Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials for Grade 1 meet the expectations of alignment. The materials include high quality texts and tasks that support students' development of literacy skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. The materials are organized to build knowledge of topics and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate integrated skills, although the organization of texts may need revision to support consistent beginning-to-end of year comprehension development. Instruction for foundational skills includes the core components necessary. While many implementation supports are available, the teacher may need to do extra work to assure lessons are implemented with fidelity.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
55
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
30
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 1 includes high-quality anchor texts that encompass a broad array of text types and genres placed at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade. Some texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.

The texts partially support students’ evolving literacy skills as texts do not grow in complexity over the course of the year. Materials provide both depth and a volume of reading practice.

Text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build within each unit to an integrated, culminating tasks that allows students to demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained through instruction through writing and/or speaking activities. Students are supported in evidence-based discussion of texts through the implementation of protocols to scaffold conversations as students’ oral language skills grow in sophistication. Use of grade-level vocabulary/syntax and appropriate questioning are encouraged during student discussions.

Students engage in a mix of evidence-based writing tasks, including both on-demand and process writing, that incorporate some of the writing types called for in the standards. Students write on-demand for opinion, but do not have opportunities to engage in process writing for opinion pieces. Explicit grammar and conventions instruction is provided with opportunities for students to practice and apply these skills within their writing tasks.

Students are provided explicit instruction in alphabetic knowledge, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, phonics, directionality and function, and structures and features of text. Throughout the course of the year, students have frequent opportunities to read on-level text with fluency and purpose. Students have multiple opportunities to apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected tasks through the use of decodable readers and Shared Reading. Frequent opportunities are provided throughout the entire program to assess students’ mastery of foundational skills and to progress monitor student growth. Support for differentiation of foundational skills is found throughout the program.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
17/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 1 includes high-quality anchor texts that encompass a broad array of text types and genres. Texts are placed at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade and some texts are accompanied by a text complexity analysis that describes the quantitative score and qualitative features as well as the reason for the placement of the texts in the unit.

The texts partially support students’ evolving literacy skills as texts do not grow in complexity over the course of the year. Materials engage students in a broad range of reading opportunities to provide both depth and volume of reading practice to achieve grade-level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for  anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.

Grade 1 materials include anchor texts that are of high interest and engaging to students. Many cultures are represented within the anchor texts and are varied within content areas as well. The anchor texts are examined multiple times for several purposes and are used to expand topics and essential questions, build vocabulary, and prompt writing.

Texts are of high quality, including rich language and engaging content. Accompanying illustrations are of high quality as well, supporting students' understanding and comprehension of the associated text. Examples of texts that fit this category include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students read Cool Dog, School Dog by Deborah Heiligman. This text is a fantasy story about a dog who follows his friend to school. While the vocabulary is not very complex, children may need support with rhyming lines, nontraditional sentences, and hyphenated adjectives. The rhyming phrases make it more engaging for students. The illustrations support the fun theme. 
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students read Move! by Steven Jenkins and Robin Page. This is an informational text and includes many sentences that begin on one page and end on the next spread of pages. Some vocabulary may be unfamiliar to children (e.g., startled, slithering, rustling, tumbling). The text also includes content vocabulary that may be unfamiliar to children (e.g., prey, mate, colony). 
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students read Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney. This realistic fiction text explains the relationship of small areas to large areas. The story shows many different types of maps and places. Students may need prior knowledge about how maps work and knowledge of how a town, state, and country relate to one another.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students read Thomas Edison, Inventor by David Adler. This text is a biography written in chapters and tells about how young Tom Edison was very curious. The biography is written by presenting the facts about the life of this historical figure as a fictional story, so students will have to make the connection that it is a nonfiction biography.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students read Click, Clack, Moo: Cows that Type, by Doreen Cronin. The text structure includes a letter format in some places and complex vocabulary such as impatient, strike, demand, neutral party, ultimatum, emergency, snoop, and exchange. The illustrations are fun, colorful and support the concept. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, students read Lissy’s Friends by Grace Lin. This is a fiction text that introduces students to the art of origami. The vocabulary is highlighted in the text to draw attention to words such as push and difficult. Students will be able to relate to the theme of loss and making new friends. The illustrations are also vibrant and lend well to students' understanding the text.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Genres and text types are varied and represented throughout the school year.  Texts include a mix of informational and literary texts, including poetry and fables. 

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Cool Dog, School Dog by Deborah Heiligman
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, A Second is a Hiccup by Hazel Hutchins
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Creep Low, Fly High by Author Unknown
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Goldilocks by Author Unknown

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Friends All Around by Miela Ford
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Where Does Food Come From? by Shelley Rotner and Gary Goss
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Koko and Penny by Author Unknown (Time for Kids)
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, The Moon by Author Unknown

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently. 

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to listen to grade-level appropriate texts during Shared Reading and Literature Anthology. Texts included have the appropriate level of complexity based on their quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and student task. 

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task and anchor texts are placed at the appropriate grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Literature Big Book, This School Year Will Be The Best by Kay Winters. This text has a quantitative measure of 440 Lexile. The text has ten challenging words that are important for students to know. According to lexile.com, the early reading indicators of syntactic, semantic, decoding and structure all measure as demanding. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Literature Big Book, The 3 Little Dassies by Jan Brett. This text has a quantitative measure of 630 Lexile.  According to lexile.com, the early reading indicators of syntactic, semantic and decoding and structure all range from high demanding to very high demanding. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Literature Big Book, A Second is a Hiccup by Hazel Hutchins. This text has a quantitative measure of 630 Lexile. The early reading indicators of structure and syntactic are reported as very high demanding, while the other indicators of semantic and decoding are demanding. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 3, Literature Anthology, Click, Clack, Moo Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin. This text has a quantitative measure 380 Lexile. The knowledge demands for this text are high because it entails multiple perspectives. Students also need to infer complex themes to fully comprehend the text. These factors make the text an appropriate level of complexity.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels). 

The materials that students interact with on a daily basis do not increase in complexity throughout the school year to help students develop independence of grade-level skills. While texts that are used for interactive read-alouds are in the appropriate Lexile band for read-alouds, there is very little increase in complexity over time. The same is true for the qualitative features of interactive read-alouds. They are considered slightly complex to somewhat complex throughout the year. The same is true for Big Books and books in the literature anthology. While the texts are in the correct Lexile band, the complexity, both qualitative and quantitative does not grow significantly over the course of the year to help students develop independence of grade-level skills. While students do gain knowledge throughout the year based on the text selections, accessing more complex, grade appropriate books by the end of the year is not present. 

Interactive Read-Alouds remain around the same Lexile level for the course of the year, as does the qualitative analysis. Specific examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, students hear the informational text “Our Pets” (no author), which has a Lexile of 700 and is considered slightly complex for meaning and knowledge demands, but moderately complex for structure and language.
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students hear the folktale “The Three Little Pigs” (no author), which has a Lexile of 660 and is considered somewhat complex, with the exception of structure, which is considered slightly complex. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students hear the informational text “Let’s Look at Video Games!” (no author), which has a Lexile of 770 and across all areas of qualitative analysis, is considered somewhat complex. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students hear the folktale “Ming’s Teacher” (no author), which has a Lexile of 700, but the qualitative complexity ranges from slightly complex with meaning and knowledge demands to somewhat complex with structure and language. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students hear the informational text “Great Inventions” (no author), which has a Lexile of 640, but qualitative features ranging from slightly complex with meaning to moderately complex with structure. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students hear the folktale “Anansi’s Sons” (no author), which has a Lexile of 760, and is considered somewhat complex, with a moderately complex language feature. 

Big Books and the Anthology are used as shared reading and are meant for students to access on their own increasingly throughout the year. Similar to Interactive Read-Alouds, the complexity only increases slightly throughout the year. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students read the informational text Friends all Around by Miela Ford, which has a Lexile of 220 and is considered slightly complex for language and meaning and somewhat complex for structure and knowledge demands. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students read the realistic fiction text, Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney, which has a Lexile of 300 and somewhat complex qualitative features with the exception of language, which is only slightly complex. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, students read the informational text Where Does Food Come From? by Shelley Rotner and Gary Goss, which has a Lexile of 770. The meaning and knowledge demands are considered somewhat complex, while the structure and language are considered moderately complex. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, students read the fantasy, Hi! Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold, which has a Lexile of 200 and is considered somewhat complex for language and knowledge demands but moderately complex for structure and only slightly complex for meaning. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 5, students read the informational text “Building Bridges” (no author), which has a Lexile of 550, and qualitative complexity levels of slightly complex for meaning, somewhat complex for language, but moderately complex for structure and knowledge. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, students read the realistic fiction text Lissy’s Friends by Grace Lin, which has a Lexile of 460 and is somewhat complex in all areas except structure, which is moderately complex.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and the series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis. Instructional materials include a text complexity analysis for most texts; however, not all texts include a text complexity analysis. Quantitative and qualitative measures are provided in the text notes section. A clear rationale for the purpose and placement for texts chosen for the program is not evident. 

Examples include the following, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 1, Literature Big Book, Move! by Steve Jenkins, materials include the following notes on the text; however, a rationale for the placement of this text in this grade level is not included:
    • "Qualitative Features - Meaning/Purpose - Somewhat Complex: Children may not grasp the true purpose of the text because it uses playful language and print to present facts about how animals move. They may need support understanding that, although this is a nonfiction text, illustrations and playful page designs are used. 
    • Structure - Slightly Complex: The text includes many sentences that begin on one page and end on the next spread of pages. Children may need support understanding the playful text sizes and shapes.
    • Language: Language - Moderately Complex: Children may be unfamiliar with some of the animal names (e.g., gibbon, jacana, arctic hare). Some vocabulary may be unfamiliar to children (e.g., startled, slithering, rustling, tumbling). The text also includes content vocabulary that may be unfamiliar to children (e.g., prey, mate, colony). 
    • Knowledge Demands - Moderately Complex: The text includes many animals (e.g., gibbon, jacana, arctic hare) that children may not be familiar with. Illustrations can be used for support. The final spread of pages includes very detailed facts about each of the animals from the text (e.g., The polar bear…may be ten feet (three meters) long. It lives in the Arctic and has a thick layer of fat that keeps it warm and helps it float in the icy water.) 
    • Quantitative Features: Lexile 430L. 
    • Reader Considerations: Readers may need support understanding the potentially unfamiliar animals of the text. They may need help breaking down the detailed animal facts on the last spread of the book. 
    • Task Considerations: The text provides teachers with an opportunity to teach informational text in a fun and playful way. Each page focuses on an animal’s movement, and page 29 asks: Animals move in different ways … how about you? This question is paired with an illustration of two human feet. This can provide teachers with an opportunity to talk about the different ways we can move and how they are the same as and different from the animals in the text. Children can also provide examples of other animals they know and the different ways they move." 
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Literature Big Book, Interrupting Chicken by David Ezra Stein, materials include the following notes on the text; however, a rationale for the placement of this text in this grade level is not included:
    • "Qualitative Features - Meaning/Purpose - Somewhat Complex: Since there are many stories contained within this story, children many need support understanding the central idea (i.e., Papa is reading bedtime stories to the little chicken, but she keeps interrupting them). 
    • Structure - Moderately Complex: The text contains stories within a story. Children may need support understanding how the stories fit together. Children may think that the little chicken is a character in the stories. They may need support understanding that Papa is telling the stories, and that the little chicken interrupts Papa to tell what she thinks should happen. For example, on pages 10-11, the story that Papa is telling (Hansel and Gretel) begins. But on pages 12-13, the little chicken interrupts the story to warn Hansel and Gretel about the witch and retell the story with her own ending. Children may also need guidance in understanding that, on pages 30-33, the story changes to the little chicken’s own story. On pages 32-33, “Z-zzzzzzz” is meant to indicate that Papa interrupted the story with his snoring. 
    • Language - Somewhat Complex: Children may be unfamiliar with some of the story’s vocabulary (e.g., interrupt, nibble, lovely, involved, stray, by and by, and yawning). Knowledge Demands Somewhat Complex: Children may need prior knowledge of well-known tales, namely Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, and Chicken Little. This background knowledge will be helpful in understanding why the little chicken is interrupting the stories. 
    • Quantitative Features: Lexile 360L 
    • Reader Considerations: Readers may need some familiarity with the fairy tales from the story to understand the little chicken’s feelings. They may also need support in following the complex structure of stories within the story. 
    • Task Considerations: The story gives teachers the opportunity to teach about the characteristics of fantasy stories, as well as the characteristics of folktales. The little chicken’s interruptions can serve as an example about different ways children can rewrite the endings of stories they know, or add to their own stories."

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year. 

The Grade 1 materials provide opportunities for students to engage with a range of texts including nonfiction, realistic fiction, poetry and fables. Throughout a given week, students interact daily with two to three texts about the same topic during whole group and small group instruction, including Shared Reading, Paired Selections for small group instruction, Anchor Texts, Interactive Read-Alouds, Leveled Readers, and Literature Big Books. Materials contain lessons and resources for read-alouds, guided reading, and independent reading. Throughout the week students also engage in a close reading of a text. In a typical week, it is suggested that on Day 1,10 minutes are spent with the literature big book or interactive read aloud,  10 minutes for shared reading, and 65 minutes of small group instruction.On Day 2, students spend 10 minutes with the shared reading and 60 minutes in small group instruction. Then on Day 3, students spend 5 minutes with the literature big book, 20 minutes with the anchor text, and 50 minutes in small group instruction, and on Day 4, students spend 15 minutes with the literature anthology and 50 minutes with small group instruction. Finally, on Day 5, students spend 55 minutes in small groups. 

Instructional materials identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading and listening to a variety of texts to become independent readers and comprehenders at the grade level and engage in a volume of reading as they grow toward reading independence in Grade 1. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students engage in reading:
    • Literature Big Book (informational text): Move! by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page
    • Shared Reading: “Move and Grin” (unknown author)
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (folktale): “The Monkey’s Fiddle” (unknown author) 
    • Anchor Text: “Move It” (unknown author) 
    • Paired Selection: “My Family Hike” (unknown author) 
    • Leveled Readers: “We Can Move!” and “What’s Under Your Skin?” (unknown author)
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students engage in reading:
    • Literature Big Book (fantasy): Millie Waits for the Mail by Alexander Steffensmeier 
    • Shared Reading (realistic fiction): “Good Job, Ben!” (unknown author)
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (informational text): “Jobs Around Town” (unknown author) 
    • Anchor Text: The Red Hat by Eva Torres
    • Paired Text: “Firefighters At Work” (unknown author)
    • Leveled Readers: Pick Up Day by Arlene Block, “The Recycling Center” (unknown author), Ben Brings the Mail by Arlene Block, “At the Post Office” (unknown author), At Work with Mom by Arlene Block, “Tools for the School Nurse (unknown author)
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students engage in reading:
    • Literature Big Book (fantasy): Interrupting Chicken by David Ezra Stein
    • Shared Reading (folktale): “The Nice Mitten” (unknown author) 
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (folktale): “The Foolish, Timid Rabbit” (unknown author).
    • Anchor Text: The Gingerbread Man by Wiley Blevins
    • Paired Text: “Mother Goose Rhymes” 
    • Leveled Readers: How Coquí Got Her Voice by Amy Helfer and The Magic Paintbrush by Amy Helfer.
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students engage in reading:
    • Interactive Read-Aloud (folktale): “The Squeaky Bed” (unknown author)
    • Literature Big Book (realistic fiction): Whistle for Willie by Ezra Jack Keats

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 1 includes text-dependent/specific questions and tasks that build to an integrated, culminating tasks that allows students to demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained through instruction through writing and/or speaking activities. Students are supported in evidence-based discussion of texts through the implementation of protocols to scaffold conversations as students’ oral language skills grow in sophistication. Use of grade-level vocabulary/syntax and appropriate questioning are encouraged during student discussions.

Students engage in a mix of evidence-based writing tasks, including both on-demand and process writing, that incorporate some of the writing types called for in the standards. Students write on-demand for opinion, but do not have opportunities to engage in process writing for opinion pieces. Explicit grammar and conventions instruction is provided with opportunities for students to practice and apply these skills within their writing tasks.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials provide opportunities for students to engage with the texts. Questions and tasks provide opportunities for students to use text-based evidence when answering  questions or completing tasks correlated with the text they are reading or listening to. These opportunities are included in the Literature Big Book, Shared Read, Interactive Read-Aloud, Reading/Writing Companion, and Paired Selections.

Instructional materials include questions, tasks, and assignments that are mainly text-based over the course of a school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Shared read, A Pig for Cliff by author unknown. In Visualize, the teacher asks the questions:
    • "How do you picture Slim’s face on these pages? 
    • Why can’t Slim sit with Cliff Cat? 
    • Talk about it with your partner.”
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Anchor Text, Literature Anthology, Move It! by author unknown, the teacher asks, "Let’s look at page 89. The boy is catching a ball. What two key details does the text tell us about catching?" 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Anchor Text, Literature Anthology, From Cows to You by author unknown, the teacher models using the strategy of rereading and teacher think-aloud, "I’m not sure I understand why being a dairy farmer is hard work…”  Students are asked “How are small farms and big farms different?” Both require students to use details from the text.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 4, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Paired Selection, Literature Anthology, Busy As a Bee by author unknown, the teacher asks, "What details on page 58 tell about queen bees?"
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, Day 4, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Paired Selection, Literature Anthology, A Young Nation Grows by author unknown, the teacher asks, “What sentence tells about what happened to the colonies? Underline it. Talk with a partner about why the author included a map.” On page 153, the teacher asks, “Talk with a partner about the numbers on the map. How does the key help you understand the map?”

Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-dependent writing, speaking, and activities. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Anchor Text, Flip by Ezra R. Tanaka, students fill in a graphic organizer. The teacher asks, “What details have we read? Flip is the girl’s pet. Flip is big. This is a key detail. Think about the words and pictures on these pages. What are some key details?” The students work with a partner to decide what is the most important key detail. Then they add it to their chart. The teacher models, “I want to know what key details are on this page. I will look at the words and pictures. What is a key detail on page 55?”  The students look at pages 58–60 and answer the question, “How does the author help you know Flip’s plan?”
  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 4, Teacher Edition, Reading Writing Companion, My Family Hike by author unknown, students respond to the question and prompt, ”What clues help you know how Otto feels? Circle the clues in the story. Then reread the text and talk with a partner about how he feels. Talk with a partner about why the word another is in bold print.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Anchor Text-Literature Anthology, Long Ago and Now by Minda Novek, students fill in the online Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer as the teacher reads. The teacher asks, ”How does the author organize the information? How do the photos help you understand the information in the text? Authors have a reason for organizing the text in a certain way. What do you understand because of the way the author organizes the information and details?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 2, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Comprehension, Reading/Writing Companion, The Story of a Robot Inventor by author unknown, the teacher models by filling in the first box of the graphic organizer. “We read that he had to build a robot that could swim. This is the problem. Write that in the first box.” Students are then guided to write about the steps Takahasi took to solve the problem.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

Throughout the program, the materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions and activities that build to a culminating task. In each week of a unit, students are given the opportunity to reflect on their learning from the week. Each week has a final performance task, called the Weekly Wrap-Up. It is designed to help students demonstrate their understanding of the essential question. Students complete the Weekly Wrap-Up in their Reading/Writing Companion. This culminating task is the same each week.

Some specific examples of what students learn and how they demonstrate their knowledge of the topic at the end of the week include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students spend the final day reviewing the essential question and discussing the different texts from the week. Students look at an image in their Reading/Writing Companion and discuss what the painting shows about where birds live and how the forest in the painting is different than the pond they read about in “The Best Spot" (no author). Then students work with a partner to compare the painting and At a Pond by Nancy Finton. They talk about how the birds building the nest in the image relate to the animals that live at the pond. Questions throughout the week that support this task include, “Which animals live in nests? What do frogs do at the pond? How are the selections similar?”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, students learn about folktales. Students review the essential question before comparing a picture in their Reading/Writing Companion with the text The Gingerbread Man by Wiley Blevins. Students compare the characters in the picture to the characters from the story. Then students compare the image with the characters in "The Nice Mitten" (no author). Students record their notes using a foldable and work with a partner. Then students reflect on what they learned throughout the week in writing. Questions throughout the week that support the culminating task include, “How are the animals in ‘The Foolish, Timid Rabbit’ like the animals in ‘The Nice Mitten’? What happens in the beginning of the story?” In addition, students complete the sentence starter, “‘The Nice Mitten’ is like other folktales because...”. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, students learn about sounds. On the last day, students hear a song called "I Have a Car" and then students compare the sound words in the song with the sound words in the text, "Now, What's That Sound?" (no author). Students work with a partner to compare the sounds in the song with the sounds that they learned about in "Shake! Strike! Strum!" (no author). Finally, students reflect on the essential question in the Reading/Writing Companion by writing what they learned about sounds. Questions throughout the week that support the culminating task include, “What is Peter’s problem? Has he tried to change or solve his problem?” Students also complete the sentence stem, “The sound ______ is made by ...”. 

In Week 6 of every unit, students complete a spiral review and show what they know from the entire unit versus just the one week. Examples of this include:

  • In Unit 2, students learn about realistic fiction. Students read the selection, “Where is Rex?” quietly to themselves and then answer questions that demonstrate their understanding from the unit such as, “How can you tell the story is realistic fiction? Where do Beth and Mom like to jog? Why does Rex run and run?”
  • In Unit 4, students learn about folktales. Students begin Week 6 by reviewing "Little Red Hen" and then answer questions such as, "How do you know this story is a folktale? What does Little Red Hen do after she plants the wheat?" Students write about the lesson in the folktales and what Little Rabbit learns.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide students opportunities to engage in evidence-based discussions using academic vocabulary in whole class, small groups, and peer-to-peer. Opportunities are seen throughout the units in the Think-Aloud, Talk About It, Collaborative Conversations, and Vocabulary Picture Cards routines.

For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1: Talk About It, teachers are prompted to say “Listen Carefully: As students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-group discussions, encourage them to: always look at the speaker, respect others by not interrupting them, and repeat others’ ideas to check understanding.” 
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, Collaborative Conversations, as students engage in partner, small group, and whole group discussions using the Reading/Writing Companion, they are encouraged to: “always look at the speaker, respect others by not interrupting them, and repeat others’ ideas to check understanding.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 1, Shared Read, A Team of Fish by author unknown, using the Reading/Writing Companion, students are asked to, “point to the idiom snapped up. Read and have students repeat. Snap your fingers. Say: I can snap. Explain that snapped up has a different meaning. Snapped up means “grabbed quickly.” Ask: What do you think happens to a fish that gets snapped up? (The fish gets eaten by a bigger fish.) Have partners talk about what causes a fish to get “snapped up.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 1: Talk About It, Be Open to All Ideas, “As children engage in partner, small group, and whole group discussions, remind them: that everyone’s ideas are important and should be heard, not to be afraid to ask a question if something is unclear, and to respect the opinions of others.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, Talk About It, English Language Learners Scaffold, teachers use the Talk About It routine and say “Point to the garden. Say garden and have children repeat. Provide a sentence frame: This is a garden. Intermediate - Help students describe what they see in the photo. Provide sentence frames: This is a garden. I see plants. Advanced/Advanced High - Encourage partners to talk about what they see in the picture. Ask: What do plants need to grow? Plants needs water to grow.”

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The materials provide opportunities for students to partake in listening and speaking activities about what they are reading through responding to evidence-based questions prompted by the teacher, as well as whole group and partner share. Collaborative conversations are encouraged throughout each unit. Students also have opportunities to discuss what they are researching. 

For example: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Big Idea, students “say hello to your partner. Talk about each photo. Circle someone in the photo who is trying something new. Talk about what these friends at doing. Talk about ways friends can get along.”
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Days 1-5, Whole Group, Shared Read, Six Kids, on Day 3, the teacher prompts, “This is an important key detail because it shows Pip’s action. Let’s add it to the Key Details chart….What key details do we see and read on these pages? What is Pip doing? Let’s add these details to our chart.”  
  • In Unit 2 Week 3, Day 2, Whole Group, Interactive Read-Aloud, “Animals in the Desert” by author unknown, students discuss the animals and habitat in the selection. The teacher guides the children to share what they discussed, and adds the students’ ideas to the class Essential Question Chart.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 5, Whole Group, Independent Writing, Write About the Anchor Text, students review their final drafts about the Anchor text. The teacher reviews the listening and speaking strategies: "speak in complete sentences, support their opinion using describing details, listen to and think about what the presenter is saying, and wait until the presenter has finished to ask questions."  Students work with a partner to practice presenting their writing to each other. Students  present their final drafts in front of the class. Students can ask and answer questions to clarify information. The teacher is encouraged to record children as they share so they can self-evaluate.
  • In Unit 5, Week 6, Day 1-2, Whole Group, Academic Vocabulary: captions, inventions, reliable, Reading Digitally, Time for Kids, Great Ideas, for the academic vocabulary word, inventions, the teacher instructs students to “Scroll back to the top, and read the article aloud. As you read, ask questions about the inventions and what they do.”  The teacher then models taking notes using the Main Idea and Details Graphic Organizer #51. After each section, the children discuss what they learned about the invention with a partner. The teacher encourages them to use text evidence. 
  • In Unit 6 Week 4, Day 1, Whole Group, Interactive Read-Aloud, “Let’s Dance” by author unknown, after the teacher reads the interactive read aloud, the children retell the text.  The teacher prompts the students to discuss the traditions that they learned about by asking, “What do people do at a powwow to celebrate Paiute history and traditions? Where might you see people doing the Hora dance?”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Instructional materials provide students with opportunities for students to write daily. For example, on Days 1 and 2, students are active participants in both shared writing and evidence based independent writing using the texts from the week. On Days 3, 4, and 5, students work through the writing process where they using practice application of  a writing skill, citing textual evidence, revising, editing, and publishing a piece of writing.

Materials include a mix of both on-demand and process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Independent Writing, Teacher Edition, students are given the opportunity to choose from three writing prompts: 
    • “Do you have any pets? What makes them special?”
    • “How are different pets special?”
    • “How can we help the pets in our lives?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 5, Whole Group, Independent Writing, students write about the anchor text, The Pigs, the Wolf and the Mud, by Ellen Tarlow. The students are prompted to find clues to help write directions for the pigs to follow.  The students use clues from the story and illustrations to describe the specific steps the pigs will need to take to build their new hut. The teacher provides sentence frames to students as needed. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 4, Independent Writing Literature Anthology, Write about the Anchor Text, Edit and Proofread, students are directed to look for specific language in their writing and editing using proofreading marks. Focus questions are: “Does the response include evidence from the text? Specific Words - Does the response contain specific words to help readers form a clear picture in their minds?” Peer editing is practiced.
  • In Unit 4, Writing and Grammar, pages 158-167, Poetry, students use a model to plan, draft, and revise their own poetry. 
    • Poetry - Plan. Student model Go, Tiger, Go!, page 158-161. Draw and write about an animal. Write about what it can do. Think about words that rhyme.
    • Poetry - Draft. Focus on descriptive words. Page 162-163
    • Poetry - Revise and Edit. Focus on verbs and adverbs. Page 164-165
    • Poetry - Share and Evaluate. Students use a checklist and a peer conversation to evaluate their writing. Students write to answer the question “What did you do well in your writing?” and “What do you need to work on?” Page 166-167.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Shared Writing, after reading the Shared Read, A Bird Named Fern by author unknown, students respond to the prompt, “What did Fern do in A Bird Named Fern?” Students respond in complete sentences as the teacher dictates their responses.
  • In Unit 6, Teacher Edition, Writing Process, after reading a persuasive text, Be a Volunteer! by author unknown, students create their own persuasive writing. Students start by choosing a topic and planning their writing using the Reading/Writing Companion pg. 160. Students write their draft. The teacher models and provides an example. Students then revise their drafts, edit and proofread. Once they have written a final draft, students publish, present, and evaluate their writing.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year-long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to write narrative, opinion, and informative writing pieces. Each writing lesson has a purpose for writing, a teaching and model section, and examples/rubrics to guide students through shared and independent writing. Materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes of writing.

Examples of narrative writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, the shared writing prompt requires the class to write a new story of “A Pig for Cliff” (unknown author) where he brings home a different pet. Students also complete a personal narrative in their Reading/Writing Companion. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students write directions for the pigs to follow when building their hut, after listening to “The Pigs, the Wolf, and the Mud” (unknown author) in their Literature Anthology. 

Examples of opinion writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students choose a book and write what they liked about it in Extend Your Learning section of the Reading/Writing Companion; however, this is optional and no instruction is provided. This writing prompt is also given in Units 4, 5, and 6. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students respond to the prompt, “Would you like to have Jen’s job? Describe what you would like or not like and why.” after listening to the text The Red Hat by Eva Torres in the Literature Anthology. Students learn that opinion writing contains the opinion, as well as the reasons for the opinion. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students look at the photographs and illustrations in “Life at Home” and respond to the prompt, “Would you rather wash things as we do now or as people did long ago? Why?” 
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students complete a shared writing about what are some of the good and bad things about being a little fish. Then students independently respond to the prompt, “Which animal team do you think is most interesting? Why?” after hearing the anchor text Animal Teams by Rachel Mann. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students listen to the text In a Lost Button by Arnold Lobel and  write whether they think Frog or Toad was the best friend and why. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students learn about persuasive writing and in their Reading/Writing Companion, students write a persuasive text on a topic of their choosing. 

Examples of informational writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students “use the words first, next, then, and last to describe the steps needed to make one of the motions in ‘Move It!’”
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, during shared writing, students hear the story, “Go Wild” (unknown author), and write about how animals use their body parts to help them find food. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students independently write about the benefits Koko gains by learning sign language in the text “Koko and Penny” (unknown author).       
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students respond to the prompt, “Why couldn’t Kitten drink the milk in the sky? How do you know?” after hearing Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes. Students use text evidence to make inferences to answer this writing prompt. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, after listening to the story, “The Story of a Robot Inventory” (unknown author), the students complete a shared writing about what makes a good inventor based on text evidence. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, after listening to the story “A Spring Birthday” (unknown author), students complete a shared writing by writing a letter from Marco explaining to his parents why he wants to start a new tradition. In the letter, students must describe the new tradition. Students learn how to use text evidence to support their ideas in the letter.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Instructional materials provide opportunities for students to write and support their writing with evidence for the texts that they are reading. During shared writing, students learn and practice new writing skills and how to provide support using evidence from the text. Students also write opinions on books they have chosen to read and use text evidence to explain their opinion.  

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Days 1-5, Reading Writing Companion, Move and Grin! by author unknown, the teacher rereads the text and takes notes to help find text evidence.  For example, on page 136, “The text tells me that Scott’s frog can hop and jump. I see the frog doing a big jump in the photo.”  The teacher reminds students to use their first note to remember information to use for their writing. Students then write a sentence using the evidence they recorded.   
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Independent Writing, Long Ago and Now by Minda Novek, students respond to the prompt, “Do you think being a kid is better now, or was it better in the past? Why?”  The teacher states, “To respond to the prompt, you need to find text evidence and make inferences to form your opinion about whether it was better to be a kid long ago or if it is better to be a kid now.” Students find text evidence to help them respond to the prompt. As students begin working on their writing, they are instructed to form their opinion and find reasons and inferences from the text to support that opinion.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 1, Language Arts, Shared Writing, the teacher and students work together to respond to the prompt, “Why do fish swim in schools?" The teacher states, “To respond to this prompt, we need to look at the text and photographs in A Team of Fish. Students find text evidence to support their writing in the prompt. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 3, Anchor Text, after students read the text, Animal Teams by Rachel Mann, students write a fact about an interesting animal in their Response Journals. A sentence frame is provided, “An interesting animal I know is a ____ . It can ____ .” On the same day, students complete an independent writing prompt about the anchor text, “Which animal team do you think is most interesting? Why?” The teacher states, “The first part of this prompt is asking for your opinion about which animal team from the selection Animal Teams is most interesting. The second part of the prompt asks you to explain why you have that opinion. You will use facts from the text to explain your opinion.” Students find text evidence using the words and photos to write to the prompt. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 3, Independent Writing, students analyze the prompt, “What can you tell about what made Thomas Edison a good inventor?” The teacher reminds students they can use the evidence about things Thomas did as a child to see if he was a good inventor. Students complete a draft using notes, details, and evidence from the text to write to the prompt.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. 

Instructional materials provide opportunities for teachers to explicitly teach grammar, language, and handwriting skills and provide guided practice. Materials include multiple opportunities for students to independently practice each new skill. Students have opportunities to practice new skills during whole group and partner share. All grammar and conventions standards are covered over the course of the year and most standards are revisited throughout the year in increasing complexity, such as application to the text. Students have opportunities over the course of the year to apply newly learned skills both in and out of context; however, opportunities are missed for students to learn printing letters a, i, n, r.

Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to print most upper- and lowercase letters. In Unit 0, 22 letters are taught. Instruction is missing in printing letters a, i, n, r. 
    • In Unit 0, Week 1, Day 2, at the end of the Phonics lesson, teachers are directed to use the models in the back of the Reading/Writing Companion to show students how to write the letters p and t. The teacher points out that when we write, we move from left to right. The teacher traces the letters with his/her finger, moving in the direction of the arrows. Students do the same. The teacher is directed to use the online handwriting models for additional instruction and practice. 
  • Students have opportunities to use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher explains to students that writers use an apostrophe and the letter s at the end of many nouns to say that someone or something owns something. The teacher displays the following sentences: "Meg’s dog is wet! The dog’s bed is red." The teacher explains that Meg’s and dog’s are possessive nouns and that in the first sentence, the dog belongs to Meg. In the second sentence, the bed belongs to the dog. The teacher displays similar sentences and reads them aloud. The teacher prompts students to chorally reread them. Students work with a partner to circle the possessive noun in each sentence and underline what item is owned.
    • In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that a common noun names a person, place, or thing and begins with a lowercase letter and a proper noun names a particular person, pet, place, or thing and begins with a capital letter. The teacher displays the following sentences: "Seth has a drum. This is West School. My dog Bing runs fast." The teacher points out that Seth, West School, and Bing are proper nouns, and drum and dog are common nouns. Students identify which proper noun names (1) a person, (2) a place, (3) a pet. The teacher writes and reads aloud similar sentences. The teacher prompts students to chorally reread them. The teacher guides pairs to take turns identifying the proper nouns. Students edit their drafts in their Writer’s Notebook for common and proper nouns.
  • Students have opportunities to use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that a singular noun names one person, place, or thing and that plural nouns name more than one person, place, or thing. The teacher explains that most times you add -s to the end of a noun to make it plural, except when nouns end in -x, -s, or -ss, add -es to make it plural. The teacher writes the following sentences on the board: "Six (cub/cubs) build a (hut/huts). A (cub/cubs) has (stick/sticks)." Students then work with partners to orally generate sentences with singular nouns and change them into plural nouns. Students review the Shared Writing and identify correct singular and plural nouns.
  • Students have opportunities to use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reviews that a noun is a person, place, thing, or idea and explains that pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. The teacher displays a paragraph and reads it aloud. The students identify the pronouns. "We got fruit at the farm stand. (we) They will make a fruit pie. (they) You can help, too. (you) She cuts up a plum. (she) He makes the crust. (he) I know it will taste good! (I, it)"

Partners use their own names in oral sentences and then replace them with the pronoun I and make sentences using you, he, she, it, we, and they.

  • Students have opportunities to use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reviews that a verb is an action word and explains that a present tense verb tells about an action happening now. The teacher displays and reads: "Spike hikes up the hill." The teacher explains that when a present tense verb tells about one noun, it ends in -s. The teacher displays the sentences: "Jan and Dave wipe off the plates. I ride my bike. You ride your bike." The teacher explains that when a present tense verb tells about more than one noun, like Jan and Dave, it does not end in -s and that when the naming word is I or you, the present tense verb does not end in -s. The teacher writes and reads aloud similar sentences and guides the students to identify present tense verbs and explain why they do or do not have an -s at the end. 
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 4, in the Grammar part of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that past tense verbs tell about action that already happened and future tense verbs tell about something that will happen. The teacher asks,  "What do you do to most verbs to show that it happened in the past? What can you do to a verb to show that an action will happen in the future?" Partners work together to change past tense to future and future tense to past. 
  • Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that an adjective is a word that describes a noun and that adjectives tell number, color, size, or shape. The teacher explains that they also tell how things look, sound, feel, smell, or taste. The teacher displays the following sentences: "A big crow floated in the sky. I feel the hot sun on my face." The teacher explains that big and hot are adjectives. The teacher points out that big describes size and hot tells how something feels. Partners work together to identify the adjectives in similar sentences. 
  • Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that two complete sentences can be joined together with a joining word and that the words and, but, and or are used to put two sentences together, separated by a comma. 
  • Students have opportunities to use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that the words a and an are special adjectives called articles. The teacher explains that we use a before a word that begins with a consonant sound (a hound). We use an before a word that begins with a vowel sound (an ape).  The teacher writes similar sentences and reads them aloud. Students identify the articles.
  • Students have opportunities to use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • In the Teacher Edition, Unit 5, Week 5, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher displays the following sentence: "The brown mole is in the ground." The teacher explains, "The word in connects the words the brown mole and the phrase that tells where the mole is—the ground. The teacher explains that a preposition connects a noun or pronoun to another part of a sentence and a prepositional phrase begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun. The teacher displays and reads similar sentences. The teacher prompts students to chorally reread them. Partners identify the preposition in each sentence.
  • Students have opportunities to produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative (command), and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
    • In Unit 1, Week 4, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that a question asks something and ends with a question mark. The teacher explains that an exclamation shows strong feeling or excitement and ends with an exclamation mark. Partners orally generate questions, exclamations, and commands. The students review the Shared Writing and point out and/or correct the use of questions and exclamations. If questions and exclamations are not in the Shared Writing, the teacher and students work to add them, and reread the response together.
  • Students have opportunities to capitalize dates and names of people.
    • In Unit 2, Week 4, Day 2, in the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that names of particular people, pets, places, and things are called proper nouns and that a proper noun begins with a capital letter. Students work with a partner to orally generate sentences with common and proper nouns, challenging them to create sentences that include at least one common and one proper noun.
  • Students have opportunities to use end punctuation for sentences.
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that a sentence is a group of words that tells a whole idea, begins with a capital letter, and ends with a punctuation mark. The teacher points out the capital letters and periods in sample sentences. Students count the number of words in the sentence. Students work in partners to orally generate complete sentences. The teacher and students review the Shared Writing and point out the capital letters and periods. 
  • Students have opportunities to use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 4, during the Grammar portion of the lesson, the teacher reminds students that when a writer uses three or more nouns in a list, there is a comma after all but the last noun. The teacher displays sentences with punctuation errors and reads each aloud. The students work together to fix the sentences. Students can have additional practice with commas in a series in the Practice Book page 94 or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 3, during the Spelling portion of the lesson, the teacher displays index cards for -un, -ut, -ug and forms three columns in a pocket chart. The teacher holds up the run Spelling Word Card from page 101 of the online Teacher’s Resource Book. The teacher says and spells it. The teacher pronounces each sound clearly: /r/ /u/ /n/. The teacher blends the sounds, stretching the vowel sound to emphasize it: /ruuun/. The teacher repeats this step with fun. Both words are placed below the -un card. The teacher reads and spells each spelling word. The students repeat each word. The teacher asks, “What do you notice about these spelling words? They have the /u/ sound, and they rhyme because they both end with /un/ spelled u-n.” The students are given the Spelling Word Cards from page 101 of the online Teacher’s Resource Book. The students say and spell -un and each word in the word family and repeat the process with the -ut and -ug words. In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 4, during the Spelling portion of the lesson, the teacher provides pairs of students with copies of the Spelling Word Cards. While one partner reads the words one at a time, the other partner orally segments the word and then writes the word. After reading all the words, partners switch roles. Students correct their own papers and sort the words by ending spelling pattern: -un, -ut, -ug, or no short u ending.
  • Students have opportunities to spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.
    • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1, during the Spelling portion of the lesson, the teacher gives a pretest for the spelling words from the week. The teacher pronounces each spelling word, reads the sentence, and pronounces the word again. The students are asked to say each word softly, stretching the sounds, before writing it. After the pretest, the teacher displays the spelling words and writes each word as the letter names are said. Students check their words using the Practice Book page.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

Wonders 2020 for Grade 1 provides explicit instruction in alphabetic knowledge, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, phonics, directionality and function, and structures and features of text. Throughout the course of the year, students have frequent opportunities to read on-level text with fluency and purpose. Students have multiple opportunities to apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected tasks through the use of decodable readers and Shared Reading. Frequent opportunities are provided throughout the entire program to assess students’ mastery of foundational skills and to progress monitor student growth. Support for differentiation of foundational skills is found throughout the program.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Grade 1 materials provide explicit instruction in phonological awareness and phonics. This includes teacher modeling, guided practice and opportunities for students to practice the skills independently. Students are given ample opportunities to build, blend, and manipulate letters and sounds to make words. Within the Word Work part of lessons, explicit instruction is given in phoneme addition, deletion, and substitution. 

Students have frequent opportunities to learn and understand phonemes (e.g. distinguish long and short vowels, blend sounds, pronounce vowels in single-syllable words, and segment single-syllable words). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words.
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 1, the teacher tells the students they can categorize short words by whether they have long or short vowel sounds. The teacher says, "Listen as I say three words: bait, cake, hand. Which word doesn’t belong? Yes, bait and cake have long a sounds, but hand has a short a sound. Hand does not belong." The teacher and students work together to identify the word that is not in the same category or does not belong. If students need additional practice categorizing phonemes, they can use the Practice Book or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3, during the Phonemic Awareness portion of the lesson, the teacher places markers on the Response Board to represent sounds. The teacher says, "I’m going to put one marker in each box as I say each sound. Then I will blend the sounds to form a word. The teacher places a marker for each sound as the teacher says: /s/ /a/ /d/. The teacher then says: This word has three sounds: /s/ /a/ /d/. Listen as I blend these sounds to form a word: /saaad/; sad. The word is sad." The teacher and students practice together. The teacher provides corrective feedback as needed.
  • Students have opportunities to isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.
    • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 2, during the Phonemic Awareness portion of the lesson, the teacher says, "Listen carefully as I say a word: out. What sound do you hear at the beginning of the word? /ou/. The word out has the /ou/ sound at the beginning." The teacher repeats for the medial /ou/ in gown and the final /ou/ in cow. Students practice isolating initial, medial, and final phonemes. The teacher says, "Listen carefully as I say a word. Tell me the sound you hear at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of the word." The teacher guides students as they practice and provides corrective feedback as needed. If students need additional practice isolating sounds in words, they can use Practice Book page 386 or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds (phonemes).
    • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3, during the Phonemic Awareness portion of the lesson, the teacher uses the Response Board to show the students how to segment the individual sounds in words. The teacher says, "I am going to say the sounds in the word slide: /s/ /l/ /ī/ /d/. The first sound is /s/. The second sound is /l/. The next sound is /ī/. The last sound is /d/. I’ll place a marker in a box on the Response Board for each sound I hear. This word has four sounds: /s/ /l/ /ī/ /d/, slide." The teacher asks students to do some similar work using their Response Boards. The students and teacher practice with the additional words.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. spelling-sound correspondences of digraphs, decode one-syllable words, know final-e and long vowels, syllable and vowel relationship). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs.
    • In Unit 2, Week 5, Day 1, during the Phonics portion of the lesson, the teacher displays the cheese Sound-Spelling Card. The teacher models the sounds /ch/ spelled ch and -tch using cheese and match. The teacher says, "This is the cheese Sound-Spelling Card. The sound is /ch/. The /ch/ sound is spelled with the digraph ch. This is the sound at the beginning of the word cheese: /ch/ /ē/ /z/. Sometimes at the end of a word the /ch/ sound is spelled with the trigraph -tch, as in match." The students practice connecting the digraph ch and the trigraph tch to /ch/ by writing them. Students practice blending words with digraphs and trigraphs and can use Practice Book page 147 or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.
    • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 1, during the Phonics portion of the lesson, the teacher displays Word-Building Cards g, o, a, t. The teacher says, "This is g. It stands for /g/. These are o and a. Together they can stand for /ō/. This is t. It stands for /t/. Listen: /gōōōt/." The teacher continues with: load, row, toe, and most. The teacher displays the Day 1 Phonics Practice Activity and guides the students as they practice, reading each word in the first row. The teacher provides corrective feedback as needed. If students need additional practice blending words with long o, they use the Practice Book or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, during the Phonics portion of the lesson, the teacher displays the train Sound-Spelling Card. The teacher models /ā/ spelled a_e using the words ate and made. The teacher models writing the word at and adding an e to make ate. The teacher says, "This is the train Sound-Spelling Card. The sound is /ā/. Today we will learn one spelling for the /ā/ sound. Look at this word: at. This word has the short a sound /a/. I’ll add an e to the end. The new word is ate. The letters a and e work together to make the sound /ā/. Listen as I say the word: /āt/. I’ll say /āāāt/ as I write the word ate several times." The teacher models again using the word made. The students practice connecting the letters a_e to the sound /ā/ by writing words with the sound-spelling. If students need additional practice blending words with long a, they use the Practice Book or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to use knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a printed word.
    • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 3, during the Structural Analysis portion of the lesson, the teacher says the word pancake and asks students to listen closely to hear the vowel sounds. The teacher points out the /a/ sound in pan and the /ā/ sound in cake. The students tell how many syllables they hear in pancake. The teacher writes the word pancake and draws a line between the syllables. The teacher underlines a and e and explains, "The letters a_e in cake act as a team to stand for the /ā/ sound. This is a vowel-consonant-e syllable." The teacher blends and decodes: classmate, bedtime, complete, invite, dislike, sunrise, onstage, and nickname. The students tell how many syllables they hear in each word and divide the word into syllables. Students practice decoding words with CVCe syllables using the Practice Book or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to decode two-syllable words following basic patterns by breaking the words into syllables.
    • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 4, during the Structural Analysis portion of the lesson, the teacher writes the words update, sunshine, and awoke on the board and reads them with students. The teacher reminds students that words are made up of smaller parts called syllables and that one vowel sound is heard in each syllable. When students see a vowel-consonant-silent e spelling, they should know that this is one syllable and these letters should be kept together. The teacher writes the following words: excite, escape, reptile, hopeful. Students work in pairs to divide each word into syllables, read the words, and then write sentences with each word.
  • Students have opportunities to read words with inflectional endings.
    • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 2, during the Structural Analysis portion of the lesson, the teacher writes and reads aloud stretch, stretched, and stretching. The teacher underlines the -ed and -ing and helps students decode. The teacher repeats with scrape, scraped, scraping and scrub, scrubbed, scrubbing. The teacher reminds students of the rules they learned for dropping final e and doubling final consonants. The teacher writes the following words on the board: thrill, splash, strip, scrape. The students add -ed and -ing to each word, and then use each word in a sentence. If students need additional practice decoding words with inflectional endings, the students use the online activity.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness instruction to build toward application. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • In the Grade 1 Scope and Sequence, the Phonemic Awareness sequence provides a scaffolded and cohesive sequence of difficulty that spirals Phonemic Awareness skills in each unit and becomes more complex:
      • Smart Start: Phonological Awareness: Onset and Rime, Sentence Segmentation, Rhyme; Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Isolation, Phoneme Identity, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Segmentation
      • Unit 1: Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Blending, Alliteration, Phoneme Categorization, Phoneme Segmentation, Phoneme Deletion, Identify and Generate Rhyme
      • Unit 2: Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Isolation, Phoneme Segmentation, Phoneme Categorization
      • Unit 3: Phonemic Awareness: Alliteration, Phoneme Deletion, Phoneme Segmentation, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Isolation
      • Unit 4: Phonemic Awareness: Identify and Generate Rhyme, Phoneme Categorization, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Segmentation, Phoneme Identity, Contrast Vowel Sound, Phoneme Substitution, Phoneme Deletion, Phoneme Addition
      • Unit 5: Phonemic Awareness: Identify and Generation Rhyme, Phoneme Substitution, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Deletion, Phoneme Categorization, Phoneme Addition, Phoneme Isolation, Phoneme Segmentation
      • Unit 6: Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Identity, Phoneme Segmentation, Identify and Generate Rhyme, Syllable Deletion, Phoneme Substitution, Phoneme Categorization, Phoneme Reversal, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Segmentation, Syllable Addition, Phoneme Deletion, Phoneme Addition

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • In the Grade 1 Scope and Sequence, the Phonics focus is listed for each unit of study. The materials begin with short vowels, inflectional endings with -s and beginning two- consonant blends. As the units progress, the materials move into long vowel and vowel teams, inflectional endings -ed and -ing and three-consonant blends. The units culminate with two-syllable words.
      • Smart Start: identify and blend (m, s, a, p, t, n, r, i), identify and blend (c, f, o, d, h, s, e, b, l, ll), identify and blend (k, ck, u, g, w, x, v, qu)
      • Unit 1: short a, short i, beginning consonant blends with r and s, short o
      • Unit 2: short e (e, ea), short u, ending consonant blends (-nk, -nd, -nt, -st, sk, mp), consonant digraphs (sh, th, -ng) consonant digraphs (ch, -tch, wh, ph)
      • Unit 3: long i (i_e), soft c, soft g (dge), long o, u, and e (Vce), variant vowel digraphs (oo, u)
      • Unit 4: long a (a, ai, ay), long e (e, ee, ea, ie), long o (o, oa, ow, oe), long i (i, igh, y, ie),  long e (y, ey)
      • Unit 5: r-controlled vowels (or, ir, ur, er), r-controlled vowels (or, ore, oar), diphthongs (ou, ow), diphthongs (oi, oy)
      • Unit 6: variant vowels (oo, ou, u_e, ew, ui, ue, u), variant vowels (au, aw, a, augh, al), silent letters (wr, kn, gn), three-letter consonant blends (scr, spl, spr, str, thr, shr), r-controlled vowels (air, are, ear)

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, and directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Grade 1 materials provide explicit instruction in print concepts, text structure, and text features to assist in comprehension of the text.  Print concepts are taught within the Concepts of Print lessons. Within the Reading/Writing Companion lessons, explicit instruction is provided in the words that authors use that allow the reader to determine the structure of the text in an effort to better understand the text. In addition, during the Literature Anthology lessons, explicit instruction and attention are given to the text features that aid in understanding the text. Anchor charts are created by the teachers and students to record this information.

Materials include frequent, adequate lessons and tasks/questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g. recognize features of a sentence). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., first word, capitalization, ending punctuation).
    • In Unit 0, Week 1, Day 2, during the Concepts of Print portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that sentences are made up of words and shows students six sentences. The teacher points to and reads each word in the first sentence. The teacher asks, "How many words are in this sentence?" Students volunteer to count the words. The teacher makes sure that students count the words in each sentence, moving left to right and from top to bottom, as appropriate.
    • In Unit 0, Week 1, Day 4, during the Concepts of Print portion of the lesson, the teacher selects a book from the classroom library large enough to display. The teacher explains to students that when you read, you read the left page first, then you read the right page. The teacher shows the front and back covers. The teacher then reads the front cover and explains to students that they can find the title, the author, and the illustrator on the front cover. The teacher reads and reviews Parts of a Book on Practice Book page 517. 

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem & solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 0, Week 1, Day 4, during the Comprehension portion of the lesson, the teacher displays page 56 of the Reading/Writing Companion. The teacher explains that informational texts can include a main idea and key details and that the main idea is what the text is mostly about. Key details give information about the main idea. The teacher models filling in the first detail on page 57 by finding a key detail. The teacher models how to write the detail in the first detail box. The teacher guides students to copy what they wrote on page 57 of their own Reading/Writing Companion and displays page 49. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher displays page 24 of the Reading/Writing Companion. The teacher says, "A character is a person or an animal in a story. The setting is where and when a story takes place. The plot is the series of events that take place in the story. These events give the story a beginning, middle, and end." The teacher explains that knowing the characters, setting, and plot can help them to better understand the story. The teacher models filling in the first box on page 25 by identifying an event at the beginning of the story. The teacher guides the students to copy what the teacher wrote in the graphic organizer on page 25 of their own Reading/Writing Companion. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher displays page 26 of the Reading/Writing Companion. The teacher says, "Sequence is the order of the main events in a story. The main events are the most important events. The sequence explains what happens first, next, then, and last." The teacher further explains that understanding the sequence of main events can help readers better understand the story. The teacher models filling in the first box on page 27 by finding the first main event. The teacher says, "On page 15, Snail and Frog decide to race to school. This is the first main event." The teacher writes this event in the first box. The teacher guides students to copy what the teacher wrote in the graphic organizer on page 27 of their own Reading/Writing Companion.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 2, during the Reading/Writing Companion portion of the lesson, the teacher displays page 56 in the Reading/Writing Companion. The teacher says, "A cause is what makes something happen. An effect is the event that happens. All events in a story make up the plot." The teacher models filling in the first row of the graphic organizer on page 57 by finding a cause and an effect. The teacher says, "On page 46, Fern stretched her wings and took off. This is the effect, or what happens. She took off because she wanted to ride on the big white boat she thought she saw in the sky. This is the cause." The teacher writes the cause and effect in the first row. Students copy the information on page 57 of the Reading/Writing Companion. 

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities about text features (e.g. title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 4, during the Literature Anthology portion of the lesson, the teacher focuses on the photographs in the text. The teacher explains that the text explains that rules keep us safe. The teacher asks the students to identify what they see in the photo. The teacher asks how the individuals in the photo are staying safe.  
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 4, during the Literature Anthology portion of the lesson, the teacher explains that nonfiction text often has bold print—letters in dark, heavy print, and that authors use bold print to point out important information. The teacher displays Teaching Poster 13 and points to the drawing on the right and reads the text underneath it. The teacher says, "The word night is in bold print. The letters in that word are heavier and darker than the other letters. The illustration shows a scene at night. The text tells us it is night and then tells us what happens at night. The author put the word night in bold print to show us it is the most important idea of the illustration and the text." The teacher and students read together the text underneath the first illustration. The teacher guides the students to identify the word in bold print. The teacher asks, "Why did the author put this word in bold print? What is the most important idea of the illustration and the text?" The teacher repeats the process for the second illustration. The students look for bold print in nonfiction selections.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 4, during the Paired Selection portion of the lesson, the teacher explains during the Read-Aloud Anthology, that a heading is the name of part of a text and that it gives you an idea of what that part of text is about. The teacher reads the heading with students and asks, “What do you think page 128 is about?” The teacher reads the main text and looks at the pictures to find out. The teacher models a Think-Aloud: "To find out what page 129 will be about, I read the heading: Fun Insect Facts. This tells me I will learn insect facts here."
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 4, during the Literature Anthology portion of the lesson, the teacher conducts a Think-Aloud:
    When I read selections with photographs, I read the captions with the photographs. The captions give information about the photographs. The caption on page 197 explains the size of the Moon as we see it in the sky." The teacher asks students what information is in the caption that the main text does not have. What information do the main text and the caption tell that helps us understand the different Moons in the photograph? The teacher guides students to discuss the information in the caption. The students look for captions as they read nonfiction text.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Throughout the course of the year, students have frequent opportunities to purposefully read on-level text during Shared Reading, where the teacher sets a purpose for reading and students return to the purpose during the reading discussion. Students are provided frequent opportunities to read text with fluency during Reader’s Theater. The teacher first models reading the text with fluency for students and then students are provided multiple opportunities during the week to practice the text for their assigned role with fluency, including accuracy and rate.  Students also have opportunities to read with fluency during Small Group instruction. During Word Work lessons, that are included in daily instruction, students have opportunities to read, spell, and write high-frequency words and words with inflectional endings.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, during Shared Reading, the teacher sets the purpose for reading “Jack Can.” The teacher says, "Let’s read to find out what Jack can do." After reading, the students talk with a partner about what Max and Jack can do.
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, during Shared Reading, the teacher sets the purpose for reading “Nate the Snake is Late.” The teacher says, "Let’s read to find out why Nate is late." After reading the teacher says, "Let's talk about why Nate doesn't want to be late. What does this tell you about him?"

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and decodable words. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
    • In Unit 1, Week 6, Day 1, during Reader’s Theater, the teacher models reading the play with fluency. The teacher states the name of each character and reads the part, emphasizing the appropriate phrasing and expression. The teacher assigns roles. Students chorally read their parts, focusing on accuracy and rate.
    • In Unit 2, Week 6, Day 1, for Reader’s Theater, the teacher explains that I Speak, I Say, I Talk is a play that tells about the sounds different animals make and the ways children can communicate with their voices. Students chorally read their parts, focusing on accuracy and rate.
    • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 3, during the Fluency part of the lesson, the teacher explains to students that as they read the selection from the Shared Read, they will pause slightly when they get to a comma. “A comma separates a list of items or ideas in a sentence, so you pause to show the separation. A comma is also used in dialogue, or the words that a character says. The comma helps show when the character’s words end and the narrator’s words start again.” The teacher models reading. Students reread the sentence chorally and the teacher reminds them to pause when they get to commas. Students practice fluency using the online Differentiated Genre Passage, The Tomato Adventure.

Materials have limited support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 4, during the Word Work portion of the lesson, the teacher writes the words spell and spelled on the board and models decoding them for students. The teacher reminds students that when -ed is added to an action word, the ending sound of the new word can be /t/, /d/, or /ed/. The teacher also reminds them that adding -ed to some words adds a word part, or syllable, as in the words head and headed. The teacher writes the following words: smell, trick, pack, sweat, dress. Students work in pairs to construct words that tell about actions in the past. Students decode each of the new words and write sentences with each word. Students practice decoding words with inflectional endings using Practice Book page 90 or the online activity.
    • In Unit 3, Week 3, Day 4, during Word Work, the teacher writes the words dance, danced, and dancing on the board and reads them to the students. The teacher reminds students that when -ed or -ing is added to a word that ends in final -e, the e is dropped before adding the ending. The teacher writes the following words: trace, change, dodge. Students work in pairs to construct words that tell about actions in the past and actions happening now by adding the inflectional endings -ed and -ing. Students write sentences with each word. If students need additional practice, they can complete Practice Book page 202 or the online activity.
  • Students have opportunities to recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
    • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, during the Word Work portion of the lesson, the students work on reading, writing, and spelling does, not, what, and school. During the Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in the Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level Groups use leveled readers that include the high-frequency words does, not, what, and school.
    • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, during the Word Work portion of the lesson, the students work on reading, spelling, and writing: away, now, some, today, way, why.  During the Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in the Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level Groups use leveled readers that include the high-frequency words away, now, some, today, way, and why.
    • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 1, during the Word Work portion of the lesson, the students work on reading, writing, and spelling the following words: answer, brought, busy, door, enough, eyes. During the Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in the Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level Groups use leveled readers that include the high-frequency words answer, brought, busy, door, enough, and eyes.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Grade 1 materials provide students multiple opportunities to apply word analysis and word recognition skills to connected tasks through the use of decodable readers and Shared Reading. During Shared Reading lessons, teachers often model and point out current phonics skills that students are working on as well as model fluent reading. Decodable readers provide students with an opportunity to decode words with current and past phonics skills as well as high-frequency words. Students participate in a Shared Writing activity that allows them to apply phonics skills and high-frequency word practice. Students often respond to a prompt related to the text and complete these in their Reading/Writing Companion. 

Materials support students’ development learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g. spelling-sound correspondences of digraphs, decode one-syllable words, syllable and vowel relationship, decode two-syllable words, read words with inflectional endings) in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher introduces r- blends and s- blends. The teacher reads each word in the first row, blending the sounds; for example: /frooog/. The word is frog. Students blend each word with the teacher. The teacher prompts students to read the connected text, sounding out the decodable words. If students need additional practice blending words with r-blends and s-blends, they use Practice Book page 67 or the online activity.
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, Day 1, during Shared Reading, the teacher reviews the high-frequency words found, near, woman, hard, would, and write and reviews that the letters –y and -ey stand for the long e sound. The teacher guides them to blend the sounds to read the words and then displays the story words guide, person, family, year, learn, trainer, eyes, ears, hear, owners, and their. Students spell each word and model reading it and then read the words as the teacher points to them. The teacher tells students that From Puppy to Guide Dog is a nonfiction text, which tells about real people or things and can use photos to give information. The teacher revisits the nonfiction text anchor chart created previously and reviews characteristics of the genre with students. As students read the selection, they may take notes in the boxes provided, for example: 
    • writing the letters y or ey.
    • writing a word with a long e or a high-frequency word.
    • write about or draw something from the story.

Students read each page and teacher reads aloud the prompts.As they read, students circle and read words with long e as well as underline and read aloud the words near, woman, and hard.

  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Day 3, during Word Work, the teacher displays the Day 3 Phonics Practice Activity. The teacher says, "Let’s blend the letter sounds to read each word: /r/ /ī/ /t/ /s/; / rrrīīītsss/. The word is writes." Students blend each word on the first line with the teacher. The teacher guides practice as needed with lines 2–7. The teacher prompts students to read the connected text, sounding out the decodable words and provides corrective feedback as needed. If students need additional practice blending words with consonant digraphs wr, kn, gn, they use Practice Book page 460 or the online activity. If necessary, students read Miss Wright’s Job and Know About Snowstorms to practice decoding words in connected text. 

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher displays the High-Frequency Word Cards be, come, good, pull and uses the Read/Spell/Write routine to teach each word. The teacher points to and says the word be. The teacher says, "This is the word be. Say it with me: be. There will be ten children at the party. The word be is spelled b-e. Spell it with me. Let’s write the word in the air as we say each letter: b-e." The teacher follows the same steps to introduce come, good, and pull. As the students spell each word with the teacher, the teacher points out the irregularities in sound-spellings, such as the /u/ sound spelled o_e in the word come. Students work with a partner to create sentences using each word. Students read the sentences. The teacher prompts them to identify the high-frequency words in connected text and to blend the decodable words.
    • I will be back.
    • Can you come here?
    • He had a good hit.
    • I can pull it up.

For additional practice with high-frequency words, students complete the online activities for high-frequency words. On Day 5, the teacher displays Visual Vocabulary Cards be, come, good, and pull. Students Read/Spell/Write each word. Students write a sentence with each word. If students need assistance reading high-frequency words, they practice reading independently using the Take-Home Story in the Practice Book on pages 47–48 or using online resources.

  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Day 1, during Shared Reading, the teacher reviews the high-frequency words: around, by, many, place, walk, as well as consonant digraphs ch, wh, and ph, and the trigraph -tch. The teacher displays the words lake, letter, each, people, shows, and town, spelling each word and modeling reading. Students read as the teacher points to each word. The teacher explains to students that “Which Way on the Map?” is a nonfiction text, which tells about real people, places, things, or events by presenting facts and information about them. It sometimes uses maps to give information. The teacher starts a nonfiction anchor chart and asks students to name characteristics of the genre and add them to the chart. As students read the selection, they may take notes in the boxes provided, for example: 
    • writing the letters ch, -tch, wh, and ph.
    • writing a word with a digraph, trigraph, or a high-frequency word.

Students read each page and then the teacher reads aloud the prompts one at a time. Students also may circle and read words in the title with the /wh/ sound like in when as well as underline high-frequency words walk, around, and place.

  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher displays High-Frequency Word Cards another, climb, full, great, poor, and through and uses the Read/Spell/Write routine to teach each word. The teacher points to and says the word another. The teacher says, "This is the word another. Say it with me: another. I need another pencil. The word another is spelled a-n-o-t-h-e-r. Spell it with me. Let’s write the word in the air as we say each letter: a-n-o-t-h-e-r." The teacher repeats the same process to introduce climb, full, great, poor, and through. As students spell each word with the teacher, the teacher points out the irregularities in sound-spellings, such as the silent letter b at the end of climb. Partners create sentences using each word. Students read the sentences. The teacher prompts them to identify the high-frequency words in connected text and to blend the decodable words. 
    • The cat will climb another tree.
    • The glass is not full!
    • The poor dog needs more water.
    • This park is great, so let’s walk through it

For additional practice with high-frequency words, students complete the online activities for high-frequency words. On Day 5,  the teacher displays the print or digital Visual Vocabulary Cards. Students Read/Spell/Write each word and write a sentence with each word. If students need assistance reading high-frequency words, they can practice reading independently using the Take-Home Story in the Practice Book on pages 365–366.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 4, during Independent Writing, students proofread and edit their writing. The teacher reviews the online proofreading marks with students and models how to use each mark. Students edit for the following:
    • Plural nouns are correctly formed.
    • Words with short u are spelled correctly.
    • High-frequency words are spelled correctly.
    • Apostrophes with contractions are used correctly.

Partners exchange drafts and take turns reviewing them using the online proofreading marks. The teacher encourages them to discuss and fix errors together.

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4, during Independent Writing, students proofread and edit their writing. The teacher reviews the online proofreading marks with students and models how to use each mark. Students edit for the following:
    • Go and do are used correctly.
    • Words with long o: o, oa, oe are used correctly.
    • High-frequency words are used correctly.
    • Capitalization and end marks are used correctly.

Partners exchange their drafts and take turns reviewing them using the proofreading marks. The teacher encourages them to discuss and fix errors together as they read.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

Instructional materials provide opportunities throughout the entire program on a weekly, monthly, and quarterly basis to assess students’ mastery of foundational skills and to progress monitor student growth. Students are assessed at the end of each unit using a summative unit assessment of designated skills taught during that unit that include phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension, and fluency. Teachers are provided with guidance on how to use the data from the assessment to provide flexible grouping and differentiated learning experiences. Teachers are instructed to use running records every four to six weeks to monitor students’ word reading fluency and application of decoding skills. Teachers are also provided a detailed assessment guide that describes the purposes and uses of all assessments in the program that are available to determine student proficiency. 

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Placement and Diagnostic Assessment, page xvii, the materials explain that beyond the initial placement of students into the appropriate Wonders level of materials, students need to be tested periodically to determine whether they are progressing on a grade-level or at a faster pace. The program suggests that teachers administer these progress monitoring or benchmark tests on a regular schedule throughout the year: fall, winter, and spring, or over a regular period of time, such as every four to six weeks. A chart is provided for general testing scheduling guide.
  • In Unit 2, Week 6, Lesson 5, Summative Assessment, teachers are provided a summative unit assessment that evaluates all the key foundational skills taught in that unit. 
    • Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Isolation, Identity, Categorization, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Substitution, Phoneme Segmentation, Phoneme Addition
    • Phonics: Short Vowels e, u, Ending Consonant Blends, Consonant Digraphs, Inflectional Endings -ed and -ing, Contractions with ‘s, -es with Plural Nouns, Closed Syllables
    • High-Frequency Words
  • In Unit 6, Week 6, Lesson 5, Summative Assessment, teachers are provided a summative unit assessment that evaluates all the key foundational skills taught in that unit.
    • Phonics: Variant Vowels, Silent Letters, Three-Letter Consonant Blends, Suffixes, Vowel-Team Syllables, Compound Words, Inflectional Ending -er, r-Controlled Vowels and Vowel Syllables
    • High-Frequency Words

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information on students’ current skills/level of understanding. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Placement and Diagnostic Assessment, page x and xi, the materials explain how to group students based on students' results for the Grade 1 Placement Assessments: Phonemic Awareness Subtests and Letter Naming Fluency Assessment. Students who score 80% correct or higher on the Phonemic Awareness Subtests AND at or above the appropriate benchmark for the Letter Naming Fluency Assessment begin instruction with Wonders On Level materials. Beyond Level materials are for students who score high on placement assessments and easily complete On Level assignments. Students who score 60–79% correct on the Phonemic Awareness Subtests AND At or above the appropriate benchmark for the Letter Naming Fluency Assessment should begin instruction with Wonders Approaching Level materials. For students who score Below 60% correct on the Phonemic Awareness Subtests OR below the appropriate benchmark for the Letter Naming Fluency Assessment. these students require focused, intensive instruction. Students are placed in Wonders Approaching Level materials and use intervention materials based on placement tests results.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, Day 1, during Word Work, the teacher follows the Spelling Dictation routine to help students transfer their growing knowledge of sound-spellings to writing. After dictation, the teacher gives the spelling pretest in the Practice Book on page 149. The teacher pronounces each spelling word and reads the sentence and pronounces the word again. Students say each word softly, stretching the sounds, before writing it. After the pretest, the teacher displays the spelling words and writes each word as they say the letter names, pointing out digraphs and trigraphs. Students check their words using the Practice Book page.

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In every unit, week, and day, there are Small Group Differentiated Instruction lessons for students who are placed in Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level for phonemic awareness, phonics, high-frequency words and leveled reading.
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 5, during Word Work, the teacher administers formal progress monitoring assessments to students in the following areas
    • Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Blending and Phoneme Substitution
    • Phonics: Beginning Consonant Blends: l-blends
    • Structural Analysis: Plural Nouns with -s
    • High-Frequency Words: be, come, good, pull
    • Informal Progress Monitoring:
      • Phonemic Awareness: Practice book, digital activities
      • Spelling: Practice book, word sorts, digital activities
      • Speaking/Listening/Research: Checklists, Rubrics
      • ORF: Conduct group fluency assessments using the Letter Naming, Phoneme Segmentation, and Sight Word Fluency assessments

Teachers should make data-based grouping decisions by using the following reports to verify assessment results. For additional support options for students, refer to the reteaching and enrichment opportunities.

    • Beyond Level small group lessons include suggestions for additional activities in the following areas to extend learning opportunities for gifted and talented children:
      • Leveled Readers
      • Vocabulary
      • Comprehension
      • Workstation Activities
      • Leveled Library Reader Online
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 5, after administering progress monitoring assessments, teachers are provided reteaching opportunities with intervention to use with students who may not have mastered a skill.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Instructional materials provide opportunities for the teacher to differentiate foundational skills lessons through the small group differentiated instruction for each unit, week, and lesson. Students are provided multiple opportunities throughout daily experiences to practice foundational skills and concepts learned throughout the whole group instruction and opportunities to apply learning during small group differentiated instruction. Foundational skills are differentiated with the leveled text selection for each group that include On Level, Approaching Level, Beyond Level, and ELL. 

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1, during Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in each level participate in lessons that teach foundational skills that include scaffolding of the skill using I Do, We Do, You Do. In the Approaching Level Group, during phonological awareness, students participate in activities to identify and generate rhyme. Students participate in a phonics activity to connect /a/ to a. During high-frequency words work, students participate in the Read/Spell/Write routine with the words does, not, school, and what. Students in the On Level Group participate in a phonics lesson where they read and build words with short a. Students in the Beyond Level Group participate in a vocabulary lesson for synonyms. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 1, during Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in each level participate in lessons that teach foundational skills that include scaffolding of the skill using I Do, We Do, You Do. In the Approaching Level Group, during phonemic awareness, students participate in a phoneme categorization activity using one-syllable, long i words. Students participate in a phonics activity to connect i, y, and igh to long i. During high-frequency words work, students participate in the Read/Spell/Write routine with the words caught, flew, know, laugh, listen, and were. Students in the On Level Group participate in a phonics lesson where they read and build words with long i: i, y, igh, ie. Students in the Beyond Level Group participate in a vocabulary lesson for synonyms and their shades of meaning. There is also an activity extension for students who may be considered “Talented and Gifted.” Students act out the shades of meaning for each word. Students extend the activity by finding words in their writer's notebook to use in sentences with synonyms.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, during Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in each level participate in lessons that teach foundational skills that include scaffolding of the skill using I Do, We Do, You Do. In the Approaching Level Group, during phonemic awareness, students participate in a phoneme blending activity using /ô/ words. Students participate in a phonics activity to connect a, aw, au, augh, and al to the sound /ô/. During high-frequency words work, students participate in Read/Spell/Write routine with the words brother, father, friend, love, mother, and picture. Students in the On Level Group participate in a phonics lesson where they read and build words with words with /ô/ spelled a, aw, au, augh, al. Students in the Beyond Level Group participate in a vocabulary lesson to determine word meaning using context. There is also an activity extension for students who may be considered “Talented and Gifted.” Partners tell each other about a person they respect and explain why. Students share with the group what their partner said.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, during Whole Group Phonics Instruction, students blend words with short i. During Small Group Differentiated Instruction, for students in the Approaching Level Group, the teacher models recognizing alliteration with words that include short i. The teacher guides students to recognize alliteration. Then the students work independently to recognize alliteration. Students in the On Level Group participate in an activity where the students read and build short i words. Students and the teacher work to read a short i word together. Students build and blend short i words independently.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 1, during Whole Group High-Frequency Words Instruction, the teacher uses the Read/Spell/Write routine with the words caught, flew, know, laugh, listen, and were. During Small Group Differentiated Instruction, students in the Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level read Leveled Readers that include these books. 
    • Approaching Level reads Where’s My Home? 
    • On Level reads The Hat
    • Beyond Level reads Come One, Come All

 Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade-level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students in the Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level have the opportunity to practice reading the words could, live, one, then, and three both in and out of context on Day 1 through Day 4 during Small Group Differentiated Instruction. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 1, during Small Group Beyond Level Vocabulary, the teacher explains to students that base words are words that you can add word parts, like prefixes, to in order to form new words. Directions state: "Say the word behavior. Students recall its meaning. Then say: The word behave is the base word in behavior. Behave means “to act.” In the word behavior, behave is a base word."
    •  We Do: The teacher models using the words behave and behavior in a sentence,  "Mom told Dan to behave in school. Now his behavior is wonderful." The teacher says the word misbehave and explains that mis- is a prefix that means “bad.” The teacher guides students in figuring out the meaning of misbehave.
    • You Do: Partners work together to create and share oral sentences for behave, behavior, and misbehave.
    • Students write about a selection they read this week. The teacher challenges them to use the words behave, behavior, and misbehave. Students repeat the activity by finding words in their writer’s notebook to use in sentences with base words and prefixes.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, students in the Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level have the opportunity to practice reading the words find, food, more, over, start, and warm both in and out of context on Day 1 through Day 4 during Small Group Differentiated Instruction.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 3, during Phonics, the teacher models and displays Word-Building Cards s, p, or, t. The teacher models how to blend the sounds. Directions state: "This is the letter s. It stands for /s/. This is the letter p. It stands for /p/. These are the letters o, r. Together they stand for /ôr/. This is the letter t. It stands for /t/. I’ll blend the sounds: /ssspôrt/. The word is sport." The teacher continues the same process by modeling the words score, stork, and roar. The teacher provides guided practice and additional practice by displaying the Day 3 Phonics Practice Activity. The teacher says, "Let’s blend letter sounds to read each word: /s/ /t/ /ôr/ /m/; /ssstôrmmm/. The word is storm." They blend the remaining words together. Students read the connected text, sounding out the decodable words. The teacher provides corrective feedback as needed. If children need additional practice blending words with r-controlled vowels or, ore, oar, they use the Practice Book or the online activity. If necessary, have children read “Born to Learn” and “A Board That Can Soar” to practice decoding words in connected text. See pages T251 or T260 for instruction in building and reading words with or, ore, and oar.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Texts are organized around genres studies focused on an essential question and topic. Sequences of questions and tasks support students as they analyze both content and craft within and across texts. Questions and tasks invite students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated (writing and speaking) tasks, including focused research topics. A cohesive, year-long plan supports grade-level writing, however vocabulary acquisition is limited and does not support the building of key academic vocabulary knowledge. The materials encourage and support a volume of independent reading, both in and out of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

30/32
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Criterion Rating Details

Texts are organized around genres studies focused on an essential question and topic. Sequences of questions and tasks support students as they analyze the content, language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure within and across texts. Questions and tasks throughout each unit support students and allow them to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated tasks. Limited opportunities are present for students to build key academic vocabulary knowledge. A year-long writing plan also supports students as they work toward grade-level proficiency. Students are engaged throughout the year in research projects that allow them to delve into a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

The materials promote and provide accountability for a volume of independent reading, both in and out of class.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Instructional materials provide students with the opportunity to build knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to read complex texts throughout the school year around various topics. Each week, students are introduced to a topic and read various texts that help to answer the essential question about that topic. Texts that help build knowledge include the Anchor Text with a Paired Text, the Interactive Read-Aloud, a Shared Reading text, and the Literature Big Book.

Texts are connected by a grade-level appropriate topic. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4 students learn about friendship and what friends do together.  The Literature Big Book is Friends All Around by Miela Ford, and the Shared Reading is “Toss! Kick! Hop!” (unknown author). The Interactive Read-Aloud is “Games Long Ago” (unknown author), and the Literature Anthology text is Friends (unknown author). The Leveled Reader for the week is called “Friends are Fun” by Lisa Kendall. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students answer the question, “Where do animals live together?” Texts read during this week around the topic include the Literature Big Book, Babies in the Bayou by Jim Arnsoksy, and the Shared Reading “The Best Spot” (unknown author). The Literature Anthology Text is At a Pond by Nancy Finton, and the Interactive Read-Aloud is “Animals in the Desert” (unknown author). The Leveled Reader is called Meerkat Family  by Donna Loughman. 
  • In Unit 3 Week 1, students learn about what happens over time and the essential question is, “How do we measure time?”  Texts are connected by the topic of time, including the Literature Big Book,  A Second is a Hiccup by Hazel Hutchins, and the Shared Reading “Nate the Snake is Late” (unknown author). The Literature Anthology texts are On My Way to School by Wong Herbert Yee and “It’s About Time!” (unknown author). The Interactive Read-Aloud is  “Measuring Time” (unknown author). 
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students learn about animals and what they are like. The texts connected to the weekly concept include “The Elephant’s Child” (unknown author) and “Animals Can Go Fast” (unknown author). The Literature Anthology is the tale Little Rabbit, retold by Gerald McDermott, and the Shared Reading is “Snail and Frog Race” (unknown author). 
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, students learn about what they can see in the sky. The Interactive Read-Aloud is the folktale “Why the Sun and Moon are in the Sky” (unknown author), and the Shared Reading is “ A Bird Named Fern” (unknown author). The Literature Anthology is Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes, and the Paired Text is “The Moon” (unknown author). Books are also added to the classroom library for independent reading to further enhance the knowledge of the topic, including the texts Little Cloud by Eric Carle, The Sun is my Favorite Star by Frank Asch, and the Island Below the Star by James Rumford. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, students answer the question, “Who helps you?” Texts read during this week around the topic include the Interactive Read-Aloud “Anansi’s Sons,” and the Shared Reading text “All Kinds of Helpers” (unknown author). The Literature Anthology text is Meet Rosina by George Accona, and the Leveled Reader is Helping Me, Helping You by Cynthai Maloney.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.


The materials provide opportunities for students to identify key ideas, details, analyze structure and craft in every unit. Students are given retelling cards to retell and answer questions for the Literature Big Book story. Students are introduced to the strategy and the skill that they will be working on throughout the week. These strategies and skills contain questions and tasks that helps students to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.


For most texts (read-aloud texts K-1 and anchor texts in Grade 2), students are asked to analyze words/phrases or author’s word choice (according to grade level standards). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Listening Comprehension, Literature Big Book, Cool Dog, School Dog by Deborah Heiligman, the teacher begins by reminding students that as they read they can use the words and illustrations to visualize, or create pictures in their minds. This can help them understand what is happening in the story.  The teacher asks, “How do the illustrations help us to visualize what is happening with Tinka in the classroom?”  
  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Literature Big Book, the teacher practices a think-aloud using the details from the cover to make a prediction about the book. This strategy is again practiced in the teacher directions for the Shared Read Good Job, Ben!, with the teacher instructing students to correct their predictions as they read. The student directions in the Reading/Writing Companion, Unit 2, Week 1, pages 12-13, Shared Read “Good Job, Ben!,” have the students talking about a prediction with their partners/class. This strategy is again used in the Anchor Text for that Unit (Day 3), when the teacher uses predictions to draw conclusions about characters.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Listening Comprehension, Mystery Vine by Cathryn Falwell, the teacher starts by having students reread the story with a focus on using text evidence to respond to questions about author’s craft. The teacher asks students to reread pages 6–7, then asks the question, “Why might the author use words like crisp, crunching, bright green, and munching to tell about plants?” Continuing with the strategy with a teacher think-aloud, the teacher says, “When I look at the illustrations, I can see the green peas. I think that the author uses these specific words to help me understand what sounds the vegetables make as the children eat them. The words appeal to the senses and make the story more interesting. I notice that the children seem to enjoy eating the fresh vegetables from the garden because they are smiling.”  Students are then asked to reread page 12 and the teacher asks,”How do the clues in the text help us figure out what surprises the characters?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Anchor Text, Hi! Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold, the teacher starts by stating the essential question, “What insects do you know? How are they alike and different?” The teacher says, “Authors use dialogue and pictures to show how characters think and feel. How does the author show you how the fly and boy feel?” On pages 102-103, Strategy: Cause and Effect, the teacher states, “Remember, many events happen for a reason, or a cause. It’s why something happens. What happens is called the effect. It’s the action that happens because of the cause. On page 102, we read that the fly was mad. Why was the fly mad? Let’s think back to what has happened so far in the story. The boy caught the fly in a jar. The fly was mad because he was trapped in a jar.” On pages 104-105, Strategy: Context Clues, the teacher thinks aloud, “When I’m not sure what a word means, I look at how it is used in a sentence. I look for clues in other sentences and in the illustrations, too. On page 106, I read the word pests and that Dad gets the fly swatter. In the illustration, I see Dad chasing the fly, and the fly calling for Buzz. I know people kill insects they don’t like. I think Dad wants to kill the fly. Pests must be insects that people don’t like.” On pages 108-109, Strategy: Character, Setting, Events, the teacher says, “Let’s read these pages and think about the setting. On page 108, where is Fly Guy? On page 109, where is he?” On pages 112-115, Strategy: Illustrator's Craft, the teacher asks, “How do the illustrations help you know the judges’ point of view?” On pages 122-123, Strategy: Author/Illustrator’s Craft, students are asked, “How does the author show that Fly Guy can be a pet?” 


For most texts (read-aloud texts K-1 and anchor texts Grade 2), students analyze key ideas and details, structure, and craft (according to grade level standards). Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Day 2, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Comprehension, A Look at Breakfast by author unknown, the teacher models page 136 of the Reading/Writing Companion and reviews what sequencing is and the words used to help understand the sequence. Children are guided to reread and then talk with a partner about the sequence for making bread.  Students then write the steps the chef uses for making bread for the third and fourth step in the sequence.
  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Whole Group, Anchor Text, Flip by Ezra R. Tanaka, Skill: Key Details, the teacher reminds students that an illustration can help them better understand the text on a page. The teacher asks students to, “Look at the words and illustration on page 57. What key detail do we learn from this page?” The teacher then adds this key detail to a chart. The teacher continues discussing key details with students by asking, “What does Flip do on page 60?” Students are guided to complete the Key Details chart. The chart is then reviewed as a whole group.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Grade 1 materials provide students the opportunity to engage in questions and tasks that are text-based and build knowledge across individual texts or multiple texts. Each weekly text set centers around a topic with questions and tasks that ask students to refer to the text to find information and support answers to questions in order to complete tasks and build knowledge. Questions and tasks require connected knowledge and ask students to connect ideas between multiple texts. 

Most sets of coherent questions and tasks support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students learn about how animals live together and engage in the shared reading of “The Best Spot” (no author). Questions asked of students to build knowledge include, “What do deer eat? Which animals live in nests?” Students then work with a partner to discuss how the animals described in the selections live. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students learn about how life was different long ago. Students hear and read the nonfiction text “Life at Home” (unknown author). Students complete a Venn diagram comparing life at home long ago compared to today. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students listen to From Puppy to Guide Dog by Time for Kids and are asked questions to build knowledge, such as, “Let’s talk about how a family can help train a puppy. What sorts of things can they do? What is the next thing we learn about guide dogs? What is the vet doing? What do you learn from the caption?” 
  • In Unit 6, Week 5, students learn why we celebrate holidays. Students complete the shared reading Share the Harvest and Give Thanks by Time for Kids. Students are given tasks, such as, “Reread and use what you know to be sure you understand what ‘celebrate the harvest’ means,” and “Let’s reread, using the photos to help us understand how people celebrate Thanksgiving and Kwanzaa.” Students then work with a partner to discuss if and how they celebrate the harvest using a provided sentence starter. 

Throughout the year, students integrate knowledge and ideas across multiple texts. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, students read the texts “Games Long Ago” and “Toss! Kick! Hop!” (unknown author). Students work with a partner to discuss how the games in “Games Long Ago” are like the ones in “Toss! Kick! Hop!” Then students talk about the games that children played long ago versus the games that children play now. 
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students learn about maps. Students work with partners to discuss how the maps in “Map It” (unknown author) are like the maps Mitch and Steph used. Then on the final day of the week, students work with a partner to compare a star map with the map of the town of Chatwell in “Fun with Maps” (unknown author)
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students listen to the texts “A Team of Fish(no author) and Animal Teams by Richard Mann. Students talk in pairs about the similarities and differences between the texts. Then, students write the answer to “How are the texts alike?” in their Reading/Writing Companion.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 1, students listen to “Great Inventions” (no author) and are asked, “How has the computer changed how people work? How might life be different if the telephone had never been invented?” Students engage in the shared reading of “The Story of a Robot Inventor” (no author).  Students also read the anchor text, Thomas Edison, Inventor by David Alder. After reading, students connect to the anchor text to compare Thomas Edison, Inventor with “The Story of a Robot Inventor.” The teacher asks, “How are the texts similar? How are they different?”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Instructional materials provide students opportunities to complete culminating tasks that are related to the text they are reading. Culminating tasks integrate reading, writing, speaking and listening skills and provide opportunities for students to show their knowledge of a topic.  

Culminating tasks are multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Reading/Writing Companion, students research what jobs need to be done in a community. Students choose a way to present their work by creating a short video of the person describing his or her job. Students should write a script for their video telling why this person’s job is important in the community, creating a brochure about the job, including labeled drawings or using an online drawing program to draw a picture of the person they chose doing his or her job, and label the parts of the drawing.  
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 4, Integrate Ideas: Research and Inquiry, students pick two insects they want to research and compare their body parts. The teacher models the research process for the students:
    • Step 1: Choose Two Insects: “The project is to compare two insects. First, I need to pick two insects that I read about and compare their body parts. I liked the butterfly, and the fly from 'Hi! Fly Guy' was neat, so I’ll pick the fly and the butterfly.”
    • Step 2:  Find Information Now: “I can research my insects’ body parts by looking at books in the classroom or in the library. I can use the table of contents or the index to find the information I am looking for. I can also look for information on the Internet. I found some ways they are alike and different.”
    • Step 3: Draw the Insects: “Now that I know more about butterflies and flies, I will draw a picture of a butterfly and a fly. I will make the butterfly’s wings larger and covered in tiny scales.”
    • Step 4: Write What You Learned: “I will compare the insects I chose. That means to tell how they are alike and how they are different. I learned that butterflies and flies both use their feet to taste food. I also learned that most butterflies have wings that are much larger than the wings of flies. Butterfly wings are also covered in tiny scales. I will write what I learned.”
    • Step 5: Choose How to Present Your Work: “I can decide how I want to present the information I learned about the body parts of both insects. I will write a report about my insects’ body parts.”

Students then move through the research process and present their finished product to the class.

  • In Unit 4, Week 5, students research how people work with animals.  Students pick a job from two choices: zookeeper or veterinarian. They decide what they want to know about the job and proceed to write questions that they have about the job. Students use books from the library to find the information they need. Next, students write about what they learned about the job they researched. Then they draw something they learned and choose how they will present their work –by creating a short video of the person describing his or her job Students should write a script for their video telling why this person’s job is important in the community, creating a brochure about the job, including labeled drawings or using an online drawing program to draw a picture of the person they chose doing his or her job and label the parts of the drawing. 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. 

Instructional materials provide limited opportunities for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.  Occasionally, academic vocabulary supports the text, but most of the time the academic vocabulary is related to the text structures and strategies. Vocabulary presented during the Oral Language portion of the lessons do not always connect to the texts students are listening to or reading. Guidance is provided to teachers in the form of videos, articles, and a handbook. The online weekly planner does not provide guidance for teachers to adequately develop academic vocabulary.  Many different academic vocabulary and other vocabulary words are introduced during the week with no consistent and cohesive learning essential to building text vocabulary. Many times, academic vocabulary is provided as a list of italicized words on the side of the menu under Academic Vocabulary. Materials do provide a vocabulary development component in the Tier 2 Intervention booklet.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routine Handbook, page 77, teachers are guided through a four-step routine that can be used throughout the year to introduce vocabulary. 
    • Step 1: Introduce (Explain the vocabulary routine) 
      • Teacher example, “Today we will learn new vocabulary words. I will say a vocabulary word, define it, and use it in a sentence. Then, I will ask you to use the word in a sentence. The more we practice using the new words, the better readers and writers we will be.”
    • Step 2: Model (I Do): Define/Example/Ask
      • Teacher example, “I am going to say the vocabulary word so you can hear the correct pronunciation. Then I am going to define it, use it in a sentence.”
    • Step 3: Guided Practice (We Do): Students are given opportunities to use and apply words.
      • Teacher example, “I am going to describe some things. If what I describe is an example of people cooperating, say "cooperate". If it is not, do not say anything. • Two children setting the table for dinner • Two children grabbing the same book • Two children putting crayons back in the box.”
    • Step 4: Independent Practice (You Do): ) “Individual turns allow you an opportunity to assess each student’s skill level and provide additional practice for those students who need it. Near the end of each week, students should write sentences in their word study notebooks using the words.”
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 3, the teacher reminds students of the vocabulary words they learned such as culture and appreciate. The teacher invites students to make sentences with these words.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Academic Vocabulary, Day 1, the teacher discusses the theme, "What Time Is It?" For the Literature Big Book, A Second is a Hiccup by Hazel Hutchins, the academic vocabulary listed in the side menu is confirm, predict.  The strategy the teacher uses to discuss understanding the text is making predictions. “Explain that we can use the structure, or how the author organizes the poem, to make a prediction as we read. Then we use the structure to correct or confirm the prediction.”  Think Aloud: "I noticed the first page was about how long a second is. The next page was about how long a minute is. I predict the next page will be about how long an hour is. Let's see if my prediction is correct.”  On Day 2, the Interactive Read- Aloud, Measuring Time, is used for the academic vocabulary located in the side menu, measure.  Students are asked to discuss partner's responses to ‘What are some ways we measure time? How are these ways to measure time the same or different from the way that Nate the Snake measures time?" The students are asked to talk about the different ways to measure time that they read about in the two selections.
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Introduce the Concept, the academic vocabulary focuses on theme, photo. Students are asked to discuss the theme Animal Features. Students describe what they know about animals and how their bodies help them. 
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Listening Comprehension, the teacher reads the Interactive Read-Aloud. The teacher uses the Define/ Example/Ask routine to introduce the oral vocabulary words ancient, drama, and movement. Students are prompted to respond using the new words as they discuss traditions. 
    •  Define: Ancient means “very, very old.” 
    •  Example: "The ancient tree was planted by my great-grandfather."
    •  Ask: "What can you think of that might be ancient?"
    • Define: "If something has drama, it gives you a feeling of surprise and excitement. Example: The movie about the superhero saving the world had a lot of drama. Ask: "Which movie scene has more drama: a scene of a man working at a computer or a scene of a man being chased by a lion?" 
    • Define: A movement is a way that someone or something moves.
    •  Example: "The bird was startled by the movement of the flag blowing in the wind."
    • Ask: "Show me a movement you can make with your hands."

Set a Purpose for Reading: Display the Interactive Read-Aloud Cards to read the text, Let's Dance. The teacher uses the Oral Vocabulary prompts as they read the selection to provide more practice with the words in context.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. 

Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to respond to writing prompts on a variety of texts. Scaffolded instruction is provided through a series of instructional supports including sentence frames, class discussions, shared writing, and teacher think-alouds. The teacher guides children to respond to a prompt, using sentence frames as needed. In Independent Writing, students start by reviewing a student writing sample that includes the weekly writing skill. Students then respond independently to a new prompt, as they practice the skill. 

Materials include writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level, and writing instruction spans the whole school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Day 1, Shared Writing, the teacher instructs students on answering the prompt and explains what it is asking. The teacher notes that the students will be adding more to the story. “Tell students you will work together to write a response to a prompt about A Pig for Cliff. Read aloud the prompt, “What will Cliff and Slim do when they reach the top of the hill?" Explain that the prompt is asking about something the story doesn’t tell." The teacher says,  "To respond to this prompt, we will write what we imagine will happen when Cliff and Slim reach the top of the hill. We’ll get ready to do this by looking at the text and illustrations in A Pig for Cliff.”
  • In Unit 2, Reading Writing Companion, students discuss ideas and characters for a fantasy story.  They draw and write about characters and what they do. Students write about a character and what the character does.  Students use an exemplar of a draft of a fantasy story to help them write their story. Adding details is shown to the students so that they can incorporate them into their fantasy story. At the end of this task, students share and evaluate by presenting their work to a partner by taking turns.   Students use a Writing and Grammar checklist of yes/no to answer statements such as, “I wrote a realistic fiction story” or “I wrote about a character who acts like a real person.” Students then self-evaluate their work by writing what they did well in their writing and what they need to work on.
  • In Unit 2, Reading Writing Companion, students use the text, The Red Hat by Eva Torres, to write to the prompt, “Would you like to have Jen’s job? Describe what you would like or not like and why.” During the Edit/Proofread, Peer Edit, the teacher has partners exchange drafts and take turns reviewing them using the online proofreading marks. The teacher encourages partners to discuss and fix errors together.
  • In Unit 4, Reading Writing Companion, Extend Your Learning, Animal Report, students discuss with a partner about the animal they want to learn about and decide where to find the information.  They write the information and  share it with the class.

Writing instruction supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Reading Writing Companion, after the teacher reads the text, Time to Plant by author unknown, the students write the sequence of the story, using First, Next, Then, Last in their Reading Writing Companion. On Days 4-5, students write about the Anchor Text, The Big Yucca Plant by Magaly Morales, by writing more lines for Rat at the end of the play.  On Day 4, students edit and proofread their draft and on Day 5, the students complete the final draft and present their work.   
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, Independent Writing, teachers instruct students on using proofreading marks. Students use those during peer conferencing. In Peer Edit, the teacher has partners exchange their drafts and take turns editing them using the online proofreading marks. They are encouraged to discuss and fix errors together.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Day 3, Independent Writing, after reading Rain School by James Rumford, students respond to the prompt about this anchor text, “What do the children in Rain School learn from their first lesson?”
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Independent Writing, Self-Selected Writing, students can choose from the following writing prompts: 
    • Write about a person in your life who has helped you.
    •  Write a book review of a book you’ve read this week. 
    •  Write about a time you have helped someone. How did you help?

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Grade 1 materials provide opportunities for students to participate in research projects using five-step research guidelines. The first step is to choose a topic; the second step is to write a question; the third step is to find information; the fourth step is to draw and/or write about what they learned; and the final step is to present the research. Each week beginning in Unit 1, Week 1, students are provided with one research and inquiry opportunity.  The research projects help students further develop their knowledge and understanding of the topic addressed throughout the week. The teacher is provided with support and guidance in the Instructional Routines Handbook for how to present the research process to students. A scoring rubric is also provided to the teacher in the Instructional Routines Handbook. 

In the Instructional Routines Handbook, teachers are provided information on how to guide students through the Research and Inquiry process. A sample rubric is also provided that includes a 4- point rating scale.  The research process routine instructs the teacher to:

    • Set research goals and introduce the project, as well as clearly identify the research focus and end product.
    • Identify sources such as texts read in class, digital media, print sources  and/or interviews with experts.
    • Find and record information by guiding students as they search for relevant information from sources.
    • Organize and help students review and analyze the information they have gathered. Students should identify the most useful information, use a graphic organizer to sort and clarify categories of related information, and identify any areas where they need further information.
    • Synthesize and present research by planning how to best present their work. Students may include audio and/or visual displays to enhance presentations, check that key ideas are included in the presentation, and rehearse the presentation.

Research projects are sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students learn about school. Students are told that they will research favorite school activities. Students are guided through the 5-step process for research. In Step 1 the teacher models by saying, “The project is to poll children in our classroom on our favorite school activities. I need to decide what question I want to use when I ask the children what their favorite school activity is. I will ask, 'what is your favorite subject at school?'”  
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students conduct research about a building. Using the Reading/Writing Companion, the teacher models the research process. The teacher says, “The project is to research a building. First, I need to pick a type of building to research. I like tall buildings, so I’ll research a skyscraper.” Students then write the questions they need to know. The teacher provides a model by saying, “I need to think about what I want to know about skyscrapers. I’d like to know how you can get to the top floor and what they’re made of.” Students are then instructed to research their buildings using books or online. Then students write about what they have learned and choose a way to present their project.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students conduct research about a typical day of a classmate. Students begin by picking a classmate and writing questions to ask their classmate. Students interview the classmate and write down what they learn before presenting their findings. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, students study the topic of animal teams. Students research an animal team. The teacher models the five-step research process. For Step 2, the teacher models by saying, “I have to decide where to find information about how birds help other animals. I can research by looking at books in the classroom or in the library. I can also look for information on the Internet. I found out that birds and hippos help each other.”  Students then apply these skills themselves using their Reading/Writing Companion.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students pick a place in their school that they and their classmates can work together to improve. In Step 2, students list three ways to be good citizens and help improve the school and then in Step 3, students poll their classmates about the best ways to improve the school. Students then write about their results before presenting their work.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Grade 1 materials provide opportunities for students to read independently in and out of class. The materials include routines for choosing a book, how to build classroom and school libraries, independent reading journals, and teacher and student conferences as well as rubrics. Many opportunities for independent reading and books for students to read independently are included within the reading class time. Materials include a School-to-Home letter each week that provides limited information for parents to have their children read.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routine Handbook, pages 109-127, teachers are provided with support on how to foster independent reading routines in the classroom. This section of the handbook gives routines for how to choose a book, how to build a classroom library, independent reading journals as well as teacher and student conferences. On page 112, a teacher-student conference routine is presented.
    • "Make a positive observation about the student’s reading or book choice. Regularly conferring with students about their Independent Reading is a great way to informally assess their progress, model social-emotional learning skills, build your classroom culture, and instill habits of learning. 
    • Talk about how the reading is going. Why did you choose this particular book or genre? Why did you abandon this book? How is your current book going? Are you using Thinking Codes and are they helping? What strategies are you using and what ones do you need help with? How are you solving problems as you read? Who is your favorite character and why? What is your favorite part so far and why? 
    • Ask the student to read aloud for a minute or two. This will help you assess their accuracy, fluency, and comprehension. 
    • Highlight a student strength. I really like the way you used context clues to figure out what that word means. And adding that word to your writer’s notebook is a good idea. 
    • Suggest a specific goal the student can work on. When you have an opinion, make sure to find text evidence to support it.
    •  Record notes from your conference. Conference forms to use with the students are provided on pages 121 and 122."  
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 111, a six-step procedure is given to the teacher to guide students through the independent reading process. The handbook states, on page 110, that a first grade student should be reading for 10-20 minutes independently each day.

1. Select a book that interests you. Check the book to make sure it’s the one you want to read. See the Five-Finger Rule on page 120 as one way to help students check how difficult a book is. See the Additional Strategies on pages 113–119 for more ways to help students choose a book. 

2. Read the book each day during Independent Reading time. Use the skills and strategies you’ve been working on. 

3. Think about what you’re reading. You can use Thinking Codes to record your thoughts or write about them in your writer’s notebook. 

4. Record what you’ve read at the end of each Independent Reading session. Keep track on your Reading Log. There are many suggestions for keeping students accountable for their independent reading in the Additional Strategies section. Using a Reading Log is just one way. 

5. Share your opinion of the book when you’re done. Tell a friend, write a review, make a poster, or ask your teacher for ideas. 

6. Begin again! Time to pick a new book!

  • In the Instructional Routine Handbook, a Reading Log is provided. The log asks students to document the date they read a book, title, genre, their opinion of the book using three faces (smile, straight, sad faces), and how hard the text was to read on a scale of C: Complex, E: Easy to me or JR:  Just Right, and the final column asks students to put a check mark if they are still reading, an A if they abandoned the text, or an F if they finished. 
  • On the ConnectED Student Edition, there is a section labeled School-to-Home Link. Within this section there are family letters for each week that support student comprehension and vocabulary with different activities. For example, the comprehension section states, “Help your child think of a title for a map, then circle details that are shown in the map.” Also on this internet site, students have access to the leveled readers that they could read or have read to them. Lexile levels range for various texts levels, 550L, 540L, 130L.
  • The School-to-Home Connection is a letter sent home with students each week. For example:
    • In Unit 4, Week 4, Resources: School-to-Home, Family Letter, “Comprehension: Point of View. Perform a short skit with your child. Then your child will answer questions that show the point of view of the characters.”
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Teacher Edition, Hide and Seek by Daniel Haikin, the teacher sets the purpose for reading by reminding the students to focus on the essential question, “Let’s read to find out what Harry sees in the sky.”  The On-Level small group is asked to read independently. During Independent Reading time, students are instructed to read a text for sustained silent reading. Students can select their book from the Classroom Library, the Leveled Reader Library, Literature Anthology, or other texts for their independent reading. Students are encouraged to read for at least 10-20 minutes. The teacher reminds students of the following as they are reading: to set a purpose for reading, look for important details in the text and illustrations, ask themselves questions before, during, and after reading, and then look for the answers in the words and illustrations or photographs. Students are also instructed to record their information on a Reading Log of their chosen text. 

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

Materials design supports appropriate lesson structure and pacing and can be completed within a school year with a pace that allows for maximum understanding. Units provide adequate review and practice resources, including clearly defined and labeled materials and activities. Visual design enhances learning and does not provide unnecessary distractions. Most lessons, questions, tasks, and assessment items note the standards alignment however some ancillary resources do not indicate a standards alignment.

The Teacher Edition provides support for successful implementation including clear explanations and examples as well as information on literacy concepts included in the materials and defines the instructional approaches of the program and the research-based strategies included. Limited support is present for the technology embedded in the program. There is not a clear explanation of the role of specific ELA standards within the program. Materials include support for stakeholder communications.

The program systematically and regularly assesses student progress, though materials include limited denotations of the standards being assessed. Routines and guidance for assessment are present, including support for interpreting assessment data and determine next steps for instruction. The materials provide accountability measures to support students as they engage in independent reading self-selected texts.

The program provides strategies and support for all learners, including English language learners, students with disabilities, and students who are performing above grade level. A variety of grouping strategies are provided

Digital materials can be used on multiple platforms and browsers. Technology is used appropriately to support student learning and foregrounds supports that provide a deeper understanding of the texts and text evidence they encounter in lessons. Opportunities for personalization/customization and teacher to student and student to student collaboration are available digitally, including customization for local use.

Criterion 3a - 3e

7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials design supports appropriate lesson structure and pacing. The program can be completed within the confines of a typical school year and the pace allows for maximum student understanding. The units provide adequate review and practice resources, including clearly defined and labeled materials and activities. The visual design of the materials enhances learning and does not provide unnecessary distractions. Most lessons, questions, tasks, and assessment items note the standards alignment however some ancillary resources do not indicate a standards alignment.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. 

Grade 1 materials are designed to immerse students in all areas of the standards and provide explicit lesson structure with embedded teacher direction, as well as recommendations for supporting all learners. There are six units in First Grade, and each unit contains a Unit Overview which supports the teacher in planning for instruction. Each unit instructs the teacher throughout each lesson on its implementation before, during, and after the readings and activities, as well as recommendations for scaffolded support. At the beginning of each unit there is a Unit Introduction followed by a weekly overview that maps out the daily content being covered. Pacing for each lesson is appropriately allocated. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The materials contain daily opportunities for whole group and small group instruction. The materials for each week contain a daily routine consisting of a Unit Opener, which discusses the Big Idea for the Unit. A social-emotional skill is taught on Day 1; then the essential question is introduced. Small group learning takes place daily and includes a focus on skills within the leveled reader along with phonics instruction, phonemic awareness and high-frequency words. The materials contain a weekly planner which outlines the various skills for the week. Each day is clearly listed and contains lesson plans with directions and contain materials needed for the lesson within a Lesson Resource box. Routines are listed within the Instructional Routines Handbook and contain an explanation and recommendations for carrying out research-based practices. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, In the Wild, the Essential Question is, “How do animals survive in nature?” A unit introduction is provided for students to develop an understanding of the content they will be learning. On T189, a Making Learning Visible page is provided where the texts students read are visible at a glance. There are subsections listed for Active Engagement and Student Outcomes that show what students will be learning in each area of focus. An explicit systematic instruction for word work is provided that includes a Daily Review to review prior sound-spellings to build fluency. After each day’s lessons, the teacher checks that students are on track and ready to move forward. Follow-up with either differentiated instruction to strengthen skills, provide targeted review and reteaching lessons to meet students' specific needs. ELL support is provided in all lessons. A suggested lesson plan is provided for a five-day span and includes small group instruction, Beyond level, English language learners, and social-emotional learning. In each lesson an objective is stated, academic language is listed, and digital tools are provided. Teacher modeling is evident throughout each lesson. A sample day for Unit 4, Week 3 is provided. Introduce the Concept In the Wild, T200–T201, Oral Vocabulary Words survive, provide, T200 Listening Comprehension “Animals in Winter,” T202–T203, Oral Vocabulary Words: communicate, superior, wilderness Word Work T204–T207, Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Categorization, Phonics/Spelling: Introduce Long o: o, oa, ow, oe, High-Frequency Words: find, food, more, over, start, warm, Shared Read “Go Wild!,” T208–T209, Shared Writing T210, Grammar Go and Do, T211.

The pacing of individual lessons is appropriate. Each day has several parts to the lesson which also have approximate time indications. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 4, Week 3, 
    • Introduce the Concept: Talk About It: 5 minutes
    • Listening Comprehension: Read the Interactive Read-Aloud: 10 minutes
    • Word Work: Phonemic Awareness: 5 minutes
    • Phonics: 10 minutes
    • Word Work: Spelling: 5 minutes
    • High Frequency Words: 5 minutes
    • Shared Read: 10 minutes
    • Language Arts: Shared Writing: 5 minutes
    • Grammar: 5 minutes within 60 minutes of literacy instruction. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 3,
    • Build the Concept/Oral language: 5 minutes
    • Comprehension/Reading & Writing Companion: 10 minutes
    • Fluency/Reading & Writing Companion: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Phonemic Awareness: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Phonics: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Structural Analysis: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Spelling: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/High-Frequency Words: 5 minutes
    • Word Work/Reinforce Vocabulary: 5 minutes
    • Anchor Text/Literature Anthology: No time indication
    • Language Arts/Independent Writing: 5 minutes
    • Language Arts/Grammar: 5 minutes
    • Writing Process/Revise and Edit: 5 minutes

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The s materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. Review, Extend, and Assess are also included in these instructional days.

Grade 1 materials include six units in the First Grade resource. Units range from 25 to 40 instructional days, for a total of 200 instructional days. Review, Extend, and Assess are also included in these instructional days.

The suggested amount of time and expectations for teachers and students to complete the materials are viable for one school year as written and would not require significant modifications. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 0 is designed to be a “Start Smart” unit to support teachers in building classroom routines. Review, Extend and Assess are also included in these instructional days.
  • Each unit comes with the flexibility for the teacher to choose what they are teaching and when they are teaching. Teachers can adjust lessons as needed. These lessons are intended to be completed daily including reading, writing and small group instruction if the teacher chooses.
  • The Wonders User Guide notes that “student and teacher choice are at the heart of Wonders. Wonders was designed to support you and your entire classroom as you teach your way—whether you follow our suggested pathway of instruction or create your own workshop lessons using our resources.”

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

 Grade 1 materials offer students opportunities to demonstrate thinking and learning through a variety of tasks such as graphic organizers, citing text evidence and interacting with the text, rereading various text selections, collaborating with partners and completing the research and inquiry process. Students demonstrate knowledge of content through writing, drawing, listening and speaking. The student materials for each unit are clearly labeled and provide clear directions for each activity. 

Student materials include ample review and practice resources. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Reading/Writing Companion, the top of the page says, “Remember characters are the people or animals in a story. The setting is where the story takes place. The events are what happens in the story.” Students reread Cubs in a Hat and talk with a partner about the characters, settings, and events. Students  describe the characters, setting, and events and write the details on a graphic organizer, page 53. 
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Reading/Writing Companion, Creep Low, Fly High by Author Unknown, students listen, talk and write about two vocabulary words (beautiful, fancy). Students practice using context clues to determine the meaning of an unfamiliar word. Students examine, reread, share, and write about the genre of Fantasy and the use of problems and solutions, while completing a graphic organizer. Students reread, talk and write about the point of view in the story. Using a graphic organizer, students list character, clue, and point of view.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Reading/Writing Companion, the companion states, “The theme of the story is the big idea or message that an author wants to share.” Students reread the text, Super Tools and talk about the clues in the story that help them understand the author’s message. Students use the graphic organizer to write about the clues and theme of the story. 

Student materials include clear directions and explanations, and reference aids are correctly labeled. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students complete the high-frequency word practice page. The directions are as follows: “Read and spell each word in the box. Complete each sentence. Use one of the words in the box. Use a word from the box to write your own sentence.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Reading/Writing Companion, students complete the Research and Inquiry, "Tell me about your day." Five-step directions are listed with ample space to write the responses. “Step 1: Pick a classmate to ask about his/her usual day. Step 2: Decide what you want to know about your classmates. Write your questions. Step 3: Ask your questions, Step 4: Write what you learned about each part of your classmates. Step 5: Choose how to present your work.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Reading/Writing Companion, students examine a paired text. The text, picture with caption, quick tip, and graphic organizer are used to support student understanding. Caption: “Worker bees make wax cups called honey combs.” The Quick Tip and Talk About It boxes direct students to areas of importance. Students are provided with a small space to write. 
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Reading/Writing Companion, students work with multiple meaning words. An example is provided for how to use text evidence to help decode multiple meaning words. The students then respond in writing to the question, “What words help you figure out the meaning of bright on page 17?”

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Grade 1 materials provide Common Core State Standards alignment documentation in the Teacher Edition under Plan: Weekly Standard. Standards are noted for each lesson and are linked to the lesson. The Assessment and Data tab in the online materials lists several printable resources; however, under the Standards tab, it indicates “no standards associated with this resource.”

Alignment documentation is provided for all questions, tasks, and assessment items within the Teacher Edition. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, the lesson objectives are seen at the top left of the page. The following objective is stated, “Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).” The Common Core State Standards were not listed next to the lesson objectives. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, students practice segmenting words into phonemes. The teacher says, "Place one marker in each box for the sound you hear. Then tell me how many sounds are in each word.” The standard alignment is stated for this task as RF.1.2d, "Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds."
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, Day 3;
    • Build the Concept/Oral Language: No standards associated
    • Comprehension/Reading & Writing Companion: RL.1.3, RF.1.4b
    • Fluency/Accuracy: RL.1.3, RF.1.4b
    • Work Work/Phonemic Awareness: RF.1.2b, RF.1.3b, RF.1.3c
    • Work Work/Phonics: RF.1.2b, RF.1.3b, RF.1.3c
    • Work Work/Structural Analysis: RF.1.2b, RF.1.3b, RF.1.3c, L.1.5
    • Word Work/Spelling:RF.1.3g, L.1.2d, L.1.2e
    • Word Work/High Frequency Words: RF.1.3g, L.1.2d
    • Word Work/Vocabulary: RF.1.3g, L.1.2d
    • Anchor Text: RL.1.2, RL.1.3, RL.1.10
    • Language Arts/Independent Writing: W.1.8, L.1.1c
    • Language Arts/Grammar: W.1.8, L.1.1c
  • Each day also contains the standards relating to the material in a drop-down menu on the right hand side of the lesson titled, “STANDARDS.”

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Grade 1 materials contain many visual aids to support student learning, including graphic organizers, response sheets, and real images that accompany the text related to the content in each unit. Illustrations and clip art in the Reading/Writing Companion are uncomplicated and appealing to the eye. The design of the materials is simple and visually appealing to a Grade 1 student. The font, margins, and spacing provided for student work areas are also appropriate. 

The materials include, but are not limited to:

  • Information on each page of the Reading/Writing Companion is clear and consistent.
  • Enough space is provided for students to draw and write responses effectively.
  • Students pages are labeled clearly allowing students to easily follow a teacher’s direction.
  • The fonts and margins are reasonable.
  • Anchor charts describing procedures and protocols are clear and easily understandable for students to refer back to throughout the year.
  • Units are comprised of materials that display a simple blue design and include adequate space. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Overall, the Teacher Edition included with the materials provide good annotations and suggestions for successful implementation, however minimal support is provided to assist with the implementation of embedded technology. The Teacher Edition provides clear explanations and examples to support the teacher, including explanations and additional information to deepen the teacher’s understanding of literacy concepts included in the materials as well as to define the instructional approaches of the program and the research-based strategies included. While pieces of the program provide documentation of their alignment to the standards, there is not a clear explanation of the role of specific ELA standards within the program. Materials include strategies for informing and involving stakeholders, including families, of the student’s progress and ways to support their learning at home.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Grade 1 materials provides clear annotations for teachers on how to present content to students. For each unit, an overview is provided for the teacher. A student outcome page that displays what the students will be learning is also present. Throughout the lessons, italicized questions and explanations are included to support teachers in how to present materials to both support and challenge students, including ELL students. Each unit includes Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level differentiated instruction. During Research and Inquiry, the teacher models the task; however, some statements provided are vague and do not provide enough guidance to teachers. There is minimal guidance and support for the use of embedded technology. 

Content knowledge is included, where needed, and is accurate, understandable, and gives true assistance to all educators using the text. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • A model for an anchor chart is provided for teacher use in the classroom. 
  • An explicit systematic instruction chart is also provided that guides teachers through the word work process. The Teacher Edition states to do a ”daily review to review prior sound-spellings to build fluency. After each day’s lessons, check that children are on track and ready to move forward. Follow up with: Differentiated Instruction to strengthen skills, provide targeted review and reteaching lessons to meet children’s specific needs.”
  • Next steps are also shown that help guide the teacher in making informed decisions. 
  • Grade 1, Resources Tab, Professional Development link, Overview: Filter Instructional Routines and Assessment: Managing Small Groups: A How to Guide and Instructional Routines Handbook, provides information to teachers about how to structure lessons in a differentiated classroom.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, the Teacher Conferences tab gives explained steps on how to conduct a writing conference with students. The steps include talk about the strengths of the writing, how the writer uses the writing trait, and make concrete suggestions for revisions.

There is minimal guidance and support for the use of embedded technology. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Digital Quick Start Guide gives teachers assistance on how to get started using the digital tools provided by Wonders.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Research and Inquiry, suggests the use of technology to “Create and present a slide show of their research using an interactive whiteboard with pictures and labels” of the research idea, but does not give any other information to support the use of technology to enhance student learning. The Reading/Writing Companion, Research and Inquiry Step 3, “Find books or websites,” contains a reference to the use of technology but does not provide further guidance or support for the technology.  Games and activities are provided on the Student Edition site, but no link from the Teacher Edition is provided.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

Grade 1 materials provide detailed explanations for each instructional lesson for the teacher to explain to the student, including information on the lesson’s  purpose. Each unit of the Teacher Guide also contains alignments to the Common Core State Standards. The User Guide and Instructional Routines Handbook, which are separate items located in the Teacher Resource Library, are designed to provide guidance on the delivery of the reading curriculum and serve as a resource to build professional knowledge in the areas of research-based best practices.  Training videos for different instructional routines, including coaching conversations and examples from the classroom, are also included in the teacher materials. Teachers can access information on a variety of topics, such as writing, access to complex text, and foundational skills.

More advanced concepts are consistently explained and will improve a teacher’s deeper understanding of the content. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Research-Based Alignment explains text complexity. “Texts must have recognized value, be worth reading, and include the variations of form documented to enhance comprehension (e.g., lexical quality). Lexical quality refers to the “extent to which the reader’s knowledge of a given word represents the word’s form and meaning constituents and knowledge of word use that combines meaning with pragmatic features.”
  • The curriculum offers the text, Managing Small Groups: A How to Guide by Vicki Gibson and Doug Fisher, that gives teachers background knowledge on how to implement small group differentiated instruction.
  • Grade 1, Resources Tab, Professional Development link, tab: Author & Coach Videos, Filters provided: Foundational Skills, Close Reading, Access to Complex Text,
    • Under the filtered options for Foundational Skills are videos such as “Long Vowel Awareness.” Through a coaching video, teachers learn how to teach students the difference between long and short vowels. 
    • Under the filtered options for writing are videos such as “Writing Across Text Types and Genres with Dr. Doug Fisher.”
  • In the User Guide, beginning on page 6, teachers are provided information on an instructional approach used within the program, Balanced Literacy Classroom: What Does It Look and Sound Like?  This information also includes 21st Century College- and Career-Ready Inspired Shifts in Balanced Literacy. 
  • In the User Guide, on page 16, teachers are provided with guidance on Guided Reading Instruction. This information informs teachers as to what guided reading looks like and what happens before, during, and after reading.
  • In the User Guide, on page 26, close reading information is provided.  Information detailing the importance of identifying a purpose for reading, determining the author’s purpose, and schema and considerations for developing a close reading program is provided. 
  • In the User Guide, on page 37, the concept of rereading is explained, “When one’s schema on a topic has significant gaps, the reader must devote cognitive resources to constructing a mental model on which to attach this new information (Kintsch & van Dijk, 1978).“ “A chief way you accomplish this is by rereading. You slow down your pace, review a previous passage, and look back to the text in order to find information.”
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, beginning on page 19, several routines, such as collaborative conversations, are explained and established.

Explanations are accessible to all educators. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Resource Library in each unit provides resources that explain more advanced concepts. For example, there are videos on setting up a balanced literacy classroom.
  • Videos are available to all teachers who have access to online materials under the professional development tab. The videos are short and easily viewed, although the videos do not appear to have a closed captioned version. 

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Grade 1 materials provide references to the standards, including lists and where to locate the standards within the curriculum; however, the role of the specific standards in ELA are not provided in the context of the overall curriculum. Standards are addressed in the Weekly Standards section with links to corresponding lessons. A Research-Based Alignment Handbook is also provided and details a summary of key research and demonstration of program alignment to the standards.  

Limited explanations of the role of the specific course-level content in the context of the overall materials are offered in each unit. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 7, the Wonders curriculum is “built around the new standards.”  References to the standards are located in the Wonders CCSS Correlation pdf and then within the Weekly Standards tab located under the Plan tab online in the Teacher’s Edition. 
  • The Wonders CCSS Correlation pdf contains each grade level, the CCSS code, the CCSS, and the Wonders Page References which provides the location of where the standard can be found within the curriculum. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, L.1.1e, "Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home)."  [6 lessons] ) For each lesson, a Standard tab is located on the right-hand side of the page. When selected, it provides no explanation except a listing of the CCSS. 

Explanations provide connections among multiple course levels. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Research-Based Alignment Handbook, Introduce vocabulary instruction in kindergarten and progress to academic vocabulary in the later grades, states, “Research in Kindergarten and Grade 1, exposure to new words begins with oral vocabulary development. The Talk About It weekly openers help develop oral vocabulary and build background knowledge about the weekly theme. New oral vocabulary words are introduced with the Visual Vocabulary Cards. The words are incorporated and repeated throughout the week to provide multiple exposure and understanding in context. New vocabulary is also introduced through the Literature Big Books and the Interactive Read-Alouds.” 

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain an explanation of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

Grade 1 materials provide a User Guide that discusses the research behind a balanced literacy approach, guided reading instruction, vocabulary and foundational skills, social-emotional learning, and writing. The Instructional Routines Handbook explains more about the research behind the curriculum, as well as modeling routines, collaborative conversations, word work, reading, writing and grammar, and research and inquiry. This handbook also explains the educational approaches and routines for English Language Learners. 

Explanations of the instructional approaches and research-based strategies of the program are provided. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Instructional Routines Handbook, page 3, the I Do, We Do, You Do, Routine is shown. “I  Do: This is where you explain and model to your students what it is they are learning to do. We Do: In this step, you and your students work together and share the instruction. Students get to practice while you guide and teach. You Do I Watch: After students have had the chance to practice with you, it's time for them to practice on their own. This is where you observe and offer corrective feedback as students collaborate and practice. You Do It Alone: After modeling, showing, guiding, and allowing them to practice, it's time for your students to work independently.” 
  • The Research-Based Alignment Handbook provides the key research findings that support the Wonders curriculum. For example, the research document states that when students engage in repeated readings it builds their fluency and comprehension. This is supported in the Wonders curriculum. “In grade 1 teachers read aloud and reread Literature and Informational big books and Interactive Read-Aloud Selections.”
  • The User Guide, page 4, provides the research behind independent reading. “Providing students with the opportunity to choose their own books to read empowers and encourages them. It strengthens their self-confidence, rewards their interests, and promotes a positive attitude toward reading by valuing the reader and giving him or her a level of control. Readers without power to make their own choices are unmotivated.”
  • The User Guide, “Guided Reading Instruction” by Kathy Rhea Bumgardner, M. Ed., discusses what guided reading is and how to prepare and teach guided reading.  Research-based approaches, such as scaffolding are referenced. “The term ‘scaffold,’ as applied to learning situations by Wood, Bruner, and Ross (1976), refers to a framework and process by which teachers use support strategies to help students complete tasks they are unable to do independently at their current stage of learning.”  References are listed at the close of this article.  
  • Resources Tab, Professional Development link, Filter: Research Base and Link to Whitepapers, includes documents that provide an explanation of the link between research and the program.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Grade 1 materials provide a Take Home Letter each week that reinforces the main lesson objectives, vocabulary, and content knowledge. Family Letters are available in several languages: English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Hmong, Korean, Tagalog, Urdu, and Vietnamese. The letter includes the weekly concept and essential question. A checklist is provided, enabling students and families to mark off any learning goals they complete. A Word Workout that includes word activities for families and students to do at home is given. A comprehension passage that has a specific area of focus is also included each week. The weekly spelling list and correlating fun activities for families to help practice spelling words are also included. In the Wonders ConnectEd Student Edition, leveled readers and games are provided to support students at home.

An example of the weekly letter can be found in Unit 3, Week 1. The School-to-Home Connection Letter states, ”This week our class will be focusing on the different ways we can measure time. Time can be measured by a clock, a shadow, and even an hourglass.”  A link to the students’ learning goals is provided and families are asked to check the ones the student completes. Word Workout includes high-frequency words the students are working on, along with spelling/phonics and words to know.  The comprehension skill the students are learning about is also included with a suggestion. “Your child will identify the character, setting, and what happens in a story. Then he or she will draw a picture to show the missing part of each story.”  A section called Pet Planet Time is included. This section includes portions titled Watch Together, Talk Together, and Breathe Together with ideas in each one. Resources are provided on the side for the students to work on their comprehension skills or their Word Workout.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The program systematically and regularly provides opportunities for teachers to assess student progress, though materials include limited denotations of the standards being assessed both formatively and summatively. These opportunities are provided via routines and guidance that helps teachers assess students when appropriate.

Adequate guidance is provided to support teachers as they interpret assessment data and determine next steps for instruction.

The materials provide accountability measures to support students as they engage in independent reading self-selected texts.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Grade 1 materials provide multiple assessment opportunities. There is an online assessment center that links to all Unit and Benchmark Assessments. Unit Assessments are given at the end of each unit. Screening/Placement and Diagnostic Assessments, such as Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, Letter Naming and Sight Words, and Phonics and Decoding, serve as an initial screening that can be assigned throughout the year to monitor student progress and pinpoint students’ strengths and weaknesses. Checks for Success are provided throughout each unit regularly. Progress Monitoring Assessments are used to guide instruction and may be administered every week, every two weeks, or every six weeks, depending on the test selected. In the Benchmark Assessment Grade 1, students are given three benchmark assessments. The focus of the Benchmark Assessments is on key areas of English Language Arts: comprehension of literature and informational text, phonics and decoding skills, and recognition of high-frequency words. There are also Running Record Assessments that evaluate student’s oral reading and identify a student’s reading level, style, and strategy use.

Materials provide regular and systematic assessment opportunities for assessment. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Inventories of Developmental Spelling (K–6+), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options,” page 21, This assessment can be administered any time of the year.  “Students’ skills can be classified as falling into particular developmental stages of spelling.”
  • Comprehension Tests (K–6), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 23, “Administer this test at any time of the year to provide a quick check or recheck of a student’s instructional reading level.”
  • Unit Assessments (K–6), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 27.  These assessments are completed after each unit of study.  “Unit Assessments include literary and informational texts with questions that focus on the main skills taught in each unit of Wonders. Test items cover reading comprehension skills, literary elements, text features, vocabulary strategies, and English language conventions.” Each unit includes a writing prompt that students use to showcase their understanding of a genre that has been previously taught.  These assessments provide information to make instructional decisions and to place students into small skill-based groups.
  • Benchmark Assessments (K–6), Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 28. These assessments are completed “at discrete points throughout the year to gauge student progress through the curriculum and readiness for state-mandated end-of-year assessments.”
  • Portfolio Assessments, Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 31. Portfolios  showcase a collection of the students work. A Reflection piece is included. Two portfolio options are presented: “a developmental portfolio and a best work portfolio. There is also a Portfolio Rubric to use when evaluating students’ portfolios.”
  • Informal Assessments, Assessment Handbook, “Part 1 Assessment Options”, page 45. “In reading, you can do this in an informal way throughout instruction.”  Examples include teaching students to monitor their own comprehension by asking questions, and retelling and monitoring their own progress.

Materials genuinely measure student progress. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 4, Progress Monitoring Assessments, students read the story “Pals Have Fun.” Students answer comprehension questions based on the text.
  • In Unit 4, Selection Tests are provided that assess students on their knowledge of weekly selections and concept vocabulary and their comprehension of the reading selections found in the literature anthology.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Grade 1 materials provide multiple ways that students are assessed throughout each unit, including formative assessments. The User Guide states that Unit Assessments are aligned to standards; however, there is no evidence to support that any standards are specifically listed in assessments.

Materials include limited denotations of the standards being assessed in both types of Assessments. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Unit Guide, page 60, explains that the unit assessments are aligned to standards, stating that assessments “ensure valid assessment of student performance and progress, [are] aligned to standards, and [measure] against grade level rigor.”
  • Each unit has weekly Common Core standards present; however, standards listed in specific assessments or within the Teacher Edition or teacher’s script for administering assessments were not present.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

Grade 1 materials provide teachers with guidance for administering assessments, ways to scaffold assessments, and how to interpret student data. Teacher scripts are provided with answers for all Unit Assessments and Diagnostic Assessments.  The answer keys have the correct answer and content focus for each question and answer. Suggestions on how to reteach content is provided to teachers.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • On page x of the Placement and Diagnostic Assessment, First Grade, the materials state that placement decisions are provided after the Reading Comprehension Test, Phonemic Awareness Subtests. and Letter Naming Fluency are administered. Students who score 80% or higher are instructed to begin Wonders On Level or Beyond Level instruction. Students who score a 60-79% are instructed to begin with the Approaching Level materials. Students who score below a 60% are instructed to start in the Approaching Level and use intervention materials as needed.
  • After each Unit assessment in the Teacher Edition, there is a Track for Success Progress Monitoring. For example, in Unit 6, Week 3, Making the Most of Assessment Results explains the assessed skills, how the teacher checks for success, and gives reteaching opportunities.   
  • Grade 1, Teacher Edition, Assessment and Data Tab, Printable Assessments, Filter to Assessment Handbook, Assessment Handbook, page 32, The Assessment Process Guide to Using Multiple Measures to Assess Student Progress provides an overall graphic on how assessments could be used in a classroom.
  • In Unit 3, Week 4, Day 5, Progress Monitoring, teachers are provided with a chart for interventions. “Reteaching Opportunities with Intervention Online PDFs.” If Children Answer 0-3 Comprehension items correctly: Then Assign Lessons 76–78 on Compare and Contrast and Lessons 88–90 on Text Connections from the Comprehension PDF. In Unit 5, Week 5, Formal Assessment, “Skills assessed in Progress Monitoring Assessment, Reteaching, “IF CHILDREN ANSWER 0–3 comprehension items correctly THEN ASSIGN Lessons 73–75 on Cause and Effect and Lessons 88–90 on Text Connections from the Comprehension PDF.”

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Grade 1 materials provide routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. There are informal Checks for Success that help collect evidence of student progress, as teachers observe students working and provide guidance for differentiation of instruction moving forward. Formative assessments are integrated within every unit by using end of unit assessments. Screening and Diagnostic Assessments, as well as Comprehension Assessments, offer guidance to inform instructional decisions.

Materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Decodable Reader tab, students read “Jill and Jim” to practice decoding in context. The resource states, “If students have difficulty with the text and need more support, the teacher can refer to T153 or T160.” The teacher is monitoring student progress while students are reading the decodable.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 3, Teacher Edition, Check for Success, the resource states, “Use your online rubric to record children’s progress. Can children read and decode words with long i: i, y, igh, ie? Can children recognize and read high-frequency and vocabulary words?” The teacher is then able to differentiate instruction based on this Check for Success. Develop pages and Reteach page numbers are given for the teacher to provide further instruction. 
  • Instructional Routines Handbook, Teacher-Student Conference Routine, page 119, states “Regularly conferring with students about their Independent Reading is a great way to informally assess their progress, model social-emotional learning skills, build your classroom culture, and instill habits of learning.”
  • Instructional Routines Handbook, Retelling Routine, page 98, states, “Retelling allows you to monitor comprehension.”  Model, Guide, and Discuss Retelling are the three steps within the Retelling Routine.
  • Instructional Routines Handbook, Students monitor their progress, page 173. Students monitor their progress through the following ways:
    • Track Your Progress in the Reading Writing Companion asks students to evaluate their progress on key skills that they have learned.
    • Writing Rubrics, Student Models, Listening and Speaking checklists offer help as students reflect on the quality and completeness of their work.
    • Progress bars on online games help students track their progress.
    • Opportunities to give feedback to students during weekly Teacher and Peer Conferences on their writing.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Grade 1 materials recommend 10-15 minutes of independent reading daily. The materials offer students a variety of texts, including anchor texts, shared texts, Time for Kids, suggested classroom library titles, and on-line titles to access, as well. The Instructional Routines Handbook provides an ample amount of opportunities for students to show accountability for their reading, including reading routines, reading logs, response pages, journaling, and conferences. Students are provided a routine for how to self-select a book of their interest to build stamina.  A Five-Finger Rule is taught about selecting books and teacher monitoring of reading, reading logs, and conferencing helps students build confidence and motivation for independent reading.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students complete self-selected reading. The teacher reminds students of the following: to set a purpose for reading, visualize the story in their minds and identify details to help them understand what is happening.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Teacher Edition, Self-Selected Reading, students select a fantasy for sustained silent reading. Students are instructed to use the Classroom Library, the Leveled Reader Library, or other books for their independent reading. The teacher encourages students to read for at least 20 minutes. The teacher reminds the students, “Set a purpose for reading. Identify causes and effects that make up the plot. Make predictions and correct or confirm them as they read." Students record the important events on a Cause and Effect chart. After reading, the teacher guides students to participate in a group discussion about the story they read. Students share their chart with a partner and explain how they could tell that the selection showed cause and effect.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The program provides strategies and support to assure all learners in the classroom are able to access grade-level content. This includes targeted support for English language learners, students with disabilities, and students who are performing above grade level. There are also a variety of grouping strategies provided as well as support for the teacher to select and deploy the most effective groupings for various learning scenarios.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Grade 1 materials provide modeling, formative assessments, language and visual supports, and background knowledge in each lesson to ensure student understanding. Materials also provide differentiated instruction to strengthen skills, provide targeted review and reteaching lessons to meet student’s specific needs.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Accessing Complex Texts are provided to the teacher to allow students to better comprehend unfamiliar vocabulary words. Students may be unfamiliar with the word dassie.  The teacher explains, “that a dassie is a small creature that lives in rocky regions in southern Africa. Dassies make their homes in nooks and crannies among large rocks. They enjoy sunning themselves on the rocks, but will run for shelter when they sense danger. They are often hunted by jackals, lions, and eagles.”
  • In Unit 3 Week 2, Enrichment Opportunities for Gifted and Talented Students, Beyond Level, small group lessons include suggestions for additional activities to extend learning opportunities for gifted and talented students: Synthesize - “Challenge children to think about how trees are important to people and animals. Have them use the selections they read to support their responses.”  Extend - “Have children use facts they learned from the week or do additional research to find out more about trees.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 1, Whole Group, Writing Process: Revise and Edit, Teach in Small Groups (sidebar) - Recommendations to the teacher to address specific skills in a small group to students state, “You may choose to work with a small group of children who need support with the following: features of the genre, including key details; grammar skill; writing trait.” Students edit and proofread their work, and work in pairs to peer edit and use their Writer’s Checklist. The following scaffolds are provided for ELL students in each level, for example:
    • "Beginning: Have children read the first sentence of their poems. Write the verbs on the board in two columns as present or past tense to create a verb word bank. For each sentence, ask: Is this sentence talking about past or present? Have children check if the verb matches the tense needed, using the word bank and your assistance as needed.
    • Intermediate: Guide children to edit their poems for verb tense by asking: Did you use present tense verbs to talk about things that are happening now? Did you use past tense verbs to talk about things that have already happened? Have children review each sentence to find the verb and check the tense.
    • Advanced/Advanced High: After children edit their poems for correct verb tense, work together to brainstorm a list of adverbs that tell when something happens."
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 2, Approaching Level students read the leveled reader, My Garden. The teacher also follows the routine, phoneme isolation for Tier 2 students, which is, I Do, We Do, You Do. The teacher displays the photo card and emphasizes the initial sound, then children repeat. The teacher gives other words for children to find the beginning sound. It states that teachers should also refer to the Language Transfers Handbook for the sounds that may not be present in the child’s native language. On Level students read My Garden, and the teacher demonstrates phoneme blending using the I Do, We Do, You Do method of instruction. The teacher models how to blend the word hat. Students practice blending other words using the given photo cards. Advanced students read The Mystery Seeds and respond to the text questions, “Who are the main characters in the story? What does the girl do to help her seeds grow?” Advanced students also practice the fluency skill of accuracy with the leveled reader.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Grade 1 materials provide opportunities for all students to engage with grade-level text. Sidebar supports are provided to ensure that students are supported during lessons. ELL scaffolding and support is provided throughout all the units. Lessons also provide additional instruction on new skills at the end of each unit for small group work, reteaching, and differentiated instruction. 

Examples include, but are not limited to: 

  • In Unit 1, Week 3, Literature Big Book, Cool Dog, School Dog by Deborah Heiligman, ELL Spotlight on Language, Strategy: Visualize, the teacher displays pages 4 and 5 of the story and reads the text aloud. The teacher slowly repeats the phrase, “a sun dog, a run-and-run-and-run dog.”  The children repeat the text. The teacher then explains “that the author uses the phrase “run-and-run-and-run” to show how much Tinka runs.”  The teacher then asks: “How do you feel when you are outside in the sun? How do you feel when you run around? (happy, excited) Let’s look for details in the picture that help us make a picture of Tinka in our minds. Read the Big Book in Small Group For specific comprehension support in reading Cool Dog, School Dog with your ELLs.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1, Teacher Edition, High-Frequency Words, the teacher models the meanings of the words one and three by writing the numerals 1 and 3 on the board. The teacher writes the words beneath each numeral and reads each one with the children to help them connect the word with the numeral. The teacher then erases the board and holds up the High-Frequency Word Card for one. The teacher tells students to read it silently and then raise the correct number of fingers to show the word. This is repeated for the remaining words. 
  • In Unit 3, Week 5, Day 4, ELL, Whole Group,  Literature Anthology, “A Food Chart” by Author Unknown, Lexile 420L, Spotlight on Language, to support ELL students with the acquisition of language, teachers are instructed to focus on a specific word, dairy. Directions on page 102 state, “Point to the word dairy. Read it aloud and have children repeat it. Explain that dairy foods are made from milk, which comes from cows. Have children look at the chart and find the word dairy there.” This is followed by a turn and talk.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Anchor Text, Thomas Edison, Inventor by David Adler, ELL Spotlight on Idioms, Page 206, the teacher reads the sentence with “What if….” Then the teacher explains “that this phrase means the same as ‘What would happen if….’ Ask: ‘What if you ate worms? What if you could fly?’ Children can respond: I would _____ .”

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Grade 1 materials provide options for extensions and more advanced opportunities. The small group/differentiated instruction section provides lessons with a leveled reader appropriate for the group’s needs. Checks for Success are present throughout each unit. The teacher is then given guidance on extensions for students who are On Level or Beyond Level. Beyond level differentiated instruction is provided for small group instruction. Sidebars are provided for Gifted and Talented Learners to further advance instruction.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, Day 1, The teacher introduces multiple meaning words using the gradual release method of instruction. The vocabulary words are physical and exercise. Student partners use the words physical and exercise in a sentence and choose a different meaning for the word in each sentence. For Gifted and Talented, students develop a short commercial that tells about the ways people exercise; they use different meanings for the words physical and exercise. Students also act out their commercials for the class.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 1, Small Group/Differentiated Instruction, Beyond Level, Genre Passage, The Tomato Adventure by Author Unknown, Differentiate and Collaborate, teachers are provided with two extension activities to build from the reading. “Ask: What do the texts inspire you to do?” Create a New Insect: Have children use their imaginations to invent a new insect. Remind them to name their insect, draw a picture of it, and write about some of its defining features. Write a Report: Research what insects are found in your region. Have children choose two or three insects and write a brief report telling facts about the insects in your area.”
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Checks for Success are provided, “Can children isolate /k/ and match Kk and ck? Can children recognize and read the high-frequency words?” Differentiated small group guidance is provided. For On Level students, the teacher is instructed to review pages T462-464. For Beyond Level students, the teacher is provided an extension activity on page T468.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Teacher Edition, Track Success, Progress Monitoring, Enrichment Opportunities for Gifted and Talented Children, Beyond Level, small group lessons include suggestions for additional activities to extend learning opportunities for gifted and talented students using Leveled Readers, Comprehension, Vocabulary, Workstation Activities, and Leveled Reader Library Online.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Grade 1 materials provide opportunities for students to collaborate and communicate about the topic and tasks at hand. There are a wide range of whole class tasks, and there are also many opportunities for small group and partner work to help students have collaborative conversations.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, Language Arts, Shared Writing, the whole class participates in a writing prompt responding to the question, “Which job in Good Job, Ben! would you like to have? Why?”
  • In Unit 4 Week 4, Whole Group, Literature Anthology, Anchor Text, Hi! Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold. Teachers are able to group students according to their reading levels for reading groups.  Differentiated Reading, Approaching Level: Students listen to the summary in English before reading. They use the Reread prompts during Small Group time. On Level and Beyond Level: Partners complete the Reread prompts on Reading/ Writing Companion pages 120-122. English Language Learners: Before reading, beginning and early-intermediate ELLs will listen to a summary of the selection. Students meet in their groups for small group instruction.    
  • In Unit 5, Week 4, Day 3, students work with a partner to orally complete each sentence stem on the Day 3, Vocabulary Practice Activity using this week’s and last week’s vocabulary words. “Have children complete Practice Book page 396.”


Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

Digital materials are available for the program and can be used on multiple platforms and browsers. Technology is used appropriately to support student learning and foregrounds supports that provide a deeper understanding of the texts and text evidence they encounter in lessons. Opportunities for personalization/customization and teacher to student and student to student collaboration are available digitally, including customization for local use.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform-neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

Grade 1 materials are web-based, compatible with multiple browsers and are platform-neutral. The digital materials function without incident on Microsoft Edge, Firefox, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, and Safari. Apple products and Window products can access the digital materials. Mobile devices are also able to open and access the functionality of the digital materials. Games were not accessible on mobile devices. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 14, “there are digital tools that can enhance and support student learning as well. Program core texts, such as the Shared Read, authentic Anchor Texts, Paired Texts, and Leveled Readers, are all provided in a multi-sensory eBook format that includes audio to support struggling readers and mark-up tools to support students in interacting with the text.”
  • In the Instructional Routines Handbook, page 103, there is a picture of a student using an iPad. The materials mention that students can record Super Summaries digitally.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

The materials contain digital documents of the Teacher Editions, Reading/Writing Companion, Readers, Vocabulary  Image Cards, and Games. The Resource Library includes projectable classroom materials for use during lessons. Also included in the digital section are Fluency Packets and multimedia support for each unit. The Teacher Edition includes references of when digital tools are available and how they can be used within a lesson. The materials for each lesson are Smartboard-compatible and the links for the digital version of the students’ Reading/Writing Companion can be found in each lesson. This allows the teacher to annotate and model how to use the text. Cloud Reader, a digital platform for the Leveled Texts, Literature Anthologies, and Reading/Writing Companion, also allows teachers to model annotating text.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
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Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Grade 1 materials include technological innovations that allow for teachers to customize weekly lessons for whole group instruction and for individual students. Teachers set the school calendar in the online platform which determines what students access in their online dashboards each day. Teachers can customize beyond that for individual students by assigning specific practice pages and texts at specific reading levels to individual students to access online.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Digital materials include a digital planning guide that provides step-by-step lesson plans and online materials that include additional support in differentiated instruction. Units combine reading, writing, speaking, and listening in a digital environment that engage students. There are also digital guides for assessment, remediation, and supplemental materials to personalize learning for students.
  • Texts that are in the Reading/Writing Companion and the Interactive Read-Aloud have audio features that the teacher can play for the students. 
  • Teachers are able to edit their class assignments by English Language Learner, On Level, Beyond Level, and Approaching Level.
  • Beginning readers are able to use a pictorial login.
  • In the Assignment Manager digital tab on the website, teachers can create assignments for students tailored to what the students need. Teachers can edit and copy existing assignments and monitor student submissions. The teacher can create student mailboxes to manage student assignments.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

Grade 1 materials provide Teach it Your Way to customize the resource. This resource can be used if the focus of the district’s instructional plan is to include other research-based practices not explicitly followed in the Wonders materials. Teachers and/or the school district can also determine if lessons will follow a Core Pathway option, due to time constraints or other needs. The Core Pathway is an abbreviated version of the curriculum that covers all tested skills but omits some optional lessons. Teachers and/or school districts can determine the order of lessons, the number of days used to teach each genre study, and what practice materials are available to students online. 

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • The Wonders Teach it Your Way format is referenced in the digital support videos and in the teacher resources entitled Teach It Your Way Daily 5, Teach It Your Way Blending Learning Station Routine, and Teach It Your Way Workshop Reading/Workshop Writing. These resources provide tips and templates to customize the Wonders program to fit these instructional frameworks. 
  • Teachers have the ability to customize their lesson plans by moving and removing lessons or adding their own resources. This is done from the Weekly Planner view of the Resource Library.
  • Teachers can automatically activate the Core Pathway by going to the Planner Options button in the middle of the screen. A gear icon in the lesson title can restore individual lessons after activating the Core Pathway. The printed Teacher Edition clearly shows which parts of the lesson plan are core and which are optional. 

The digital lesson planner allows for teachers to customize lesson plans. For example, the teacher can drag and drop lessons on the planner to move them forward to another day or use the gear icon to move lessons to the Holding Bin and decide later when to use them. Teachers can also add their own digital resources as well as add their own notes to lessons. In the center of the Weekly Planner, teachers can select the Customize drop-down menu and select Add Note to insert notes.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

Grade 1 materials provide routines and opportunities for students to collaborate and discuss with peers. Teachers can create Talk About it discussions for students’ collaboration in the student digital materials, by posting discussion questions to which students post responses. Teachers can access students’ notes and work that they have assigned, but an area where the teacher has discussion online or can collaborate with the student digitally is not available. The materials provide students with daily opportunities to work together and discuss their choices through the use of online interactive lessons.  

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Grammar: Adjectives, students work together to complete the interactive grammar activity on adjectives.  There are six sentences that the students work through before checking their answers. “Read each sentence. Drag the adjective that best completes the sentences to the line. We felt a ___  wind. I asked _____ friends to come to my party. The _____ truck woke us up.” Student choices are loud, six, or cold. Within the To Do section of the Student Edition, assignments for students to complete appear once the teacher has assigned them. The binder includes a student work area for notes, resources, writing notebook, audio recordings, response to reading, worksheets, and worktext, when assigned by the teacher.
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 11/21/2019

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Authentic Literature ? Package 978-0-0768-9792-6 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/Writing Companion Package 978-0-0768-9998-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Wonders Teacher Edition Package 978-0-0769-0004-6 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 1 978-0-0790-1665-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 2 978-0-0790-1667-6 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 3 978-0-0790-1668-3 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 4 978-0-0790-1671-3 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 5 978-0-0790-1672-0 McGraw Hill 2020
Teacher?s Edition ? Unit 6 978-0-0790-1673-7 McGraw Hill 2020
Practice Book (BLM) 978-0-0790-1694-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 2 978-0-0790-1792-5 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 3 978-0-0790-1794-9 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 4 978-0-0790-1797-0 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 5 978-0-0790-1801-4 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 6 978-0-0790-1805-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Authentic Literature - Grade 1 Units 4-6 978-0-0790-1812-0 McGraw Hill 2020
Reading/ Writing Companion Unit 1 978-0-0790-1846-5 McGraw Hill 2020
Authentic Literature - Grade 1 Unit 1 978-0-0790-6631-2 McGraw Hill 2020
Authentic Literature - Grade 1 Unit 2 978-0-0790-6632-9 McGraw Hill 2020
Authentic Literature - Grade 1 Unit 3 978-0-0790-6633-6 McGraw Hill 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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