook to respond to the prompt. Students then write a response to the prompt as a draft, using evidence from the text.  Sentence frames are available, if needed, for the students to use. Students work over three days to write the rough draft, proofread, revise, edit, publish and evaluate their work.
  • In Unit 3, Weeks 1 and 2, Writing Process, students write a personal narrative. Students begin the writing process with a brainstorm, drawing and writing ideas. They write a personal narrative about a about a time they helped others. Students plan their writing using the Reading Writing Companion, page 28, to  respond to the sentence starters, “I helped when I_____. I wanted to do this because______. I felt_____.” Students plan the sequence of their story. The teacher advises, “Write details about your personal narrative in sequence. Tell what happens in the beginning, in the middle, and at the end of your narrative.” Students write a draft of the narrative. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Anchor Text, From Cows to You by author unknown, students write to the prompt, “Based on From Cows to You, which job in the milk process would you rather have? Why?” The students write their draft, and  check to make sure they responded to the prompt. Students proofread and edit their work and create a final draft.  On Day 5, students present their work and self-evaluate with the Reading Writing Companion, page 157. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 3 and 4, Teacher Edition, Realistic Fiction, Writing Process, using the Reading Writing Companion, page 29, students read a letter and discuss the character's feelings about the party. Students brainstorm ideas for making the character's voice stronger so readers can better understand their feelings. Student point out the words, descriptions, and punctuation they added or changed to show how the narrator feels. The teacher reviews voice, story structure, and descriptive details, asking students to share points from their draft, if their answer is yes to the following questions:
    • Does your story begin by introducing a main character and two locations? 
    • Does the character, or narrator, tell the story in first person? 
    • Do you include descriptive words and details to show the character’s feelings?
    • Do you use exclamation marks to show when the character is excited? 
    •  Does your main character include descriptive details about two locations? 
    •  Is your story written in the form of a letter?

Students then revise their drafts with a focus on voice.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year-long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to write narrative, opinion, and informative pieces throughout the year. Each writing lesson has a purpose for writing, a teaching and modeling section, and examples/rubrics to guide students through shared and independent writing.  Materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standard.

Examples of narrative writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students write a personal narrative. Students focus on including a beginning, middle, and end, and writing with paragraphs. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students write a personal narrative about a time they helped others. Students complete this writing task over the course of several days and use the text, “Landing on Your Feet” (unknown author), as a mentor text. 

Examples of informational writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students write their own expository essay about how a baby animal grows by explaining the sequence of events. 
  • In Unit 5, Weeks 1 - 4, students write a biography. They study biographies and go through a several-week process of brainstorming, drafting, and publishing a biography about a hero. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, students write a research report about banks using the text, Money Madness by David Adler to guide their research and report. 

Examples of opinion writing include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 1, students have the option of writing a book report where they share their opinion about something they have read. This is an option in the Extend Your Learning section of the Reading/Writing Companion. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, after reading the text, Many Ways to Enjoy Music, students explain why that is a good title for the selection. Students use text evidence to support their opinion. 
  • In Unit 5, students write a persuasive article in their Reading/Writing Companion. They begin by studying, ”A Call to Compost”, which is a persuasive essay. Students write about something they would like to change at school.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to write and support their writing with evidence for the texts that they are reading. During shared writing, students learn and practice new writing skills and how to provide support using evidence from the text. Students also write opinions on books they have chosen to read and use text evidence to explain their opinion.  

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Shared Read, Reading Writing Companion, Maria Celebrates Brazil, students are asked to find evidence of the character’s changing feelings through the course of the story. On pages 4, 6, and 7, students are asked to circle the text evidence. On page 11, students answer the question,  “How does the author show that Maria’s feelings change at different parts of the story?” 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Shared Read, Eagles and Eaglets by Author Unknown, students respond in writing to the prompt, “How does the author use facts and text features to explain how an eaglet becomes an eagle?” The teacher says, “Let’s reread to find facts and details about how an eaglet grows and changes to become an adult eagle. Taking notes will help you write your response.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Days 1-5, Starry Night, by Author Unknown, students use text evidence to write to the prompt, “How does the author show that the sleepover was different from what the girls expected? Think about what the girls say and do.”  The teacher rereads and models locating details and dialogue that tell how the girls feel. The teacher continues with a think-aloud and the students use sentence starters to form their responses.
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Days 1-5, students write a persuasive essay using an expert model. They read the selection, A Call to Compost, by author unknown, and cite evidence to answer questions, such as, “How does the author try to get the reader to change his or her mind or take action?” 
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Anchor Text, Respond to Reading, Write About the Author Text, after reading the story, The Contest of Athena and Poseidon by Pamela Walker, students respond to the prompt, “How does the author use dialogue to help you understand why the citizens choose Athena as their patron?” Students reread the text to see how the author uses dialogue to help answer the prompt. Students use the provided sentence starter in their Reading Writing Companion, page 52, to respond to the prompt.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. 


Instructional materials provide opportunities for the teacher to explicitly teach each grammar objective and provide guided practice. Materials also include multiple opportunities for students to independently practice each new skill. The grammar focus is connected to the independent writing tasks. In addition to the grammar focus, each week of each unit includes a spelling focus, which provides opportunities for students to practice the conventional spellings of words with common spelling patterns and irregular spelling patterns. Students have opportunities over the course of the year to apply newly learned skills both in and out of context.


Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to use collective nouns (e.g., group).
    • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 3, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that a collective noun names a group of people, animals, or things. The teacher displays and reads aloud: herd of deer, class of second graders, pile of rocks. The teacher explains that herd, class, and pile are collective nouns and they are not capitalized. The teacher displays the sentences and guides students to identify proper nouns, common nouns, and collective nouns. Students work in a small group to write three collective nouns on a piece of paper. Students take turns choosing a piece of paper and describing the collective nouns using common and proper nouns. The other students try to identify the collective noun based on the description.
  • Students have opportunities to form and use frequently-occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).
    • In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 7, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that a plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing and that some irregular plural nouns change their spelling to name more than one. Others don’t change at all. The teacher writes pairs of sentences and partners complete the second sentence with the correct irregular plural noun. Students work in a small group and write five plural nouns, including irregular plural nouns. Students take turns selecting a noun and saying it aloud. The others in the group say the singular form of the noun.
  • Students have opportunities to use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
    • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 7, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that reflexive pronouns refer to the subject of a sentence and use -self if the subject is singular or -selves if the subject is plural. Myself, herself, and themselves are reflexive pronouns. Partners work together to orally generate sentences using pronouns myself and ourselves. Students talk about what they do after school by themselves or with others. For example: 
  • Students have opportunities to form and use the past tense We raked the leaves our ___. (selves) I practiced for the game by my___. (self) of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that verbs are often words that describe an action and to form the past tense of verbs, we usually add -ed: look, looked; walk, walked. The teacher also explains that the verbs go and do have special forms in the past tense. They are called irregular verbs. Partners orally generate sentences using the present and past tense irregular verbs go/went and do/did. Volunteers share their sentences. One partner writes a sentence using go and the second partner writes a sentence for do. Partners exchange sentences and create went/did sentences.
  • Students have opportunities to use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that an adjective is a word that describes a noun, or a person, place, or thing. Adjectives can tell what kind or how many. The teacher models identifying adjectives that tell what kind. Groups of students take turns using adjectives that tell what kind to describe different objects. The students begin with the word ball. The teacher asks, "How many different adjectives can you use with ball?" The teacher goes on to other objects, such as flower, dog, and house.
    • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 7, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that an adverb can tell where an action took place. The teacher displays sentences and underlines the adverb and the verb. The teacher models identifying the adverb in the sentences. Pairs of students work together to write two sentences each that include an adverb that tells where an action occurred. Students exchange sentences and identify the adverb. Volunteers share their sentences with the class.
  • Students have opportunities to produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy).
    • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that expanding sentences helps make writing sound better and more interesting, because when you expand a sentence, you add more details. The teacher writes and displays: The boy rides the bike. The teacher models how to expand the sentence by adding information about the subject or predicate and explains that the sentence can be expanded three ways: "Tell more about the subject, add details to the predicate, or add to the subject and the predicate."  Partners generate and expand sentences. One partner offers a subject. The other provides a verb. Partners take turns expanding the sentence by adding details. Volunteers share their sentences. 
  • Students have opportunities to capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
    • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 4, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that a proper noun begins with a capital letter. The teacher introduces the capitalization of months and days and explains that the names of months and days always begin with a capital letter because they are proper nouns. 
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 3, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that a proper noun names a specific person, place, or thing and that the names of people, cities, states, countries, and continents are all proper nouns. Months and days of the week are also proper nouns. A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. The teacher displays and reads aloud the sentences. Students capitalize proper nouns.
  • Students have opportunities to use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 3, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that letters have special punctuation. The greeting (the beginning of a letter) and the closing (the end of a letter) both begin with a capital letter and a comma is used after the greeting and closing. The teacher writes a brief letter on the board and reads it aloud. The teacher guides the students to tell where to use capital letters and commas. Groups of students talk about someone they would like to write a letter to and each group writes a two-sentence letter, punctuating it correctly. On Day 4, students proofread and correct errors in a letter.
  • Students have opportunities to use apostrophes to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
    • In the Teacher Edition, Unit 2, Week 5, Day 2, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reviews that a possessive noun shows who or what owns or possesses something. The teacher guides the students to form the possessive of cats: The cats claws are sharp. (cats’) The teacher repeats the process for plural nouns not ending in s: (geese, geese’s). Pairs of students write down five singular nouns each and each student takes a turn choosing a noun and stating the plural of the noun, and then the possessive form. The students write a sentence with the plural possessive noun and read it aloud.
    • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 6, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains contractions. “A contraction means the same thing as the two words we put together, but it’s shorter. Some contractions are formed by combining a verb with the word not.” The teacher models combining verbs with not, taking away the /o/, and placing an apostrophe in place of the missing /o/. The teacher writes and displays do and not. Students guide the teacher in forming the contraction don’t. Small groups of students write four or five sentences using contractions with not. Students take turns reading a sentence aloud but replacing the contraction with the two words used to form it.
  • Students have opportunities to  generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil).
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 7, during the Spelling portion of the lesson, the teacher reviews words with short o and long o sounds. The teacher reads each sentence, repeats the review word, and asks students to write the word. Students trade papers with a partner to check their spelling.
  • Students have opportunities to consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 7, during the Expand Vocabulary portion of the lesson, the teacher models how to use a print dictionary to determine the meaning of an unknown word using guide words and alphabetical order to find the word. The teacher discusses how to read the pronunciation and definition. Partners look up an unknown word and read the definition to determine its meaning. The students write the definitions of the words in their writer’s notebook.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 2 provides explicit instruction in phonics, print concepts, text structure, and text features.

Throughout the course of the year, students have frequent opportunities to read on-level text with fluency and purpose. Students have multiple opportunities to apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected tasks through the use of decodable readers and the Literature Anthology. Frequent opportunities are provided throughout the entire program to assess students’ mastery of foundational skills and to progress monitor student growth. Support for differentiation of foundational skills is found throughout the program.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for explicit instruction in phonics during the Word Work portions of the lessons. This includes teacher modeling, guided practice, and opportunities for students to practice the skills independently. Students are given ample opportunities to build, blend, and manipulate letters and sounds to make words. Within the Word Work part of lessons, explicit instruction is given in phoneme addition, deletion, and substitution. 

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. distinguish long and short vowel sounds, apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode two-syllable words with long vowels). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words.
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, during the Phonics portion of the lesson, the teacher displays Word-Building Cards n, o, t, e and models how to generate and blend the sounds to say the word. The teacher says,  "This is the letter n. It stands for /n/. This is the letter o. It can stand for /ō/. This is the letter t. It stands for /t/. The letter e is silent. Listen as I blend these sounds together: /nnnōōōt/. Let’s read the word: note." The teacher continues to model how to blend words with drop, clock, smoke, drove, and globe. The teacher points out the silent e in the long-vowel words. The teacher repeats the routine with children with block, cone, not, hope, stone, flop, top, and rode. The teacher guides students and gives feedback until students can work on their own.
  • Students have opportunities to know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.
    • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 6, during the Phonics part of the lesson, the teacher displays the Straw Sound-Spelling Card. The teacher explains that the sound is /ô/ and /ô/ sound can be spelled with the letters aw. The Teacher repeats for /ô/ spelled a, au, augh, al, and ough using ball, sauce, caught, talk, and thought. The teacher has students practice connecting the letters a, aw, au, augh, al, ough to the /ô/ sound by writing them. Students independently practice words with variant vowel /ô/ using Practice Book page 396.
  • Students have opportunities to decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels.
    • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 3, during the Phonics portion of the lesson, the teacher says, "Let’s listen to words that have two different syllable types." The teacher displays cards labeled Closed Syllable and Open Syllable and reviews examples of each syllable type. The teacher says, "I will write and say a word: basic. I'll point to the syllable I want to identify and hold up the correct card. When I say basic, I point to the first syllable, ba. The vowel sound is the last sound in the syllable, the long vowel /ā/. So ba is an open syllable. When I say sic, I hear the short vowel /i/; the syllable ends in a consonant. Sic is a closed syllable." The teacher repeats, contrasting the syllables within the words unit, began, protest, spinal. The teacher distributes cards labeled Closed Syllable and Open Syllable. The teacher guides practice and gives corrective feedback to pairs as needed.
  • Students have opportunities to decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.
    • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 3, during the Structural Analysis portion of the lesson, the teacher writes the words unkind, refill, distrust, peaceful, and sleepless. The teacher points out that each of these words has either a prefix or a suffix. The teacher reviews that prefixes and suffixes are word parts that are added to root words to change the root words' meanings. The teacher points out and defines the prefixes in the first three words and points out and defines the suffixes in the last two words. The teacher helps the students blend the words displease, resell, helpful, unreal, and shapeless and asks students to identify each prefix or suffix and tell the meaning of each word.
  • Students have opportunities to identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4, during the Phonics part of the lesson, the teacher explains that the /ôr/ sounds can be represented by the letters or, ore, and oar. The /är/ sounds can be represented by the letters ar. The teacher displays the Word-Building Cards h, a, r, d. The teacher and students blend the sounds together and read the word: /härd/, hard. The teacher changes the d to m. The teacher explains that they made the word harm and has students read the word together. Students use the Word-Building Cards to continue building with harsh, harp, sharp, shark, stark, stork, store, shore, chores, tore, more, wore, rewore, worn, born, torn, torch, porch, and pork. Once students have built the words, the teacher dictates the words to students and they write the words on a piece of paper. Students can work with a partner to check their word lists for spelling.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. Examples include, but not limited to:

    • In the Grade 2 Scope and Sequence, the Phonics focus is listed for each unit of study. The materials begin with short vowel review, blends and a short vowel, long vowel comparison.  As the units progress, the materials move into r-controlled vowels. The units culminate with variant vowels and short vowel digraphs.
      • Unit 1: short a, short i, short e, short o, short u, two- letter blends (r,-,s-,t-,l-) , short a, long a_e, short i, long i_e
      • Unit 2: short o, long o_e, short u, long u_e, words with soft c and soft g, three-letter blends (scr, spr, str, thr, spl, shr)
      • Unit 3: long a (a, ai, ay, ea, ei, eigh, ey), long i (i, y, igh, ie), long o (o, oa, ow, oe), long e, (e, ee, ea, ie, y, ey, e_e), long u (u_e, ue, u, ew)
      • Unit 4, silent letters (wr, kn, gn, mb, sc), r-controlled vowels (er, ir, ur, or), r-controlled vowels (or, ore, oar, ar, are, air, ear, ere), diphthongs (oy, oi), variant vowels (oo, u, u_e, ew, ue, ui), variant vowels (oo, ou, u), variant vowels (a, aw, au, augh, al, ough), short vowel digraphs (ear, ou, y)

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, and directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Grade 2 materials provide explicit instruction in print concepts, text structure, and text features to assist in comprehension of the text. Students are given ample opportunities to write letters and extend handwriting concepts.  Within the Reading/Writing Companion lessons, explicit instruction is given in the words that authors use that allow the reader to determine the structure of the text which helps students’ understanding of the text. Teachers develop anchor charts with and by students as a way to capture the information and use as a reference for future lessons.

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 8, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher reads aloud the model chart on Reading/Writing Companion on page 29. The teacher and students discuss how one event leads to the next. The teacher says, "Since the back gate is open, Annie’s puppy escapes. Because the puppy is gone, the parents have to look for the dog." The teacher asks students if it would make sense to begin the story with Gina holding the puppy. The teacher tells students that authors think carefully about how to order events. They often use sequence words to help readers follow the order. The teacher and students discuss the sequence words first, next, and last and students fill in these words on the chart. Student volunteers name the characters and the setting. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher reads the first paragraph and asks students, “What problem does the boy have at the beginning of the story?” The teacher models a Think-Aloud: "I read in the first paragraph that the shepherd boy is not fond of his job. He wants something wonderful to happen and that nothing ever does. I also read, in the second paragraph, that the shepherd boy watches the clouds to stay busy. This makes me think that the shepherd boy is bored. That is his problem." Students share the text evidence that helps them identify the shepherd boy’s problem. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 3, during the Comprehension portion of the lesson, the teacher explains to students that stories have different elements. A character is a person or animal in a story. The setting is where and when the story takes place. The plot is the key events that happen in a story. Often, the plot includes a problem that the characters need to solve. The ending usually tells how the characters solved or tried to solve the problem. The teacher models how to identify the problem in the beginning of a story. Students work in pairs to identify steps the character takes to solve the problem and add them to the graphic organizer and then identify and record the solution. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher tells the students that they can compare and contrast the events in a story.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher conducts a Think-Aloud: "As I read, I find a problem: The boy is not sure if the book is worth the price to purchase. This is a problem because the boy is not sure if he should buy the book. I can look at the steps the boy takes to solve the problem. I see that the boy reads the back of the book and thinks about the price. This is the first step the boy takes to solve the problem. What is the next step the boy takes to solve the problem?" 

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities about text features (e.g. title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher uses the Reading/Writing Companion on pages 6-7 and reads the first paragraph and the caption. The teacher guides students through finding information to answer questions in a caption.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher models identifying and using the text features on page 6. The teacher points out the photograph of the people and explains that photographs help show who or what is described in the text. The teacher reads the caption aloud and explains that it gives more information about the photograph and helps readers better understand the text. Partners look at the photographs and caption on pages 4 and 5 of Lighting Lives
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher models identifying and using the text features in They’ve Got the Beat! The teacher tells students that previewing text features can help them make predictions about what they will read. The teacher reminds students that a bar graph uses bars. The bars help readers compare numbers or amounts. Authors use bar graphs to compare information between groups. The teacher points out the bar graph and reads the title and labels. Students repeat after the teacher. The teacher asks, "What is the topic of this bar graph?" Student volunteers add this text feature and information about it to the expository text anchor chart.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing portion of the lesson, the teacher models identifying and using the text features on page 4 of César Chávez. The teacher points out the word drought on page 4 and explains that the author has put this word in bold print because it is important to help us understand the topic. The teacher tells students that scanning a text for bold words is one way they can quickly locate important information. The teacher then points out the timeline and reminds students that a timeline shows the dates of important events in the order in which they happened. The teacher asks, "Why did the author include a timeline in this biography?" The teacher uses the timeline to locate the important events that happened in César’s life in 1942. Students add information to the biography anchor chart.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Throughout the course of the year, students have frequent opportunities to purposefully read on-level text during Shared Reading, where the teacher sets a purpose for reading and students return to the purpose during the reading discussion. Students are provided frequent opportunities to read text with fluency during Reader’s Theater. The teacher first models reading the text with fluency for students and then students are provided multiple opportunities during the week to practice the text for their assigned role with fluency, including accuracy and rate. Students also have opportunities to read with fluency during Small Group instruction. During Word Work lessons, that are included in daily instruction, students have opportunities to read, spell, and write high-frequency words and words with inflectional endings.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, during Shared Reading, before students begin to read, the teacher asks them to think about the Essential Question. Students think about what they want to know about the story. They write their questions in the left column on page 2. As students read, they jot down interesting words and key details from the text.
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, during Shared Reading, before students begin to read, the teacher asks students to think about the Essential Question and what they know about helping in a community, and then sets a purpose for reading. As students read, they use the left column of page 2 to note their questions, list interesting words they would like to learn, and identify key details from the text. 
    • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, during Shared Reading, before students begin to read, the teacher asks students to think about the Essential Question, what they know about money, and then sets a purpose for reading. As students read, they use the left column of page 2 to note their questions, list interesting words they would like to learn, and identify key details from the text.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade-level decodable words. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
    • In Unit 2, Week 6, Day 1, during Reader’s Theater, the teacher models reading the song as the children follow along in their scripts. The teacher models fluently reading the play, and reads each part emphasizing the appropriate intonation and expression. The teacher points out that Act I has several interjections, words usually added to the beginning of sentences to show feeling, such as hey, yeah, well, and oh. The teacher models how to read these words with expression. The teacher assigns roles. Each day, students practice their parts. The teacher pairs fluent readers with less fluent readers. The pairs echo read or choral read their parts. As needed, the teacher works with less fluent readers to mark pauses in their script using one slash for a short pause and two slashes for longer pauses. Throughout the week, students work on the Reader’s Theater Workstation Activity Card 26. Once students have practiced reading their parts several times, they practice performing the script. The teacher reminds students to read the interjections with expression, showing how the character feels.
    • In Unit 4, Week 6, Day 1, during Reader’s Theater, the teacher models reading the play as students follow along in their scripts. As the teacher reads each part, the teacher states the name of each character, and reads the part emphasizing the appropriate phrasing and expression. The teacher assigns roles. The students practice their parts in the play. The teacher pairs fluent readers with less fluent readers. Pairs echo read or choral read their parts. The teacher works with less fluent readers to mark pauses in their scripts using one slash for a short pause and two slashes for longer pauses. Throughout the week, students work on the Reader’s Theater Workstation Activity Card 26 for more practice. Once students have practiced reading their parts several times, they then practice performing the script. At the end of the week the students perform their play.
    • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 2, during Whole Group Fluency, Cesar Chavez, the teacher reminds children that reading with phrasing means grouping words together so the meaning of the text is clear. The teacher says to “remember to pay attention to punctuation marks as you read. They tell you where to pause. A comma tells you take a short pause, and end punctuation (a period or question mark) tells you take a longer pause. As we read and understand text, we can adjust our voices in response to the punctuation.” The teacher reads a paragraph, emphasizing pauses signaled by commas and end punctuation. The teacher models reading with accuracy, good intonation, and at an appropriate rate and asks students what they noticed as the text was read with phrasing. The teacher has groups work together to practice reading with good phrasing. The teacher reminds students to read with accuracy, or to say all the words correctly, and to read with good phrasing, pausing in response to the punctuation. The teacher listens to the groups, providing corrective feedback as needed.
  • Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, during Whole Group Decodable Reader, the teacher reviews with children the words with short o and long o: o_e, as well as the high-frequency words that they will find in the decodable reader At Home in Nome. The teacher guides students to reread At Home in Nome. The teacher points out the high-frequency words and the words with short o and long o: o_e.  Reread the Book: On page 3, students point to each word, sounding out the decodable words and saying the high-frequency words quickly.
    • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 6, during Decodable Reader, the teacher reviews the words and letter-sounds that students will find in the decodable reader. The teacher reviews the high-frequency words also, apart, begin, either, hundred, over, places, those, which, and without and reminds students that i, y, igh, and ie can stand for the /ī/ sound. Students read the selection, “High in the Sky.”
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4, during Decodable Reader, the teacher reviews the /ôr/ sound spelled or, ore, and oar and the /är/ sound spelled ar, as well as the high-frequency words everyone, outside, people, and together that children will find in the Decodable Reader. The teacher guides the students in rereading Just for Fun! and points out the high-frequency words and the words with /ôr/or, ore, oar and /är/ar. The class rereads the book and the students point to each word, sounding out the decodable words and saying the high-frequency words quickly. If students struggle sounding out words, the teacher models blending for them.
    • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 1, during Decodable Reader, the teacher reviews the words and letter-sounds that students will find in the Decodable Reader. The teacher reminds students that the variant vowel /ü/ can be spelled oo, u, u_e, ew, ue, and ui and that the variant vowel /u/ can be spelled oo, ou, and u. The teacher points to the title of the folktale and asks students to sound out each word with the teacher. The class begins to read the story, Soon the North Wind Blew. On page 24, students point to each word, sounding out decodable words and saying high-frequency words quickly. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending.
  • Students have opportunities to recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, during the Decodable Reader portion of the lesson, the students read the story, At Home in Nome. On page 2, the teacher asks students to point to each word, sounding out decodable words and saying high-frequency words quickly. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending for them. If students are having difficulty with high-frequency words, the teacher rereads the word in isolation and then in context. On Day 2, the students reread the Decodable Reader, At Home in Nome
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 3, during the Decodable Reader portion of the lesson, the teacher reviews the high-frequency words family and school. The teacher guides students as they read the selection,
    •  At Home in a Pond. On page 8, students point to each word, sounding out the decodable words and saying the high-frequency words quickly. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending for them. If students are having difficulty with high-frequency words, the teacher rereads the word in isolation and then rereads the high-frequency word in context. On Day 4, the students reread At Home in a Pond.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Grade 2 materials provide students multiple opportunities to apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected tasks through the use of decodable readers and the Literature Anthology. During the Shared Reading lessons, the teacher often models and points out current phonics skills that students are working on as well as model fluent reading. Decodable readers provide students with an opportunity to decode words with current and past phonics skills as well as high-frequency words. Students participate in a Shared Writing activity that allows them to apply phonics skills and high-frequency word practice. Students often respond to a prompt related to the text and complete these in their Reading/Writing Companion. 

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g., apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels, decode words with common prefixes and suffixes) in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher displays Word-Building Cards d, r, i, p. The teacher says, "This is the letter d. It stands for /d/. This is the letter r. It stands for /r/. This is the letter i. It can stand for /i/. This is the letter p. It stands for /p/. Listen as I blend the sounds to say the word: /drrriiip/, drip." The teacher continues by modeling the words block, slick, sled, and trap and points out the two-letter blend in each word. The teacher displays the Phonics/Fluency Practice chart and reads each word in the first row, blending the sounds. For example, /ssssllliiip/, slip. Students blend each word with the teacher. The teacher prompts students to read the connected text, sounding out the decodable words and gives corrective feedback if students need further support.
    • Do not slip on the grass.
    • We will pick the crop.
    • Trent went west on a trip.

The teacher begins to read the story Spot and Fran. On page 28, students point to each word, sounding out the decodable words and saying the high-frequency words quickly. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending for them. 

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, during Word Work, the teacher reviews the words and letter-sounds that children will find in the Decodable Reader. The teacher reviews the high-frequency words almost, buy, food, out, pull, saw, sky, straight, under, and wash and also reviews with students that the letters dge, ge, lge, nge can stand for the /j/ sound and that the letter c can stand for the /s/ sound. The teacher points to the title of the selection and has students sound out each word. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending. If students are having difficulty with high-frequency words, the teacher rereads the word in isolation and then in context.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher displays Word-Building Cards s, o, a, p and models how to blend the sounds: "This is the letter s. It stands for /s/. These are the letters oa. Together they stand for /ō/. This is the letter p. It stands for /p/. Listen as I blend these sounds together: /sssōōōp/. The word is soap." The teacher continues modeling blending with the words cold, low, and doe. The teacher displays the Phonics/Fluency Practice chart and reads each word in the first row, blending the sounds. For example, say: /nnnōōō/. The word is no. Students blend each word with the teacher and prompts students to read the connected text, sounding out the decodable words.
    • Moe ate toast and oats.
    • The coach told Joan she made a goal!
    • Joe put on his coat to go out in the cold snow.

The teacher begins to read the story Three Goats and a Troll. On page 37, students point to each word, sounding out the decodable words and saying the high-frequency words quickly. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending. 

  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 1, the teacher models by writing the words repack, unhappy, and disobey. The teacher underlines the prefix in each word and explains that a prefix can be added to the beginning of a word to make a new word. The prefix re- means “again,” the prefix un- means “not,” and the prefix dis- means “opposite of.” The teacher models how to define repack, unhappy, and disobey, based on each prefix and root word.  The teacher uses the same procedure with the words hopeful and spotless to discuss the suffixes -ful (full of) and -less (without) Students write the following words: useful, unmade, painless, disagree, rewrap. Students identify each prefix or suffix and tell the meaning of each word.

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher reviews words and letter-sounds that students will find in the Decodable Reader and reviews the high-frequency words because, cold, family, friends, have, know, off, picture, school, and took. The teacher reminds students that inflectional endings –ed and -ing can tell about actions now and in the past. The teacher points to the title of the story, and has students sound out each word together. The teacher asks, "What do you see in the picture? Why do you think the girl is waving to her friends in the school bus?" The teacher begins to read the story At Home in Nome. On page 2, students point to each word, sounding out decodable words and saying high-frequency words quickly. If students need support reading decodable words, the teacher models blending for them. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher displays the High-Frequency Word Cards and uses the Read/ Spell/Write routine for each word. The teacher points to and says the word better. The teacher says, "This is the word better. Say it with me: better. The word better is spelled b-e-t-t-e-r. Spell it with me. Let’s write the word in the air as we say each letter: b-e-t-t-e-r."  The teacher points out any irregularities in sound-spellings, such as the /ü/ sound spelled o in the word who. Partners create sentences using each word. Students identify the high-frequency words in connected text and blend the decodable words.
    • Joe is much better today.
    • A group of kids played tag.
    • Ken has a long bus ride.
    • May I have more grapes?
    • Only one fish is in the bowl.
    • It is our time to play ball.
    • The race has just started.
    • Joan has three gifts for us.
    • Who is on the phone?
    • I won’t go without you.

The teacher begins to read the story Three Goats and a Troll. On page 37, students point to each word, sounding out the decodable words and saying the high-frequency words quickly. If students are having difficulty with high-frequency words, the teacher rereads the word in isolation and then in context.

  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Day 1, during Word Work, students identify the high-frequency words in connected text and blend the decodable words.
    • I don’t really need anything.
    • How many children are in a class?
    • Everybody likes that music.
    • Let’s play ball instead of cards.
    • Write your name on the top of your paper.
    • Do you know which person is Dan?
    • Nya has a lovely singing voice.
    • We ate a whole watermelon!
    • The woman rode her bike to work.
    • Write some words on the card.

The teacher begins to read the selection, Don’t Dread Rules! On page 46, students point to each word, sounding out decodable words and saying high-frequency words quickly. If students are having difficulty with high-frequency words, the teacher rereads the word in isolation and then in context.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 8, during Word Work, students identify the high-frequency words in connected text and blend the decodable words.
    • Does the baby look like me?
    • How early did we get here?
    • I went to see him eight times.
    • It isn’t time for lunch yet.
    • Did you learn to sing it?
    • Seven is less than eight.
    • Did you start the game yet?
    • I know these are my pants.
    • Let’s try to make a cake!
    • We can walk to school.

The teacher points out any irregularities in sound-spellings, such as the /ī/ sound spelled y in try. Students independently practice the high-frequency words using Practice Book page 144. The teacher adds the high-frequency words to the cumulative word bank. Partners create more sentences using the words. 

  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, during Structural Analysis, students are reminded that a plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing. The teacher explains that most nouns are made plural by adding -s or -es to the end. The teacher writes the sentences: The child saw a mouse. The children saw mice. The teacher points out that the nouns child and mouse are irregular. The words change spelling in the plural. The teacher explains that some nouns are the same in the singular. The students read these sentences: I saw a fish and a deer at the park. I saw five fish and two deer at the park. The teacher points out that the nouns fish and deer are the same whether they are singular or plural. For guided practice, the teacher writes the following words: mice, child, men, mouse, man, foot, feet, children. Students identify whether each noun is singular or plural. Then students  use each word in a sentence.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

Instructional materials provide opportunities throughout the entire program on a weekly, monthly, and quarterly basis to assess students’ mastery of foundational skills and to progress monitor student growth. Students are assessed at the end of each unit using a summative unit assessment of designated skills taught during that unit that include phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension, and fluency. Teachers are provided with guidance on how to use the data from the assessment to provide flexible grouping and differentiated learning experiences. Teachers are instructed to use running records every four to six weeks to monitor students’ word reading fluency and application of decoding skills. Teachers are also provided a detailed assessment guide that describes the purposes and uses of all assessments in the program that are available to determine student proficiency. 

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Placement and Diagnostic Assessment, page xvii, the materials explain that beyond the initial placement of students into the appropriate Wonders level of materials, students need to be tested periodically to determine whether they are progressing at grade-level or at a faster pace. The program suggests that teachers administer these progress monitoring or benchmark tests on a regular schedule throughout the year: fall, winter, and spring, or over a regular period of time, such as every four to six weeks. A chart is provided for general testing scheduling guide.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information on students’ current skills/level of understanding. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Placement and Diagnostic Assessment, page xii and xiii, the materials explain how to group students based on student results for the Grade 2-3 Placement Assessments: Oral Reading Fluency Assessment, Reading Comprehension Tests, Sight Word Fluency Assessment (if applicable), Phonics Survey Subtests (if applicable). Students who score in the 50th percentile or higher on the Oral Reading Fluency Assessment AND 80% correct or higher on the Reading Comprehension Tests begin instruction with Wonders On Level materials. Students who score below the 50th percentile on the Oral Reading Fluency Assessment OR 60% to 79% correct on the Reading Comprehension Tests begin instruction with Wonders Approaching Level materials. For students who score below the 50th percentile on the Oral Reading Fluency Assessment AND 60% to 79% correct on the Reading Comprehension Tests begin instruction with Wonders Approaching Level materials. For further leveling clarification/confirmation, teachers administer the Phonics Survey Subtests to students who are struggling with decoding. Otherwise, the teacher administers the Sight Word Fluency Assessment. Students who score 80% correct or higher on the majority of the Phonics Survey Subtests OR Less than 40 correct words on the Sight Word Fluency Assessment continue using the Wonders Approaching Level materials. Students scoring below 60% correct on the majority of the Phonics Survey Subtests OR Less than 40 correct words on the Sight Word Fluency Assessment require focused, intensive instruction. It is suggested to place students in Wonders Approaching Level materials and engage students using appropriate lessons from intervention materials. Students who score below 60% correct on the Reading Comprehension Tests require focused, intensive instruction. Students should be placed in Wonders Approaching Level materials and use intervention materials.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Day 5, the teacher has the opportunity to administer additional assessments to gather data on students’ progress using the following assessment tools and options:
    • Fluency: Conduct assessments individually using the differentiated passages in Fluency Assessment. Children’s expected fluency goal for this Unit is 90-110 WCPM with an accuracy rate of 95% or higher.
    • Running Records: Use the instructional reading level determined by the calculations for regrouping decisions. Children at Level 20 or below should be provided reteaching on specific Comprehension skills.
    • ELL Assessment: Assess children’s English language proficiency and track children’s progress using the McGraw-Hill English Learner Benchmark Assessments. This resource draws from a variety of contexts to evaluate social and academic language proficiency. These assessments also can be used for placement to achieve an optimal learning experience for new children.

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In every unit, week, and day, materials include Small Group Differentiated Instruction lessons for students who are placed in Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level for phonemic awareness, phonics, high-frequency words, and leveled reading.
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 5, under progress monitoring, teachers are provided a variety of online tools to analyze data and receive suggestions for reteaching and intervention. For example: 
    • "Make data-based grouping decisions by using the following reports to verify assessment results. For additional support options for your students, refer to the reteaching and enrichment opportunities.
    • ONLINE ASSESSMENT CENTER
      • Item Analysis Report
      • Standards Analysis Report
    • DATA DASHBOARD
      • Recommendations Report
      • Activity Report
      • Skills Report
      • Progress Report"

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Instructional materials provide opportunities for the teacher to differentiate foundational skills lessons through the small group differentiated instruction for each unit, week, and lesson. Students are provided multiple opportunities throughout daily experiences to practice foundational skills and concepts learned throughout the whole group instruction and opportunities to apply learning during small group differentiated instruction. Foundational skills are differentiated with the  leveled text selection for each group that include On Level, Approaching Level, Beyond Level, and ELL. 

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Tier 2 Intervention Phonemic Awareness Teacher Edition, Lesson 103, the students participate in activities for final phoneme in a blend deletion. The teacher first explains that when you delete a phoneme at the end of a word you can end up with a new word. The teacher models breaking a word into its sounds and deleting the final phoneme and says the new word. If students struggle with identifying sounds, the teacher has the students put counters in each box to represent each sound and then take away the final counter to delete the final phoneme. The students practice deleting the final phoneme in words and identifying the new word. The students then practice applying this skill independently.
  • In the Tier 2 Intervention Phonics/Word Study Teacher Edition, Lesson 87, the students participate in activities for r-controlled vowel /ar/, as in star. The teacher models identifying the /ar/ at the end of star and articulating it correctly for students. The teacher models blending words with /ar/, such as; far, jar, art, hard. The students and teacher practice blending words with /ar/ together. Then students practice applying this skill independently.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 7, during Small Group Differentiated Instruction for Beyond Level readers for the leveled text The Lost Kitten, there is a section in the lesson called Differentiate and Collaborate that provides activities to do with the book beyond the lesson. 
    • "Be Inspired: Have children think about The Lost Kitten and other selections they read. Ask, "What do the texts inspire you to do?" Use the following activities or have partners think of a way to respond to the texts. 
    • Give a Speech: Have partners discuss the characteristics of a good citizen. Then have them write a speech explaining what it means to be a good citizen and telling children what they can do to be good citizens."

The students practice their speeches and then deliver them to the class. 

    • "Write a Letter: Have children think about people in their community who are good citizens. Have them write a thank-you letter to one of them for helping the community."

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 8, during Whole Group Word Work, the teacher reviews adding -ed and -ing and reminds students that the use of -ed is to show something happened in the past and -ing is something happening now. The teacher explains that sometimes when -ed is at the end of a word, it makes the /t/ sound. The Approaching Level Group uses the Differentiated Passage to separate root words from endings to figure out the meanings of words. The On Level Group uses the Differentiated Passage, A Bicycle Built for Two, and students work with partners to use their knowledge of root words and endings to determine the meanings of the following words: turned, oiled, climbed. In the Beyond Level Group, students use the Differentiated Passage to find the meanings of various root words. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 3, during Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in each level read a leveled text called Earthquakes. Each group reads the leveled text with phrasing as a focus. In the Approaching Level Group, the teacher models reading the sentences on page 6, one at a time. Students chorally repeat. The teacher points out how to group words together as you read and pause between the groups of words. Students apply phrasing when they practice reading with a partner. In the On Level Group, the teacher models reading the sentences, one at a time. Students chorally repeat. The teacher points out how to pause after end punctuation and commas for correct phrasing. Students practice applying phrasing by repeated readings with a partner. The teacher provides feedback as needed. For students in the Beyond Level Group, the teacher models reading the first two paragraphs on page 2 with correct phrasing and reads the rest of the page, while the students read along. Students practice applying phrasing by reading the passage with a partner. 

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade-level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 7, during Structural Analysis, the teacher models and reminds children that when they see a vowel team in a long word, such as au or oy, the letters that make up the team must stay together in the same syllable. This can help them decide how to divide up, or chunk, an unfamiliar word to figure out how to pronounce it. The teacher writes the word awkward and reads it aloud. The teacher draws a vertical line between the k and the w that follows it and reads each syllable. The teacher reminds students that each syllable has one vowel sound, and circles the letters that make each vowel sound. The teacher draws attention to aw and continues modeling with the word eastern. The teacher provides guided practice and additional practice with students by writing the following words: raincoat, yellow, squawking, joyful, spoiling. Students draw a line to divide each word into syllables and circle the vowel teams. Students independently practice vowel-team syllables using Practice Book page 398.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, students in the Approaching, On Level, and Beyond Level Groups have multiple opportunities within the Whole Group and Differentiated parts of the lessons on Days 1-4 to practice and use the following words both in and out of context: door, front, order, probably, remember, someone, tomorrow, what’s, worry, and yesterday.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Texts are organized around genres studies focused on an essential question and topic. Sequences of questions and tasks support students as they analyze both content and craft within and across texts. Questions and tasks invite students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated (writing and speaking) tasks, including focused research topics. A cohesive, year-long plan supports grade-level writing, however vocabulary acquisition is limited and does not support the building of key academic vocabulary knowledge. The materials encourage and support a volume of independent reading, both in and out of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32
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Criterion Rating Details

Texts are organized around genres studies focused on an essential question and topic. Sequences of questions and tasks support students as they analyze the content, language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure within and across texts. Questions and tasks throughout each unit support students and allow them to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated tasks. Limited opportunities are present for students to build key academic vocabulary knowledge. A year-long writing plan also supports students as they work toward grade-level proficiency. Students are engaged throughout the year in research projects that allow them to delve into a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

The materials promote and provide accountability for a volume of independent reading, both in and out of class.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build student knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Instructional materials provide students with the opportunity to build knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to read complex texts throughout the school year around various topics. Students read texts around a topic and genre study every one to two weeks that help build knowledge. Each week’s topic is supported by texts that connect to the topic and enrich student’s abilities to gain knowledge and vocabulary from the topic. Students read texts about the same topic in their Literature Anthology, in Shared Reading, and in the Interactive Read-Aloud. 

Texts are connected by a grade-level appropriate topic. Examples of these topics include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students learn about families who work together and answer the essential question, “What happens when families work together?” Students read “Families Working Together” and “Why We Work,” which are Time for Kids articles in their Literature Anthology. The Shared Reading is “Families Work!” (Time for Kids). All three expository texts help students understand jobs that families can have in the community. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students learn about baby animals and learn how offspring are like their parents. Texts that support this topic include the Literature Anthology stories Baby Bears by Bobbie Kalman, “From Caterpillar to Butterfly” (unknown author), and the Interactive Read-Aloud “Wild Animal Families” (unknown author). Students also engage in the Shared Reading text “Eagles and Eaglets” (unknown author).
  • In Unit 3 Week 1, students learn about different ways to help in the community. The Shared Reading is “Lighting Lives” (unknown author), which is a nonfiction narrative about a woman helping people in communities get electricity by using solar power, and the Literature Anthology is Biblioburro by Jeanette Winter, about a man who brings his books into faraway hills to share with those who have none.  
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students learn how the earth changes. Texts include the Shared Reading “Into the Sea” (unknown author) and the Interactive Read-Aloud “Earth Changes” (unknown author). Students also read the texts Volcanoes by Sandra Markle and “To the Rescue” (unknown author) in their Literature Anthology. All of these texts help students understand ways that the Earth changes. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students learn about rules and read persuasive texts about the importance of recycling. Texts include the Shared Reading, “The Problem with Plastic Bags” (Time for Kids) and “A Call to Compost,” a Time for Kids article in the Literature Anthology. 
  • In Unit 6, Weeks 1 and 2, students learn about how we use money. In their Literature Anthology, students read Money Madness by David A. Adler and “King Midas and the Golden Touch.” For Shared Reading, students also read “Life of a Dollar Bill” (unknown author), which teaches students about how money is made and when it is replaced. 

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.


The materials provide opportunities for students to identify key ideas and details, analyze structure and craft in every unit. Students are given retelling cards to retell and answer questions for the Literature Big Book story. Students are introduced to the Strategy and the Skill that they will be working on throughout the week. These strategies and skills contain questions and tasks that helps students to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.


For most texts (read-aloud texts K-1 and anchor texts in Grade 2), students are asked to analyze words/phrases or author’s word choice (according to grade level standards). Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Text Features, Diagrams and Labels, Reading/Writing Companion, Using the Shared Read, Eagles and Eaglets author unknown, the teacher models how to use the text features to make predictions and gather information. On page 11 of the Reading/Writing Companion, students use those text features (Diagram and Label) to gather information about eagles. This is used again when students read the anchor text and use diagrams and heading to help determine knowledge.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared Read, Happy New Year by author unknown, the teacher begins by having the students think about the Essential Question, “How are kids around the world different?” The teacher reads the second paragraph and asks the students, “Why does the girl say, ‘We were surrounded by fun!’”? Students then use their Reading/Writing Companion, page 3, to list two details that tell why the girl made that statement.  Continuing with the strategy of Visualize, in the Reading/Writing Companion, page 5, the teacher is asked to “Elicit how a balloon can hang in the air. Then ask: What words help you form a picture in your mind of the moon?” Students then circle words from the text that help them visualize the moon and then answer the question, “What lights up at night?”  


For most texts (read-aloud texts K-1 and anchor texts Grade 2), students analyze key ideas and details, structure, and craft (according to grade-level standards). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared Read: Reading/Writing Companion, Maria Celebrates Brazil, the teacher models using text evidence to determine character and setting, using illustrations and text. The question on page 3 of Reading/Writing companion asks students to “Draw a box around the characters. Where are they?” On pages 12-13 of the Reading/Writing Companion, students are asked to complete a chart with the character, setting, and events from the places they marked in the text. Later on Day 3 (same unit and week), students are asked to use the same strategy to understand the anchor text Big Red Lollipop by Rukhsana Khan, and to use a graphic organizer. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared Read: Reading/Writing Companion, The Boy Who Cried Wolf, the teacher models using context clues to determine the meaning of the word delicious. Later in the Reading/Writing Companion, page 44-45, students revisit those vocabulary words that were highlighted in the text during the shared read and use antonyms and synonyms to help determine meaning. The task under “Expand Vocabulary,” also on Day 1, returns to these same vocabulary words within different sentences.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Anchor Text, Beetles by Monica Shannon, after the students look at the illustrations on pages 156-159, the teacher asks, “What key details do we learn about beetles from the poem and illustrations?” Students are asked to read the prompt, “How do the poets arrange the lines to show different visual patterns in the poems?” Students are asked to talk with a partner about what else they may notice about the visual patterns in the poems. The students are asked to explain why they think the poets used these visual patterns.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Teacher Edition, Shared Read, Reading and Writing Companion, They’ve Got the Beat! by author unknown, the teacher asks, “What word in the first sentence helps us to understand the meaning of the word chorus? What is a chorus?” After students read the first two paragraphs, the teacher asks, “Where is the chorus from?” The teacher then thinks aloud/models using text evidence. After modeling the teacher asks, “Where has the chorus traveled to sing?” 
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, Day 1-5, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared Read, The Ticket by Constance Keremes, the teacher reads the first stanza of The Ticket, and asks, “What word does the speaker use to describe her ticket?  Where can the ticket take her?” Students write the answers to the questions on Reading/Writing Companion page 61.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

The materials provide students the opportunity to engage in questioning and tasks that are text-based and build knowledge. Each text set centers around a topic and genre with questions and tasks that ask students to refer to the text to find information and support answers to questions in order to complete tasks. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge and ask students to connect ideas between multiple texts. 

Most sets of coherent questions and tasks support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas. Materials provide guidance to teachers in supporting students’ literacy skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students engage in the shared reading of “Families Work!” (no author), and are asked a series of questions to build knowledge, including, “Why do doctors like Ellen work long hours? What jobs does Steve do to make sure he is ready to fight a fire? If children can get sick at any time, what does that mean for doctors? Why is it important for firefighters to check their equipment?” 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students engage in the shared reading of “From Caterpillar to Butterfly” (no author), and are asked questions to build knowledge, such as, “Why is a chrysalis important in the butterfly’s life cycle? In the larva stage, what comes out of the egg? In the adult stage, what comes out of the chrysalis?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students engage in the shared reading of “Into the Sea” (no author), and are asked a series of questions to build knowledge. These include, “What is the biggest cause of erosion? What can happen when a cliff becomes weak? Why do some buildings get washed away when there is beach erosion?” 
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students engage in a shared reading of “The Life of a Dollar Bill” (unknown author), and are asked a series of questions to build knowledge. “How does the girl receive and use the bill? Why does the man trade in the dollar bill for a new bill? Why does the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing replace the old bill?”

Throughout the year, students integrate knowledge and ideas across texts throughout the week and at the end of the week. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students are given the task of using text evidence to make connections between Baby Bears by Bobbie Kalman and “From Caterpillar to Butterfly” (unknown author), and a photograph on page 24 of the Reading/Writing Companion. Students identify how they are similar and different. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, students who are in the Approaching Level small group, compare the text “Musical Expression” (no author) with other selections from the unit. Students respond to the questions, “How do the authors help you understand how music can be used to show feelings? How do they show you that you can make music?” Students who are On Level make connections between “Talking Underwater” (unknown author) and “The Sound of Trash” by Susan Evento. All students also have the opportunity to make connections, as they are asked to make connections between the Ukiyo-e print on page 82 of the Reading/Writing Companion with the selections they have read in the unit. 
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 3 and 4, students make connections between a photo and caption on page 56 of the Reading/Writing Companion with the selections they have read in order to integrate knowledge. In small group instruction, students who are at Approaching Level make connections between the texts “Glaciers” (unknown author) and “Earthquakes” by Elizabeth Doering in order to build knowledge. Students do the same thing on a different day with the genre passage “Tsunamis" (unknown author). 

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Instructional materials provide students opportunities to complete culminating tasks that are related to the text they are reading. Culminating tasks integrate reading, writing, speaking and listening skills and provide opportunities for students to show their knowledge of a topic. 

Culminating tasks are multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Weeks 1 and 2, students study how children around the world are different.  For the culminating task, students make a chart about a celebration from another place. They use primary and secondary sources to include important details about the celebration. Sentence starters such as, “My celebration is …” and “What I want to know about the celebration" are provided.  Students discuss what sources they might use in their research. They think about which sources are primary and which are secondary sources. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Research and Inquiry, students develop a research plan about the water cycle. Students review the research plan on page 71 of the Reading Writing Companion. The teacher models how to create a research plan. Partners write a list of questions about the water cycle to create a research plan. Students create a Two-Pocket Foldable to store their research plans and notes. The teacher reviews students’ research plans with them. Students create a water cycle diagram. The diagram includes labels and arrows to show the order of the cycle. Students spend the next two weeks on this project. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Research and Inquiry, students create a flowchart that shows how people are producers and consumers. Students show how people earn and spend their money. Students are given the following guidelines, “Organize events in sequence, or in order. Make a drawing or use a photo to show each event. You may set up the events in a circle. This will show how money circulates, or passes from person to person in a cycle.”
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Research and Inquiry, students think about a plant they know about and write about its parts. Students work with a partner to “Research one type of plant. Record information about its parts. Find out how each part keeps the plant healthy.” Students create a diagram showing the information they collected. 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. 

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.  Academic vocabulary supports the text, but most of the time the academic vocabulary is related to the text structures and strategies. Guidance is provided to teachers in the form of videos, articles, and a handbook. The online weekly planner does not provide guidance for teachers to adequately develop academic vocabulary.  Materials provide a vocabulary development component in the Tier 2 Intervention booklet.


Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routine Handbook, page 77, teachers are guided through a 4-step routine that can be used throughout the year to introduce vocabulary. 
    • Step 1: Introduce (Explain the vocabulary routine) 
      • Teacher example, “Today we will learn new vocabulary words. I will say a vocabulary word, define it, and use it in a sentence. Then, I will ask you to use the word in a sentence. The more we practice using the new words, the better readers and writers we will be.”
    • Step 2: Model (I Do): Define/Example/Ask
      • Teacher example, “I am going to say the vocabulary word so you can hear the correct pronunciation. Then I am going to define it, use it in a sentence.”
    • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do): Students are given opportunities to use and apply words.
      • Teacher example, “I am going to describe some things. If what I describe is an example of people cooperating, say cooperate. If it is not, do not say anything. • Two children setting the table for dinner • Two children grabbing the same book • Two children putting crayons back in the box.”
    • Step 4: Independent Practice (You Do): ) “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it." Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words.
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Teacher Edition, Vocabulary: Words in Context, the teacher uses the routines on the Visual Vocabulary Cards to introduce each word: actions, afraid, depend, nervously, peered, perfectly, rescue, and secret
    • Actions are things someone or something does.
    • When you are afraid, you are scared of something.
    •  When you depend on someone, you need or count on them. 
    • When you act nervously, you act in a fearful or restless way. 
    • Peered means looked hard or looked closely at something.
    • When something is done perfectly, it is done in the best possible way. 
    • When you rescue something, you save it from danger. 
    • A secret is something that is private or not known by many people. 

The teacher explains root words, stating, “When children see an unknown word, they can look to see if it has a root word and an ending such as –s, -es, -ed, or –ing.” The teacher models how to figure out the meaning of the word landed on page 43 of the Reading Writing Companion. Students complete the Reading Writing Companion, pages 43-44, and respond in writing to questions about the words. Partners use root words to figure out the meanings of peered, jumped, and flying on pages 40, 41, and 42 of Little Flap Learns to Fly. Students separate the root words from the endings and use the word parts to determine word meanings. 

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Words in Context, Visual Vocabulary Word Cards: believe is an example of one of the vocabulary words that is used also in the text, The Boy Who Cried Wolf by Author Unknown. “Nobody believes a person who tells lies.”  From the text, Wolf! Wolf! by John Rocco, comes the example, “Those villagers won’t believe you, anyway.”  In Unit 2, Week 3, the vocabulary words are reinforced by the students orally completing each of the cloze sentences to review the words. “To win, you must______ it is possible. (believe). In Writing, Unit 2 ,Week 3, students connect to writing by writing sentences in their writer’s notebook using the target vocabulary.  Students write sentences that provide context to show what the words mean.
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Teacher Edition, Day 1, Shared Read, They’ve Got The Beat!, in the Reading Writing Companion, pages 64-67, students are shown yellow highlighted words as they engage with the text. After reading, the teacher uses the visual vocabulary routine to go over the words in context.  
    • Cheered means shouted with happiness or praise. 
    • A concert is a performance by musicians or singers. 
    • An instrument is a tool used to do or make something. Our movements are our ways of moving.
    • Music is the pleasing sounds made by a singer or musical instrument, such as a piano or guitar. 
    • Rhythm is the repeating accents of sounds or movements to create a beat.
    • Sounds are noises that can be heard. When you understand something you know what it means.  

Students then use the Reading Writing Companion, pages 68-69, to respond to questions in writing about the vocabulary words. Students engage in the Anchor Text, Many Ways to Enjoy Music. The vocabulary words appear in highlighted yellow in the text. 

  • In Unit 6 Week 3, Vocabulary, on Day 1, students work with the Oral vocabulary Define/Example/Ask routine for the words dense, encircled, magnificent, stunned, and transform. Next, students study different words in context using the visual vocabulary cards and the Define/Example/Ask routine for the words appeared, crops, develop, edge, golden, rustled, shining, stages. Students are also exposed to these words in their reading/writing workshop book on pages 40-41. The students talk with a partner about each word and answer the questions. On Day 2, students review the words. Students expand vocabulary by practicing adding or removing inflectional endings, prefixes, or suffixes to a base word to the end of the weekly vocabulary words. On Day 3, students reinforce weekly oral vocabulary cards by filling in the blanks with a vocabulary word from a clue. Afterwards students complete a fill in the blank sentence activity with the vocabulary words, “Do you think the toy is _____ten dollars? (worth)”On Day 4, students connect their vocabulary to their writing.  The students write sentences in their notebook using the vocabulary to show what the word means through the context of the sentence. On Day 5, students expand their vocabulary with Word Squares, which is a vocabulary word written in one square, a definition of the word in another, an illustration, and a non-example like antonyms.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to respond to writing prompts on a variety of texts. Scaffolded instruction is provided through a series of instructional supports like sentence frames, class discussions and shared writing along with teacher think -alouds. The teacher guides children to respond to a prompt, using sentence frames as needed. In Independent Writing, students start by reviewing a student writing sample that includes the weekly writing skill. Students then respond independently to a new prompt, as they practice the skill. 

Materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level, and writing instruction spans the whole school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Expository Text, Expert Model, Reading Writing Companion, the teacher reviews the features of an expository essay by creating an anchor chart:
    • It gives information about a topic, including facts and examples. 
    • It may have text features, such as headings, photographs with captions, diagrams with labels, and charts. 
    • It uses details to help explain ideas. 
    • It has a clear ending, or conclusion.

Students are reminded that Families Working Together begins with a heading that asks a question. The teacher talks about how a specific heading helps readers think about what the text will be about. The teacher then models that the first three paragraphs read like the story of a typical day for Mary and her family. 

  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Research and Inquiry, Now and Then, students interview a teacher or older person at school about what their school life was like when they were a child. The students use pages 118–119 in the Reading Writing Companion after the teacher reviews the steps in the research process. The students choose a person and write some questions they would like to ask them about their school experiences. After asking the questions,  the students write about what they learned from the person. Students choose how they are going to present their work. Suggestions are made for a digital recording or a poster.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 6, Writing about the Anchor Text, after taking notes, students are instructed to use their notes to draft a piece. Students learn about topic/opening sentences, indicating that the first sentence should state their main idea, such as ‘The author uses a quote from someone who was there, descriptive language, and text features to help readers understand the power of a volcano’s eruption.’”
  • In Unit 5, students write an opinion piece about whether composting should be a law or a choice after reading two arguments that the author shares about composting using their Reading Writing Companion. Students are also asked to reference, “What details did the author give to persuade you?”
  • In Unit 6, students focus on a topic and strengthen their writing by revising, editing, and publishing their writing by using their Reading Writing Companion. Students analyze a student model of a research report and use the Literature Anthology, Money Madness, to study research reports and then write a research report about the ways people use banks. Students focus on the topic and strengthen their writing by revising their draft, page 29, with suggestions, such as “work on using long and short sentences.” Students later work with peers to conference about suggestions to revise their work, page 30.  Students edit, proofread, publish and evaluate their work.

Writing instruction supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1 Week 4, Write to the Prompt, the teacher guides students to review their notes and plan their writing. The students reread the prompt, “Describe how where Pip lives affects what he does.”  Students write a draft using evidence from the text and making inferences. Students are encouraged by the teacher to use supporting details from the text to tell more about Pam’s plan. Sentence frames are available if needed for the students to use. “Before Pam’s plan, the girls ____. After Pam’s plan, the girls _____.
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 2, Respond to the Shared Read, teachers help students use sentence starters to stay focused on the prompt. Students may use the sentence starters in the Quick Tip on Reading/Writing Companion, page 74. The partners use the sentence starters to focus on how the author shows how families work and make choices about spending the money they earn.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Independent Writing, Anchor Text, Fun With Maps by author unknown, students write about the anchor text using the prompts, “Why does the author show different kinds of maps? What does this help us to understand about maps?” Students look for clues in the text and maps and take notes in their writer’s notebook to respond to the prompt. Students write a response to the prompt as a draft, using evidence from the text. Sentence frames are available if needed for the students to use. Students work over three days to write the rough draft, proofread, revise, edit, publish, and evaluate their work.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Reading Writing Companion, students use a model and revise their work using the skill of voice. Students are asked to use describing words to explain a character’s feelings. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, Shared Read, Respond to Reading, after students read the text, The Problem with Plastic Bags by author unknown, they respond in writing to the shared read. The teacher reads aloud the prompt, “How does the author persuade you to agree or disagree with a ban on plastic bags?" As students analyze the text, the teacher prompts them to locate evidence by saying, “Here the author states an opinion and then presents facts, examples, and a chart. Use these text features to determine if the author persuades you to agree or disagree.” Using the Reading Writing Companion, page 70, students use the text evidence to respond to the sentence starter. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Anchor Text, Respond to Reading, Write About the Author Text, after reading the story, The Contest of Athena and Poseidon by Pamela Walker, students respond to the prompt, “How does the author use dialogue to help you understand why the citizens choose Athena as their patron?” Students reread the text to see how the author uses dialogue to help answer the prompt. Students use the provided sentence starter in their Reading Writing Companion, page 52, to respond to the prompt.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for students to participate in research projects using a five-step research guidelines. The first step is to choose a topic; the second step is to write a question; the third step is to find information; the fourth step is to draw and/or write about what they learned; and the final step is to present the research. Every two weeks beginning in Unit 1, Week 1, students are provided with one research and inquiry opportunity.  The research projects help students further develop their knowledge and understanding of the topic addressed throughout the week. The teacher is provided with support and guidance in the Instructional Routines Handbook for how to present the research process to students. A scoring rubric is also provided to the teacher in the Instructional Routines Handbook. 

In the Instructional Routines Handbook, teachers are provided information on how to guide students through the Research and Inquiry process. A sample rubric is also provided with a 4-point rating scale.  The research process routine instructs the teacher to:

    • Set research goals and introduce the project, as well as clearly identify the research focus and end product.
    • Identify sources such as texts read in class, digital media, print sources  and/or interviews with experts.
    • Find and record information by guiding students as they search for relevant information from sources.
    • Organize and help students review and analyze the information they have gathered. Students should identify the most useful information, use a graphic organizer to sort and clarify categories of related information, and identify any areas where they need further information.
    • Synthesize and present research by planning how to best present their work. Students may include audio and/or visual displays to enhance presentations, check that key ideas are included in the presentation, and rehearse the presentation.

Research projects are sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students research the study skill of internet searches using keywords. The teacher explains key points about keyword searches. The teacher models how to conduct a search using keywords. The teacher then reviews the Reading/Writing Companion, and students think about how they can use keywords to learn about family celebrations in Brazil. 
  • In Unit 2, Weeks 3 and 4, students research the wolf food chain. With a partner, students read a paragraph about citing sources before researching wolves and what they eat. Students draw a food chain diagram and label it. 
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 3 and 4, students work with a partner to conduct research about how the Earth changes. Students conduct research and then complete a drawing with captions about how the Earth changes. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students research recycling with a partner and create a recycling chart with the headings: paper, plastic, and metal. Students use sources to find information about what types of objects can be recycled in each section and they make a drawing of an object from the chart that can be recycled. 
  • In Unit 6, Weeks 1 and 2, the teacher explains that there are many ways to present information and the students discuss ways to share and present information. Then students conduct research to create a flowchart that shows where money comes from and where it goes, and how people earn and spend their money. 

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for students to read independently in and out of class. The materials include routines for choosing a book, how to build classroom and school libraries, independent reading journals, and teacher and student conferences as well as rubrics. Many opportunities for independent reading and books for students to read independently are included within the reading class time. Materials include a School-to-Home letter each week that provides limited information for parents to have their children read.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, pages 109-127, teachers are provided with support on how to foster independent reading routines in the classroom. This section of the handbook gives routines for how to choose a book, how to build a classroom library, independent reading journals as well as teacher and student conferences. On page 112, a teacher-student conference routine is presented.
    • Make a positive observation about the student’s reading or book choice. Regularly conferring with students about their Independent Reading is a great way to informally assess their progress, model social-emotional learning skills, build your classroom culture, and instill habits of learning. 
    • Talk about how the reading is going. Why did you choose this particular book or genre? Why did you abandon this book? How is your current book going? Are you using Thinking Codes and are they helping? What strategies are you using and what ones do you need help with? How are you solving problems as you read? Who is your favorite character and why? What is your favorite part so far and why? 
    • Ask the student to read aloud for a minute or two. This will help you assess their accuracy, fluency, and comprehension. 
    • Highlight a student strength. I really like the way you used context clues to figure out what that word means. And adding that word to your writer’s notebook is a good idea. 
    • Suggest a specific goal the student can work on. When you have an opinion, make sure to find text evidence to support it.
    •  Record notes from your conference. Conference forms to use with the students are provided on pages 121 and 122. 
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 111, a six-step procedure is given to the teacher to guide students through the independent reading process. The handbook states, on page 110, that a second grade student should be reading for 10-20 minutes independently each day.
    • 1. Select a book that interests you. Check the book to make sure it’s the one you want to read. See the Five Finger Rule on page 120 as one way to help students check how difficult a book is. See the Additional Strategies on pages 113–119 for more ways to help students choose a book. 
    • 2. Read the book each day during Independent Reading time. Use the skills and strategies you’ve been working on. 
    • 3. Think about what you’re reading. You can use Thinking Codes to record your thoughts or write about them in your writer’s notebook. 
    • 4. Record what you’ve read at the end of each Independent Reading session. Keep track on your Reading Log. There are many suggestions for keeping students accountable for their independent reading in the Additional Strategies section. Using a Reading Log is just one way. 
    • 5. Share your opinion of the book when you’re done. Tell a friend, write a review, make a poster, or ask your teacher for ideas. 
    • 6. Begin again! Time to pick a new book!
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, a Reading Log is provided. The log asks students to document the date they read a book, title, genre, their opinion of the book using three faces (smile, straight, sad faces), how hard the text was to read on a scale of C: Complex, E: Easy to me or JR: Just Right, and the final column asks students to put a check mark if they are still reading, an A if they abandoned the text, or an F if they finished. 
  • On the ConnectED Student Edition, there is a section labeled School-to-Home Link. Within this section, there are family letters for each week that support student comprehension and vocabulary with different activities. For example, the comprehension section states, “Your child will read a short story and then compare and contrast characters and settings.” Also on this site, students have access to the leveled readers as well as additional student reads that include, articles, time for kids and readers theaters that they could read or have read to them. Lexile levels range for various texts.
  • The School-to-Home Connection is a letter sent home with students each week. For example:
    • In Unit 2, Week 5, Resources: School to Home, Family Letter “Comprehension: Key Details Your child will read each sentence and circle the picture that shows one of the details from the sentences.”
  • In Unit 6, there is a unit bibliography for students to discover books outside of the classroom. It states, “use these and other classroom or library resources to ensure children are reading independently outside of class.” 

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

Materials design supports appropriate lesson structure and pacing and can be completed within a school year with a pace that allows for maximum understanding. Units provide adequate review and practice resources, including clearly defined and labeled materials and activities. Visual design enhances learning and does not provide unnecessary distractions. Most lessons, questions, tasks, and assessment items note the standards alignment however some ancillary resources do not indicate a standards alignment.

The Teacher Edition provides support for successful implementation including clear explanations and examples as well as information on literacy concepts included in the materials and defines the instructional approaches of the program and the research-based strategies included. Limited support is present for the technology embedded in the program. There is not a clear explanation of the role of specific ELA standards within the program. Materials include support for stakeholder communications.

The program systematically and regularly assesses student progress, though materials include limited denotations of the standards being assessed. Routines and guidance for assessment are present, including support for interpreting assessment data and determine next steps for instruction. The materials provide accountability measures to support students as they engage in independent reading self-selected texts.

The program provides strategies and support for all learners, including English language learners, students with disabilities, and students who are performing above grade level. A variety of grouping strategies are provided

Digital materials can be used on multiple platforms and browsers. Technology is used appropriately to support student learning and foregrounds supports that provide a deeper understanding of the texts and text evidence they encounter in lessons. Opportunities for personalization/customization and teacher to student and student to student collaboration are available digitally, including customization for local use.

Criterion 3a - 3e

7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials design supports appropriate lesson structure and pacing. The program can be completed within the confines of a typical school year and the pace allows for maximum student understanding. The units provide adequate review and practice resources, including clearly defined and labeled materials and activities. The visual design of the materials enhances learning and does not provide unnecessary distractions. Most lessons, questions, tasks, and assessment items note the standards alignment however some ancillary resources do not indicate a standards alignment.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. 

Grade 2 materials are designed to immerse students in all areas of the standards and provide explicit lesson structure with embedded teacher direction as well as recommendations for supporting all learners. There are six units in Second Grade, and each unit contains a Unit Overview which supports the teacher as they plan for instruction. Each unit instructs the teacher throughout each lesson on its implementation before, during and after the readings and activities, as well as recommendations for scaffolded support. At the beginning of each unit there is a Unit Introduction followed by a weekly overview that maps out the daily content being covered. Pacing for each lesson is appropriately allocated. 

 Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The materials contain daily opportunities for whole group and small group instruction. The materials for each week contain a daily routine consisting of Introduce the Concept, which includes the Opener, which discusses the essential question. A social-emotional skill is taught on Day 1; then, the essential question is introduced. Small group learning takes place daily and includes a focus on skills within the leveled reader along with phonics instruction, phonemic awareness, and high frequency words. The materials contain a weekly planner which outlines the various skills for the week. Each day is clearly listed and contains lesson plans with directions and materials needed for the lesson within a Lesson Resource box. Routines are listed within the Instructional Routines Handbook and contain an explanation and recommendations for carrying out research-based practices. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, the Essential Question is, “What do myths help us understand?” A unit introduction is provided for students to develop an understanding of the content they will be learning. A Making Learning Visible page shows the texts students read. There are subsections listed for Active Engagement and Student Outcomes that show what students will be learning in each area of focus. An explicit systematic instruction for word work is provided that includes a Daily Review to review prior sound-spellings to build fluency. After each day’s lessons, the teacher checks that students are on track and ready to move forward. Teachers can follow up with either differentiated instruction to strengthen skills or provide targeted review and reteaching lessons to meet students' specific needs. ELL support is provided in all lessons. A suggested lesson plan is provided for a five-day span and includes small group instruction, Beyond Level, ELL,  as well as social-emotional learning. Each lesson and objective is stated; academic language is listed and digital tools are provided. Teacher modeling is evident throughout each lesson. 

The pacing of individual lessons is appropriate. Each day has several parts to the lesson, which also have approximate time indications. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2 
    • Vocabulary/Reread Reading & Writing Companion: 10 minutes 
    • Text Features/Point of View Reading and Writing Companion: 10 minutes
    • Comprehension/Sequence Reading and Writing Companion: 10 minutes
    • Comprehension/Craft and Structure Reading and Writing Companion: 10 minutes
    • Respond to Reading/Write about the Shared Read Reading and Writing Companion: 10 minutes
    • Fluency/Intonation Reading and Writing Companion: 10 minutes
    • Study Skill/Develop a Research Plan Reading and Writing Companion: 10 Minutes
    • Grammar, Spelling, Expand Vocabulary: No time indication
    • Word Work/Phonemic Awareness: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Phonics: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Phonics: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Structural Analysis: 5 minutes
  • In Unit 4, Week 1 
    • Introduce the Concept: Talk about it: 5 minutes
    • Oral Vocabulary: 10 minutes
    • Listening Comprehension: Introduce the Genre: 10 minutes
    • Shared Read: Vocabulary: Words in Context: 10 minutes
    • Synonyms: 10 minutes
    • Comprehension Strategy: Summarize: 10 minutes
    • Text Features: Bold Print and Timeline: 10 minutes
    • Comprehension Skill: Sequence: 10 minutes
    • Comprehension: Craft and Structure: 10 minutes
    • Respond to Reading: Write about the Shared Read: 10 minutes
    • Fluency: Phrasing: 10 minutes
    • Study Skill: Paraphrase: 10 minutes within 105 minutes of literacy instruction. 

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

Grade 2 materials include six units in the Second Grade resource. Units range from 30 to 40 instructional days, with a total of 215 instructional days. Review, Extend, and Assess are also included in these instructional days. 

The suggested amount of time and expectations for teachers and students to complete the materials are viable for one school year as written and would not require significant modifications. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Each unit comes with the flexibility for the teacher to choose what they are teaching and when they are teaching. Teachers can adjust lessons as needed. These lessons are intended to be completed daily including reading, writing and small group instruction if the teacher chooses.
  • The Wonders User Guide notes that “student and teacher choice are at the heart of Wonders. Wonders was designed to support you and your entire classroom as you teach your way—whether you follow our suggested pathway of instruction or create your own workshop lessons using our resources.”

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

Grade 2 materials offer students opportunities to demonstrate thinking and learning through a variety of tasks such as graphic organizers, citing text evidence and interacting with the text, rereading various text selections, collaborating with partners and completing the research and inquiry process. Students demonstrate knowledge of content through writing, listening and speaking. The student materials for each unit are clearly labeled and provide clear directions for each activity. 

Student materials include ample review and practice resources. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Practice Book, students complete the practice page vocabulary review of the words share, aside, culture, plead, invited. Students fill in the sentences with the correct vocabulary word.
  • In Unit 3, Starry Night, students practice finding text evidence by marking the text with circles for pronouns, underlining events, and drawing a box around details. Side note boxes remind students of the essential question and to look for author’s craft. Students mark up the text for compound words, sequencing, and text evidence. The sidebar Fluency box reminds students to raise their voice when reading a question. Students continue to mark up the text for text evidence and sidebars remind students about sequencing and author’s craft. A few lines give students a small amount of space to answer questions. 
  • In Unit 4 Week 3, Literature Anthology, Volcanoes by Sandra Markle, Note Taking, use the Graphic Organizer, the materials tell the teacher to “Remind children to take notes. Guide children to fill in Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer 13 as they read. Have them record causes and effects they find in the text.”

Student materials include clear directions and explanations, and reference aids are correctly labeled. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Practice Book, students complete the practice page. Directions include, “Circle the word that names each picture. Read each word. Write a word from the box that rhymes.”
  • In Unit 4, Paired Selection, students talk about how the author organizes the selection and complete a graphic organizer citing text evidence. Students then complete the following sentence starter: “The author organizes the selection….” The Quick tip box encourages students to focus on the headline and photo for help. 
  • In Unit 6, Reading/Writing Companion, Vocabulary: Shared Read, students are asked to “Use the sentences to talk with a partner about each word. Then answer the questions.” Students are shown red, bolded vocabulary words, a sentence with the vocabulary word highlighted, and a question about the word. 

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Grade 2 materials provide Common Core State Standards alignment documentation in the Teacher Edition under Plan: Weekly Standard. Standards are noted for each lesson and are linked to the lesson. The Assessment and Data tab in the online materials lists several printable resources; however, under the Standards tab, it indicates “no standards associated with this resource.”

Alignment documentation is provided for all questions, tasks, and assessment items within the Teacher Edition. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students reread parts of “Into the Sea” by Unknown, to analyze the techniques the author used in writing the selection. The Standards tab lists the following standards:
    • RI.2.5 - "Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently." 
    • RI.2.6 - "Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe."
    • RI.2.8 - "Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text."
  • Unit 4, Week 1, Day 1;
    • Introduce the Concept/Talk About It: SL.2.1a, SL.2.1b, SL.2.3
    • Oral Vocabulary: SL.2.3, L.2.6
    • Listening Comprehension: RL.2.2, SL.2.2
    • Shared Read/Reading & Writing Companion: RL.2.1, RL.2.7
    • Vocabulary/Words in Context: L.2.4a, L.2.5
    • Vocabulary/Similes: L.2.4a
    • Grammar/Practice Book: L.2.1d, L.2.2b
    • Grammar/Practice Book: L.2.1d, L.2.2b
    • Spelling/Practice Book: RF.2.3e, L.2.2d
    • Expand Vocabulary/Practice Book: L.2.4a, L.2.4b, L.2.4c, L.2.4e
    • Work Work/Phonemic Awareness: No standards associated
    • Work Work/Phonics: RF.2.3
    • Work Work/Structural Analysis: RF.2.3d
    • Word Work/High Frequency Words: RF.2.3f
    • Word Work/Decodable Reader: RF.2.3f, RF.2.4a
    • Word Work/ Handwriting: No standards associated
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, the lesson objectives are listed at the top left of each lesson. The following objective is stated, “Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using adjectives and adverbs to describe (e.g., When other kids are happy that makes me happy.)” The Common Core State Standards were not listed next to the lesson objectives. 
  • Each day also contains the standards relating to the material in a drop-down menu on the right-hand side of the lesson titled, “STANDARDS."

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Grade 2 materials contain many visual aids to support student learning, including graphic organizers, response sheets, and real images that accompany the text related to the content in each unit. Illustrations and clip art in the Reading/Writing Companion are uncomplicated and appealing to the eye. The design of the materials is simple and visually appealing to a Grade 2 student. The font, margins, and spacing provided for student work areas are also appropriate. 

The materials include, but are not limited to:

  • Information on each page of the Reading/Writing Companion is clear and consistent.
  • Enough space is provided for students to draw and write responses effectively.
  • Students pages are labeled clearly allowing students to easily follow a teacher’s direction.
  • The fonts and margins are reasonable.
  • Anchor charts describing procedures and protocols are clear and easily understandable for students to refer back to throughout the year.
  • Units are comprised of materials that display a simple blue design and include adequate space. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable. 

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Overall, the Teacher Edition included with the materials provide good annotations and suggestions for successful implementation, however minimal support is provided to assist with the implementation of embedded technology. The Teacher Edition provides clear explanations and examples to support the teacher, including explanations and additional information to deepen the teacher’s understanding of literacy concepts included in the materials as well as to define the instructional approaches of the program and the research-based strategies included. While pieces of the program provide documentation of their alignment to the standards, there is not a clear explanation of the role of specific ELA standards within the program. Materials include strategies for informing and involving stakeholders, including families, of the student’s progress and ways to support their learning at home.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning..

Grade 2 materials provides clear annotations for teachers on how to present content to students. For each unit, an overview is provided for the teacher. A student outcome page that displays what the students will be learning is also present. Throughout the lessons, italicized questions and explanations are included to support teachers in how to present materials to both support and challenge students, including ELL students. Each unit also includes Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level differentiated instruction. During Research and Inquiry, the teacher models the task; however, some statements provided are vague and do not provide enough guidance to teachers. There is minimal guidance and support for the use of embedded technology.

Content knowledge is included, where needed, and is accurate, understandable, and gives true assistance to all educators using the text. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • A model for an anchor chart is provided for teacher’s use in the classroom. 
  • An explicit systematic instruction chart is also provided that guides teachers through the word work process. The Teacher Edition suggests to do a ”daily review to review prior sound-spellings to build fluency. After each day’s lessons, check that children are on track and ready to move forward. Follow up with Differentiated Instruction to strengthen skills, provide targeted review and reteaching lessons to meet children’s specific needs.”
  • Next steps are also shown that help guide the teacher in making informed decisions. 
  • Grade 2, Resources Tab, Professional Development link, Overview: Filter Instructional Routines and Assessment: Managing Small Groups: A How to Guide and Instructional Routines Handbook, provides information to teachers about how to structure lessons in a differentiated classroom.
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Essential Question, the teacher is guided to display the online Student Learning Goals for this genre study. The teacher then reads the key concept: Friends Help Friends. “Tell children that they will read fiction texts that tell about how friends help each other. Have children think about friendships they have. Lead them to discuss how friends depend on one another and how their actions can demonstrate friendship.”  The teacher continues to discuss friends depending on each other with guided prompts. Then the teacher models how to use the graphic organizer on page 37 of the Reading/Writing Companion to document ways friends depend on each other. The students add their ideas to complete the graphic organizer.
  • In Unit 2, the text on T35 suggests, “Use your online rubric to record student progress. Can children figure out which meaning of hatch the author used?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, the Teacher Edition states that teachers should remind children of the key characteristics of realistic fiction such as, “Realistic fiction has a setting that could be a real place and a plot that is believable.”

There is minimal guidance and support for the use of embedded technology. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Digital Quick Start Guide gives teachers assistance on how to get started using the digital tools provided by Wonders.
  • In Unit 6 Week 5, Research and Inquiry, the materials suggest the use of technology. “Work with a partner to research an author or an artist from your state. Choose one of this person’s poems, stories, songs, or pieces of art to share. Use audio or visuals to help you express your ideas,” but it does not give any other information to support the use of technology to enhance student learning. The Reading/Writing Companion, Research and Inquiry, contains references to the use of technology. such as, “Research audio and visuals you can use,” but it does not provide further guidance or support for the technology.  Games and activities are provided on the Student Edition site, but no link from the Teacher Edition is provided.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meets the criteria that materials contain a teacher edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

Grade 2 materials provide detailed explanations for each instructional lesson for the teacher to explain to the student, including information on the lesson’s  purpose. Each unit of the Teacher Guide also contains alignments to the Common Core State Standards. The User Guide and Instructional Routines Handbook, which are separate items located in the Teacher Resource Library, are designed to provide guidance on the delivery of the Reading Curriculum and serve as a resource to build professional knowledge in the areas of research-based best practices.  Training videos for different instructional routines, including coaching conversations and examples from the classroom, are also included in the teacher materials. Teachers can access information on a variety of topics, such as writing, access to complex text, and foundational skills.

More advanced concepts are consistently explained and will improve a teacher’s deeper understanding of the content. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Research-Based Alignment, executive functioning is explained. “Executive function, typically defined as the category of cognitive processes devoted to monitoring behavior, shifting attention, planning, organizing, and completing goals, has been shown to be closely related to reading comprehension.”
  • The Language Transfers Handbook provides knowledge about the reasons ELL students have difficulty with English sounds and grammar. It includes information about cognate knowledge and how it affects reading comprehension. 
  • Grade 2, Resources Tab, Professional Development link, tab: Author & Coach Videos, Filters provided: Foundational Skills, Close Reading, Access to Complex Text,
    • Under the filtered options for Foundational Skills are videos like “Multi-syllabic Word Routine.” Through a coaching video, teachers learn how to teach students how to decode multi-syllabic words. 
    • Under the filtered options for Foundational Skills are videos such as “Decodable Text Routine: First Read.” Through a coaching video, teachers learn how to teach students how to decode texts with the first and second reading. 
    • Under the filtered options for writing are videos such as “Shared Writing vs. Interactive Writing.”
  • In the User Guide, beginning on page 6, teachers are provided information on an instructional approach used within the program, Balanced Literacy Classroom: What Does It Look and Sound Like?  This information also includes 21st Century College- and Career-Ready Inspired Shifts in Balanced Literacy. 
  • In the User Guide, on page 16, teachers are provided with guidance on Guided Reading Instruction. This information informs teachers as to what guided reading looks like and what happens before, during and after reading.
  • In the User Guide, on page 26, close reading information is provided.  Information detailing the importance of identifying a purpose for reading, determining the author’s purpose, and schema and considerations for developing a close reading process is provided. 
  • In the User Guide, on page 37, the concept of rereading is explained, “When one’s schema on a topic has significant gaps, the reader must devote cognitive resources to constructing a mental model on which to attach this new information (Kintsch & van Dijk, 1978).“ “A chief way you accomplish this is by rereading. You slow down your pace, review a previous passage, and look back to the text in order to find information.”
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, beginning on page 19, several routines, such as collaborative conversations, are explained and established.

Explanations are accessible to all educators. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Resource Library provides in each unit provides resources that explain more advanced concepts. For example, there are videos on setting up a balanced literacy classroom.
  • Videos are available to all teachers who have access to online materials under the professional development tab. The videos are short and easily viewed, although the videos do not appear to have a closed captioned version.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Grade 2 materials provide references to the standards and lists where to locate the standards within the curriculum. However, the role of the specific standards in ELA are not provided in the context of the overall curriculum. Standards are addressed in the Weekly Standards section with links to corresponding lessons. A Research-Based Alignment Handbook is also provided and details a summary of key research and demonstration of program alignment to the standards.  

Limited explanations of the role of the specific course-level content in the context of the overall materials are offered in each unit. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 7, the Wonders curriculum is “built around the new standards.”  References to the standards are located in the Wonders CCSS Correlation pdf and then within the Weekly Standards tab located under the Plan tab online in the Teacher Edition. 
  • The Wonders CCSS Correlation pdf contains each grade level, the CCSS code, the CCSS, and the Wonders Page References which provides the location of where the standard can be found within the curriculum. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, L.2.1, "Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking." [14 lessons] ) For each lesson, a Standard tab is located on the right-hand side of the page. When selected, it provides no explanation except a listing of the CCSS. 

Explanations provide connections among multiple course levels. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Research Based Alignment Handbook, the writing recommendation is, “Encourage students to engage in writing activities as a way to demonstrate an understanding of text.” In grades 2-6, through the comprehension mini-lesson on Day 2 of the instructional plan, teachers model how to reread the Shared Read in the Reading/Writing Companion for a specific purpose, aligned with the grade’s reading standards. Students write to fill in a graphic organizer, using evidence from the text. As they read the weekly selections from the Literature Anthology on Day 3, students are asked to take notes in a graphic organizer. This writing opportunity has students apply what was modeled in the mini-lesson from Day 2. The Respond to the Text at the end of each Literature Anthology selection provides text-dependent questions for students to answer. Students can respond in class or partner discussions in tandem with writing their responses. Instruction is provided in the Teacher Edition to teach students how to go back into the text to find evidence to support their responses. On Day 8, students work in pairs to compare weekly texts they have read, write notes, and then share their notes with other pairs. Also, on Day 8, the Research and Inquiry project asks students to use information they have learned from their research to help them present their final project.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain an explanation of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

Grade 2 materials provide a User Guide that discusses the research behind a balanced literacy approach, guided reading instruction, vocabulary and foundational skills, social-emotional learning, and writing. The Instructional Routines Handbook explains more about the research behind the curriculum, as well as modeling routines, collaborative conversations, word work, reading, writing and grammar, and research and inquiry. This handbook also explains the educational approaches and routines for English Language Learners.

Explanations of the instructional approaches and research-based strategies of the program are provided. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • Instructional Routines Handbook, page 3, the I Do, We Do, You Do, Routine is shown. “I  Do:This is where you explain and model to your students what it is they are learning to do. We Do: In this step, you and your students work together and share the instruction. Students get to practice while you guide and teach. You Do I Watch: After students have had the chance to practice with you, it's time for them to practice on their own. This is where you observe and offer corrective feedback as students collaborate and practice. You Do It Alone: After modeling, showing, guiding, and allowing them to practice, it's time for your students to work independently.” 
  • An article, “Writing from Sources” by Douglas Fisher, explains the research behind writing from sources and the steps for how teachers can teach writing from sources. It also discusses the writing process and the connection to college and career readiness.
  • The User Guide, page 4, provides the research behind independent reading. “Providing students with the opportunity to choose their own books to read empowers and encourages them. It strengthens their self-confidence, rewards their interests, and promotes a positive attitude toward reading by valuing the reader and giving him or her a level of control. Readers without power to make their own choices are unmotivated.”
  • The User Guide, “Guided Reading Instruction” by Kathy Rhea Bumgardner, M. Ed., discusses what guided reading is and how to prepare and teach guided reading.  Research-based approaches, such as scaffolding are referenced. “The term ‘scaffold,’ as applied to learning situations by Wood, Bruner, and Ross (1976), refers to a framework and process by which teachers use support strategies to help students complete tasks they are unable to do independently at their current stage of learning.”  References are listed at the close of this article.  
  • Resources Tab, Professional Development link, Filter: Research Base and Link to Whitepapers, includes documents that provide an explanation of the link between research and the program. 

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Grade 2 materials provide a Take Home Letter each week that reinforces the main lesson objectives, vocabulary, and content knowledge. Family Letters are available in several languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Hmong, Korean, Tagalog, Urdu, and Vietnamese. The letter includes the weekly concept and essential question. A checklist is provided, enabling students and families to mark off any learning goals they complete. A Word Workout that includes word activities for families and students to do at home is given. A comprehension passage that has a specific area of focus is also included each week. The weekly spelling list and correlating fun activities for families to help practice spelling words are also included. In the Wonders ConnectEd Student Edition, leveled readers and games are provided to support students at home.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, the School-to-Home Connection Letter states, ”For these two weeks, our class will study the genre of narrative nonfiction. We will be focusing on the ways people can help their community. We will also be talking about how people solve common problems in their communities.”  A link to the students’ learning goals are provided and families are asked to check the ones the student completes. Word Workout includes spiral review, vocabulary the students are working on, along with spelling for Weeks 1 and 2. The comprehension skill the students are learning about is also included with a suggestion, "Your child will look at each set of illustrations to be used in a book. Then he or she will think about what the author’s purpose is for writing the book. Your child can suggest a variety of author’s purposes based on the pictures.”  Resources are provided on the side for the students to work on their comprehension skills or their Word Workout.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The program systematically and regularly provides opportunities for teachers to assess student progress, though materials include limited denotations of the standards being assessed both formatively and summatively. These opportunities are provided via routines and guidance that helps teachers assess students when appropriate.

Adequate guidance is provided to support teachers as they interpret assessment data and determine next steps for instruction.

The materials provide accountability measures to support students as they engage in independent reading self-selected texts.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Grade 2 materials provide multiple assessment opportunities. There is an online assessment center that links to all Unit and Benchmark Assessments. Unit Assessments are given at the end of each unit. Screening/Placement and Diagnostic Assessments, such as Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, Letter Naming and Sight Words, and Phonics and Decoding, serve as an initial screening that can be assigned throughout the year to monitor student progress and pinpoint students’ strengths and weaknesses. Checks for Success are provided throughout each unit throughout a variety of days. Progress Monitoring Assessments are used to guide instruction and may be administered every week, every two weeks, or every six weeks, depending on the test selected. In the Benchmark Assessment Grade 2, students are given three benchmark assessments.The focus of the Benchmark Assessments is on key areas of English Language Arts: comprehension of literature and informational text, phonics and decoding skills, and recognition of high-frequency words. There are also Running Record Assessments that evaluate student’s oral reading and identifies a student’s reading level, style, and strategy use. 

Materials provide regular and systematic assessment opportunities for assessment. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • Inventories of Developmental Spelling (K–6+), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 21. This assessment can be administered any time of the year.  “Students’ skills can be classified as falling into particular developmental stages of spelling.”
  • Comprehension Tests (K–6), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 23, “Administer this test at any time of the year to provide a quick check or recheck of a student’s instructional reading level.”
  • Unit Assessments (K–6), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 27. These assessments are completed after each unit of study.  “Unit Assessments include literary and informational texts with questions that focus on the main skills taught in each unit of Wonders. Test items cover reading comprehension skills, literary elements, text features, vocabulary strategies, and English language conventions.” Each unit includes a writing prompt that students use to showcase their understanding of a genre that has been previously taught.  “These assessments provide information to make instructional decisions and to place students into small skill-based groups.”
  • Benchmark Assessments (K–6), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 28. These assessments are completed “at discrete points throughout the year to gauge student progress through the curriculum and readiness for state-mandated end-of-year assessments.”
  • Portfolio Assessments, Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 31. Portfolios  showcase a collection of the student's work. A Reflection piece is included. Two portfolio options are presented: “a developmental portfolio and a best work portfolio. There is also a Portfolio Rubric to use when evaluating students’ portfolios.”
  • Informal Assessments, Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 45. “In reading, you can do this in an informal way throughout instruction.”  Examples include teaching students to monitor their own comprehension by asking questions, retelling, and monitoring their own progress.

Materials genuinely measure student progress. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Weeks 3 and 4, Progress Monitoring Assessments, students read the passage “The North Star,” and answer the related comprehension questions.
  • In Unit 5, Grace for President, the Selection Test assesses student comprehension on the selections read throughout the unit.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Grade 2 materials provide multiple ways that students are assessed throughout each unit, including formative assessments. The User Guide states that Unit Assessments are aligned to standards; however, there is no evidence to support that any standards are specifically listed in assessments.

Materials include limited denotations of the standards being assessed in both types of Assessments. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Unit Guide, page 60, the guide explains that the unit assessments are aligned to standards, stating that assessments “ensure valid assessment of student performance and progress, [are] aligned to standards, and [measure] against grade level rigor.”
  • Each unit has weekly Common Core standards present; however, standards listed in specific assessments or within the Teacher Edition or teacher’s script for administering assessments were not present.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up

Grade 2 materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments, ways to scaffold assessments, and how to interpret student data. Teacher scripts are provided with answers for all Unit Assessments and Diagnostic Assessments.  The answer keys have the correct answer and content focus for each question and answer. Suggestions on how to reteach content is provided to teachers. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • After each Unit assessment in the Teacher Edition, there is a Track for Success Progress Monitoring. For example, in Unit 6, Week 6, Making the Most of Assessment Results, the text explains the assessed skills, how the teacher checks for success, and gives reteaching opportunities. 
  • Grade 2, Teacher Edition, Assessment and Data Tab, Printable Assessments, Filter to Assessment Handbook. Assessment Handbook page 32. The Assessment Process Guide to Using Multiple Measures to Assess Student Progress provides an overall graphic on how assessments could be used in a classroom.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 10, Progress Monitoring, teachers are provided with a chart for interventions. “Reteaching Opportunities with Intervention Online PDFs. If Children Score below 70% in comprehension: Then Assign lessons 34–36 point of view in Comprehension PDF."

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Grade 2 materials provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. There are informal Checks for Success that help collect evidence of student progress, as teachers observe students working and provide guidance for differentiation of instruction moving forward. Formative assessments are integrated within every unit by using end-of-unit assessments. Screening and Diagnostic Assessments, as well as Comprehension Assessments, offer guidance to inform instructional decisions.

Materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Teacher Edition, Check for Success states, “Can children read text with appropriate rate and intonation?" The teacher is then able to differentiate instruction based on this Check for Success. Develop pages and Reteach page numbers are given for the teacher to provide further instruction. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Teacher Edition, the teacher is given an informative checklist to assess the students’ presentation of materials. A student and teacher checklist are provided. “Presenting: Did you express your ideas clearly using the correct conventions of language? Did you support your topic with appropriate facts and details? Did you present your ideas in a logical sequence? Did you make appropriate eye contact with your audience? Did you speak with appropriate rate, volume, and enunciation? Did you use appropriate digital technology such as visuals and audio to enhance your presentation? Assess the Presentation: Spoke clearly and at an appropriate pace and volume. Used appropriate and natural gestures. Maintained eye contact. Used appropriate visuals and technology. Assess the Listener Listened quietly and politely. Made appropriate comments and asked clarifying questions. Responded with an open mind to different ideas.”
  • Instructional Routines Handbook, Teacher-Student Conference Routine, page 119, “Regularly conferring with students about their Independent Reading is a great way to informally assess their progress, model social-emotional learning skills, build your classroom culture, and instill habits of learning.”
  • Instructional Routines Handbook, Retelling Routine, page 98, “Retelling allows you to monitor comprehension.”  Model, Guide and Discuss Retelling are the three steps within the Retelling Routine.
  • Instructional Routines Handbook, Students monitor their progress, page 173. Students monitor their progress through the following ways:
    • Track Your Progress in the Reading Writing/Companion asks students to evaluate their progress on key skills that they have learned
    • Opportunities to give feedback to students during weekly Teacher and Peer Conferences on their writing
    • Writing Rubrics, Student Models, Listening and Speaking checklists to help students reflect on the quality and completeness of their work
    • Progress bars on online games help students track their progress.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Grade 2 materials recommend 30-40 minutes of independent reading daily. The materials offer students a variety of texts, including anchor texts, shared texts, Time for Kids, suggested classroom library titles, and online titles to access. The Instructional Routines Handbook provides an ample amount of opportunities for students to show accountability for their reading, including reading routines, reading logs, response pages, journaling, and conferences. Students are provided a routine for how to self-select a book of their interest to build stamina.  

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Teacher Edition, students are instructed to choose an expository selection for sustained silent reading and set a purpose for reading that selection. Students are able to check the online Leveled Reader Database for selections. The teacher reminds students that “they should identify causes and effects, they can reread causes and effects and other information they did not understand the first time they read.” As students read independently, they record causes and effects in their selections on a copy of online Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer 13. After they finish reading, they can conduct a Book Talk about what they read. Students share the information they recorded on their graphic organizer. “What was the most interesting fact you learned from reading this book?”  Students also tell the group about any sections they reread and how rereading helped them better understand these sections. The teacher offers assistance and guidance with self-selected assignments. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 7, students choose an expository text for sustained silent reading from the Leveled Reader Database. Students read the text to find the problem and solution and complete a graphic organizer, recording the problem and solution.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The program provides strategies and support to assure all learners in the classroom are able to access grade-level content. This includes targeted support for English language learners, students with disabilities, and students who are performing above grade level. There are also a variety of grouping strategies provided as well as support for the teacher to select and deploy the most effective groupings for various learning scenarios.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Grade 2 materials provide modeling, formative assessments, language and visual supports, and background knowledge in each lesson to ensure student understanding. Materials also provide differentiated instruction to strengthen skills, provide targeted review and reteaching lessons to meet student’s specific needs.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, Shared Read, The Boy Who Cried Wolf by Author Unknown, multiple strategies are provided. For example:
    • Before students read, they take notes on the Essential Question to provide a purpose for reading.
    • The teacher uses a think-aloud to identify what happens at the beginning of the story. “Think-Aloud: I read in the first paragraph that the shepherd boy is not fond of his job. He wants something wonderful to happen and that nothing ever does.”
    • Strategies for Accessing Complex Text - ACCESS COMPLEX TEXT 
      • "Children may need help in making inferences about the boy’s motivation and actions and connecting them to story events….Help children connect the boy’s actions on pages 40 and 41 with the villager’s actions on page 42. Have children discuss why the villagers don’t come when there is a real wolf."
    • Use of a quick write - “Quick Write: After their first read, have partners summarize the selection orally with the help of their notes. Then have them write a summary in their writer’s notebook.”
  • In Unit 3 Week 2, Enrichment Opportunities for Gifted and Talented Students, Beyond Level, small group lessons include suggestions for additional activities to extend learning opportunities for gifted and talented students: Leveled Readers, Vocabulary Strategy, Leveled Readers Library Online, Genre Passages, Comprehension, and Workstation Activities.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Gifted and Talented tab, students complete an independent study to create a resource about everyday heroes. The level-up tab states that if On Level students fluently read the On Level passage, then they can read the Beyond Level passage and summarize it. If Approaching Level students read their passage fluently, then they can read the On Level passage and summarize it.
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, Teacher Edition, guidance on differentiated instruction for small groups is provided for the teacher. Approaching Level instruction is provided using a genre passage, Growing Up in One Day. On Level students are provided with the leveled reader, A Fantastic Day, and Beyond Level students are provided with the leveled reader, A Day in Ancient Rome.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for all students to engage with grade-level text. Sidebar supports are provided to ensure that students are supported during lessons. ELL scaffolding and support is provided throughout all the units. Lessons also provide additional instruction on new skills at the end of each unit for small group work, reteaching, and differentiated instruction. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2 Week 3, Shared Read, The Boy Who Cried Wolf by Author Unknown, students working below grade level are provided opportunities to work with the grade-level text and meet grade-level standards. ELL Spotlight on Language, Page 39, Paragraph 2 - “Focus on the phrase: He made up stories. Say: ‘When we make up stories, we create them in our heads. They are not about real life, they are pretend. Which clues in the story help you understand that the boy made up stories about things that were not real?’ Provide a frame to help children answer: ‘The text says he saw horses, dogs, and dragons in the sky. He made up stories with these things as characters. I know that horses, dogs, and dragons don’t really live in the sky. If he uses the animals as characters, I know it’s not real.’”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, Comprehension Skill, students work in pairs during Guided Practice. For the range of ELL students, a series of scaffolded instructions/activities is provided for the teacher to differentiate among the skill levels. At each level the students use a graphic organizer to record their work.
    • Beginning - "Write the main events in random order and help partners put them in order using the illustrations and the text…...Help children read the sentences using signal words first, next, then, and last…."
    • Intermediate - Model the first sentence starter: “First, Josie and Ling plan a sleepover.” Have pairs complete these starters: “Next, Josie and Ling meet in the backyard. Then, they do their homework and see the Moon and stars. Last, they want to keep looking through the telescope…..”
    • Advanced/Advanced High - Display the graphic organizer. What did Josie and Ling do first? What happened next? Then what happened? What happened last?......
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Newcomer tab, the text asks to have children listen to the anchor text in their native language and then in English. “Have children ask and answer questions using sentence frames.”
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Teacher Edition, Differentiated Instruction, ELL students read the leveled reader, Hercules and the Golden Apple. The teacher builds background, reviews the story vocabulary, and goes through the interactive response routine.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Grade 2 materials provide options for extensions and more advanced opportunities. The small group/differentiated instruction section provides lessons with a leveled reader appropriate for the group’s needs. Checks for Success are present throughout each unit. The teacher is given guidance on extensions for students who are On Level or Beyond Level. Beyond Level differentiated instruction is provided for small group instruction. Sidebars are provided for Gifted and Talented Learners to further advance instruction.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Gifted and talented tab, Independent study, students integrate their notes about the selections to create an illustrated encyclopedia. They write facts and details; they create a diagram for each animal. Partners then trade encyclopedias for evaluation and students revise as necessary.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Teacher Edition, Checks for Success are provided. “Can children use sentence clues to figure out the meanings of crumble and boulders?” Differentiated small group instruction is provided for On Level and Beyond Level students who master the skills. For students who are On Level, the teacher is to review page T296. For students who are Beyond Level, the teacher is instructed to extend the lesson using page T302.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for students to collaborate and communicate about the topic and tasks at hand. There are a wide range of whole class tasks, but there are also many opportunities for small group and partner work to help students have collaborative conversations.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Introduce the Concept, after introducing the Essential Question, small groups of students develop ideas by using prior knowledge to discuss baby animals that they have seen or read about. The teacher asks groups to use as many words from the organizer as possible in their discussion.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, the whole class reads the text, Bibliburro. The teacher follows a whole class reading routine and students respond to text-based questions. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 2, Respond to Reading/Write about the Shared Read, students respond to the following prompt, “How does the author show that the sleepover was different from what the girls expected?”  Approaching Level: Have partners work together to plan and complete the response to the prompt. On Level: Discuss how the girls felt at the beginning and then at the end. Have children write their responses independently and then discuss them. Beyond Level: Have children brainstorm words to describe the girls’ feelings at different points in the story. Encourage them to use the words in their responses. ELL Group: Children of mixed proficiency levels discuss and respond to the prompt.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Whole Group, Literature Anthology, Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio. Teachers are able to group students according to three levels of reading for reading groups. “Approaching Level: Have children listen to the selection summary. Use the Reread prompts during Small Group time. On Level and Beyond Level: Pair children or have them independently complete the Reread prompts on Reading/Writing Companion pages 48–50. English Language Learners: Before reading, have beginning and early-intermediate ELLs listen to the selection summary, available in multiple languages. See small group pages for additional support for the Anchor Text.” Students also meet in their groups for small group instruction. 

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

Digital materials are available for the program and can be used on multiple platforms and browsers. Technology is used appropriately to support student learning and foregrounds supports that provide a deeper understanding of the texts and text evidence they encounter in lessons. Opportunities for personalization/customization and teacher to student and student to student collaboration are available digitally, including customization for local use.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform-neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Grade 2 materials are web-based, compatible with multiple browsers and are platform neutral. The digital materials function without incident on Microsoft Edge, Firefox, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, and Safari. Apple products and Window products can access the digital materials. Mobile devices are also able to open and access the functionality of the digital materials. Games were not accessible on mobile devices. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 14, “There are digital tools that can enhance and support student learning as well. Program core texts, such as the Shared Read, authentic Anchor Texts, Paired Texts, and Leveled Readers, are all provided in a multi-sensory eBook format that includes audio to support struggling readers and mark-up tools to support students in interacting with the text.”
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 103, there is a picture of a student using an iPad. The materials mention that students can record Super Summaries digitally.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

The materials contain digital documents of the Teacher Editions, Reading/Writing Companion, Readers, Vocabulary  Image Cards, and Games. The Resource Library includes projectable classroom materials for use during lessons. Also included in the digital section are Fluency Packets multimedia support for each unit. The Teacher Edition includes references of when digital tools are available and how they can be used within a lesson. The materials for each lesson are Smartboard-compatible and the links for the digital version of the students’ Reading/Writing Companion can be found in each lesson. This allows the teacher to annotate and model how to use the text. Cloud Reader, a digital platform for the Leveled Texts, Literature Anthologies, and Reading/Writing Companion, also allows teachers to model annotating text.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. 

Grade 2 materials include technological innovations that allow for teachers to customize weekly lessons for whole group instruction and for individual students. Teachers set the school calendar in the online platform which determines what students access in their online dashboards each day. Teachers can customize beyond that for individual students by assigning specific practice pages and texts at specific reading levels to individual students to access online.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital materials include a digital planning guide that provides step-by-step lesson plans and online materials that include additional support in differentiated instruction. Units combine reading, writing, speaking, and listening in a digital environment that engages students. There are also digital guides for assessment, remediation and supplemental materials to personalize learning for students.
  • Texts that are in the Reading/Writing Companion and the Interactive Read-Aloud have audio features that the teacher can play for the students. 
  • Teachers are able to edit their class assignments by English Language Learner, On Level, Beyond Level, and Approaching Level.
  • Beginning readers are able to use a pictorial login.
  • In the Assignment Manager digital tab on the website, teachers can create assignments for students tailored to what the students need. Teachers can edit and copy existing assignments and monitor student submissions. The teacher can create student mailboxes to manage student assignments.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

Wonders Grade 2 materials provide Teach it Your Way to customize the resource. This resource can be used if the focus of the district’s instructional plan is to include other research based practices not explicitly followed in the Wonders materials. Teachers and/or the school district can also determine if lessons will follow a Core Pathway option, due to time constraints or other needs. The Core Pathway is an abbreviated version of the curriculum that covers all tested skills but omits some optional lessons. Teachers and or school districts can determine the order of lessons, the number of days used to teach each genre study, and what practice materials are available to students online. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Wonders Teach it Your Way format is referenced in the digital support videos and in the teacher resources entitled Teach It Your Way Daily 5, Teach It Your Way Blending Learning Station Routine, and Teach It Your Way Workshop Reading/Workshop Writing. These resources provide tips and templates to customize the Wonders program to fit these instructional frameworks. 
  • Teachers have the ability to customize their lesson plans by moving and removing lessons or adding their own resources. This is done from the Weekly Planner view of the Resource Library.
  • Teachers can automatically activate the Core Pathway by going to the Planner Options button in the middle of the screen. A gear icon in the lesson title can restore individual lessons after activating the Core Pathway. The printed Teacher Edition has which parts of the lesson plan are core and which are optional clearly marked. 

The digital lesson planner allows for teachers to customize lesson plans. For example, you can drag and drop lessons on the planner to move them forward to another day or use the gear icon to move lessons to the Holding Bin and decide later when to use them. Teachers can also add their own digital resources as well as add their own notes to lessons. In the center of the Weekly Planner, teachers can select the Customize drop-down menu and select Add Note to insert notes.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

Grade 2 materials provide routines and opportunities for students to collaborate and discuss with peers. Teachers can create Talk About it discussions for student collaboration in the student digital materials, by posting discussion questions to which students post responses. Teachers can access students’ notes and work that they have assigned, but an area where the teacher has discussion online or can collaborate with the student digitally is not available. The materials provide students with daily opportunities to work together and discuss their choices through the use of online interactive lessons.  

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Grammar: Verbs, students work together to complete the interactive grammar activity on pronouns.  There are 18 sentences that the students complete before checking their answers. “Read each sentence. Choose the pronoun that best completes each sentence.  Charlie and ________ went to the library.” Student choices are I, me, or mine. Within the To Do section of the Student Edition, assignments for students to complete appear once the teacher has assigned them. The binder includes a student work area for notes, resources, writing notebook, audio recordings, response to reading, worksheets, and worktext, when assigned by the teacher.
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 11/21/2019

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Reading/Writing Companion Package 1 Year 978-0-0768-9999-9 McGraw Hill 2020
Wonders Teacher Edition Package 978-0-0769-0005-3 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher's Edition ? Unit 1 978-0-0790-1676-8 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher's Edition ? Unit 2 978-0-0790-1677-5 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher's Edition ? Unit 3 978-0-0790-1678-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher's Edition ? Unit 4 978-0-0790-1681-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher's Edition ? Unit 5 978-0-0790-1682-9 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 6 978-0-0790-1683-6 McGraw Hill 2020
Practice Book (BLM) 978-0-0790-1695-9 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 2 978-0-0790-1807-6 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 3 978-0-0790-1811-3 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 4 978-0-0790-1814-4 McGraw Hill 2020
Authentic Literature 978-0-0790-1815-1 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 5 978-0-0790-1818-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 6 978-0-0790-1820-5 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 1 978-0-0790-1848-9 McGraw Hill 2020

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Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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