Alignment: Overall Summary

Pearson Literature 2015 does not meet expectations of alignment for Grade 11. Texts and tasks in reading, writing, speaking, and listening partially meet expectations of Gateway 1 criteria, providing some standards-aligned practice in reading, writing, and speaking and listening for Grade 11 students. Teachers may need to supplement in some areas to provide comprehensive support for literacy development. The instructional materials for Grade 11 do not meet the expectations of Gateway 2, as texts are partially organized around topics. Materials contain few sets of questions and tasks that cohesively and consistently grow knowledge and provide support with integrated standards skill development. Writing supports for Grade 11 students may need supplementation to ensure students are prepared for end of grade level writing tasks and products.

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
21
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
8
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

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-
Gateway One Details

Pearson Literature Grade 11 partially meets the criteria for Gateway 1. Texts are of quality and reflect the distribution of text types and genres. Some texts do not meet the criteria of text complexity. Anchor and supporting texts provide some opportunity for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. Materials partially meet the criteria to provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions and tasks are evidence based and build to a culminating task. Materials provide some opportunity for discussions, but lack guidance and protocols. Both on-demand and process evidence based writing is present, however there is limited opportunity for students to practice and receive feedback before assessment. Over the course of the year’s worth of materials, grammar/convention instruction is provided, however it does not increase in sophisticated contexts.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
10/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

Pearson Literature Grade 11 partially meets the criteria for providing quality texts that support students toward advancing toward independent reading. Texts are of quality and reflect the distribution of text types and genres. Materials partially meet the criteria of text complexity. Also, text complexity analysis and rationale provided by the publisher is limited. Anchor and supporting texts provide some opportunity for students to engage in a range and volume of reading but may not succeed in having students achieve grade level proficiency.

NOTE: Indicator 1b is non-scored and provides information about text types and genres in the program.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for anchor/core texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

Anchor texts in the majority of chapters/units and across the year-long curriculum are of publishable quality. All are previously published and some are award winners. Anchor texts are well-crafted, content rich, and include a range of student interests, engaging students at the grade level for which they are placed. Subjects are compelling, content is meaningful, style of the texts is varied, and each are well-crafted. Included anchor texts provide an appropriate amount of quality texts to span the school year.

Quality texts found in Grade 11 materials include (but are not limited to) the following high-quality text selections:

  • “From the ‘Iroquois Constitution’” Primary Source Document
  • The Devil and Tom Walker by Washington Irving
  • From My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglas
  • Winter Dreams” by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • “In Another Country” by Ernest Hemingway
  • from Dust Tracks on a Road by Zora Neale Hurston
  • From Hiroshima by John Hersey
  • “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath
  • “Courage” by Anne Sexton
  • “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King Jr.
  • “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker
  • “Camouflaging the Chimera” by Yusef Komunyakaa
  • “One Day, Now Broken in Two” by Anna Quindlen

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Materials provide an appropriate balance between literature and informational text. Literature consists of stories, dramas, and poetry. Informational texts consist of argument, exposition, and functional text. There are additional non-fiction sections: historical and literary background, the American experience - reading in the humanities, literature in context - reading in the content areas, world literature connections, and literary history. While most units follow the standards for a 70/30 balance of non-fiction versus fiction, additional texts that are in the informational text section because they are often small blurbs on the side of pages, single page infographics providing additional information, or background information are mostly informational text. Examples of texts include but are not limited to:

Unit 1- A Gathering of Voices

  • from The Iroquois Constitution
  • "Huswifery," Edward Taylor
  • from Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford
  • from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equino by Oleaudah Equiano
  • Letter from the President's House by John Adams

Unit2- A Growing Nation

  • from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  • from Walden by Henry David Thoreau
  • Poetry and Essay Excerpt by Walt Whitman

Unit 3- Division, Reconciliation, and Expansion

  • "The Gettysburg Address" by Abraham Lincoln
  • "Letter to His Son" by Robert E. Lee
  • "To Build a Fire" Jack London
  • "The Story of an Hour" Kate Chopin

Unit 4- Disillusion, Defiance, and Discontent

  • "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T.S. Eliot
  • from The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  • " A Worn Path" by Eudors Welty
  • "Chicagor" by Carl Sandsburg

Unit 5- Prosperity and Protest

  • from Hiroshima by John Hersey
  • "The First Seven Years" by Bernard Malamud
  • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
  • Inaugural Address by John Fitgerald Kennedy

Unit 6- New Voices, New Frontiers

  • "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker
  • "Onomatopoeia" by William Safire
  • "Urban Renewal" by Sean Ramsay
  • from The Names by N. Scott Momaday


Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

50% of the anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. The appropriate grade level lexile bank for grades 11 and 12 is 1185L to 1385L.

Texts that fall below the Lexile band for the 11-CCR grade band do not increase in qualitative complexity to make-up for their lack of quantitative complexity, therefore cannot be considered at the appropriate level for the grade.

Examples include, but are not limited to,

  • Unit 1: There are four anchor texts, and this unit meets the criteria for appropriate text complexity
    • From “The Iroquois Constitution . Lexile 1510, qualitative 3-4
    • From “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards. Lexile 1210 qualitative 4-5
    • “The Declaration of Independence”. Lexile 1390, qualitative 3-4,
    • From The American Crisis by Thomas Paine. Lexile 1200 qualitative 3-4.
  • Unit 2: There are four anchor texts, and this unit does not meet the criteria for appropriate text complexity
    • “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving. Lexile 1130, qualitative 2-3.
    • “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Lexile 1250, qualitative 3-5
    • From “Civil Disobedience” by Henry David Thoreau. Lexile 980, qualitative 3
    • From The Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman. Lexile 1900, qualitative 3-4.
  • Unit 3: There are four anchor texts. Most fall below the complexity band for grade 11.
    • From My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglas. Lexile 1110, qualitative 4,
    • “Heading West” by Miriam Davis Colt. Lexile 970 and qualitative 3-4,
    • “ I Will Fight No More Forever” speech by Chief Joseph. There is no Lexile score.
    • “The Story of An Hour” by Kate Chopin. Lexile 960, qualitative 3-4.
  • Unit 4: There are three anchor texts which fall below the appropriate grade level complexity.
    • “Winter Dreams” by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Lexile 1090, qualitative 2.3
    • “In Another Country” by Ernest Hemingway. Lexile 1020, qualitative 2.6
    • From Dust Tracks on a Road by Zora Neale Hurston. Lexile 920, qualitative 2
  • Unit 5: This unit has five anchor texts that do fall in the appropriate grade level complexity band. Some are poetry and do not have Lexile scores.
    • “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath. Poetry, qualitative 2.6
    • “Courage” by Anne Sexton. Poetry, qualitative 3
    • “Inaugural Address” by John F. Kennedy. Lexile 1410, qualitative 2
    • “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King Jr. Lexile 1330, qualitative 2.3
    • From Hiroshima by John Hersey. Lexile 1230, qualitative 2.3
  • Unit 6: Two of three anchor texts in this unit do not fall in the appropriate grade level complexity band.
    • “Camouflaging the Chimera” poetry by Yusef Kmmanyakaa. Qualitative 3.6
    • “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker. Lexile 980, qualitative 2.6
    • “One Day Now Broken in Two” by Anna Quindlen. Lexile 1160, qualitative 2

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

The complexity of anchor texts students read do not provide an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth. There is a variety of complexity levels, however they do not systematically increase within units nor across the year. Therefore, it is unclear that student’s literacy would grow across a school year. Series of texts include a variety of complexity levels. However, quite a few are out of grade level band (1185L-1385L) and importantly, do not make up in quantitative complexity what they lack in qualitative. Also, anchor texts in Volume 2 range from below the Lexile band in unit 4, to the middle/top of the Lexile band in unit 5, to below the Lexile band in unit 6. Importantly, for the texts below the Lexile band for the grade, they are not significantly complex to make-up qualitatively for their lack of quantitative complexity.

  • Anchor texts do not increase in both quantitative or qualitative complexity over the course of the school year. Note that the qualitative measure here is the average of the scores on context/knowledge demands, structure/language conventionality, and levels of meaning/purpose/context. Each of these values had a score on a scale of 1 to 5 attached.
    • In Unit 1 there are four anchor texts, ranging from 1200 to 1510 Lexile levels. The average of the qualitative measures is 3
    • In Unit 2 there are 4 anchor texts ranging from 980 to 1900 Lexile levels. The average of the qualitative measures is 3.1
    • In Unit 3 there are four anchor texts ranging from 960-1110 Lexile levels. The average qualitative measure is 3.5
    • In Unit 4 there are three anchor texts ranging from 920-1090 Lexile levels. The average qualitative measure is 2.3
    • In Unit 5 there are five anchor texts, two of which are poetry with no Lexile level, but the other selections have a range of 1230-1410 Lexile levels, and average qualitative measure of 2.2
    • In Unit 6 there are three anchor texts ranging from 980-1160 Lexile levels. The average qualitative measure is 2.7

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

There is a “Text Complexity: At a Glance” section at the beginning of each Part. It provides a general text complexity rating for the selections in this part of the unit to help guide instruction. It states the title of the text and provides a label of either more complex or more accessible. Within each Part, a Text Complexity Rubric is provided that is more specific, however it is still not specific enough to provide appropriate and strategic scaffolding. The Text Complexity Rubric for qualitative measures is divided into three parts, all with a scale of 1-5 (1 being the lowest): Context/Knowledge Demands, Structure/Language Conventionality and Clarity, Levels of Meaning/Purpose/Concepts. Then there is a quantitative measures section which includes Lexile and text length. Lastly, a Reader and Task Suggestions section exist for each text. Each unit is divided into parts. Each part in the unit is a set of connected texts featuring one or more Anchor Texts, and works of particular significance. At the beginning of each part there is a “Selection Planning Guide” that tells are place in the section. However, the rationale for educational purposes and placement are limited.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Most units have a central question or theme which seem to provide rationale for the text selections that appear. For example;
    • Unit 1 introduction states, “This text set introduces students to the cultural groups that claimed a place in the early American wilderness. The origin myths and the “Iroquois Constitution” offer a closer look at the culture of several Native American nations”. Anchor texts, “From the Iroquois Constitution”, “From Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”, “The Declaration of Independence” and “From The American Crisis
  • Unit 4, Part 2, “In Another Country”. Structure/Language Conventionality and Clarity is labeled as “accessible”. No rating for structure is identified at all. Levels of Meaning/Purpose/Concept Level is described as “Subtle conflict and resolution; abstract theme (alienation)”. No levels of meaning identified at all.
  • Unit 5, Part 2, “The Life You Save May Be Your Own”. Context/Knowledge Demands is described as “short story; life experience demands”. The rating for Structure lists “Dialect” when no distinct dialect is present.
  • Unit 6, Part 1, “Everyday Use”. Context/Knowledge Demands is listed as “Contemporary short story; cultural knowledge demands” No specific cultural knowledge demands were identified. For Structure, “Dialect; some lengthy sentences” is listed. No distinct dialect throughout the text. There is no mention of Walker’s use of three contrasting conflicts to drive the story’s plot

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of text types and disciplines to become independent readers at the grade level. There are a variety of text types and disciplines in the materials, including, poems, short stories, nonfiction, drama, novel excerpts . However, it is unclear in the materials how students will build stamina, read for extended periods of time, and other such activities that build students from strong readers in a group setting to strong readers independently. While, instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in a volume of reading as they grow toward reading independence at the grade level, there is no clear opportunity for students to independently engage in a volume of text (or a shorter piece of text). There are no clear supports for teachers and/or students to monitor progress toward grade level independence.There are no clear supports to engage students in this independent reading.

There is no clear mechanism for progress monitoring of student reading achievement towards independence at the grade level.

  • Unit 1 contains a large variety of genres and topics related to the theme of “The American Experience”. Selections include 3 myths, 6 essays, 2 political documents, 3 narratives, 3 poems, 1 sermon, 3 speeches, 1 argumentative text, 1 functional text, 1 biography, 3 autobiographies, 2 letters and 1 blueprint. The volume of reading alone would help help a student build toward independence.
  • Unit 2 also provides a rich variety of genres and topics including, 6 essays, 1 short story, 1 field report, 4 poems, 2 autobiographies, 2 letters and 2 blueprints.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
11/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Pearson Literature Grade 11 materials partially meet the criteria to provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions and tasks are evidence based and build to a culminating task. Materials provide some opportunity for discussions, but lack guidance and protocols. Both on-demand and process evidence based writing is present, however there is limited opportunity for students to practice and receive feedback before assessment. Over the course of the year’s worth of materials, grammar/convention instruction is provided, however it does not increase in sophisticated contexts.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text; this may include work with mentor texts as well).

Most of the questions, tasks, and assignments provided over the course of a school year in the materials are text-dependent or text-specific. Each unit provides opportunities to analyze texts in different ways. One way is for students to study a stand-alone text and answer text-dependent questions. Another way texts are presented allows students to analyze texts that are similar in topic or genre with accompanying close reading activities that ask them to compare the texts’ key ideas and details and write an analysis. After each text there is a “Critical Reading” section where questions are directly connected to the text and ask students to cite textual evidence to support ideas. There are writing tasks found throughout the text that require students to engage with the text directly. Within units, text-dependent questions are embedded within stories and follow each text. At the beginning of each unit, the teacher’s guide suggests students engage in “Multi-draft Reading” to support and extend reading comprehension for all students. The protocol in the multi-draft reads is as follows: First reading - identifying key ideas and details and answering and Comprehension questions. Second reading - analyzing craft and structure and responding to the side-column prompts. Third reading - integrating knowledge and ideas, connecting to other texts and the world, and answering end-of-selection questions.

Examples of text dependent/specific questions, tasks and assignments include but are not limited to:

  • In Volume 1, Unit 1, Part 3, while reading “Straw Into Gold,” students are asked comprehension questions and comparing autobiographies, respectively: “What Mexican dish was Cisneros asked to prepare?” and “Are the challenges Cisneros describes similar in any way to those Franklin set for himself? Explain.” A red circle next to each of these question sets reminds students: “Cite textual evidence to support your responses.”
  • In Volume 1, Unit 2, Part 2, after each text are “Critical Reading” leveled questions that focus on either Key Ideas and Details or Integrate Knowledge and Ideas. For example, “(a) At what time of day does the stranger arrive at the house? (b) Analyze: In what ways does this choice add to the air of mystery surrounding the stranger?”
  • In Volume 1, Unit 3, Part 1, Close reading activities ask students: “Write a persuasive essay about the importance of archaeology and whether society has a responsibility to preserve historical sites and objects. Take and defend a position about the types of documents, sites, or objects that are most important, and explain your reasons. Support your claims with details from the ‘Periodical Abstract’ and the ‘Government Form’.”
  • In Volume 2, Unit 4, Part One Text Set, In a follow-up activity after “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufock” under critical reading activities, students are asked “What is the effect of the repetition of ‘there will be time’ in lines 23-34 and again in lines 37-48?” Then, under Writing to Sources, students are asked to write an argumentative essay and present and defend their own analysis of this character. In the prewriting directions they are told to support their viewpoint through detailed references to the text.
  • In Volume Two, Unit 4, Part Two Text Set, “Robert Frost” students write an argument at the end of the unit. They are writing a critical essay and are asked to use examples from Frost’s poems to bolster their own views or to contrast his worldview with their own.
  • At the end of each text there is a set of mostly text-specific questions, under the title, ‘Critical Reading’. Examples of these questions include:
  • Unit 1: “Key Ideas and Details (a) What household activities are described in the first two stanzas? (b) Analyze: How do these images contribute to the idea of being ‘clothed in holy robes for glory,’ stated in the third stanza?”
  • Unit 2: “Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Does the portrait this story paints of Puritan New England seem too sympathetic, too harsh, or simply accurate? Explain. In your response, use at least two of these Essential Question words: severe, powerful, community, struggle.”
  • Unit 3: “Craft and Structure (a) Hypothesize: Do you think Twain could have written so well about riverboat life had he not become a pilot himself? Explain. (b) Apply: In what ways do you think Twain’s love for the MIssissippi River contributed to his success as a writer?”
  • Unit 5: “Key Ideas and Details (a) Support: What evidence suggests that sharp divisions exist among the people of Salem Village? (b) Apply: Name two others who may be accused. Explain your choices.”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent and text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

There are a variety of culminating tasks found throughout the texts. One is found in the introductory part of each unit, titled Multiple Perspectives on the Era, with a Speaking and Listening: Collaboration tasks. At the end of each text set, students have an opportunity to write about the texts read and analyzed. Also, each unit includes Common Core Extended Studies which includes culminating tasks for the texts included in the Extended Study. At the end of each unit there is a Common Core Assessment Workshop. Within this Workshop, the Constructed Responses are text dependent and require use of the text from the unit. There are three Writing prompts and three Speaking and Listening tasks.

Culminating tasks are varied over the year. However, not all writing tasks are supported by text dependent questions and activities needed to support the culminating tasks. The “Writing Workshop”, “Speaking and Listening”, “Language Study” assessments are most often not tied to text, either from the unit’s selections or otherwise. The “Text Set Workshop” assessments require students further explore the unit’s texts and build from the central themes of those texts. As the text-specific questions accompanying these texts explore similar themes, this set of assessments builds from previous text-dependent questions in the materials. The “Assessment Workshop: Test-Taking Practice” are designed to give students direct practice with SAT and ACT tests. The texts and questions in these assessments are not tied to those of unit. The “Assessment Workshop: Constructed Response” are text-dependent because they require the use of texts from the unit but do not explore themes from text-dependent questions or extend previous text dependent tasks.

After Unit 2 there is a Text Set Workshop. In Part 1: Meeting of Cultures, students are asked to write an argumentative essay about the first European explorers arriving in North America. In Part 2: The Puritan Influence, students are asked to research the Puritans coming to North America in search of religious freedom and the opportunity to lead lives according to their own principles. In Part 3: A Nation is Born, students are asked to conduct a listening and speaking project in the form of a press conference.

  • In Unit 3, Part 3, students read “A Wagner Matinee”. After they write an argument about how the story provoked an outcry among Nebraskans who felt Carter had portrayed the state unfairly. A question leading to this task, “What questions might you ask about the difficulties of Aunt Georgiana’s life in Nebraska? Reread to find two details in the story that help you understand Nebraska life at the time in history. In what ways do these details clarify the meaning of the story for you?”
  • In Unit 5, in the Assessment Workshop: Constructed Responses students have a prompt that asks to write an essay in which they analyze the role that setting and characters play in driving the plot events in a story from this unit. One of the stories in this unit is The Crucible. A questions leading to this prompt, “Ask students what Giles Corey’s remarks about his wife’s books show about women in these times.” Also, “How does Mrs. Putman’s confession add to the rising action?” Another example, is found in a Literature in Context, where students read a short paragraph on “The Inquisition”. Then, “What else might the Salem trials have in common with the Inquisition?”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

At the end of every unit, in the Assessment: Synthesis there is one speaking and listening opportunity where students have a group discussion. In the Close Reading Workshop found in each unit, there is a “Discussions” paragraph, which gives students some directions on how to have discussions. The directions for these end of unit activities ask students to “refer to text in this section, other texts you have read, your personal experience, and research you have conducted to support your ideas.” In some activities, there is a direction to “Present your ideas using academic vocabulary”, however, there is no modeling of academic vocabulary found in the material. There are some opportunities to promote students’ ability to master grade level speaking and listening standards. Within the reading selections, there are questions for teachers to ask in the margins of the teacher’s edition. In some lessons, directions will state “Have students discuss...” There are no discussion protocols provided in the material. The teacher materials provided repeat the students’ directions and remind teachers to prompt their students to read the directions. However, there are some protocols, monitoring tools, accountability rubrics, and guidance for organizing students found in the Professional Development Guidebook. Examples of materials partially meeting this indicator include, but are not limited to:

The speaking protocols found in the Professional Development Guidebook are; Numbered Heads, Think-Write-Pair- Share, Save the Last Word for Me, Paired Discussion, and Give One, Get One.

  • At the end of each unit, there are Assessment: Synthesis Lessons:
    • Unit 1: Evaluate a Persuasive Speech
    • Unit 2: Write & Deliver a Persuasive Speech
    • Unit 3: Oral Interpretation of a Literary Works
    • Unit 4: Analyze a Non-Print Political Advertisement
    • Unit 5: Analyze and Evaluate Entertainment Media
    • Unit 6: Compare Print News Coverage

All of these lessons include a page on how to complete the skill and then a page on implementing the skill.

  • In Unit 1, Part 1, in the “Introduce” section at the beginning of the unit, the teacher is given a very detailed lesson with questions to work through the background information prior to reading texts. In the teacher edition, many questions are given that teachers might use to guide students through discussions on the texts. These are in bold “Ask” and provide possible answers. They are meant to be used as whole class discussion, at various places, the teacher instructions state to “summarize the class discussion” before moving on to the next text. At the end of this section, there are two opportunities that are labeled as speaking and listening. The first is only in the teacher edition as “Speaking and Listening: Collaboration” and provides three questions to guide a class discussion. There is a reference to the Professional Development Guidebook p. 65 for help to conduct a discussion. The second opportunity is printed in the student edition and is part of the “Integrate and Evaluate Information” activity called “Speaking and Listening: Oral Presentation.” Students are to “develop an oral presentation in which you perform an example of the form (of spoken word).” Students are given four forms of early American spoken word and are to research and perform the example they chose. No instructions are given for whether this is a group or individual activity, though there is direction in the teacher edition to have students who chose the same form to “work together to list likely research resources.”
  • In Unit 1, There is an Assessment Workshop, Speaking and Listening Task. Students are directed, “As you speak, present information, findings, and evidence clearly so that listeners can follow your line of reasoning. Make sure your use of language speaking style, and content are appropriate for a formal discussion”. However, there are no protocols or examples for students to follow.
  • In Unit 2, there are three speaking and listening tasks. In all of these tasks, the standard that is addressed under speaking and listening is standards 6, “Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate”. The tasks include delivering a speech and delivering two oral presentations. Also, in Unit 2 Part 3, students are prompted to discuss the role of individuals in our society today. They are provided with three questions to discuss and prompted to choose a point person to share the group’s conclusions with the class.
  • In Unit 2, students get the following directions for engaging in a debate, “Designate someone to moderate the debate. This person will make sure students from each team speak in order and for equal amounts of time. Each debate team should prepare and deliver an opening statement that is lively, to the point, and presents the team’s primary claim. Make sure you have evidence to support each of your team’s points. Anticipate claims opposing team members might make in favor of their poet. Have responses ready to counter these claims. Be respectful of others’ opinions at all times.
  • In Unit 3, there are three speaking and listening tasks for students to participate in. Students are asked to identify all works from the unit to engage in the task which is to hold a panel discussion in which they analyze various authors’ use of irony in works from Unit 3. Also in Unit 3 there is the following activity; “Speaking and Listening: Collaboration Small Group Discussion 1. Review the assignment with students. Divide the class into small groups and have students discuss the idea of how historians divide the past into meaningful time periods. Have a representative from each group present the group’s ideas to the class. 3. Open up the discussion to the whole class. Write on the board the sentence, ‘What are the benefits of organizing the past into ‘meaningful units’? What are the drawbacks?’ Then invite students to respond, and list their comments on the board. 4. To help conduct the discussion, use the Discussion Guide in the Professional Development Guidebook, page 65.
  • In Unit 4, in “Winter Dreams” students have a few opportunities to discuss the text. The first one is in Activating Prior Knowledge, “Have students discuss what this description reveals about Judy. After they read the story discuss their predictions and compare them against the actual plot.” Another opportunity is midway through the story, “Have three students act out the scene described in the bracketed passage.” Students are asked to read aloud bracketed passages often during this story. Lastly, teachers are directed to lead a class discussion, probing for what students have learned that confirms or invalidates their initial thoughts. Directions state, “Encourage students to cite specific textual details to support their responses.” There is no protocol to put into place. Within this story there is one opportunity to use evidence in the discussion. No modeling of academic vocabulary. Teacher materials provide limited support and direction to fully implement.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence. Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading and researching through varied grade-level-appropriate speaking and listening opportunities. Opportunities include speeches, formal presentations, and engaging in small and large group discussions.

Speaking and listening opportunities are not frequent over the course of the school year. It happens once at the beginning of the unit in the “Snapshot of the Periods” and once at the end of the unit. Instruction and speaking and listening opportunities throughout the unit lessons is rare. End of unit activities do increase in complexity. Speaking and listening is often presented as a stand alone task.Prompts and presentations are included in final tasks with criteria for success listed, however clear instruction on how to engage in small or large discussions, debates, formal presentations is not included within materials. Practice in speaking and listening is not varied over the school year.

The speaking and listening work requires students to marshall evidence from texts and sources and is applied over the course of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, student directions include: “William L. Andrews raises an important question at the end of his essay: Has the United States become the country early citizens imagine? Conduct a full-class discussion about this issue. Work together to achieve the following goals: Determine the ideals held by Jefferson and his contemporaries. Come to a consensus about whether modern America has fulfilled these ideals.”
  • In the unit openers (Snapshot of the Period), there is a speaking and listening activity that asks students to research information and then present. For example, in Unit 2, students use a variety of print and electronic resources to research one of the nineteenth-century inventions. Then they write and deliver a slide presentation that explores the impact of the invention on American life: the mechanical reaper, the cotton gin, the steam locomotive, the telegraph, the bicycle. In their presentation they should answer the following questions: What aspects of American life did the invention affect or change? What ripple effects did the invention cause? Whom did the invention most benefit? Whom, if anyone, did the invention harm? In Unit Three, in “Snapshot of the Period”, students read “Recent Scholarship: Defining an Era” by Nell Irvin Painter. After they read, there is a Speaking and Listening: Collaboration where students hold a small group discussion about their own time period. What event or events define it? When would you say it started? What name or label would you give it? As a group, arrive at a consensus and then share your ideas with the class.
  • In Unit 2, students are prompted, “Both Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman are today acknowledged as poetic geniuses. Review their work, giving special attention to Whitman’s ‘Preface to the 1855 Edition of Leaves of Grass’ Consider the qualities that make these writers so enduringly great. Assignment: Establish two debate teams, one focusing on Dickinson and one focusing on Whitman. Prepare to have a debate about which was the greater and more influential of the two poets. Look to secondary sources, including biographies and literary criticism.”
  • In Unit 3, Part 1, there is one opportunity for students to marshall evidence from the text while practicing speaking and listening with the text. In “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” the teacher edition states, “Have students read aloud the spiritual, emphasizing the rhythm and rhymes. Ask students the Listening question.” The listening question has students read the song aloud. What is the effect of the repetition of the word home?
  • In Unit 3, Part 2, there is a research opportunity where students present information in an oral presentation. Within this, the teacher support states to “Organize students into groups. Suggest that one student in each group record its ideas and share them with the class. Encourage students to give specific examples of their favorite aspects of American humor today. Specify the amount of time that groups will have to work together.”
  • In Unit 4, students have an opportunity to create a multimedia presentation. Directions say, “Choose one of these popular culture forms and prepare a brief multimedia presentation about its significance during the period of 1914-1945. There are some questions for students to answer, such as, “Who were some of the outstanding people in this field and what did they do?” Student directions for creating this project state, “Integrate print, visual, and audio examples into your presentation to communicate your points clearly and to add interest to your presentation.”

Every unit contains a Speaking and Listening lesson at the end of the unit. The lessons include:

  • Unit 1: Evaluate a Persuasive Speech
  • Unit 2: Write & Deliver a Persuasive Speech
  • Unit 3: Oral Interpretation of a Literary Works
  • Unit 4: Analyze a Non-Print Political Advertisement
  • Unit 5: Analyze and Evaluate Entertainment Media
  • Unit 6: Compare Print News Coverage

While there are ample opportunities for listening and speaking about what is read and researched, the facilitation, monitoring and instruction within the materials is limited.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Examples include:

  • At the end of each unit there is a ‘Writing Workshop’ portion (six times total for the 11th grade materials). Each workshop comes with a prompt and is followed by writing process details under the headings, ‘Prewriting and Planning’, ‘Drafting’, ‘Revising’, ‘Developing your Style’, ‘Editing and Proofreading’, ‘Publishing, Presenting, and Reflecting’
  • Some Close Reading Activities at the end of various texts have a ‘Writing to Sources’ section. In some cases the ‘Writing to Sources’ task comes with a prompt and process writing details. In these cases, there is a prompt followed by short details for writing process under the headings, ‘Prewriting’, ‘Drafting’, ‘Revising’.
  • In Unit 1 Part 1 there is a writing prompt, “William L. Andrews states that the American Revolution created “a new person.” What do you think “a new person” means? Does this idea still inform American identity? Integrate information from this textbook and other sources to support your ideas.” This seems like a shorter writing assignment, but there is no time limit mentioned of how long it should actually last.
  • In Unit 1, Part 1, students are asked to, “choose one of the three myths and turn it into a play that a group of classmates can perform for an audience.” Again, there is no limit of time here, but it does give students directions to prewrite and draft, making it seem like a process writing activity. Students are directed to prewrite, draft, and revise. However, There is no instruction, revising tips or strategies provided. Students are instructed to, “Read your draft aloud. If you find that some of the dialogue is hard to say, rewrite those sections so they sound more natural.”
  • In Unit 2, as a part of the Writing Workshop, students are asked to write a reflective essay where they, “explore a personal experience or an event and reflect on its deeper meaning.” Students are asked to prewrite, narrow topic, gather details, shape their writing, provide elaboration, revise their overall structure, revise their sentences, and then develop their style. In this assignment the revising section is specific and asks students to look at specific things, along with giving them a student model.
  • Each lesson has a close reading tool and an online writer’s notebook available in their digital resources. Students have access to work online with finishing assignments or using the close reading tools.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards. May include “blended” styles.

Materials include sufficient writing opportunities for a whole year’s use. Materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to practice and apply different genres/modes of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. However, learning opportunities are limited. There is a Writing Workshop at the end of each unit which teaches a writing lesson. However, students are asked to practice and apply genres/modes throughout the entire unit, including at the beginning before instruction on those genres and modes has been provided. Materials provide few opportunities for students/teachers to monitor progress in writing skills. Rubrics and checklists are found in the Writing Workshops at the end of each unit (6 times total). The “Writing to Sources” tasks say to use rubrics which are in the Professional Development Guidebook. Also, in the teacher’s edition, it says to guide students to writing a specific text using the Support for Writing page, available online. The writing tasks found in the Common Core Assessment Workshop provide a rubric and a checklist for tasks.

None of the six Writing Workshops require students to connect to text or text sets, however at the end of every unit there is a Text Set Workshop where students explore the fundamental connections among the texts through a writing task. In the Writing to Sources activities students have to connect to the text in order to complete the activity.

  • In Unit 1, under the Close Reading section students: “Choose one of the three myths and turn it into a play that a group of classmates can perform for an audience.” This involves using the myths students read, but there isn’t much writing they have to create on their own since the plays are already written.
  • Some examples of the variety of genres/modes are seen in these assignments:
    • Unit 3, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to sources, Argument,Students are prompted: “ When it was first published, Dunbar’s work received mixed reviews. Conduct research to find examples of both positive and negative responses to Dunbar’s work. In a report, summarize your findings and take a position about Dunbar’s legacy. Examine how ideas help during Dunbar’s era - including prejudice - may have influenced critics.
  • Unit 4, Part 1, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources Informative Text, “Winter Dreams” can be thought of as a commentary on the notion of the American Dream - the idea that a person’s success depends more on his or her efforts than o factors such as class or race. In an essay, explore the vision of the American Dream as Dexter experiences it.
  • Unit 4, Part 2, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Argument,” In his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Faulkner notes that the writer’s duty is “to help endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pite and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past.” Apply this criteria to a critical review of “A Rose for Emily.” Consider whether Faulkner fulfills his ideal. Support your opinion with facts, details, quotations, or other information and examples from the story.
  • Unit 5, Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response, Writing Task 1: Literature, Analyze Word Choice, Write an essay in which you analyze the figurative and connotative language in a story or a poem from this unit.
  • Unit 5, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources Argumentative Text: Effective persuasive writing in Salem could have saved lives or even more effectively condemned the accused. Assume the persona of a character in the play and write a persuasive letter urging another character to take a particular course of action.
  • Unit 6, Part 1 Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Narrative Text, In both literature and life, stories are shaped by the points of view of those who tell them. Write a new version of the story from the point of view of one of the men who changes Yolanda’s tire.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis and/or evaluation of information, supports, claims.

Writing opportunities are presented throughout the materials but are not explicitly taught or monitored and are not consistently part of daily and weekly lessons that flow from the instruction and text-dependent questions. The majority of these writing tasks require the use of evidence from texts, however there are writing tasks that do not require evidence and ask for personal experiences and/or opinions and to go beyond the text. Materials do not always meet the grade level demands of the standards listed for this indicator, specifically the standard where students produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to tasks, purpose, and audience. Directions for students and teachers are limited and brief in regards to development, organization, style, purpose, and audience.

Examples of writing tasks found in the units that provide opportunities for students to learn, practice and apply writing using evidence while encouraging close reading of the the texts include:

  • In Unit 1, Part 2, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources Argument. “ A speaker’s choice of persuasive techniques should depend on the audience and the occasion. Write an evaluation of the persuasive techniques that Edwards uses. Discuss the responses he evokes in an audience and the ways he achieves it.”
  • In Unit 2, Part 1, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources,Informative Text. “Choose two passages from the poems you have just read that evoke distinct moods in the readers. The passages should be between five and ten lines long. Write a compare-and-contrast essay in which you describe the mood evoked by each passage and discuss the stylistic devices the poet uses to create those moods. For example, in addition to meter, consider each poem’s subject, striking images or work choices, and other aspects that you find noteworthy. Support your comparisons and contrasts with details from the passage.”
  • In Unit 2, Close Reading Activities, Timed Writing. “Refer to both the Consumer Guide and the Government Report to write a position statement, a persuasive essay in which you state and support an opinion about the management of natural resources both today and in the future. Cite facts, statistics, and quotations from the documents to support your case and persuade readers to agree with your position.
  • In Unit 4, Part 1, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Informative Text, “The Turtle” is part of Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath, which portrays the struggles of a Depression-era farm family. Steinbeck intended that readers draw parallels between the turtle and the human characters. Write an essay connection the events described in “The Turtle” to the lives of ordinary people during the Great Depression.
  • In Unit 4, Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response, Writing Task 2. Students, “Write an essay in which you analyze the impact of word choice in a poem from this unit.”
  • In Unit 5, Part 3, CLose Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Explanatory Text. Directions say, “Although Miller wrote The Crucible in response to the hysteria caused by anti-Communist hearings of the late 1940s to 1950s, the themes of the play have endured. Indeed, The Crucible remains one of the most-performed plays worldwide. Write an essay in which you interpret the play’s primary themes and explain how the reflect both the play’s historical context and universal human issues.”
  • In Unit 6, Assessment Workshop, Writing Task 2. “Write an essay in which you analyze the word choice and tone in a literary work from this unit.”

Examples of writing tasks that do not require students to use evidence from the texts under consideration and do not require close reading of the text, or analysis or claims include, but are not limited to:

  • All of the Writing Workshop tasks: For example in In Unit 3 and In Unit 5, students, “Write an argument essay that urges readers to accept your viewpoint on and claims about an issue.”
  • In Unit 4, Part 3, Close Reading Activity, Timed Writing. Write an argumentative essay in which you persuade readers that it is or is not a good idea to do important research using an online encyclopedia that is written and edited by its users. Consider both the benefits and issues such as an online tool might present. Cite specific details, including your own observations, to support your argument. This is a prompt without a text discussing the usefulness of wikis or the use of an actual wiki, just a printed example of a wiki.
  • In Unit 5, Part 3, Close Reading Activity, Timed Writing. “When The Crucible premiered, critics had the power to make or break a Broadway play. Today, with the rise the Internet, social networking sites, and numerous forms of publishing, can any one critic still be as important or as powerful in any art form? Write an argumentative essay in which you express and defend your opinion on this topic. Support you claims with detail from the feature article and theater reviews as well as your own observations and experience.” This is a prompt without any example of any internet sources or a text discussing the impact of critics in various forms.
  • In Unit 1, Part 1, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Found Poem. “A found poem is a poem created from writing or speech not intended to be poetry. Choose a passage from the Iroquois Constitution that you think is especially strong or beautiful. Turn it into a poem by rewriting it with line breaks like those of poetry. Organize the stanzas and place the line breaks where you feel they create the most impact. Read your poem aloud to verify your choices; revise them if necessary.
  • In Unit 4, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources,Narrative Text. “Write a reflective essay that tells a story about a moment in your life that inspired you to pursue something you love. Develop a clear conflict or problem by describing obstacles you faced. Develop a clear resolution by showing the events that inspired you and the change that occurred as a result. Enhance the plot and develop characters by using a range of literary strategies and devices, including dialogue.
  • In Unit 5, Part 2, Close Reading Activity, Writing to Sources. “Prepare a response to “One Art” and “Filling Station” in more than one genre, or form. Illustrate the poems with drawings, paintings, photographs, or collage of images from other sources, including the internet. Then, write an explanation of your choices. Finally, combine the images with the text in a poster to display in your classroom.
  • In Unit 6, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Informative Text. “Write a letter to the author of the essay you found most interesting. Explain what you liked, what you did not like, and ask any questions you might have.”
  • In Unit 6, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Narrative Text. “Both of these writers share an experience from the past. Choose a significant event that you have experienced and write a brief memoir exploring its meaning.

The materials do not meet all the demands of the standards listed for this indicator. For example, Writing Standard 1 speaks specifically about developing “claims and counterclaims fairly, while pointing out strengths and limitations of both”. No counterclaims were required to be addressed in students writing. There was also a lack of norms and conventions of the discipline in which students are writing. Writing standard 8 was also missing. There was no instruction on how to cite sources or how to determine if a source is reliable.

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application context.

A variety of opportunities exist for students to practice and apply grammar and conventions skills as stand-alone activities or as applied to a text. Some explicit instruction is made. There is generally one task for each standard present. Most tasks that the materials identify as aligned to language standards are tasks that require students to already know about the grammar rule or convention. Often, the direct instruction comes in units after the tasks that require students to know and apply the rule. In some instances pages are cited for language standards instruction and have none at all. Grammar and convention instruction is provided in the same context each time - as exercises that require students to recognize use of grammar and conventions in a given text, as revision guidelines, or as stand-alone (not attached to any particular text instruction) explicit instruction. There is no change in the sophistication of these contexts throughout the school year.

  • The teacher’s guide identifies language standards and provides page numbers for exercises aligned to those standards. However, sometimes this is not accurate, as there are no exercises, or no instruction/guidance on those standards. For example:
    • Language Standard 1a: Parallel Structure. The teacher’s guide lists pages 141, 199, and 290, where there is no reference to parallelism at all. On page 466, parallel structure is defined, but no examples are given. Students must find them in the reading selection. On page 634, parallel structure is finally fully explained, and multiple examples are given.
    • Language Standard 5b: Nuance in word meaning of words with similar denotations. The following pages are referred to in the teacher’s guide: On pages 108-09 there is an explanation of how a dictionary or thesaurus can help with connotations and denotations, but there are no exercises for students to practice. On page 290 there are no exercises with use of nuanced word meaning for words with similar denotations. Then on page 342 there is an exercise on analyzing poetic language. The definitions of denotation and connotation are presented, and there are examples of each. There are no exercises for students to practice. On page 654-655 a language study lesson is found with explicit instruction on connotation and denotation).
  • For many standards there is no increase in sophistication in the instruction as the school year progresses. This is demonstrated by following vocabulary lessons over the school year:
  • Unit 1, Part 2, Close Reading Activities Language Study Vocabulary: “The words listed below appear in “Rules of the Game.” Using your knowledge of these words, tell whether each sentence below makes sense. Use the meaning of the italicized word to explain your answer.”
  • Unit 1, Part 3, Close Reading Activities Language Study Selection Vocabulary:” The following sentences appear in “The Scarlet Ibis.” Define each boldface word, and use the word in a sentence of your own.”
  • Unit 3, Part 2, Close Reading Activities Language Study Vocabulary: “The italicized words in the numbered statements below appear in Poetry Collection 4. Decide whether each statement is usually true or usually false. Then, explain your answer.”
  • Unit 3, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Language Study Selection Vocabulary: “The following passages appear in the two poems. Research the etymology (history) of each boldface word. Then, explain each word’s modern English meaning.”
  • Unit 5, Part 2, Close Reading Activities, Language Study Vocabulary: “The italicized word in each sentence appears in the excerpt from the Odyssey, Part 2. Indicate whether each statement is usually true or usually false. Explain your answers. Then, revise the statements to make them true.”
  • Unit 5, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, p. 884: Language Study, Selection Vocabulary The following passages appear in “The Washwoman.” Define each boldface word. Then, use each word in a new sentence.
  • A variety of opportunities exist for students to practice and apply grammar and conventions skills as stand-alone activities or as applied to a text. Each Close Reading Activity in Parts 2, and 3, has a Language Study section with exercises that focus on vocabulary and word study. Part 4 has no such opportunities. Part 1 only has vocabulary definitional exercises.
  • Revising and Editing prompts exist for many of the writing prompts. These often include guidance on revising for clarity and conventions. However, some of these revision guidelines are specific to standards and some are not. Examples of specific and nonspecific guidelines include:
    • Unit 1, Part 3, Writing to Sources: Argument, Review Style: “Revise to cut wordy language. Check that you have found the clearest, simplest way to communicate your ideas. Omit unnecessary words and replace vague words with better choices that clearly state what you mean.”
    • Unit 3, Part 3, Assessment Synthesis, Writing: Narrative, Conventions: “Check your work to eliminate errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. “
    • Unit 4, Part 2, Writing Process, Revising to Combine Sentences With Phrases:”In Your Writing, review your draft, looking for short sentences that might be combined using appositive, participial, gerund, or infinitive phrases. Consider combining these sentences.”
    • Unit 5, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Write, Editing and Proofreading: “ Review your draft to make sure you have avoided errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics. Check that you have maintained an appropriate academic style throughout your essay. Be sure that any paraphrases accurately reflect the original text.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Grade 11 do not meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Texts are partially around topics/themes but their sequencing is unclear. Materials contain few sets of questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. The materials do contain some sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Culminating tasks do not always promote the building of students’ knowledge of the theme/topic. The materials include a year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words across texts throughout the year, however, it is not cohesive and the vocabulary does not connect across texts. Materials include some writing instruction aligned to the standards and shifts for the grade level, although teachers may need to supplement and add more practice to ensure students are mastering standards. The materials include some focused research skills practice. The materials do not meet the expectations for materials providing a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

8/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently. Texts are connected by a grade level appropriate topic and/or theme. In these materials, texts are grounded in 11th grade content, specifically, American history and literature. They are mostly compiled by time period or text type genre rather than a focused topic or theme. Texts do build some knowledge across the school year, though it is not clear that the collections of texts are carefully sequenced so that students’ will build knowledge about the world over the course of the year. This is because the topic of each unit, framed by an era of American history, is quite broad. As a result, the texts that are included in each unit are not focused enough to help students build knowledge on a single topic or theme. Since there is no clear, systematic, and sequenced set of texts in each grade level so it is difficult to identify to what extent students will be able to build the prerequisite knowledge and vocabulary to successfully access increasingly complex grade level text independently.

  • Texts are connected by a grade level appropriate topic or theme. Units 1 - 4 follow the pattern of an overall theme, an era, and sub-themes in parts 1-3. This is exemplified below:
    • Unit 1 Theme: A Gathering of Voices. Text selections are “Literature of Early America (beginnings to 1800). Each part of the unit has a sub-theme. Part 1 - “Meeting of Cultures”, Part 2 - “The Puritan Influence”, and Part 3 - “A Nation is Born”.
  • Unit 1: A Gathering of Voices has a wide collection of texts on the subject of early America (“Museum Indians” by Susan Power, excerpts of the Iroquis Constitution by Dekanawidah and Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards, and The Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson.) Various parts in the unit are subdivided into text-type collections: Part 3 includes “Extended Study: Speeches”, “Comparing Literary Works” and “Comparing Autobiography Past and Present”.
  • Unit 3: Division, Reconciliation, and Expansion has a wide collection of texts about the US Civil War and the expansion of the American West (“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce, from My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass, “Letter to His Son” by Robert E. Lee, from Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain, “I Will Fight No More Forever” by Chief Joseph). Various parts of the unit are subdivided into type-type connections: Part 1 includes: “Extended Study: Narrative Nonfiction”, “Comparing Humor Past and Present”.
  • Unit 5: Prosperity and Protest has a wide collection of texts either written during or on the subject of literature in the post-war era (1945-1970). Various subtopics provide further topical focus, for example - Part One: War Shock, Part Three Tex Set: Literature of Protest. However, on the whole the unit is not focused on a single topic or theme. The texts include: from Hiroshima by John Hersey, “Backing the Attack” by the editors of the New York Times, “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath, “The Purpose of Theater” by Arthur Miller, “Life in his Language” by Toni Morrison, “A Rock of the Modern Age, Arthur Miller is Everywhere"

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

After each text or text set there are Critical Reading questions and Close Reading Activities which include key ideas and details, integration of knowledge and ideas, and craft and structure. All three types of questIons can also be found in the Extended Study questions. Students’ opportunities for analyzing language and author’s word choice are very limited. Questions and tasks within the parts provide evidence of student understanding of the definitions and concepts of the components identified in each unit. However, there are no culminating tasks at the end of each part for students to show their understanding of concepts. Also at the end of each unit there are no opportunities for students to show they are building understanding of topics. The tasks at the end of the unit are not necessarily related to key ideas and details or craft and structure, but are often centered around one or two of the Essential Questions of the textbook. The larger tasks do not build understanding of the texts.

  • There are few questions that support students in analyzing author’s language and word choice. Most of the questions focus on key ideas and details, structure, and craft. The questions that do focus on language or word choice do not support students to analyze its effect on the text. Unit 4, Close Reading Activities, There is an activity called Vocabulary Acquisition and Use, Vocabulary: Synonyms. Students are asked to “review the words from the vocabulary list on page 706. Then, choose the letter of the word that is the best synonym, or word with a similar meaning, for the first word. Explain your thinking”
  • Each text contains a Critical Reading section along with a Literary Analysis piece where students are asked questions such as Key Ideas and Details. In one of the first stories, When Grizzlies Walked Upright by Modoc, students are not asked any structure or craft questions. They are simply focused on details and key ideas.
  • In 11th grade each unit is centered around a topic. For example, Unit 1: A Gathering of Voices is based off of Literature of Early America (Beginnings to 1800), Unit 2: A Growing Nation is based off of Literature of the American Renaissance (1800 to 1870), Unit 3: Division, Reconciliation, and Expansionis based off of literature of the Civil War and the Frontier (1850 to 1914), Unit 4:Disillusion, Defiance, and Discontent is based off of Literature of the Modern Age (1914 to 1945), and Unit 5: Prosperity and Protest which is based off of Literature of the Post-War Era (!945 to 1970). Within each of these units are three different text sets centered around different topics. There is not one place specifically where the teacher knows whether students are making meaning or building understanding of the texts.
  • At the end of the unit there is a Research Task along with a Writing Workshop. In Unit 1 Writing Workshop it asks students to “Choose an event from your life that is meaningful to you, interesting to readers, and not awkward or painful to share”. This activity does not prove students have made meaning or have built understanding or knowledge of the texts and topics at hand.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts. The integration of knowledge and ideas does not change from the first to the last tasks in the materials.

Most questions support student analysis of a given text, but not often in the service of building knowledge and ideas about larger topics or themes. This is partially because there are not coherent topics or themes across the materials. There are answer keys for the Critical Reading and Close Reading Activity questions. These might help guide teachers to support students’ answers, though it is unclear in the materials how teacher should use these answers. There are process guidelines for multiple readings. Some questions are provided across texts, but these are often not well-aligned to the complexity, themes, language, etc. of the texts and so are not quality questions and tasks. None of the text sets listed in the table of contents have questions that bridge between all the texts in the set. Assessment questions at the end of each unit often require students to only choose one text to analyze.

  • Questions that build knowledge and ideas are found throughout the text selections. For example:
    • Unit 4, Part 2,Critical Reading, Key Ideas and Details, “(a) According to Faulkner, will humanity endure or prevail? (b) Define: In what ways does Faulkner define the difference between enduring and prevailing?”
    • Unit 6, Part 3, Integration of Knowledge and Ideas, “Based on these two memoirs, what does the idea of homeland mean? Use at least two of these Essential Question words: global, natural, formative, environment, exile.”
    • Unit 6, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Key IDeas and Details, “(a) Identify two events that Momaday describes in this excerpt. (b) What connects these events to the cultural theme he introduces in the opening paragraph?”
  • The integration of knowledge and ideas does not change from the first to the last tasks in the materials. In fact, the integration of knowledge and ideas is present in the assessment tasks for unit 1 and not present for the assessment tasks in unit 6. For example: Unit 1, Performance Tasks, “Write an essay in which you analyze one of the Foundational U.S. documents that appears in this unit, identifying its theme, purpose, and key rhetorical features.” For the Unit 6 Performance Tasks, there are no questions that require students to integrate any specific information. Instead, each task is focused on a single text and asks students to analyze author's word choice and tone, author’s rhetoric, or the structure of a literary work.
  • Various sections of each unit pair one or more text into small sets and include questions that bridge these texts. For example:
    • Unit 4, part 1, there is a pair of E.E. Cummings poems preceded by informational text on the author. One task at the end of the set asks students to use information from 2 or 3 of these texts: Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources - Informative Text “Imagine that E.E. Cummings will be giving a poetry reading at a bookstore in your town. As the organizer of the event, write an introduction that provides background about the poet and prepares the audience for the poetry they will hear. Select the most relevant and interesting facts about Cummings and include at least one eloquent quotation from the poet. Use a conversational style appropriate to the setting and purpose of the event. “
    • Unit 5, part 3, Comparing Literary Works: Rhetorical Devices pairs John F. Kennedy’s “Inaugural Address” with an excerpt of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham City Jail”. One question of the ten at the end of this set connects the two texts. Comparing Literary Works (a) Which text - Kennedy’s speech or King;s letter - makes more frequent use of parallelism and antithesis? (b) Explain why each author’s use of these devices is appropriate to the kind of document he is writing and to its method of deliver.
    • Unit 6, Close Reading Activities for Technical Report and Mission Statement,, Timed Writing, Argument (40 Minutes). “Both the Technical Report and Mission Statement touch on the idea of heritage. Names represent the heritage of families and ethnic groups, while museums preserve our shared historical and cultural heritage. Write an argumentative essay in which you discuss who should bear the most responsibility for preserving heritage sites. Consider the government, the general public, non-profit organizations, or another institution. Cite information from the Technical Report and Mission Statement to support your ideas.”
  • Text Sets listed in the Table of Contents for each unit (three sets for each unit) do not have questions that bridge between all the texts in the set at the end of each set. There are tasks under the ‘Text Set Workshop’ section at the end of each unit. Some of these tasks are text-dependent, yet none of them are text specific. Few are of the quality that support students to provide analysis across various texts.
    • Unit 5 Text Set Workshop, “Work with a partner to create documentary slide shows that present multimedia interpretations of literary works. Develop one presentation about one of the Anchor Text poems, and one about a Part 2 selection that you see as thematically related. Conduct research and analyze the texts to answer questions such as: What is the history of each work?; What does a close reading of each work reveal about its meaning? Gather video clips and images such as photograms, paintings, and illustrations. Use sound when possible. Embed the video files or links to videos in you slide show. Share your documentaries with your classmates.”
    • Unit 6, Text Set Workshop, “Develop and defend a claim about the ways in which one or more characters in this text, particularly in the Anchor Text, use the past to create a sense of identity. As a way of exploring this idea, consider how an everyday item, experience, or encounter connects a person to hise or her heritage. Use textual evidence and background information to support your claim.”
  • There are some questions that are labeled as bridging between texts that do not, in fact, require students to integrate information from multiple texts in the selection. For example, in Unit 6, Part 2, Close Reading Activities for “Traveling Through the Dark”, “The Secret”, and “The GIft”, question 7 ‘Integration of Knowledge and Ideas’: Follow these steps to interpret each of these lyrical poems: “a)Identify the central image or event in each poem. (b) List two pieces of new information you learned about this image over the course of the poem. (c) Explain how your understanding of the image changes. (d)Interpret the poem by telling what you think each central image means to the speaker.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks are not multifaceted. They do not provide students the opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. Although there are a multitude of assessment opportunities at the end of each unit, many of them are optional. Assessments at the end of units are not integrated to combine reading, writing, speaking and listening. Assessments frequently only address two standards at a time, reading and writing. Earlier questions and tasks in the unit do not give the teacher information about students’ readiness to complete culminating tasks.

  • Most of the Assessment Workshop tasks only address one or two standards at a time. For example:
    • Unit 4, Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response, Writing, Task 3: Literature, Analyze Text Structure, Write an essay in which you analyze how an author’s choice of a particular structure adds to the overall meaning and impact of a story in this unit.
    • Unit 4, Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response, Speaking and Listening, Task 6: Literature/Informational Text, Analyze Author’s Styles, Participate in a discussion group in which you compare and contrast authors’ styles in a work of fiction and a work of nonfiction from this unit.
    • Unit 5, Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response Writing, Task 1: Literature, Analyze Word Choice, Write an essay in which you analyze the figurative and connotative language in a story or a poem from this unit.
    • Unit 6, Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response, Speaking and Listening, Task 4, Analyze Story Elements, Deliver an oral presentation in which you analyze the development of and relationship among elements of a work of fiction from this unit.
  • In the Assessment Workshop portion at the end of each unit, Writing and Speaking & Listening assessment tasks include prompts such as, “Analyze the development of two themes”, “Analyze how an author’s choice of a particular structure..”, “..discussion group in which you compare and contrast authors’ styles”. The essential questions, which might provide some element of topic focus for assessment, do frame some assessment questions. However, these are likewise based on analysis skills and not the building of knowledge. For example, in Unit 4, Assessment Workshop, there is a sidebar with the unit’s essential question, How does literature share or reflect society? The assignment reads: “Choose one Modernist work and one traditional work from this unit. Write a comparison-and-contrast essay about the challenges each work presents and the assumptions you feel each author makes about his or her readers.”
  • Assessment Workshop tasks, show little content or skill connection the the previous Writing prompts from throughout the unit. For example:
    • Unit 6 Assessment Workshop, Constructed Response, Writing Task 3: Informational Text, Analyze and Evaluate Rhetoric, Write an essay in which you analyze and evaluate the author’s rhetoric in a nonfiction work from this unit.There are no other Critical Reading or Close Reading Activity tasks that explicitly refer to author’s use of rhetoric. Some tasks do ask about craft and structure to create an effective argument such as Close Reading Activities 2. Craft and Structure. Questions include, “ (a) Locate two examples of scholarly diction Safire uses. (b) Locate two examples of folksy, or familiar diction. (c) In what ways does this mix of diction add to the effectiveness of the essay?)”, but nothing refers to rhetoric. How can students prepare for the final assessment task, and how will teachers know if they are prepared for this task, if they have never dealt with rhetoric in these texts?

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for providing a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials include a consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic and figurative language in context.

Materials do not provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive, year-long vocabulary development component. Select words are listed before text sets and students or teacher are prompted to record the words, noting how well they know the words before and then after reading the text. These same words are defined in the margins of the text. Vocabulary tasks most often separate from these words are provided at end of text. The tasks that are embedded in the text do not enhance the understanding of the text itself (only of the listed terms). Words are not used across texts. Attention is not paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high value academic words. Few tasks require students to use certain words when writing or speaking, but those that do use words that are not from the text; it is unclear what is the purpose of using the words. It is also unclear that these tasks are sophisticated enough for 11th grade students. There are no tasks that require use of vocabulary in the assessments. There are no opportunities for students to learn, practice, apply and transfer words into familiar and new contexts.

Often, the vocabulary terms and tasks are not associated with a text. For example;

Unit 4, Part 1: Building Knowledge and Insight, Vocabulary, “You will encounter the words listed here in the text that follows. Copy the words into your notebook. Which words a verb? How can you tell? dispersal, plodding, embankment, frantic”. Also, in Close Reading Activities, Vocabulary: Word/phrase relationships, students are asked to “Use your knowledge of the words from the vocabulary list to determine whether the relationships between the italicized words below and the phrases that follow them are logical. Explain your reasoning. embankment - the bottom of a lake, plodding - tired during a hike, dispersal - collection of garbage, frantic - nerves before a test

In Unit 6, Part 3: Building Knowledge and Insight, Vocabulary, “The words below are important to understanding the text that follows. Copy the words into your notebook and note which words are nouns: mundane, induce, savagery, revelations, prosperity. Then, in Close Reading Activities, Vocabulary Acquisition and Use, students, “Use New Words, For each item below, write a sentence in which you use the word or word pair correctly. 1. mudane, 2. induce/savagery 3. revelation/prosperity”

Text embedded vocabulary tasks are often weak. For example:

Unit 5, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Using Resources to Build Vocabulary, Theatrical Words: Words for Cueing Action, “In the stage directions, Miller includes modifiers to describe the way he envisions actions speaking, reacting, and moving on the stage. Here a few of them: suspiciously, instantly , prayerfully, politely, feverishly, hysterically. Review these words by rereading the relevant lines in them. Then, use a print or electronic thesaurus to find a synonym for each word. For example, a synonym for politely might be courteously. On your own paper, rewrite the stage directions in which the word appears, replacing the word with your own synonym. Reread the stage directions. In a few sentences, explain why Miller would choose vivid words to direct the speech and movement of actions.”

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Writing prompts span the school year, but instruction is limited. Though prompts in Close Reading and Assessment sections have directions for students “brainstorm a list, use the rubric below, cite your sources” there is no opportunity for students to work on the drafting of a claim, selection of relevant vs. irrelevant evidence, guidance on how to make formal citation of sources in writing, frames for connecting claims, evidence, and reasoning, or otherwise. The writing instruction remains relatively the same throughout the school year. Supports do not build on one another from one unit to the next and the writing prompts in this section are divorced from any of the selection’s grade-level text.

The materials do include a mix of both on-demand and process writing, however, it not always clear with each writing task which one is required. There are not always clear guidelines in teachers materials or student prompts for which writing tasks are on-demand and which are process writing. There are opportunities for students to revise their writing, however there are limited opportunities to edit. In the writing to source tasks, students are guided each time to revise and are provided a focus for their revisions. The only time they are guided to edit their work is during the Writing Workshops found at the end of each unit, six times during the school year. The digital resources included are limited and not necessary for students to use in order to support their writing process or product. There are student and teacher resources available on-line. It is unclear if assignments are short or long. There are no clear parameters given for the length of the written product or the time students should spend on writing assignments (with the exception of the timed writings found in the material - 2 times per unit). Writing tasks and projects are sometimes aligned to the grade level standards being reviewed.

Writing tasks follow a similar pattern throughout the year. In the Close Reading Activities, students go through Prewriting and Planning, Drafting, Revising, Editing and Proofreading each time. Specific directions vary according to requirements of the task, but do not build from one to the next across the school year.

  • For many writing assignments, there is no clear instruction for students. For example in Unit 6, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Drafting, directions state, “As you draft, use legal language…” Students may not be familiar with such language. They are also prompted to, “...present your arguments logically and persuasively….” There is no explanation for how to do this. Finally, they are directed to, “...establish cause-and-effect relationships…” Again, there no support for students, and it is assumed that they know how. There is no instruction on what cue words or sentence frames students might use.
  • Writing tasks have the same demands from the start to end of the year. They do not build on one another. For example, here are the Close Reading, Writing to Sources activities from Units 4-6:
  • Unit 4, Narrative Writing. “A monologue is a dramatic form in which only one person speaks. A stream-of-consciousness monologue is a type of interior monologue in that it takes place within the mind of a character. Choose a character from the story or make up a new one. Write a monologue in which you use stream of consciousness to portray the character’s thoughts.
  • Unit 5, Explanatory Text. “Both Hersey and Jarrell present powerful themes about war. Write an essay to compare and contrast these themes as they are expressed in Hiroshima and “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner.”
  • Unit 6, Narrative Text. “In both literature and life, stories are shaped by the points of view of those who tell them. Write a new version of the story from the point of view of one of the men who changes Yolanda’s tire.”

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

Research prompts exist at end end of some unit parts but are not sequenced to build research skills. It is also unclear the scope (in terms of time, allocation of resources, and student product) of any of these research tasks. There are no research tasks in assessment tasks. Clear development of aspects of any given topic is only present in some Text Set Workshop research tasks, though these are often only vaguely related to previously developed ideas. Some research prompts explore tangential topics from provided texts and authors that do not follow any line or inquiry, theme or topic previously developed. Some questions/tasks take into account short sets of materials within unit parts. Few tasks are about a topic or across topics. They are more often about standards across topics. No questions clearly span multiple texts across a unit or across the year. Materials do not provide many opportunities for students to apply Reading, Writing, Speaking & Listening, and Language skills to synthesize and analyze multiple texts and source materials about a topic or topics. There is regularly a lack of clarity on length of projects.

Research prompts are not sequenced to build student independence. Below are research projects suggested for units 1, 3, and 5. The tasks are similar and do not get more challenging as the school year progresses.

  • Unit 1, Part 1, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Prewriting, “Reread the biography of Bradford on page 57 and the excerpt from his narrative. In a chart like the one show, record questions you still have about Bradford. Then, use both print and electronic sources to find answers to these questions. Document answers and sources in your chart.”
  • Unit 4, Part 3, Text Set Workshop, Part 2: From Every Corner of the Land, Research: Magazine Articles, Assignment: “Working in small groups, design and create a series of magazine articles that examine the idea of isolation in early twentieth-century America. Each person should first choose a selection from Part 2 and think about the lack of social connection apparent in the text. Conduct research on the historical context of the text’s setting - e.g. World War I, or the Great Depression - to help explain - the factors that kept people from connecting with each other. Include illustrations or photographs with each article, and model the layout on magazine pieces you have seen. Combine your group’s articles into a magazine to share with the class.”
  • Unit 6, Part 3, Close Reading Activities, Writing to Sources, Informative Text, “Choose a word or phrase in English you find interesting, odd, or funny. Research the history of the word: its first appearance in the language and changes in its meaning. In an informative essay, explain your research. Use a mix of scholarly diction, familiar diction, and idiomatic expressions.”

Many projects do not require the development of aspects of topic under consideration in texts. For example:

  • After a series of persuasive primary sources from WWII, Unit 5, Part 1, Common Core, Research Project, Research Task, “Create a computer slide show or poster presentation in which you analyze several editorial cartoons. Use historical or contemporary cartoons, and evaluate how messages in the cartoons present social and cultural views differently than do traditional written texts.”
  • Unit 6, Part 3, Text Set Workshop, Part 2, Contemporary Fiction, Assignment, “With a partner, research the literary history, major writers, and important words of two specific American cultural groups represented by the writers in Part 2. Include Yosef Komunyakaa’s group as one of your choices. Discuss the similarities and differences between the two groups. Present your research in a display for Literary Culture Fair, a celebration of American multicultural writing. Use a checklist like the one shown to help organize your research and your presentation.”
  • After a series of texts on events of 9-11, Unit 6, Part , Common Core Research Project, Research Task, Assignment, “Write a persuasive article that takes a stand on the value of a memorial. Conduct research that will allow you to provide an authoritative analysis of the subject. Use a variety of strategies to develop and support your opinion.”

Few specific resources for student research are suggested. There are prompts to “research the [topic]….”, “Use online and library searches…”, or “Consult your library for audio or video clips…”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

There is some organization built in that could foster independent reading, but instructions for implementation are not comprehensive. These include multi-draft reading instructions and a section in the Time and Resource Manager where teachers are to “Direct students to read the selection independently” and “Build knowledge of the topic by direction students to read the text independently”. However, it is unclear what students might do when encountering a text outside of the anthology’s selections. There are no procedures, such as a proposed schedule or accountability system organized for independent reading suggested in the lessons. The suggested texts for independent reading span a wide volume of texts at various readability levels. There is no clear guidance provided for what is read in and out of class.

Independent reading is only clear in Part 4 of each unit, not in the rest of lessons. In Part 4, which is 2 pages long, ‘Titles for Extended Reading’ are provided but not any expectations or timeline or further purpose. It is not clear which texts under consideration in Parts 1-3 of each unit are meant for group reading, whole class reading, independent reading, nor which are to be read in class and which are to be read outside of class.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2017/08/31

Report Edition: 2015

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Pearson Literature 2015 Grade 11 978‑0‑1332‑6860‑7 Pearson 2015
Student Materials: Common Core Companion Workbook, Grade 11 978‑0‑1332‑7112‑6 Pearson 2015
Pearson Literature 2015 Grade 11 Student Edition 978‑0‑1333‑1988‑0 Pearson 2015

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA High School Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complements the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations