Alignment: Overall Summary

This report was published on June 8, 2017.

The Wit and Wisdom materials meet the expectations of alignment to the standards to support students' growing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The program is built on engaging and high quality texts and present strong multimedia options alongside printed texts. The materials provide strong opportunities for students to hone their writing, speaking, and listening skills throughout the content while demonstrating their growing content knowledge.

Note: The K-2 materials reviewed do not include a formal foundational skills component and instead recommend pairing the materials with a high-quality foundational skills program. The 3-5 materials provide some foundational skills instruction through their language, vocabulary, and writing instruction, and fluency practice. However, they do not include extensive phonics instruction.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
41
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
34
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Texts included with these materials are of high quality, appropriately complex, and include opportunities to apply reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills across a variety of tasks designed to grow students’ literacy skills over the course of the year. The materials reviewed do not have a formal foundational skills component and instead recommend pairing the materials with a high-quality foundational skills program. With the materials provided, foundational skills are met or partially met in various ways throughout the materials.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
20/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Core texts consider a range of student interests, are worthy of careful reading, and many are written by award winning authors. Included are a mix of informational and literary texts centered around a single theme or topic per module to facilitate the learning of the content. Each module contains a wide array of informational and literary text integrated to support knowledge acquisition on the module’s topic. The texts are at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Core texts are accompanied by a rationale for purpose and placement as well as support for all learners as they grapple with complex text. The materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year while engaging in a range and volume of reading. Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for central texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and considering a range of student interests.

Core texts consider a range of topics of interest to Grade 5 students, including cultures, teamwork, the Civil War, word origins/meaning, humor, westward expansion, conflict, sport, and goals. Many of the core texts are written by award-winning authors and are worthy of careful reading.

Examples of central texts that are worthy of careful reading include the following:

Module 1:

  • Thunder Rolling in the Mountains, by Scott O’Dell and Elizabeth Hall
  • Lincoln Hall Speech, Washington D.C., January 14, 1879, Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

Module 2:

  • The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster

Module 3:

  • The Boys’ War, by Jim Murphy
  • The River Between Us, by Richard Peck

Module 4:

  • We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball, by Kadir Nelson

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards.

Core Texts include a mix of informational and literary texts. Each module centers on a theme that integrates many types of text and media to support the learning of the topic. The themes of the modules at this grade level are Cultures in Conflict, Word Play, War, and Sport. What is important to note is that there is a wide array of informational and literary text integrated throughout every module no matter the topic or theme. Additional supplementary texts are included resulting in a wide distribution of genres and text types as required by the standards, including historical fiction, poetry, fables, non-fiction, biographies, websites, journal articles, speeches, plays, and historical accounts.

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Module 1: Thunder Rolling in the Mountains, by Scott O’Dell and Elizabeth Hall
  • Module 2: The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster
  • Module 3: The River Between Us, by Richard Peck
  • Module 4: N/A

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Module 1: Lincoln Hall Speech, Washington D.C., January 14, 1879, Chief Joseph, Nez Perce
  • Module 3: The Boys’ War, Jim Murphy
  • Module 4: We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball, Kadir Nelson

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Most texts are aligned to the complexity requirements outlined in the Common Core Standards, with text complexity rubrics appearing in Appendix A of the Great Minds Teacher’s Guide. All major text qualitative/quantitative information is identified in Appendix A, while supporting texts are referenced in Appendix E. Among the texts that are not within the grade-level band, a qualitative feature analysis gives additional insight as to the appropriateness of their placement in the curriculum. The texts that have a Lexile level above the grade-level band show ample support for accessing the text during the "reader and task" components.

Module 1, Lessons 13-29: Thunder Rolling in the Mountains, by Scott O’Dell and Elizabeth Hall (historical novel, 680L): This text has an accessible concept and is organized chronologically with a first-person point of view. The language is authentic to the main subjects. Teacher support and building background will help support students with this text.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for supporting students' ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The texts, both anchor and supporting, fall within the grade-level band, and appear to provide students access to increasingly rigorous texts over the course of the school year. As seen in the quantitative and qualitative analyses of the included texts, there is clear, defined scaffolding of the texts to ensure that students are supported to access and comprehend grade-level texts at the end of the year. While the rigor of text is appropriate in aggregate over the course of the school year, students will engage with texts at varying levels unit to unit and quarter to quarter in a structure where teachers may provide support to assist students in accelerating their literacy growth.

Over the course of the school year, students will engage in appropriately rigorous texts. Some examples that demonstrate this include the following:

  • In Module 1 students read the literary text Thunder Rolling in the Mountains,which is quantitatively measured as 680L. Students engage with the historical text Lincoln Hall Speech 950L. At the end of the module, students are expected to be able to write an informative or explanatory essay to explain how Chief Joseph’s “Lincoln Hall Speech” conveys two important Nez Perce beliefs and values, developing ideas with specific evidence from the speech. The consistency of these quantitative measures, coupled with the consistency of the qualitative features of these texts, support students' accelerating their reading abilities.
  • In Module 3 students read the literary text A River Between Us, which has a quantitative measure of 740L. This less-rigorous text is followed by the literary text Boys’ War, which has a quantitative measure of 1060L. These texts are used to write an opinion essay in which students are to support their point of view about whether the Civil War impacted members of the Pruitt family in a negative or positive way. Students are expected to use evidence from The River Between Us to develop two reasons that support their stance and then elaborate their evidence to support their reason.

The qualitative measures of these texts are appropriate, as are the associated tasks and questions. Teachers will need to provide extra support to help Grade 5 students navigate these variations unit to unit. The supporting texts consistently increase in complexity across the year.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. Text complexity rubrics appear in Appendix A of Great Minds Teacher’s Guide. All major text qualitative/quantitative information is identified in Appendix A, while supporting texts are referenced in Appendix E. This includes a description of text that provides rationale for why the text was selected.

  • Module 2: The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster:The story provides an excellent opportunity for students to analyze how authors play with words to create meaning and engage readers. As Milo’s experiences transform him, so too do students discover both the importance of using precise language and the positive impact of taking responsibility for their own learning and experience of the world.”
  • Module 1: The rationale is provided in the overview of the unit, stating, “What does it mean to belong to a culture? How do a culture’s beliefs and values guide the actions of its people, both as individuals and collectively? What happens when cultures with very different beliefs and values come into conflict? Students are coming of age in a world made up of increasingly diverse and conflicting cultures. They will repeatedly return to these questions as they navigate their own place among others in our complex cultural landscape. This module gives fifth-grade students the opportunity to ask these universal questions in the context of one of America’s most heartbreaking and tumultuous eras as they explore the devastating impact of U.S. territorial growth through the eyes of one Native American tribe, the Nez Perce.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for core texts and supporting materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading.

Each unit includes lessons with supplementary texts of varying lengths. These texts are read independently, in groups, aloud, and silently, offering multiple opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading.

  • Module 1, Lesson 1: Supplementary materials include a Map of United States Expansion and a Map of Native American Tribes, along with a National Archive article, Teaching With Documents: The Lewis and Clark Expedition—Background, to introduce the unit.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 11, students are asked to use three supplementary texts to answer the following question: “Do you think Civil War doctors were seen as people who helped soldiers or hurt them? Why?”

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities for students to build fluency to become independent readers at the grade level.

  • Module 2, Lesson 3: Using the supplementary material, “Who’s on First?” students are directed to “Encourage students to read fluently and with expression. Students should focus on trying to capture the tone and feelings of Abbott and Costello in their reading while paying close attention to the delivery quality they chose to focus on.”
  • Module 4, Lesson 4 demonstrates one way students work to build fluency: “Students practice reading aloud their chosen fluency passage from “Raymond’s Run” three to five times. Students evaluate their own progress in the unshaded box for Day 3 and then ask an adult or peer to listen and evaluate them as well.”

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in writing, speaking, and listening work that requires them to gather evidence from texts and sources. Opportunities to ask questions and hold text-based discussions using academic vocabulary with peers and teachers about research, strategies, and ideas are present throughout the year. Questions throughout the modules build knowledge as students prepare to complete the culminating tasks. Writing tasks are varied and include longer, focused, evidence-based writing tasks.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the texts. Questions draw the reader back into the text and support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. Reading and writing (and speaking and listening) are done in a cohesive learning environment. Students read and reread to write and discuss. The materials provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing. Examples of student directions include: “Look closely”, “Provide details”, “Compare”, “Write a summary”, “What do you notice?”, “Write an introduction” and, “Use evidence from the text.”

Below are examples of text-dependent/specific questions included in each module:

  • Module 1, Lesson 21, ““Analyze a scene in chapter 9 of Thunder Rolling in the Mountains to interpret a character’s message and understand a difference in characters’ beliefs.”
  • Module 2, Lesson 12, “Describe the sequence of events that led to the witch being imprisoned. Use the sentence frames: First…Eventually,...this led to…Then…Finally…”
  • Module 3, Lesson 20, “How do Tilly’s feelings in this scene influence the way she describes the evening in her family’s home? Use evidence from the text to support your ideas.”
  • Module 4, Lesson 3, “What evidence supports the point that the gods controlled life on Earth?”

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation that they should contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task that integrates skills to demonstrate understanding. Each module begins with an Essential Question; each module also contains multiple Focusing Questions that deal with the core text. Each of the daily lessons work toward answering the Focusing Questions, while building the skills and knowledge needed to complete the End-of-Module Task. Supplementary texts help to build knowledge while integrating skills such as speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

For example, in Module 2, The Essential Question asks, “How and why do writers play with words?” The Core Text in this module is, The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster. Then, during the module lessons, students read, discuss, and write to build knowledge through various activities and routines. Students work towards understanding the Focusing Questions to build knowledge and complete the culminating task.

Examples of Focus Questions to guide students through this module are:
  • Lesson 1-4, “How can wordplay create confusion and humor?”
  • Lesson 5-15, “How can writers use wordplay to develop a story’s settings and characters?”
  • Lesson 16-26, “How can writers use wordplay to develop a story’s plot?”
  • Lesson 27-36, “How is The Phantom Tollbooth a story of transformation?”

The learning culminates in an End-of-Module Task. For this module it states, ”For their End-of-Module (EOM) Task, students employ Juster-esque wordplay to write an “exploded moment” narrative in which Milo encounters one of the demons from the Mountains of Ignorance on his return journey and helps him resolve a conflict related to the wordplay of his name and his experiences in The Phantom Tollbooth by imparting wisdom he learned on his journey.”

For example, in Module 3, the Essential Question asks, “How did the Civil War impact people?” The Core Texts in this module include the informational text, The Boys’ War, by Jim Murphy and the literary novel, The River Between Us, by Richard Peck. Then, during the module lessons, students read, discuss, and write to build knowledge through various activities and routines. Students work towards understanding the Focusing Questions to build knowledge and complete the culminating task.

Examples of Focus Questions to guide students through this module are:

  • Lesson 1-5, “What factors led to the start of the Civil War?”
  • Lesson 6-15, “How did the Civil War impact boy soldiers?”
  • Lesson 16-29, “How did the Civil War impact girls and women?”
  • Lesson 30-32, “How did the Civil War impact free people of color in the South?”
  • Lesson 33-37, “How did the Civil War impact the Pruitt family from the historical-fiction novel, The River Between Us?”

The learning culminates into an End-of-Module Task. For this module students will “write an opinion essay, expressing their opinion about the impact of the Civil War on the Pruitt family from The River Between Us. Students create reasons and cite evidence to support their point that war had a mostly positive or mostly negative impact on the family.” Within this task students will have the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of writing an opinion and supporting it with evidence and elaboration.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations providing students frequent opportunities to practice academic vocabulary and syntax in their evidence-based discussions. Each module gives the students ample opportunity to hold evidence-based discussions with Think-Pair-Share, Socratic Seminars, Jigsaw discussions. Gallery Walk/follow-up discussions, etc. The materials offer scaffolds to help students hold academic conversations, including evidence to support students’ claims. Scaffolds include sentence starters, evidence graphic organizers, and teacher-facilitated discussions.

Academic vocabulary instruction is found throughout the modules. Teachers use multiple strategies in introducing, discussing, and using new vocabulary. Each module contains Appendix B, entitled Vocabulary, which clarifies the category in which each word is listed. The materials vocabulary is presented in three categories: Content Vocabulary, Academic Vocabulary, and Text-Critical Vocabulary. Students create vocabulary journals and also participate in Vocabulary Deep Dives and Style and Conventions Deep Dives.

Examples of how students have opportunities for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary include:

Module 1:

  • Lesson 13, “Until my fourteenth birthday three moons ago, [my rifle] had hung in the lodge. What context clues help you determine the meaning of moons?”

Module 2:

  • Lesson 3, “Share that students will move from a focus on what’s happening in Who’s on First? to a deeper exploration of how the skit plays with words—the effect this wordplay has on the characters and their audience!”
Module 3:
  • Lesson 23, “After the reading, create the four-column chart shown below, and use Equity Sticks to have students share out examples of sensory language, including figurative language, that helps them to see, hear, smell, or feel the scene in which Calinda dances on pages 91–94..”

Module 4:

  • Lesson 22, “Students complete a Quick Write in their Response Journals to answer the question that corresponds with the quotation they chose. Encourage students to write at least two or three sentences in response to their quotation.”

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Speaking and listening work requires students to gather evidence from texts and sources. Opportunities to ask questions and hold discussions with peers and teachers about research, strategies and ideas are present throughout the year.

Within this curriculum there are multiple opportunities for speaking and listening that include whole group discussions and small group discussions. In addition, through the lessons there are instructions for the teacher and tips on facilitating whole group, small group, and partner speaking and listening. Students specifically practice these skills in every module in Socratic Seminars. Materials include speaking and listening rubrics, as well as the Socratic Seminars. There is a tracking form that helps the teacher track students’ ability to perform skills with speaking, listening, and reading (citing evidence).

Module 1, Lesson 16:

  • Students work in pairs to elaborate on the significance of the Nez Perce homeland using evidence from Thunder Rolling in the Mountains and a clip from the film A Landscape of History.

Module 2, Lesson 2:

  • Using Think-Pair-Share, students discuss what they notice and wonder after watching a comedy routine with Abbott Costello. Students are encouraged to respond to their partner's notice and wonderings.

Module 3, Lesson 28:

  • Using graphic organizers, students plan an opinion statement of Tilly’s point of view to orally rehearse with a partner. Partners listen for and track the reasons and supporting evidence. Partners then give feedback to help their partners strengthen their writing.

Module 4, Lesson 15:

  • Pairs take turns practicing their speeches, using their note cards and revising them as needed. The student who is listening offers suggestions on how the student presenting could improve either their organization of ideas or one of the qualities of giving a speech.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects. Students write both "on demand" and "over extended periods" throughout every module.

Materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects. Writing tasks and projects are aligned to the grade-level standards being reviewed. Throughout each module students engage in many methods of writing including note-taking, checklists, response journals, graphic organizers, short answer, and longer essay construction.

Module 1:

  • In Lesson 8, students are asked to write a paragraph that contains an appropriate topic sentence, key details, and closing sentence that explains how the Nez Perce homeland sustained one aspect of the tribe’s lifestyle and culture.
  • In Lessons 6-8 students are asked to to draft, compose, and revise a topic statement.

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 4, students are asked to write an explanatory paragraph in their Reader’s and Writer’s Response Journals, using highlighted evidence for support to explain how words create humor and confusion in Bud Abbott and Lou Costello’s comedy routine, “Who’s on First?”
  • In Lessons 14-15, students are asked to draft, compose, illustrate, and revise a narrative snapshot of a character.

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 14 students are asked to “write an opinion essay in which you explain whether being a soldier in the Civil War affected boys for the better or for the worse. Use evidence from The Boys’ War to develop two reasons. Elaborate on your evidence to support your reasons.”
  • In Lesson 19 an example of an on-demand writing task is that students are asked to "make inferences about Delphine and/or Calinda based on evidence in this scene. For each piece of evidence listed below, write your inference(s) about Delphine and/or Calinda."

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 7 students work on paraphrasing evidence and are asked to read and revise text excerpts from We Are the Ship. “Determine whether or not each paraphrase meets the characteristics of a successful paraphrase, and revise the paraphrases that do not meet the criteria.”
  • In Lesson 13, in preparation for further research and writing for the End of Unit Module Task, students are asked to write a speech “explaining why the Negro League and its players should be honored and remembered on April 15, along with Jackie Robinson. Use evidence from We Are the Ship to develop three points to support your thesis.”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities center around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills through the use of checklists, models and rubrics. Students are given opportunities for instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards over the course of the school year.

Module 1:

  • Students write an informative/explanatory essay to explain how Chief Joseph’s Lincoln Hall Speech conveys two important Nez Perce beliefs and values, developing ideas with specific evidence from the speech.
  • Students are asked to explain and support their written opinion to the prompt, “Do you think the Nez Perce are right in following Chief Joseph’s decision to leave Wallowa, or do you agree with the Red Coats that they should remain and fight for their homeland?"

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 4, students write an explanatory paragraph to explain how words create both confusion and humor in Bud Abbott and Lou Costello’s comedy routine Who’s on First?
  • The End-of-Module Task has students write “a complete exploded moment narrative, including a narrative lead, dialogue, and narration sequences that develop conflict and plot, and an ending in which Milo conveys wisdom he has learned, related to the book’s themes."

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 19, students write an opinion essay about whether boy soldiers were affected by fighting in the Civil War for better or for worse.
  • In Lesson 22, students are asked to write an opinion from Tilly’s first-person point of view, supporting it with a text-based reason and evidence.

Module 4:

  • Throughout the module, students conduct research to build knowledge about the topic of Sport by gathering and synthesizing relevant information from several sources; paraphrasing and summarizing relevant information in notes culminating in the End-of-Module Task.
  • In Lesson 34, students write a research essay, focusing on synthesizing information from multiple sources and using directly quoted and paraphrased information to support key ideas.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around student’s analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

The following examples demonstrate evidence-based writing opportunities across all four modules:

Module 1:

  • In Lesson 8, students write a well-developed paragraph to explain how the Nez Perce homeland shaped or sustained the aspect of Nez Perce lifestyle or culture, supporting their ideas with information and evidence from the article read.
  • In Lesson 4, students write a paragraph to explain how words create confusion and humor, using specific examples from Who’s on First to support their ideas.

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 11, students complete the first three rows of the a chart detailing Officer Short Shrift’s character: Description, Illustration, and Literal Meaning. They are encouraged to reread pages 58–65 as needed to support deeper exploration of this character.
  • In Lesson 13, students work in pairs to create an oral story map, writing evidence from the text on the map.

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 7, students write evidence from the text in the Boxes and Bullets organizer to respond to the question, “What are two of Jim Murphy’s points, or opinions, about boys enlisting in the army?”
  • In Lesson 20, students use evidence from The Scarlet Stockings Spy and George vs. George to write an essay that explains Maddy Rose’s perspective on the American Revolution and how it influenced her actions in the story.

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 7, students analyze sample paraphrases of key ideas from We Are the Ship’s (3rd Inning) and rewrite examples to meet criteria for paraphrased evidence that students learned in the previous lesson.
  • Lesson 17: The lesson establishes a set of research questions students will apply to the informational texts they explore in this set to build knowledge of how people can challenge barriers through sports.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Each lesson has a deep dive in either vocabulary or style as well as conventions for 15 minutes of instruction, allowing students to practice the skills throughout the modules. Writing rubrics include grammar and conventions, and there are checklists at the End-of-Module tasks to assess application of conventions listed in the language standards.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 8: Add detail to and expand sentences using prepositional phrases.
  • Lesson 32: Identify coordinating and subordinating conjunctions and their functions.

Module 2:

  • Lesson 1: Students learn about different sets of homophones and homographs and use them to construct sentences.
  • Lesson 12: Teacher guides students in learning a synonym of proverb: adage. Then they practice identifying adages in text The Phantom Tollbooth and decode their meaning.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 4: Students practice using the three verb functions: time, sequence of events, and how likely something is to happen. They then use those functions to write appropriate responses to questions pertaining to the texts: America Divided and The Civil War, Episode 1: The Cause, by Ken Burns.
  • Lesson 22: Students work with a partner to identify and fix inappropriate verb tenses in sentences.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 3: Spell homophones and commonly misused words correctly.
  • Lesson 5: Add commas to items in a series, and explain why the commas are needed.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
5/6
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed do not have a formal foundational skills component and instead recommend pairing the materials with a high-quality foundational skills program. With the materials provided, foundational skills are met or partially met in various ways throughout the materials.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Each module includes instruction, review, and/or practice in the foundational skills of morphology, vocabulary and fluency. Emphasis is placed on students determining new or unknown words and word parts through Greek and Latin roots and affixes. However, there is no review or instruction in the foundational skill area of phonics (letter-sound correspondence and syllabication patterns). Students practice morphology both in and out of context, allowing for students to make connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning from reading. Modeled, echo, whisper, and partner reading throughout the lessons, along with fluency assignments for homework, provide multiple opportunities for students to increase oral and silent fluency across grade level.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 9: The teacher explains that sometimes writers do not give enough or any context clues about word meanings in their writing. Using knowledge of affixes and roots can help readers determine word meaning when context clues alone aren’t enough.
  • Lesson 9: Students Think-Pair-Share to come up with a definition for descendants, using knowledge of the affix and the limited context clues; they write it into the “My Definition” column of the table.

Module 2:

  • Lesson 3: The teacher displays the word interjection and ask: “What word parts do you recognize in the word interjection? What might these word parts mean?”
  • Lesson 28: The teacher shares with students that they will continue to encounter words that end in –ous as they read and can now apply their knowledge of the suffix to help understand new words.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 6: The teacher displays and instructs students to draw the following chart in the “Morphology” section of their Vocabulary Journals. “Choose two words from student responses in the Launch with the suffix –ible, and add them to the chart.”
  • Lesson 17: Students carefully read the featured fluency passage from chapter 2 of The River Between Us. Students read the passage aloud three to five times, practicing decoding each word correctly.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 10: Students Think-Pair-Share and discuss the definitions of the words, group them into like groups, and discuss what the prefixes sym- or syn- might mean.
  • Lesson 33: Vocabulary Learning Goal: Demonstrate acquisition of grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words and Greek and Latin roots and affixes.

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. The Appendix B: Vocabulary found within the materials states that this curriculum “focuses on teaching and learning words from texts. Students develop an awareness of how words are built, how they function within sentences, and how word choice affects meaning and reveals an author’s purpose.” In the Vocabulary Deep Dives lessons, students learn morphology. The Vocabulary Deep Dives use the anchor and supplemental texts and materials to reinforce connections in order to help the student generalize the skill within the context of what they are learning.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 5: “Even if you have no background knowledge about submarines, but know that the root mar- means “water” and the affix sub- means “up from below,” you can use affix and root knowledge to determine that a submarine is something that exists below the water.”
  • Lesson 30: The teacher is to display paragraph three of Chief Joseph’s Lincoln Hall Speech, with the words misinterpretations and misunderstandings underlined. The teacher explains the prefix mis- means “badly or wrongly,” so the word misinterpretations means “wrong or incorrect understandings or explanations.”

Module 2:

  • Lesson 28: The teacher is to reveal to students that the Latin root feroc means “fierce.” Students work in pairs to use the Outside-In strategy to solve for the word ferocious in the first paragraph on page 221.
  • Lesson 31: Students carefully read the featured fluency passage from chapter 18 of The Phantom Tollbooth. Students practice reading the passage aloud three to five times, practicing decoding each word correctly.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 6: The students demonstrate understanding of the suffix –able/–ible, apply knowledge to other words, and verify meanings in a dictionary.
  • Lesson 11: Students skim page 86 and Think-Pair-Share, and the teacher asks: “What clues do you notice to the meanings of amputated and mutilation?”

Module 4:

  • Lesson 4: As a culmination of Focusing Question 1 and students’ work with fluency and Squeaky’s character and perspective in “Raymond’s Run,” the teacher is to consider devoting additional class time for a formal fluency performance. Students may choose to perform the fluency passage from Handout 2C, or choose another passage from Raymond’s Run.
  • Lesson 23: Pairs of students use context clues and a dictionary to discover the meaning of zeal. Select two or three pairs to share their definitions with the class.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for providing students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Within the lessons, fluent reading is modeled, and students have ongoing opportunities to engage in partner reading, choral reading, echo reading and repeated reading. There are a variety of resources that include fluency instruction, fluency practice, and student performance checklists for self and peer/adult. Within each module, fluency passages are also assigned as homework for repeated practice over multiple days and include a checklist for self-reflection and listener feedback.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 5: Students carefully read the featured fluency passage, Nimiipuu Homeland, annotating language that helps them read fluently. Students practice reading the text aloud three to five times, focusing on decoding each word correctly. Students evaluate their own progress in the unshaded box for Day 1 and then ask an adult or a peer to listen and evaluate them as well.
  • Lesson 32: Students practice reading the featured fluency passage from Chief Joseph’s “Lincoln Hall Speech.” Students evaluate their own progress in the box for Day 4 and then ask an adult or a peer to listen and evaluate them as well. Afterward, students complete the reflection prompt on the back of Handout 29C.

Module 2:

  • Lesson 5: Students carefully read the featured fluency passage from chapter 1 of The Phantom Tollbooth. Students practice reading the passage aloud three to five times, practicing decoding each word correctly.
  • Lesson 21: In pairs or small groups, students read chapter 12 and pages 160–164. The teacher is to circulate and support students with reading fluency and expression, as well as checking in with groups to monitor comprehension.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 12: Students chorally read the reasons from the introduction paragraph.
  • Lesson 17: Students carefully read the featured fluency passage from chapter 2 of The River Between Us. Students read the passage aloud three to five times, practicing decoding each word correctly.
  • Lesson 33: Students partner read chapter 13.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 4: Students practice reading aloud three to five times their chosen fluency passage from Raymond’s Run. Students evaluate and record their own progress for Day 3 and then ask an adult or a peer to listen and evaluate them as well. Afterward, students answer the self-reflection questions on the back of Handout 2C.
  • Lesson 15: Students practice reading aloud three to five times the featured fluency passage on Handout 13A from Extra Innings of We Are the Ship.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Materials provide ample opportunities for students to build knowledge through content-rich, integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language experiences. Students grow their knowledge as they engage in building academic vocabulary and applying new understanding to new texts and tasks. The materials include comprehensive instruction in writing, building research skills, and supporting students' developing independent reading.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the criteria for texts being organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The series of texts in each collection are cohesive and are related to the anchor texts. All modules develop student’s knowledge through structured learning activities that provide effective scaffolding of content leading to students comprehending texts independently and proficiently.

Examples include:

  • In Module 1, students study the theme/topic Cultures in Conflict. Students read to answer what it means to belong to a culture and to determine how a culture’s beliefs guide the actions of its people? And finally, what happens when different cultures come into conflict? Students read and discuss multiple texts to answer questions such as, “How did the United States' westward expansion impact Native American cultures in the West? How did the Nez Perce’s homeland sustain their lifestyle and culture? What role do stories play in Nez Perce culture? How does the conflict between the Nez Perce and the US government reveal differing cultural beliefs and values? What important beliefs and values guide Chief Joseph and his daughter, Sound of Running Feet?and What important Nez Perce beliefs and values does Chief Joseph convey in his Lincoln Hall speech?” Students read a novel, Thunder Rolling in the Mountains, by Scott O’Dell and Elizabeth Hall, a speech, Lincoln Hall Speech, Washington, D.C., January 14, 1879, by Chief Joseph, Nez Perce, and multiple stories such as, Coyote and the Monster Story Parts 1, 2, and 3, told by J. R. Spencer, How Beaver Stole Fire from the Pines. Students also study works of art and watch videos to build knowledge about what it means to belong in a culture.
  • In Module 3, students study the topic of A War Between Us. Students are exposed to the many ways in which war impacts people and the many consequences of war. Students read firsthand accounts and historical fiction to answer the question, “How did the Civil War impact people?” Students read and discuss multiple texts to answer questions such as, “What factors led to the start of the Civil War? How did the Civil War impact boy soldiers? How did the Civil War impact girls and women? How did the Civil War impact free people of color in the South? and How did the Civil War impact the Pruitt family from the historical-fiction novel The River Between Us?” Students read texts such as articles like Hospitals and Medical Knowledge, Civil War Preservation Trust and Amputation, Civil War Preservation Trust. Students also read an historical account titled, The Boys’ War, by Jim Murphy, the novel, The River Between Us, by Richard Peck, and poetry such as, The Women Who Went to the Field, by Clara Barton. Students examine historical photographs, videos, and web pages to build knowledge about how war impacts people.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. The Implementation Guide notes: “Craft Questions teach students the elements of strong craft—writing, speaking, and listening—so that students become adept at applying these skills for a variety of purposes. Students explore the author’s craft and word choices, analyze the text’s structure and its implicit meaning, and attend to other unique features of the text. Students begin by examining high-quality exemplars of the craft. Then they receive progressive direct instruction in the skills necessary to practice and master the craft. Annotation during the first read aims to develop the habit of monitoring understanding of a text as students read. In subsequent reads, annotation focuses readers on deeper understanding, such as distinguishing among purpose, claim, and conclusion, noticing authors’ crafting of literary elements or text features, and/or supporting learning goals relevant to the text (e.g., character analysis, influence of setting).”

Examples include:

Module 1:

  • In Lesson 4, groups work to discuss and record a main idea statement (“Boxes”) and at least two details (“Bullets”) the author uses to support the main idea.
  • In Lesson 29, students are asked, “What questions could a writer ask to determine whether or not to add comparison-contrast transition?”

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 2, students are asked, “How did Abbott and Costello’s delivery create humor and confusion?”
  • In Lesson 27, students are asked, “What does a deeper exploration of Milo’s responses to challenges in the Mountains of Ignorance reveal?”

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 17, students are asked, “What do you notice about the structure of chapters 1 and 2? In other words, how has the author organized, or set up, the story in chapters 1 and 2?”
  • In Lesson 36, students are asked, “Which set of evidence best proves whether the impact of war is positive or negative?”

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 19, student pairs read 5th Inning, using sticky notes to annotate key details that show the accomplishments of Negro League baseball players.
  • In Lesson 2, students are asked, “How does an author’s choice of narrator impact how a story is told? Support your ideas with an example from one of the stories you have read this year.”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials containing a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Each module contains focus questions that are included with a set of texts. Content Framing and Craft questions are then asked of both single and multiple texts to integrate and build knowledge in order for students to reach the module’s learning goals. All lessons include coherently sequenced sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge. Students also participate in at least one socratic seminar where multiple texts are discussed as well as completing New Read Assessments which provide students with texts they have not read before to demonstrate their ability to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas.

For example, in Module 1, students study the focus question, “What role do stories play in Nez Perce culture?” Students analyze both single and multiple texts by answering Content Framing and Craft questions. Students read the text Coyote and the Monster Story, Parts 1, 2, and 3, by J.R. Spencer and answer, “What is the meaning of the story 'Coyote and the Monster' for the Nez Perce people?” Students also read the texts, Coyote and the Monster Story, Parts 1, 2, and 3, by J.R. Spencer and How Beaver Stole Fire from the Pines to answer questions such as, “How do Nez Perce stories build my knowledge of Nez Perce culture?”

Each End-of-Module Task ensures that students are analyzing the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. For example, in Unit 4 the End-of-Module Task states, “Write an informative/explanatory research essay in which you explain how an organization is using the sport of soccer to influence individuals and societies. Create a thesis with two points and use evidence from three sources, two of which are researched on your own, to support your points.”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 5 meet the expectations that questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, and listening).

Each module has several Focusing Question Tasks that scaffold the material to aid in the successful completing of the End-of-Module task. The materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to each culminating task. Many tasks are focused on pieces of writing; however, students engage in speaking and listening as well as reading and writing to prepare for tasks, providing learning through integrated skills.

For example, in Module 2, the End-of Module task states,”Write an 'exploded moment' scene in which Milo encounters one of the demons from the Mountains of Ignorance on his return journey and helps him resolve a conflict related to the wordplay of his name and his experiences in The Phantom Tollbooth, by conveying wisdom related to the story’s central themes.” To prepare for this, students answer questions and complete tasks such as:

  • Write an explanatory paragraph to explain how words create both confusion and humor in Bud Abbott and Lou Costello’s comedy routine,Who’s on First?
  • Write a “character snapshot” scene featuring Milo and an invented character from Abandon Elementary School, including wordplay to describe both the setting and the character.
  • Write an “exploded moment” scene featuring Milo and an invented character from Abandon Elementary School, including dialogue sequences to show conflicting ideas between characters.
  • Write an explanatory paragraph to identify one overarching theme in Norton Juster’s The Phantom Tollbooth, and explain how Juster reveals this theme by revealing how the main character, Milo, changes from the beginning to end of the story.
  • Participate in a Socratic Seminar: Explain how wordplay can create both confusion and humor, drawing on examples from the collection of jokes and riddles students shared and Abbott and Costello’s famous comedy routine, Who’s on First?
  • Participate in a Socratic Seminar: Synthesize understanding of overarching themes in Norton Juster’s novel, The Phantom Tollbooth, drawing on evidence of how Milo has changed since the beginning of the book, what he has learned throughout his journey to the Lands Beyond, and how he has confronted and overcome challenges along the way.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Vocabulary is taught both implicitly and explicitly, using words in the core and supplementary texts. As texts are read multiple times, students gain new vocabulary. Explicit vocabulary instruction focuses on Content Specific Vocabulary, Academic Vocabulary, and Text Critical Vocabulary. Materials focus on elements of vocabulary, such as abstract or multiple meanings, connotation, relationships among words, and morphology.

Vocabulary Routines can be found in the Resources section of the Implementation Guide and include routines and instructional examples such as the Frayer Model, Morpheme Matrix, Outside-In, Relationship Mapping, and Word Line. Teachers utilize Word Walls and Vocabulary Journals for students to record newly-acquired words and vocabulary strategies.

Appendix B includes vocabulary support that explains the implicit and explicit vocabulary instruction. For example, Core lessons, 75-min. daily: vocabulary study that is essential to understanding the text at hand. Instructional strategies are explicitly introduced and practiced during vocabulary instruction and put into practice during a reading of the text. Vocabulary Deep Dives: vocabulary instruction and practice that advances students’ knowledge of high-value words and word-solving strategies, focusing on aspects such as abstract or multiple meanings, connotation, relationships across words, and morphology. The appendix also includes a Module Word List and a list of words that would pose a challenge to student comprehension.

Module examples of vocabulary instruction include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 1, Explain to students that they will take a closer look at the word culture. Display and distribute Handout 1C: Frayer Model. Instruct students to record the definition of culture in the upper left hand box of the Frayer Model: “the way a group of people lives and understands the world, including ideas, beliefs, and values; traditions; religion; language; rules; gender roles; food; clothing; art, music, dance, sports, and other ways of life.”
  • In Module 2, Lesson 1, Deep Dive: Vocabulary, Instruct students to Think-Pair-Share, and ask: “What are the different meanings of the homographs left and left and homophones they’re, there, and their?”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 26, Display the following sentence from The River Between Us with the idiom underlined or italicized: “[Dr. Hutchings] needed a little starch in his spine and [Delphine] was the one to put it there” (118).Instruct students to Think-Pair-Share, and ask: “What type of figurative language is the phrase ‘needed a little starch in his spine’?”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 20, Instruct students to Think-Pair-Share to generate a list of words that use the prefix trans-. Call on volunteers to share examples; record and display examples on the board or on a piece of chart paper.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.

Through explicit learning-to-write instruction, teachers gradually release responsibility for a specific writing strategy through a series of lessons. One or more of the following Craft Stages shapes each lesson. (Implementation Guide)

  • Examine: Students analyze how an exemplar models one or more writing strategies. The exemplar can come from authentic texts, class collaborative writing, or a module resource.
  • Experiment: Students practice applying a target strategy. Scaffolded tasks provide significant support by limiting
    the volume of writing, providing parts of a writing piece, or focusing on a relatively simple topic.
  • Execute: Students plan or draft a full writing piece, paying particular attention to applying the target strategy to
    support the purpose of the task.
  • Excel: Students revise, edit, and respond to feedback on the pieces they drafted in the
  • Execute stage, focusing on the target strategy. They reflect on their use of the strategy to refine their thinking about its use in current and future writing.

Students write an average of twenty or more minutes of writing pers lesson and are given explicit instruction of writing strategies. Students write both on-demand and process writing while accessing complex texts. There are a variety of writing performance tasks and Craft Lessons address 5 features; Structure, Development, Style, Conventions and process.

Students study Mentor texts and get feedback from the teacher, a peer, and themselves as well as being provided with writing checklist and rubrics to ensure that writing skills are grown throughout the year.

Examples of materials supporting students’ increasing writing skills include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 22, student examine a painted essay with the Craft Question, “What is a Painted Essay?”. Students have learned about and practiced writing paragraphs. For Focusing Question Task 5, they write a longer essay to express their ideas and learn about the form of a basic essay.
  • In Module 2, Lesson 32, students experiment with introductory elements using the mentor text, The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster and answering the Craft Question, “How does expanding sentences with introductory elements work?”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 15, students execute planning an opinion essay. The teacher is to, “Circulate as students draft their essays; provide feedback to individuals, small groups, or the whole group as trends arise in students’ work. Students reread their drafts when they are finished. Then they self-assess, or trade papers with a partner, and check their work against the “Checklist for Success” on Assessment 12A. On the back of Assessment 12A, students explain one strength and one area of improvement for their own or a partner’s writing.”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 31, student revise their explanatory essay and answer the Excel Craft Question, “How do I improve an explanatory essay, with a focus on the reflective conclusion?” Students work together with a partner to give feedback on each other’s essays and think about how they can improve them. Students add from the earlier Socratic Seminar, message discussion, or their Knowledge Journals and are reminded to focus on the conclusion to be sure it effectively restates the focus statement and gives the reader something to ponder.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area, by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Modules are divided into Focus Questions that build knowledge of a topic using multiple texts. The focus questions all build to the End-of-Module Task that encompasses a module’s worth of texts and source materials. Students also complete shorter research projects throughout the modules. Teachers are also encouraged to use pausing points to complete student-led research projects. In every grade, at least one EOM Task focuses on a sustained research project. In addition, students conduct a variety of short research projects throughout the year.

Examples include:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 32, teachers encourage students (after their learning about Delphine’s experience as a free woman of color) to conduct mini-research projects into the experiences of other African American women during the Civil War and how those experiences differed from Delphine’s. For example, students might explore the Underground Railroad and the critical roles that free African-American women like Harriet Tubman played in this network during the Civil War.
  • In Module 4, the End-of-Module task is a sustained research project. Students research a soccer organization and describe how the organization is using soccer to influence individuals and societies, demonstrating their understanding of the power of sports.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. The majority of lessons require some independent readings of text followed by text-specific questions and tasks that reflect student accountability. Students are asked to annotate texts. Additionally, most homework assignments include independent readings and tasks that require students to produce evidence of reading and to keep an independent reading log.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Appendix D: Volume of Reading outlines independent reading: Students may select from these recommended titles that support the module content or themes. These texts and Volume of Reading Reflection Questions can be used as part of small-group instruction or as part of an independent and/or choice reading program.
  • In Module 1, Lesson 3, teachers are to instruct students to reread the first three paragraphs independently and underline or highlight three words or phrases that most help them understand the main idea of the passage.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 10, students are told that when finished, they should check their work. Then, students may begin independently reading Chapter 5 of The Boys’ War.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

Materials are designed to support teachers in providing standards-aligned instruction for all students and are easy for both students and teachers to navigate. The instructional design includes ample opportunities for assessment and support to use data to improve instruction and student learning.

Criterion 3a - 3e

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are well-designed and easy to navigate. Alignments to standards are clear and appropriate. Student materials provide appropriate support for the acquisition and practice of key literacy skills.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Each lesson is designed for a 90 minute block. Each module contains from 35-37 lessons. This pacing allows for unexpected or special school events which may interfere with traditional pacing.

A module overview is found at the beginning of each module which includes: Module Summary, Essential Questions, Suggested Student Understandings, Texts, Module Learning Goals, Module in Context, Standards, Major Assessments, and Module Map.

Materials include detailed lessons plans with supporting materials which include an agenda for the lesson including Welcome, Launch, Learn, Land, Wrap, and a Vocabulary Deep Dive or a Style and Convention Deep Dive. Each section has hyperlinks included for materials needed, such as graphic organizers or articles.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

Each module provides 35-37 lessons, and each lesson is designed for a 90-minute block. Each of the four modules can be completed in a 9 week grading period. Teachers and students can reasonably complete the content within a 36-week school year as long as their schedule provides a 90-minute block of time for English Language Arts.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

Students have access to an array of materials that provide ample review and practice resources, such as note catchers, reference charts, anchor charts, new-read assessments, supporting excerpts or texts, close read guides, essay rubrics, reference aids, model writings, vocabulary words list and definitions, and speaking and listening checklists.

Student resources include clear explanation and directions. Activities that are completed with teacher guidance have directions included in the teacher lesson plan notes. Resources that are completed independently or in small groups without direct teacher guidance include clear directions and explanations so that the task can be completed.

Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 6 includes an “Experiment with at Topic Statement” handout students. It has clear directions and exemplar statements for students to use as models as they write their own topic statements.
  • Module 3, Lesson 31 includes a chart with information that helps explain an analogy. The chart is clearly labeled and includes both text and a place for students to use illustrations to better understand the analogy.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

Alignment to the CCSS is documented in multiple places in the curriculum including the following sections: Module Map, Module Learning Goals, Standards, Major Assessments, and Lesson Agenda with the section, ”Standards Addressed.”

For example, in the overview of each module there is a Module Map that includes learning goals and standards addressed. The standards section includes all Reading (Informational and Literary), Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language standards that are addressed in each module. In the Major Assessments section of the Module Overview, each standard is listed for each Focusing Task Question Activity and each End-of-Module Task.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The material design is simple and consistent. All modules are comprised of materials that display a simple design and include adequate space. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable. All modules include graphic organizers, charts, worksheets, tables, and other activities that are easy to read and understand. There are no distracting images, and the layout of the student consumables is clear and concise. Each handout and/or activity is hyperlinked in each lesson overview and detailed lesson plan.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide strong support for teachers to facilitate planning, use of all parts of the program, alignment to the standards, research of best practices that underpin the program, and information for involving students and their families/caregivers about supporting the student as a learner.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. There is limited integration of technology and or guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The materials contain a teacher's edition that provides teaching notes for each lesson that provide a Focusing Question, Content Framing Question, as well as a Lesson Summary. The lesson overviews include an “At A Glance” outline of each lesson, as well as Learning Goals and Standards Addressed. The Land/Wrap section has teachers analyze, look at context and alignment, and provide next steps.

The following are examples which demonstrate how the materials are useful and offer ample guidance for teachers:

Module 4

  • Lesson 3 Welcome/Launch: "Post the Content Framing Question. Remind students that a character’s perspective includes his/her view of himself/herself, others, and the world. Affirm that the questionnaire challenged them to think about Squeaky’s perspective—particularly how she views herself. Tell students that they will explore Squeaky’s perspective more in depth, but they will focus on how she views other characters in the story—and how these views change by the end of the story."
  • Lesson 17 Teacher’s Note: "Encourage students to think about what they learned about segregation and discrimination against African Americans from reading We Are the Ship, Raymond’s Run, and from watching the documentary about Nelson Mandela."
  • Lesson 33 Land/Wrap: Next Steps: "Before moving on to the next lesson, ensure students have a workable plan (Handout 33B). If students do not, determine why. Did they have a hard time developing a thesis statement with two points? Did they not have enough time to complete the handout? Did they find usable information from a sufficient number of sources? Did they struggle to synthesize information from multiple sources? Did they have a different struggle? Determine the greatest need, either for the whole group or a small group, and plan follow-up instruction as needed. Students will type their drafts in the next lesson, so prioritize who you will work with during that time to improve their plans."

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The Implementation Guide provides multiple explanations and charts regarding curriculum terminology. The implementation Guide also explains at length the research behind each approach in the curriculum. There are Appendices that include adult level explanations as well as sample student answers and annotated responses that teachers can use to improve their knowledge of what standards being met would look like in a response.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet expectations for materials containing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

Materials include an extensive Implementation Guide which goes into great depth about how the curriculum as a whole addresses all of the standards. Additionally, a Module in Context and a Module Learning Goals document are provided in the Module Overview of each unit. The Module in Context includes an overview of how the materials address the Common Core shifts as well as a detailed account of how the CCSS standards have a role in the curriculum. The Module Learning Goals articulate specific standards as they are addressed in each individual module.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.Materials include resources found primarily in the Implementation Guide that provide explanations of the instructional approaches and identify research-based strategies. The Implementation Guide lists what research says, what students need and how Wit and Wisdom materials provide what students need within the curriculum.

Explanations provided include, but are not limited to:

Research Says: “Performance on complex texts is the clearest differentiator in reading between students who are likely to be ready for college and those who are not.” (ACT 16-17) “But as expectations of college and career reading have held steady or increased, the complexity of Grades K-12 texts have held steady or increased, the complexity of Grades K-12 texts has declined (Adams 4-5; NGA Center and CCSS) 3). Students need to be able to unlock meaning from complex texts.”

Wit & Wisdom Responds: “Instead of basals, Wit & Wisdom students read complex, grade-level books they love from classics such as The Story of Ferdinand and Animal Farm, to new favorites such as Last Stop on Market Street and The Crossover, to captivating nonfiction such as I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban and An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793. Students use these texts at every turn-to learn, and eventually master, essential reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammar, and vocabulary skills.”

Some Core Practice examples include:

Vocabulary: “The Wit & Wisdom approach to teaching vocabulary thorough knowledge of word meanings is key to understanding any complex text and to learning as a whole (Chall and Jacobs; Anderson and Freebody 77). Vocabulary instruction in Wit & Wisdom is accordingly designed to achieve three key student outcomes:

  • Better comprehension of complex texts
  • Broader and deeper knowledge of words and word parts (including affixes and roots)
  • Increased ability to determine the meanings of unknown words As a text-based curriculum,

Wit & Wisdom teaches vocabulary both implicitly and explicitly using words in the core and supplementary texts. Through repeated readings of complex, knowledge-building texts, students implicitly learn many new words (Feitelson, Kita, and Goldstein 340; Miller and Gildea 96; Nagy and Scott 273). Explicit vocabulary instruction focused on the three student outcomes emphasizes three categories of high-leverage vocabulary words and phrases.”

Questioning: “Students monitor their understanding of the text by recording questions they have about it. During their first encounter of the text, students record questions they have about it. When students return to the text, they continue to monitor their understanding, recording any additional questions that arise while also looking for answers to their original questions. After the first stage of reading, students share, and when possible, answer these text based questions, or problem solve about how to answer the questions. For example, students may return to the text, consult a reference source, or conduct research. This helps students maintain engagement with and focus on the text while reading and monitor their comprehension of what they are reading. This helps teachers formatively assess students to indicate their understanding of the text and learning from previous modules.”

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. There is a series of Parent Tip Sheets that provide a summary of each module in the curriculum, including a list of module texts, additional books to read at home, sample questions, and activities to extend thinking and learning. There are also several resources available, such as blogs about learning, on the greatmind.org website to help parents better understand how to support their child.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials offer regular opportunities for systematic and strategic data collection to inform instruction and describe student progress and performance.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Each lesson includes a check for understanding question. Throughout the modules there are 3-6 Focusing Question Tasks and 2-3 New Read Assessments where students independently do a cold read of an informational or literary text and then complete various question (multiple choice, open-ended, short response, multi-select, etc). After answering questions, students also complete a short writing task accompanied by a graphic organizer to capture their thinking. Students also participate in 2 Socratic Seminars per module, and each of these tasks builds to the End-of-Module Task.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed clearly denote which standards are being emphasized. Standards are found in multiple places and times during the module. Each lesson includes Learning Goals which are connected to and labeled with a standard. In each module, there is a tab labeled Module Overview. A chart is provided that lists all of the standards for New Read Assessments, Socratic Seminar, and EOM (End-of-Module) Assessments. All standards assessed are labeled clearly.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations of assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. Appendices include Answer Keys, Rubrics, and Sample Responses as well as rubrics for all writing types tasks.

Materials regularly provide:

  • Sample answers and recommended scripts to share with students
  • Suggestions for differentiation
  • Next steps, if students had difficulty. ‘Consider reviewing handout…. and re-watching ……”
  • Rubrics for scoring student tasks

Guidance for Interpreting Student Performance and suggestions for follow up can be found in the teacher’s notes and in the wrap section of each lesson. For example, in Module 4, Lesson 30, the next steps teacher notes state, “Analyze the CFUs to identify trends amongst learners. Was one module’s content more memorable or significant for students? Have students built larger, transferable understandings that encompass learning from multiple genres or historical time periods? Are students able to make larger observations about the world beyond the context of the texts they studied? Consider the consistencies and inconsistencies in students’ responses and the implications they may have on teaching the same modules to the next group of students.”

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectation for including routines and guidance that provide opportunities to monitor student progress.

All modules of Wit and Wisdom follow the same format and elements for student performance. The New Read Assessments are routine and help teachers monitor students progress towards standards mastery. The Focus Questioning Tasks routinely and regularly build to the End of the Module (EOM) Assessment and monitors student progress. Checklists are provided with tasks so that students are prepared for the EOM Assessment.

A variety of resources are available in Appendix C to assist teachers in monitoring progress. Some examples include:

  • Self, peer and teacher evaluations
  • Checklists for poetry performances and Socratic Seminars.
  • Speaking and Listening Rubrics

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 5 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation. In each module, Appendix D contains a curated Volume of Reading text list, which includes texts that add to the module and offer students choices at varying levels of complexity. Based on the Content Framing Questions, a set of Volume of Reading Reflection Questions appears in the Student Edition of each module, giving students guidance and structure to apply the Content Framing Questions independently to books of their choice. Time for Volume of Reading is not included within the ninety-minute module lessons, but it is noted that it should be a high priority and is included in the sample daily schedules in the Getting Started Section of the Implementation Guide.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide multiple strategies for supporting all learners throughout the program, including strategies for students.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

Examples of strategies listed in the Implementation Guide and found throughout the program include:

  • “Deliberate sequencing. Students build knowledge of each module topic by reading texts in a purposeful sequence. Students complete each module study with knowledge and skills that they can use to access grade-level text.”
  • “Predictability of structures. The predictability of the recurring Content Stages helps students develop habits of mind and provides a scaffold for reading challenging texts. Students use the Content Framing Question as an entry point to difficult texts.”
  • “Reading scaffolds. Organizing ideas from informational and literary texts establishes student understanding of the main ideas and plot points prior to the consideration of deeper ideas. Focus on vocabulary and syntax. Students learn to read closely and discuss important passages, with particular emphasis on learning the meanings of essential content words and academic vocabulary, studying roots and affixes to grow capacity to discern word meaning independently, and dissecting phrases to reveal how syntax conveys meaning.”
  • “Exploration of content in multiple forms. Students explore print texts, visual art, videos, audio recordings, photographs, and maps to access module concepts and information."
  • Reliance on strong models. Students examine models of strong writing to understand how to craft effective sentences, paragraphs, and essays.”
  • “Frequent feedback. Students receive ongoing and explicit feedback from peers and teachers.”
  • “Scaffolds. At key moments, lessons include specific suggestions for how to scaffold instruction. These scaffolds empower teachers to seamlessly integrate remediation suggestions into instruction. For students who may be challenged by the lesson’s rigor, scaffolds provide another path to the learning goal, rather than minimize or change the learning goal.”
  • “Extensions and differentiation suggestions. Lessons often offer suggestions for how to vary learning tasks for those who already have well-developed skills, or to extend learning for students who seek an additional challenge. The chart below more specifically illustrates how Wit & Wisdom lessons support striving readers.”

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed meet the expectations that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. Materials include explicit vocabulary and grammar instruction, text-dependent questions that focus all students on key terms, phrases, and passages for rereading and repeated exploration, partner work that includes oral practice of written responses, and multiple authentic opportunities to use academic language with support, such as explicit teaching about speaking and listening, sentence frames, and vocabulary support.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet requirements for regularly including extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level. Extension activities are provided throughout materials. These are included in boxes in the Teacher’s Edition lesson plans.

Extension activities include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 18: If students finish early, they may record and elaborate on additional evidence on Sound of Running Feet and/or Chief Joseph.
  • Module 4, Lesson 6: Encourage students to determine if there is evidence in the paragraph that would be better suited as a direct quotation. Students mark this evidence, then offer a suggestion on what evidence would work better as a paraphrase.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials reviewed meet the expectations of providing ample opportunities for teachers to use grouping strategies during lessons. Lessons indicate where pairs, whole group, small group, or individual groupings are utilized for instruction. Each lesson provides students opportunities to work through more than one type of grouping. Teachers are also provided suggestions for how to assign roles or divide groups. For example, Socratic Seminars are used frequently, and teachers are given detailed instructions on how to model the strategy and assign groups and responsibilities. Other routines that provide opportunities for grouping include anchor charts, boxes and buttons, categorization, chalk talk, choral reading, echo reading, fishbowl, gallery walk, give one-get one-move on, graffiti wall, grammar safari, graphic organizers, jigsaw, link up, literary dominoes, mix and mingle, outside-in, partner reading, praise/question/suggestion, question corners, quick write, quiz-quiz-trade, reader’s theater, and response techniques.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials work well on all technology platforms and are easy to access. They are easily customizable for local use. Supports for teachers to use technology as a part of the learning process with students is available. Adaptive technology is not offered with this program.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Accessibility was tested on Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, an Android phone, an iPhone, and an iPad. All access was successful.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Technology is used throughout modules and lessons to enhance student learning and draw attention to evidence and texts.

  • In Module 1, Lesson 9, students listen to the story Coyote and the Monster and pay attention to how the Nez Perce artist and storyteller J.R. Spencer uses his voice to bring the story of Coyote and the Monster alive for his audience. Students try to picture the characters and events in their minds as they listen.
  • In Module 4, Lesson 18, the teacher displays images from a web link and points out items mentioned in the text, such as crinolines, hoop skirts, and bonnet.
  • In most lessons, a document camera is used to display student work, show examples, and direct student’s attention to evidence and tests.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials do not meet expectations that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. Adaptive or other technological innovations are not included in the instructional materials.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials can be easily customized for local use. The Implementation Guide states, “When observing teachers, school leaders should keep in mind that Wit & Wisdom is not a scripted program, and Wit & Wisdom instruction will vary from classroom to classroom. While the lessons can be implemented as written, teachers will study the modules and come to know them as deeply as the educators who wrote them. Teachers should use their knowledge of the modules and of their students to customize lessons when needed.” However, all handouts and lessons can only be downloaded in pdf form and can not be edited.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Materials do not include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate.

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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 02/27/2020

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Wit & Wisdom Grade 5 Module 2 978-1-63255-966-1 Copyright: 2016 Great Minds 2016
Wit & Wisdom Grade 5 Module 3 978-1-63255-967-8 Copyright: 2016 Great Minds 2016
Wit & Wisdom Grade 5 Module 4 978-1-63255-968-5 Copyright: 2016 Great Minds 2016
Wit & Wisdom Grade 5 Module 1 978-1-68386-001-3 Copyright: 2016 Great Minds 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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