Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for Alignment to the CCSSM. In Gateway 1, the materials meet expectations for focus and coherence, and in Gateway 2, the materials partially meet expectations for rigor and meet expectations for practice-content connections.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
16
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
17
24
27
24
24-27
Meets Expectations
18-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for focus and coherence. For focus, the materials assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. For coherence, the materials are coherent and consistent with the CCSSM.

Criterion 1a - 1b

Materials assess grade-level content and give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for focus as they assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Indicator 1a

Materials assess the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for assessing grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. 

Each Grade Level consists of 12 modules. Each module contains three types of summative assessments. Check-ups assess concepts taught in the module, and students select answers or provide a written response. Performance Tasks assess concepts taught in the module with deeper understanding. In Interviews, teachers ask questions in a one-on-one setting, and students demonstrate understanding of a module concept or fluency for the grade. In addition, Quarterly Tests are administered at the end of Modules 3, 6, 9, and 12.

Examples of assessment items aligned to Grade 2 standards include:

  • Module 3, Quarterly Test A, Problem 1 “Choose the equation you would use to solve the problem. Andrew had 11 pennies. His dad gave him 3 more. How many pennies does he have in total. A. 11 - 3 = 8, B. 11 + 3 = 14, C. 14 - 3 = 11.” (2.OA.1)

  • Module 5, Check-Up 2, Problem 1, “Write the fact family to match the domino. 15 dots in total.” (2.NBT.5)

  • Module 12, Performance Tasks, Problem 2, “Split these shapes into four equal parts. Use splits that are different from the splits on similar shapes in Question 1.” (2.G.3)

Indicator 1b

Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for the materials giving all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Extensive work is provided as students engage with different types of problems in each lesson. There is a Student Journal with problems in three sections: Step In, Step Up, and Step Ahead. Maintaining Concepts and Skills include additional practice opportunities, including Computation Practice, Ongoing Practice, Preparing for Module _, Think and Solve, and Words at Work. Each Module includes three Investigations and all grade-level standards are present within materials. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Module 3, and Module 5 engage students in extensive work with 2.OA.2 (Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.) In Module 1, Lesson 10, Addition: Reviewing the count-on strategy, Student Journal, Maintaining Concepts and Skills, page 34, students are asked to “Draw a check mark beside each correct answer on Jennifer’s test paper. Count each check mark and write the total at the bottom of the page. Correct the facts that were wrong.” In Module 3, Lesson 12, Addition: Developing fact fluency, Student Journal, Step Up, page 116, Question 1 students are directed to, “Write the missing numbers to complete each equation.” Students are given 12 equations with missing parts to solve. In Module 5, Lesson 11, Subtraction: Reinforcing the think-addition strategy (make ten facts), Student Journal, Step Up, page 188, Question 1, students are given pictures of 6 dominoes. They are asked to, “Draw dots to help you complete the subtraction fact, then write the related addition fact.”

  • Module 2 and Module 8 engage students in extensive work with 2.MD.7 (Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.) In Module 2, Lesson 7, Time: Reviewing on the hour, Student Journal, Step Up, page 62, Question 1, students see analog clocks with times shown to the hour. They must then “Write each time on the digital clock.” In Module 2, Lesson 8, Time: Reviewing half-past the hour, Student Journal, Step Up, page 65, Question 2, students see analog and digital clocks with times to the hour and half-hour. Next they must, “Write each time in words.” Students write the half-hour times as “Half-past twelve o’clock”. In Module 8, Lesson 10, Time: Working with five-minute intervals, Student Journal, Step Up, page 303, Question 1, students see analog clocks with time to the 5 minute, and matching digital clocks with time to the 5 minute. Students must then demonstrate their ability to, “Draw lines to connect the matching times. Cross out the digital clock that does not have a match.”

  • Module 11, Lessons 10, 11, and More Math engage students in extensive work with 2.MD.8 (Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?) In Lesson 10, Money: Identifying amounts of money, Student Journal, page 423, Step Ahead, “Peta has 4 coins in her pocket. The total is greater than 40 cents but less than 60 cents. Draw two different pictures to show the coins she might have in her pocket.” In Lesson 11, Money: Working with dollars and cents, Maintaining Concepts and Skills, Investigation 3, “Ramon has seven coins in his pocket. He has 35 cents in total. What coins could Ramon have in his pocket?” In More Math, Problem Solving Activity 4, Question d, “Mako has 2 quarters, three dimes, and 2 nickels in her wallet. She gave 25 cents to her sister. She then found 15 cents while walking home from school. How much money does Mako have now?”

The instructional materials provide opportunities for all students to engage with the full intent of 2nd grade standards through a consistent lesson structure, including sections called Step In, Step Up and Step Ahead. Step In includes a connection to prior knowledge, multiple entry points to new learning, and guided instruction support. Step Up engages all students in practice that connects to the objective of each lesson. Step Ahead can be used as an enrichment activity. Examples of meeting the full intent include:

  • Module 1 and Module 3 engage students with the full intent of 2.NBT.3 (Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.) In Module 1, Lesson 1, Number: Reading and writing two-digit numbers, Student Journal, Step Up, page 6, Question 1, students are given a number name and pictures of place value expanders. The paper unfolds to show the place value next to each digit. Students are instructed to, “Read the number name. Write the number with and without the expander.” In Module 1, Lesson 8, Number: Writing three-digit numbers, Student Journal, Step Up, page 26, Question 1, students see pictures of base-ten blocks and blank number expanders to answer questions for 3-digit numbers. They are then asked to, “Look at the picture of blocks. Write the matching number on the expanders.” In Module 3, Lesson 4, Number: Writing three-digit numbers in expanded form, Student Journal, Step Up, page 91, Question 2, students are given expanders filled in. They must then, “Write each number in expanded form.”

  • Modules 6, 7, and 8 engage students with the full intent of 2.NBT.5 (Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.) In Module 6, Lesson 12, Data: Introducing vertical bar graphs, Student Journal, Step Up, page 198, Question 1b, “Write the missing totals. If 4 + 4 = ___ then 40 + 40 = ___” In Module 7, Lesson 3, Subtraction: One-digit numbers from two-digit numbers bridging tens (number line), Maintaining Concepts and Skills, Problem Solving 1 activity, students are given the numbers 2, 5, 0, 9, a blank equation _ _ - _ _ = _ _, an empty number line, and a hundred chart. “Kevin chose these four number cards. He wants to write a subtraction equation that will give him the greatest possible difference. What equation should Kevin write? Use the number line or hundred chart to help your thinking.” In Module 8, Lesson 4, Subtraction: Reinforcing two-digit numbers (decomposing tens), Student Journal, Maintaining Skills and Concepts, Preparing for Module 9, page 293, Question a, students are given a number line. “Draw jumps to show how you could count on to figure out each of these. Then write the total. 52 + 17 = ___.”

  • Module 8, Lessons 9-12 engage students with the full intent of 2.MD.7 (Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.) In Lesson 9, Time: Identifying five-minute intervals, Student Journal, Step In, page 307, Question 2a, students see a picture of an analog clock showing 7:20. “Write numbers to show each time. ___ minutes past ___.” In Lesson 12, Time: Identifying and recording time using a.m and p.m, Student Journal, Maintaining Concepts, Ongoing Practice, page 317, Question 2a, students are given a picture of an analog clock showing 6:15 and a blank digital clock under the heading wake up. “Write the digital time for each event. Then write a.m. or p.m. to match the event.”

Criterion 1c - 1g

Each grade’s materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for coherence. The materials: address the major clusters of the grade, have supporting content connected to major work, make connections between clusters and domains, and have content from prior and future grades connected to grade-level work.

Indicator 1c

When implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations that, when implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade.

  • The approximate number of modules devoted to, or supporting, major work of the grade is 5 out of 12, which is approximately 42%.

  • The approximate number of lessons devoted to major work, or supporting major work of the grade, is 102 out of 144, which is approximately 71%. 

  • The number of days devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 111 out of 156, which is approximately 71%. 

A lesson-level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials because this calculation includes all lessons with connections to major work with no additional days factored in. As a result, approximately 71% of the instructional materials focus on major work of the grade.

Indicator 1d

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations that supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Materials are designed so supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. These connections are sometimes listed for teachers on a document titled, “Grade __ Module __ Lesson Contents and Learning Targets” for each module. Examples of connections include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 10, Addition: Reviewing the doubles strategy, Step 4 Reflecting on the Work, connects the supporting work of 2.OA.3 (Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.) to the major work of 2.OA.2 (Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.) “Direct their attention to Question 3. Ask, Is it possible to double a number from 1 to 9 and record a total that is odd? How do you know? How can you prove your thinking? Facilitate debate among the class (SMP3). If necessary, draw one long row of circles to show a number. This number is then doubled by drawing a matching row of circles directly below, as shown. Point out that each circle has a partner, so the number is even.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 12, Length/data: Using line plots to record length, connects the supporting work of 2.MD.9 (Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit, or by making repeated measurements of the same object. Show the measurements by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole- number units) to the major work of 2.MD.1 (Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.) In the Student Journal, page 353, Question 2a, “Your teacher will give you a piece of drinking straw. Use a centimeter ruler to measure its length. Write its length here __cm” Question 2b, “With your teacher’s help, record the length of each student’s straw.” Question 2c, “Use the measurements above to complete the line plot below. Show your measurement first.”

  • Module 11, Lesson 5, Multiplication: Adding equal rows, connects the supporting work of 2.OA.4 (Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.) to the major work of 2.OA.2 (Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By the end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.) Student Journal, Step Up, page 408, Question 1c, students see a picture of 6 ladybugs arranged in 3 rows of 2. “Circle each row of bugs. Write the missing numbers. ___ rows, ___ ladybugs in each row, ___+____+___=___.” There are four of these problems in Question 1. Student Journal, Step Ahead, page 409, students use an array as an addition tool. “Draw an array of worms that has 5 rows. Then write a story and an equation to match.”

  • Module 11, Lesson 12, Money: Solving word problems, connects the supporting work of 2.MD.8 (Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?) to the major work of 2.OA.1 (Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.) In Step 3, Teaching the Lesson, Slide 3, students solve word problems using money. “Oliver has a 1 bill, 3 nickels, 1 dime, and 2 pennies. How much money does he have?” Student Journal, Step Up, page 429, Question, “2b. Daniela has 74 cents and Felipe has 2 dimes, a quarter, and a nickel. If they combine their money, how much will they have in total? 2d. William has five quarters fewer than Nicole. William has 6 quarters. How much money does Nicole have?”

Indicator 1e

Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for including problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade.

Materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards. Examples of connections include:

  • In Module 4, Lesson 10, Length: Working with feet and inches,Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, students solve a word problem (2.OA.A) using units of length to add (2.MD.B). 

  • In Module 6, Lesson 9, Addition: Two-digit numbers (composing tens and hundreds), Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, students solve two-digit addition word problems (2.OA.A) with sums greater than 100 (2.NBT.B). For example, “78 cars are parked on the top floor of a parking garage. There are 65 fewer cars parked on the top floor of the parking garage than the bottom floor. How many cars are parked on the bottom floor?” 

 However, there are a few missed opportunities to foster coherence through connections at a single grade. Examples include:

  • In Module 5 Lesson 2, Addition: Skip counting by five or ten (number line), and Lesson 10, Subtraction: Reviewing the think-addition strategy (make-ten facts), students use a variety of strategies to add and subtract two digit numbers, including using a number line and ‘make ten’ (2.NBT.A). However, place value is not referenced, so there is a missed connection to 2.NBT.B.

  • In Module 12 Lesson 3, students create halves and fourths from shapes (2.G.A). A connection to reinforce money (dollars as the whole, \frac{1}{4} as 1 quarter, etc. (2.MD.C)) is omitted.

Indicator 1f

Content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations that content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. 

Materials relate grade-level concepts from 2nd Grade explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. These references are consistently included within the Topic Progression portion of Lesson Notes and within each Module Mathematics Focus. At times, they are also noted within the Coherence section of the Mathematics Overview in each Module. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 5, Number: Working with hundreds, Lesson Notes connect 2.NBT.1 (Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.), 2.NBT.2 (Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.), 2.NBT.3 (Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.), and 2.NBT.8 (Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100-900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100-900.), to work from grade 1 (1.NBT.2). “In Lesson 1.12.1, students use the hundred chart and their knowledge of place value to investigate two-digit numbers. In this lesson (1.5), students make groups of 10 and then groups of 100 to represent numbers greater than 100. Emphasis is also placed on composing and decomposing quantities of blocks to show that the same number can be represented in more than one way.”

  • Module 6, Lesson 10, Data: Introducing picture graphs, Lesson Notes connect 2.MD.10 (Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put- together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph) to the work from grade 1 (1.NBT.1, 1.MD.4). “In Lesson 1.1.12, students collect and display data in simple picture graphs. In this lesson (6.10), students survey the class and collect the data using tallies. They then show their survey results in a one-to-one picture graph.” 

  • Module 9, Mathematics, Focus, Coherence table “identifies the prerequisite standards and learning targets needed for Grade 2, Module 9.” Specific Lessons, Standards, and Learning Targets from previous grades are listed. “Stepping Stones Grade 1 Lesson 3.10, Standard 1.MD.A.1, Learning Target: Use indirect comparison to compare and order length.”

Content from future grades is identified within materials and related to grade-level work. These references are consistently included within the Topic Progression portion of Lesson Notes and within the Coherence section of the Mathematics Overview in each Module. Examples include:

  • Module 4, Lesson 12, Length: Working with customary units, Lesson Notes connect 2.MD.1 (Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.), 2.MD.2 (Measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.), 2.MD.3 (Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.), to work in grade 4 (4.MD.1, 4.MD.4). “In this lesson, students estimate the length of pieces of string. They then measure each length, justifying the measurement unit and tool that they decided to use. In Lesson 4.6.6, students review different units of length, focusing on the relationship between the size of feet and inches. A line plot is used to display the lengths of alligators.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 12, 2D shapes: Drawing polygons, Lesson Notes connect 2.G.1 (Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes) to the work of grade 3 (3.G.1). Lesson Notes, “In this lesson, students draw 2D shapes to match given criteria. In Lesson 3.2.10, students examine the properties that define rectangles. The concept that squares are also rectangles is reinforced.”

  • Module 10, Mathematics Overview, Coherence, “Lessons 10.1-10.12 focus on using all strategies for subtraction of up to three-digit numbers from three-digit numbers.” This “prepares students for using count-back and count-on strategies for subtraction of up to three-digit numbers from three digit numbers with regrouping (3.5.8-3.5.12).”

Indicator 1g

In order to foster coherence between grades, materials can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 foster coherence between grades and can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification. 

 There are  a total of 156 instructional days within the materials.

  • There are 12 modules and each module contains 12 lessons for a total of 144 lessons.

  • There are 12 days dedicated to assessments.

 In addition, each module includes three investigation problems and four problem solving activities. These are embedded into lesson activities.

According to the publisher, “The Stepping Stones program is set up to teach 1 lesson per day and to complete a module in approximately 2\frac{1}{2} weeks. Each lesson has been written around a 60 minute time frame but may be anywhere from 30-75 minutes depending upon teacher choice and classroom interaction.”

Gateway Two

Rigor & the Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for rigor and balance and practice-content connections. The materials help students develop procedural skills, fluency, and application. The materials also make meaningful connections between the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Criterion 2a - 2d

Materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students’ conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications.

6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 partially meet expectations for rigor. The materials give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency and spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of mathematics. The materials partially develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts and partially balance the three aspects of rigor.

Indicator 2a

Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 partially meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings.

The materials include some problems and questions that develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade level. Students have few opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade.

Cluster 2.OA.A includes representing and solving problems involving addition and subtraction. Modules 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 explore a variety of real-world applications using a few mathematical representations. 

Some opportunities exist for students to work with addition and subtraction that address conceptual understanding through the use of some visual representations and different strategies. Examples include:

  • Module 8, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Composing and decomposing two-digit numbers, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Organize students into groups. Project slide 1 and read the problem twice with the students. Then help them make sense of the problem by discussing the points below (MP1): How would you describe this problem in your own words? What do you know? What do you need to find out? What strategy or tool could you use to help solve the problem? (MP5) Explain that there are many possible solutions to this problem. Allow time for students to discuss the problem in their groups and plan what they are going to do to solve it. Encourage them to select and use math tools to support their thinking as they find possible solutions (MP5). Encourage groups of students to find as many combinations as possible. Afterward, invite students from each group to list their combinations on the board.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 3, Addition: Three-digit numbers, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Project slide 1. Ask, What different numbers can we show on this number line? Students should explain that any number can be shown, as there are no marked numbers to act as benchmarks. Mark and label 218 on the left end of the number line. Ask, How can you show the number 100 greater? What about 200 greater? Choose a volunteer to draw jumps above the number line to 318 and then 418. Reinforce that the size of each jump is not really important on an empty number line. Rather, it is the thinking behind the jumps that are made. Repeat the activity for other three-digit numbers and finding the numbers 100, 200, and/or 300 greater.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 2, Subtraction: Two-digit numbers from three-digit numbers beyond 200, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “ Project the word problem (slide 11). Read the problem aloud then help the students interpret the problem (MP1) by asking questions such as: What information do you know? What do you need to find out? What operation will you use to solve the problem? How could you figure out the amount of money Sandra has left? Encourage the students to choose math tools from the resource center to help them solve the problem (MP5). Afterward, invite students to share their strategies. Highlight the place-value strategies.” 

However, the instructional materials do not regularly provide students opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade-level. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 10, Addition: Reviewing the count-on strategy, Student Journal, page 32, Step Up, Students are given dominoes to count-on and write the number sentence. Students don’t necessarily have to use the count-on strategy in order to solve the problem.

  • Module 1, Lesson 11, Addition: Reinforcing the count-on strategy, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Project slide 1. Point to the numbers shown on the left of the equals symbol at the start of each equation. Establish that these numbers are the totals. Confirm that the numbers on the right of the equals symbols are the parts and that one part in each equation is missing. Work through the equations, one at a time, discussing the questions below: How did you figure out the missing number? What type of thinking did you use - addition or subtraction? What equation could you write to show your thinking?” Students practice finding the missing numbers. 

  • Module 8, Lesson 3, Subtraction: Two-digit numbers (decomposing tens), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Organize students into pairs and distribute the blocks. Project 55 - 46 = ___ (slide1) and ask, How many tens and ones blocks will you need to represent this problem? (5 tens and 5 ones.) Have students show 5 tens blocks and 5 ones blocks, placing their extra blocks to one side. Ask, How can you use the 5 tens blocks and 5 ones blocks to show how to subtract 46? Have the pairs discuss their thinking. Students should recognize there are not enough ones blocks to carry out the subtraction with blocks. Encourage them to think about the different ways to represent the number 55 with blocks (MP7). If necessary, provide prompts such as, How can you show the number with only 4 tens blocks? How many ones blocks would you need? Does this make the subtraction easier to carry out? Why/why not? Have one student in each pair regroup 1 tens block as 10 ones blocks, then solve the problem.” Students do not build conceptual understanding of subtraction with regrouping since the students are told exactly how to set up their problem to solve it. 

  • Module 11, Lesson 10, Money: Identifying amounts of money, Student Journal, page 422, Step Up Question 1, “Write the missing numbers.” Students are given a selection of coins and a table showing how many of each coin is present and then asked to fill in the blank. For example, 4 dimes, 2 nickels and 3 pennies are shown. 4 dimes is ______¢. Students do not build conceptual understanding of money and its connection to the place value system.

Indicator 2b

Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation for procedural skill and fluency.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for giving attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. Materials attend to the Second Grade fluencies add and subtract within 20. 

The instructional materials develop procedural skills and fluencies throughout the grade-level. Opportunities to formally practice procedural skills are found throughout practice problem sets that follow the units. Practice problem sets also include opportunities to use and practice emerging fluencies in the context of solving problems. Ongoing practice is also found in Assessment Interviews, Games, and Maintaining Concepts and Skills.

The materials attend to the Grade 2 expected fluencies: 2.OA.2 fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By the end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers. In addition, the instructional materials embed opportunities for students to independently practice procedural skills and fluency. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 9, Time: Reinforcing on the hour and half-past the hour, Maintaining concepts and skills, students practice adding and subtracting within 20. 

  • Module 12, Lesson 1, Division: Developing language (sharing), Maintaining concepts and skills, “This lesson provides projectable practice that is designed to foster fluency of basic facts. Project or read the facts to the students, allowing a few seconds between each fact that you show or read. Be sure to alternate this delivery from one lesson or module to the next. Roll over the image below to reveal the focus of the content.” Students are practicing fluency with 20.

  • Maintaining Concepts and Skills lessons incorporate practice of previously learned skills from the prior grade level. For example, Maintaining Concepts and Skills in Module 3, Lesson 10,  Addition: Reinforcing the make-ten strategy, provides practice for adding within 20. 

  • Each module contains a summative assessment called Interviews. According to the program, “There are certain concepts and skills, such as the ability to route count fluently, that are best assessed by interviewing students.” For example, in Module 6’s Interview 1 and 2 has students subtracting within 20. 

  • “Fundamentals Games” contain a variety of computer/online games that students can play to develop grade level fluency skills. For example Total Ten, students demonstrate fluency of adding within 20 (2.OA.2). 

  • Some lessons provide opportunities for students to practice the procedural fluency of the concept being taught in the “Step Up” section of the student journal.

Indicator 2c

Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

Materials include multiple routine and non-routine applications of the mathematics throughout the grade level. Teachers routinely engage students in single and multi-step application problems during the Step In Discussion at the beginning of lessons. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 9, Addition: Reviewing Concepts, Student Journal, page 30, Step In Discussion, students represent and solve addition and subtraction non-routine problems. (2.OA.1) “What addition story could you say about this picture? Which number is the total in your story? How do you know? Which numbers are parts of the total? How do you know? What addition fact could you write to match your story?”

  • Module 4, Lesson 10, Length: Working with feet and inches, Student Journal, page 146, Step In Discussion, students solve routine word problems involving calculations with standard measures of length. (2.MD.5) “How many inches equal one foot? How many inches equal two feet? How do you know? How many inches taller than one foot is this plant? How many more inches would the plant need to grow so it was two feet tall?” An image shows a plant measuring 15 inches.

  • Module 10, Lesson 12, Subtraction: Reinforcing two- and three-digit numbers (decomposing tens and hundreds), Student Journal, page 390, Step In Discussion, students use equations to show subtraction with two and three digit numbers in non-routine real-world problems. (2.NBT.7) “These students figured out the number of days until they turned 8 years old. They recorded the number in the table. How many fewer days did Laura record than Ruby? What equations could you write to show your thinking? How could you figure out the difference with blocks? How could you find the difference on a number line?” A table shows Ruby 165 days, Nathan 132 days, Laura 117 days, and Carlos 285 days. 

Materials consistently provide opportunities for students to independently engage with routine and non-routine applications of mathematics. These are found across the grade level within Thinking Tasks, Problem Solving Activities, and Investigations. Examples include:

  • Module 6, More Math, Thinking Tasks, Question 1, students compare values and use addition strategies in a non-routine real world problem. (2.OA.1) “Look at the prices of these balls. Baseball $31, Basketball $54, Golf ball $6, and Football $49. If you buy two different balls, which two balls would cost the least? Write an equation to show the total cost of the two balls.”

  • Module 8, More Math, Investigation 2, students subtract two digit numbers from three digit numbers in non-routine problems. (2.NBT.7) “How many pairs of three-digit and two-digit numbers will make this subtraction equation true? 1__ __ - __5 = 92.” 

Module 11, More Math, Problem Solving Activity 3, students use make-a-table strategy to solve routine money problems. (2.MD.8) “How many different ways can you make 40¢ with quarters, dimes, and nickels? Complete the table to help you.” A table is shown with columns of 5 cents, 10 cents, and 25 cents.

Indicator 2d

The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the three aspects of rigor within the grade.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 partially meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. All three aspects of rigor are present in the materials, but there is an over-emphasis on procedural skills and fluency.

There is some evidence that the curriculum addresses conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application standards, when called for, and evidence of opportunities where multiple aspects of rigor are used to support student learning and mastery of the standards. There are multiple lessons where one aspect of rigor is emphasized. The materials have an emphasis on fluency, procedures, and algorithms. 

Examples of conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application presented separately in the materials include:

  • Module 4, Lesson 2, Subtraction: Reviewing the count-back strategy, Student Journal, Step Up, students solve subtraction problems with a number track. For example, “2. Write an equation to match what is shown on each number track.”

  • Module 8, Lesson 3, Subtraction: Two-digit numbers (decomposing tens), Student Journal, Step Up, students use conceptual understanding to solve subtraction with regrouping problems. For example, “1. In the pictures below, a tens block has been regrouped as 10 ones blocks. Cross out blocks and complete the sentences to figure out the difference.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 6, Addition: Two- and three-digit numbers (composing tens and hundreds), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students use conceptual understanding to solve addition problems. “Use base-10 blocks to demonstrate using a place-value method to find the total. As you demonstrate with the blocks, ask, How many hundreds are there? (1.) How many tens? (11.) How many ones? (8.) Discuss the different ways of calculating the total. Say, You could regroup the 11 tens as 1 hundred and 1 ten, which makes a total of 2 hundreds, 1 ten, and 8 ones. Adding these together as 200 + 10 + 8 equals 218. Another way is to add each amount together as 100 + 110 + 8, which also equals 218.”

  • Module 8, More Math, Problem Solving Activities, Activity 4, “A Grade 2 class has 121 prizes in their prize box. Students pick a prize after they earn 10 stars. In the first week of school, 17 students win a prize, 28 students win a prize in the second week. How many prizes are left after the second week?” (2.OA.1)

 Examples of students having opportunities to engage in problems that use two or more aspects of rigor include:

  • Module 6, Lesson 9, Addition: Two-digit numbers (composing tens and hundreds), Student Journal Step Up, students use conceptual understanding and application to solve two-digit numbers, “1. Add the tens blocks then add the ones blocks. Write an equation to match.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 6, Subtraction: Reinforcing the count-on strategy bridging tens, Student Journal, Step Up, students use conceptual understanding and application to solve subtraction problems with a number line. For example, “1. Alisa’s jump was 53 inches and Allan’s jump was 75 inches. Count on to figure out the difference. Draw jumps to show your thinking. Then complete the equation.”

Criterion 2e - 2i

Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for practice-content connections. The materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Indicator 2e

Materials support the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. Students have opportunities to engage with the Math Practices across the year and they are often explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical Practice Overview, Module Mathematical Practice documents and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within lesson notes.

MP1 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students make sense of problems and persevere in solving them as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 5, Number: Comparing two-digit numbers on a number line, Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, students make sense of a problem and persevere in making sense of comparison problems and discussion pathways for solving them. “Arrange the place-value cards in separate piles facedown at the front of the classroom. Ask two students to each select a card from each pile to create two two-digit numbers. Ask the class to read the two numbers. Refer to the two numbers and ask, How can we compare these two numbers? Which number is greater? How do you know? Encourage students to share their suggestions such as, "We could show each number with blocks or fingers," or "We could compare the number of blocks on a pan balance." Some students may suggest comparing the digits in the tens then the ones place to find the greater number. If necessary, guide the discussion by asking questions such as, Why did you choose that tool? Is there another way you could compare the numbers? Can you explain the steps you could follow? (This discussion will support students in achieving MP1.)”

  • Module 8, Lesson 5, Subtraction: Estimating to solve problems, Student Journal, page 295, Step Up Question 2a, students make sense of estimation problems to determine what they know and what they need to find out. “The movie runs for 96 minutes. Evan pauses the movie after 54 minutes to make some popcorn. About how many more minutes will the movie run? 30 minutes, 40 minutes, 50 minutes.” Teaching the lesson, the teacher helps students “make sense of the problem by asking students to restate the problem in their own words.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 6, Addition: Two- and three-digit numbers (composing tens and hundreds), Student Journal, page 335, Step Ahead, students make sense of problems and persevere when they “analyze a real-world problem to identify what they know and what they need to find out, then persevere in finding a solution.” Students are given a picture of two different priced game consoles and three different priced games. “Jack bought a game console and one game. He had $200 and got some change. Circle the items he may have bought. There is more than one possible answer.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “For Step Ahead ask, What steps did you follow to solve this problem? Encourage students to explain their processes (MP1).”

  • Module 11, Lesson 12, Money: Solving word problems, Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, students analyze word problems in groups in order to make sense of what they know, what they need to find out, and then persevere in solving them. “Organize students into small groups. Ensure each group has access to the resources. Project slide 2 as shown and read the problem aloud. Then discuss the points below (MP1): Alexis has a $1 bill, 2 pennies, and 3 dimes. How much money does she have? Module 11, Lesson 12, Money: Solving word problems, students make sense of problems as they “analyze word problems to determine what they know and what they need to find out, then persevere in solving them.” Teaching the lesson, students are given, “Alexis has a $1 bill, 2 pennies, and 3 dimes. How much money does she have? If students are struggling to figure out the answers, encourage perseverance (MP1) by asking questions such as: How could you describe the problem in your own words? What are you trying to figure out? What have you already tried? Is there a different tool you could use to figure out the answer?”

MP2 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students reason abstractly and quantitatively as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 3, Lesson 10, Addition: Reinforcing the make-ten strategy, Step 2 Starting the Lesson, students reason abstractly as they match a real world situation to an equation. “Organize students into pairs and distribute the ten-frames and counters. Project the equation 9 + 6 = ___ (slide 1). Ask, What real-word situation could this equation match? (MP2)”

  • Module 5, Lesson 9, Subtraction: Reinforcing the think-addition strategy (doubles facts), Student Journal, page 182, Step Up, Question 1, students reason abstractly and quantitatively as they relate addition and subtraction facts with dots on dominoes. “Draw dots to help you complete the subtraction fact. Then complete the related addition fact.” Problem 1a, students are shown a domino with one half filled with 6 dots, and the other half is blank. “13 - 6 = ___, 6 + ___ = 13” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “Discuss the students’ answers to Student Journal 5.9. For Questions 1 and 2, ask students to share the strategy they used to find out the missing number on the domino. Make sure they relate the equations to the domino picture (MP2).”

  • Module 7, Lesson 2, Subtraction: Two-digit numbers (number line), Student Journal, page 247, Question 2a, students reason abstractly and quantitatively when they write equations to represent a word problem, relate the solution back to the problem to make sense of quantity in context, and think about real-world problems that could match each equation. Students are given a blank number line with points 40, 50, 60, and 70 labeled. “Complete each sentence. Draw jumps on the number line to show your thinking. 66 - 13 = ___.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “As time allows, have students think of real-world problems that could match these equations (MP2).”

  • Module 8, Lesson 12, Time: Identifying and recording time using a.m. and p.m., Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, students contextualize a.m. and p.m. times by identifying activities that they do before and after noon. Students add sunrise and sunset times to a timeline with hourly increments. “Discuss what the students or their families do at different times of the day, for example, read a bedtime story, and have them identify the time using a.m. or p.m. and say whether it is nighttime or daytime (MP2).”

Indicator 2f

Materials support the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. 

Students have opportunities to meet the full intent of MP3 over the course of the year as it is explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical Practice Overview, Module Mathematical Practice documents and within specific lessons, and alongside the learning targets or embedded within lesson notes.

Teacher guidance, questions, and sentence stems for MP3 are found in the Steps portion of lessons. In some lessons, teachers are given questions that prompt mathematical discussions and engage students to construct viable arguments. In some lessons, teachers are provided questions and sentence stems to help students critique  the reasoning of others and justify their thinking. Convince a friend, found in the Student Journal at the end of each module and Thinking Tasks in modules 3, 6, 9, and 12, provide additional opportunities for students to engage in MP3. 

Students engage with MP3 in connection to grade level content, as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 3, Number: Comparing and ordering two-digit numbers, Step 2 Starting the lesson, students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others when they use place value skills to compare and order two-digit numbers. “Ask two students to come to the front and each take a handful of tens and ones blocks. Have them sort their blocks to determine the two-digit numbers they represent. Discuss the way in which the two students counted/sorted the blocks. For the first set of blocks, ask, How do you know (Lisa’s) blocks represent (16)? Have students form an argument that proves (Lisa’s) blocks represent (16) and share this with another student (MP2). Repeat for the second set of blocks. Then ask, Which number is greater? How do you know? When the greater number is identified, have another student use blocks to represent the number that is 10 greater. As a class, determine the order of the three numbers from least to greatest. Invite students to prove that the order of the three numbers is correct by representing the numbers with blocks (MP3). Ask, Do you agree these numbers are ordered from least to greatest? How do you know they are correct? Repeat the activity with three new numbers.”

  • Module 3, More Math, Thinking Tasks, Question 2, students construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others as they represent and compare three-digit numbers. “Gloria scores 294 on her game app. Dwane scores 305 on the same game. Liam says Gloria’s score is greater because 9 is the greatest digit. Do you agree or disagree with Liam? Explain why.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 12, 2D shapes: Drawing polygons, Student Journal, pages 276-277, Step Up, students critique the work of others and offer suggestions for improvement when drawing 2D shapes to match a given set of criteria. “Draw a shape to match each label. a. a triangle with exactly two sides the same length”. Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “Discuss the similarities and differences between the students’ drawings. Encourage critique by the students, asking them to explain why the shapes match (or do not match) the clues. For each non-example, ask them to suggest how it could be changed to make it match the clues. (MP3)”

  • Module 8, Student Journal, page 319, Convince a friend, students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others as they identify times using quarters of an hour. “Monique says she can write four times that are between 4 o’clock and half-past six and they all include the word quarter. Maka says he can write more times. Who is correct?” Students are given, “I think ___ is correct because…”

  • Module 10, Lesson 9, Subtraction: Reinforcing two-digit numbers from three-digit numbers (decomposing tens and hundreds), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students share their methods, justify their thinking, and critique the methods and reasoning of their peers. Students solve 435 - 52, “Then invite a student to write the difference in the diagram and demonstrate their method. Encourage others to critique the method and explanation. If needed, provide sentence stems such as the following to prompt the critique (MP3): I am confused by …, I think that makes sense, but …, I disagree with that method because …, I did it the same way because …”

Indicator 2g

Materials support the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Choose tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Use appropriate tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. 

Students have opportunities to engage with the Math Practices throughout the year. The MPs are often explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical practice overview, Module Mathematical practice documents, Mathematical modeling tasks, Thinking tasks, and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within lesson notes.

MP4 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have many opportunities to solve real-world problems, identify important quantities to make sense of relationships, and represent them mathematically. Students model with mathematics as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 3, Lesson 7, Number: Comparing to order 3-digit numbers, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students model with math as they reason about digits and place value. “Discuss the students’ answers to Student Journal 3.7. Ask questions such as, Were there any scorecards for which you could decide the order just by looking at the digits in the hundreds place? Where did you need to look at the ones places to decide which number was greater? Can you think of another real-world situation where you would compare three-digit numbers? (MP4)”

  • Module 4, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Reviewing concepts, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students model with mathematics as they represent subtraction problems in a variety of ways and explain how the representations are connected. “Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Project the word problem (slide 1), read the problem aloud, and discuss the points below (MP1): What is the problem asking you to find out? How could you say the problem in your own words? How could you use the ten-frame to help solve the problem? What equation could you write to match the problem? Allow time for students to work together to solve the problem. Encourage them to represent the problem in a variety of ways, for example, drawing a picture, acting it out with the ten-frame and cubes, or writing an equation. (MP4)”

  • Module 7, Lesson 2, Subtraction: Two-digit numbers (number line), Student Journal, page 246, Step Up, Questions 1a-b, students model with mathematics when they “model two-digit subtraction on number lines, and make connections between the jumps made and how they subtracted on the hundred chart in the previous lesson.” Students see two number lines with points 50, 60, and 70 labeled. “a. Draw jumps on this number line to show how you would figure out 68 - 12. b. Draw jumps to show another way you could figure out 68 - 12.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “Ask volunteers to demonstrate the two different ways they thought about the problem 68 - 12 (MP4). Ask others to describe the steps in each method. Write equations on the board to record the different methods.”

  • Module 8, Student Journal, page 318, Mathematical modeling task, students model with mathematics when they use the math they know to solve problems connected to everyday situations. Students are given a picture of a cap $25, a necklace $15, a shirt $49, a pair of sunglasses $65, and a jacket $75. “Ruben has $109 left on a gift card he was given for his last birthday. He wants to buy some clothing but he does not want to spend all the money on his card. He would like to leave about $50 on the gift card. Which items of clothing could he buy?”

MP5 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have multiple opportunities to identify and use a variety of tools or strategies, working with the support of the teacher and independently, throughout the modules to support their understanding of grade level math. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 12, Addition: Reinforcing strategies (count-on and doubles), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students use appropriate tools strategically as they solve addition word problems. “Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 2.12 and work through the questions with the whole class. Read the Step Up and Step Ahead instructions with the students. Refer to Question 2 and explain that counters, cubes, and number tracks can be used to help solve each problem. The students need to select the tool that they would like to use (MP5). Make sure they know what to do, then have them work independently to complete the tasks.”

  • Module 7, Problem solving activities, Activity 1, Greatest difference, students choose appropriate strategies and tools to solve a word problem. Students see four number cards: 2, 5, 0, and 9. They are also given a blank number line and a hundreds chart. “Kevin chose these four number cards. He wants to write a subtraction equation that will give him the greatest possible difference. What equation should Kevin write? Use the number line or hundred chart to help your thinking. _ _ - _ _ = ___”

  • Module 9, Thinking tasks, Questions 1 and 3, “students are encouraged to consider and select from the available tools to help them solve the problem” and then “solve the problem in a different way”. Question 1, students are given a chart, “Fun park meal deals, Family mega combo $45, Family combo $37, Family mini combo $26”. “Jie has $92. Entry tickets to the fun park will cost $53. Which meal combo can Jie buy for his family? Show your thinking.” Question 3, “Lillian uses a different strategy to solve Question 1. Show another way to solve the problem.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 11, Subtraction: Reinforcing three-digit numbers (decomposing tens and hundreds), Student Journal, page 389, Step Up, Questions a-d, students choose an appropriate strategy as a tool to solve subtraction problems. Students see number lines on parts a and b, “a. 212 - 131 = ___, b. 184 - 127 = ___, c. 275 - 108 = ___, d. 232 - 116 = ___”. Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Explain that students can choose the strategy (count-back or count-on) they use for each problem. (MP5)”

Indicator 2h

Materials attend to the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. MP6 is explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical practice overview, Module Mathematical practice documents, Mathematical modeling tasks, Thinking tasks, and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within whole class lesson notes. 

Students have many opportunities to attend to precision in connection to grade level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 4, Lesson 8, Length: Measuring in inches, Step 2 Starting the lesson, students attend to the precision of math by measuring length with an inch ruler. “Review what the students know about measuring lengths with an inch ruler. Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Ask students to draw a line that measures exactly 6 inches long. The pairs exchange their work to confirm the length of the line (MP6). Repeat the activity by asking the students to draw lines of the following length: 3 inches, 8 inches, and 5 inches.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 4, Subtraction: Counting back to subtract two-digit numbers bridging tens (number line), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students attend to precision when they check the reasonableness of their answers when solving subtraction problems. “Read the Step Up and Step Ahead instructions with the students. Make sure they know what to do, then have them work independently to complete the tasks. Discuss reasonable answers and have students think about and suggest ways they could test their answers to make sure they are correct (MP6). For example, they could use a different method, different jumps, or use the relationship between addition and subtraction. For example, to check 65 - 26 = 39 they could add 39 + 1 + 25 to make sure it equals 65.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 10, Length: Working with centimeters, Step 3 Teaching the lesson and Student Journal, page 347, students attend to precision when they measure lengths accurately. In Step 3, “Students should apply what they know about measuring with inch rulers to measuring with centimeter rulers. For example, the importance of aligning the first scale indicator (0) to the beginning length they want to measure (MP6).” Student Journal, Step Up, Question b, students are given a white strip, “Use a ruler to measure the distance along each white strip. Mark the length and color the strip to match. b. Measure 6 cm.”

Students have frequent opportunities to attend to the specialized language of math in connection to grade level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 3, Module overview, Vocabulary development, students can attend to the specialized language of math as teachers are provided a list of vocabulary terms. “The bolded vocabulary below will be introduced and developed in this module. These words are also defined in the student glossary at the end of each Student Journal. A support page accompanies each module where students create their own definition for each of the newly introduced vocabulary terms. The unbolded vocabulary terms below were introduced and defined in previous lessons and grades. Addition, analog clock, digital clock, double, empty number line, equal, even number, expander, fact, greater than, greatest, half an hour, half-past, hour, hundreds, least, less, less than, longest, minute, more, near-double, nearest ten, number line, number name, number track, o'clock, odd number, on the hour, ones, position, shortest, temperature, tens, time, total.” Students are provided with a Building Vocabulary support page. The page includes: Vocabulary term (the bolded terms), Write it in your own words, and Show what it means.

  • Module 5, Lesson 8, Subtraction: Reviewing the think-addition strategy (doubles facts), Student Journal, page 180, Words at Work, students attend to the specialized language of mathematics by explaining their strategy in words. “a) Write two different two-digit numbers that have more than 5 tens and fewer than 4 ones. b)Write an addition problem using the numbers. c)Write how you figure out the total.)”

  • Module 11, Lesson 7, 3D objects: Identifying pyramids, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students attend to the specialized language of mathematics as they use correct mathematical terms such as 3D object, corner, faces, triangle, stack, edge, and pyramid to identify and describe specific 3D objects and their attributes. “Organize students into pairs or small groups and have them discuss why pyramids are not used very often to make boxes for food. Listen to their discussions and remind students to use clear and precise language. Then invite students to share their thinking with the whole class. Establish that pyramids do not stack easily and things cannot be packed inside them easily either. (MP6)”

While there are examples of the intentional development of MP6, attend to precision, throughout materials, there is also evidence of imprecise language or content connections that are not grade-specific. Example include:

  • Module 9, Lesson 1, Addition: Extending the count-on strategy to three-digit numbers, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, the term “turnaround” is used for the commutative property, “Project 20 + 867 = ___ (slide 8) and ask, How could you figure out the total? Discuss the students’ ideas and, if necessary, suggest using the turnaround (867 + 20) to make the calculation easier.” 

  • Module 9, Lesson 2, Addition: Two- and three-digit numbers, Student Journal, page 325, Ongoing Practice, Question 2d, “Think of the turnarounds to help figure out the totals. d. 10 + 374 = ___"

Indicator 2i

Materials support the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. Students have opportunities to engage with the Math Practices throughout the year and they are often explicitly identified for teachers in several places:  Mathematical practice overview, Module Mathematical practice documents, Mathematical modeling tasks, Thinking tasks, and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within whole class lesson notes.

MP7 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have many opportunities throughout the modules to look for, describe, and make use of patterns within problem-solving as they work with support of the teacher and independently. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 2, Number: Writing two-digit numbers and number names, Step 2 Starting the lesson, students look for and make use of structure when using the known structure of a hundred chart to see patterns in two-digit numbers. “Open Flare Number Board online tool to reveal the hundred chart, as shown, and discuss the points below: Where is the number that is five more than 20? Where is the number that is one before 40? Where is the number that is five before 80? Encourage the students to describe what they know about each number. Guide students to refer to the known structure of the hundred chart to support their thinking. (MP7)”

  • Module 5, Lesson 1, Addition: Two-digit numbers (hundred chart), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students look for and make use of structure as they decompose a number to help with addition. “Project slide 3, as shown. Explain that one way of figuring out the total is to split one of the numbers into tens and ones and add each part to the other number (MP7). Have the students place a counter on 56. Discuss the points below: What number are you going to add to 56? (23.) How many tens does 23 have? (2.) 2 tens is 20. How can you move your counter to add 20? (Down two rows.) How many ones does 23 have? (3.) How can you move your counter to add 3 more? (Right three spaces.) Move your finger along the row to 79. Review the steps and write the equation 56 + 20 = 76 on the board. Then write 76 + 3 = 79 below. Then repeat for price tags showing $43 + $24 (slide 4), and then $62 + $37 (slide 5). Project the $56 and $23 price tags (slide 6) to repeat the activity. However, this time have the students add by counting on the ones first, then the tens (MP7). For example, 56 + 3 = 59; 59 + 20 = 79. Reinforce that the total in each method (tens first or ones first) is the same. Repeat the discussion for $43 + $24 (slide 4) and $62 + $37 (slide 5).”

  • Module 8, Lesson 10, Time: Working with five-minute intervals, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students look for and make use of structure when they “recall and apply previously learned concepts to make sense of the word half.” Students see an analog clock showing 3:30. The teacher asks, “How many different ways can we say this time? (Thirty minutes past 3, half- past three, three-thirty.) Why do we use the term half past? What does the half mean? Highlight responses that refer to halfway around the clock face, or relate half to the area model of fractions. Some students may also make connections between 30 minutes and half of 60 minutes. (MP7)”

  • Module 9, Lesson 4, Addition: Composing three-digit numbers, Student Journal, page 329, Step Up, Question a, students look for and make use of structure when they “use the structure of our base-ten number system to represent the same number in a different way. For example, 1 hundred, 5 tens, and 14 ones is the same value as 1 hundred, 6 tens, and 4 ones.” Directions state, “Read the number of hundreds, tens, and ones. Write the number to match. Show your thinking. a. 2 hundreds, 1 ten, and 13 ones is the same value as ___.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students are given “a pile of base-10 blocks containing 1 hundred, 18 tens, and 12 ones”. Students group the blocks according to place value. The teacher asks, “What number is represented? What do we need to do to figure out the number? Is 1 hundred, 18 tens, and 12 ones the same value as 2 hundreds, 9 tens, and 2 ones? Why? (MP7)”

MP8 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have multiple opportunities throughout the materials, with support of the teacher or during independent practice, to use repeated reasoning in order to make generalizations and build a deeper understanding of grade level math concepts. Examples include:

  • Module 6, Lesson 10, Data: Introducing picture graphs, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning by determining that skip counting by fives to count tallies, is more efficient than counting one by one. “Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 6.10 and work through the questions with the whole class. Point out that pictures for this graph are arranged into rows, not columns. Read the Step Up and Step Ahead instructions with the students. Help the students vote on their favorite type of movie. These results can be recorded on the board with students transferring them into their Student Journal. Ask, What is a quick way of counting the tallies for each type of movie? Guide students to explain the shortcut method of counting by fives (MP8). The students can then work independently to complete the remaining tasks.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 9, 2-D shapes: Identifying polygons, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning when they “generalize about the number of vertices being the same as the number of sides for any polygon, then test their prediction by drawing different polygons.” Students draw a polygon on a sticky note. “They then attach their sticky note to the board to sort their polygons by the number of sides” and share their observations. Next, students “sort their polygons by the number of vertices (corners). Discuss the results. Students should note that their polygon was placed in the same group for each sort. Ask, Is it possible to draw a polygon that has more sides than vertices? (No.) Will the number of sides always match the number of vertices? (Yes.) Have students draw polygons on paper to test their predictions. (MP8)”

  • Module 11, Lesson 11, Money: Working with dollars and cents, Student Journal, page 426, Step Up, Question 1b, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning when they “see patterns and make connections while working with coins and bills.” Students see a picture of an orange with a price tag of 30¢ each. “Write or draw two different ways to pay for each fruit using nickels, dimes, and quarters. Use exact amounts because no change will be given.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “For Question 1, have students draw their examples on the board and explain any patterns or connections they used, such as skip counting, doubling, or grouping. (MP8)”

  • Module 12, Lesson 5, Common fractions: Showing the same fraction with wholes of different size, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning when they “make a generalize to describe their understanding about the same fractional amount of different and same sized wholes.” The teacher says, “Imagine a new student came to our class and they did not know anything about fractions of different sized wholes. How could you explain to that student what we have learned in this lesson? Organize students into pairs to brainstorm ideas, then invite them to present their generalizations to the class. For example, they could say, “If two whole shapes are the same in size, then the size of one-half of each whole will be the same. But if the two whole shapes are different in size, then the size of one-half of each whole will be different too. Encourage them to demonstrate their thinking with area models. (MP8)”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for Usability. The materials meet expectations for Criterion 1, Teacher Supports, partially meet expectations for Criterion 2, Assessment, and meet expectations for Criterion 3, Student Supports.

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

9/9
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for Teacher Supports. The materials: provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for enacting the student and ancillary materials; contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current grade so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject; include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series; provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies; and provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

Materials provide comprehensive guidance that will assist teachers in presenting the student and ancillary materials. Examples include:

  • ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Comprehensive Mathematics, Teacher Edition, Program Overview, The Stepping Stone structure, provides a program that is interconnected to allow major, supporting, and additional clusters to be coherently developed. “One of the most unique things about ORIGO Stepping Stones is the approach to sequencing content and practice. Stepping Stones uses a spaced teaching and practice approach in which each content area is spaced apart, the key ideas and skills of these topics have been identified and placed in smaller blocks (modules) over time. In the actual lessons, work is included to help students fully comprehend what is taught alongside the other content development. Consequently, when students come to a new topic, it can be easily connected to previous work.”

  • Module 1, Resources, Preparing for the module, Focus, provides an overview of content and expectations for the module. “In Grade 1, students worked with numbers up to 120. They used a variety of concrete resources and pictures to represent numbers. These resources — connecting cubes, finger pictures, and base-10 blocks — emphasized three key aspects of numbers: counting, place value, and relative position. This meant students could count in different ways; by ones, tens, twos, or fives. Place value was developed using finger pictures, connecting cubes grouped in tens and loose ones, and base-10 blocks showing tens and ones, and, later in the year, one hundred, some tens, and ones. The numeral expander was used with the place- value resources to help students record the numbers as they were represented. This module reviews all the work from Grade 1 that involved two-digit numbers. The lessons focus on using place-value models and the numeral expander to ensure students are confident with reading and writing two-digit numbers. Students compare and order two- digit numbers using the comparison symbols (< and >) to describe the relationship between the numbers. The number work in this module focuses on the place value of three-digit numbers, and counting by one or 100 within 1,000. Base-10 blocks and the numeral expander are used to help the students read and write number names and numerals for three-digit numbers. The digits in the tens place are all greater than one, which means the number names are easier to say. As students are working with the numeral expander, they are encouraged to say the name of the two-digit part of the number by looking at the tens and ones digits together. However, when reading three-digit numbers with teens it is difficult to read a number completely left to right; for example, 216 is read two hundred sixteen. It is better to read a number by looking at the digits in the tens and ones places in one eye movement and saying the number name. That is why the lessons in this module stress using the method of reading a number with hundreds, tens and ones before teen numbers are introduced in later discussions.”

Materials include sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions that are presented within the context of the specific learning objectives. Several components focus specifically on the content of the lesson, such as the Step In, Step Up, Step Ahead, Lesson Slides, Step 1 Preparing the Lesson, while other components, like the Step 2 Starting the lesson, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, and Step 4 Reflecting on the work, serve to ensure teachers have the support and knowledge they need to successfully implement the content.” Lesson notes can also highlight potential misconceptions to support teacher planning and practice. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 6, Number: Reading and writing three-digit numbers, Step 2 Starting the lesson, teachers provide context with reading and writing three digit numbers. “Have the students stand in a circle and say, Today, we are going to count by hundreds from 150 in order around the circle. Have students count forward by 100, taking turns to say the numbers to 950, then have students count back from 950 to 150, continuing around the circle. As the students’ confidence increases, create a counting game by drawing a tally on the board each time a successful count forward to 950 and back to 150 occurs. This game can be used repeatedly throughout the week to improve counting fluency and foster enthusiasm for number-related activities.”

  • Module 5, Lesson 5, Addition: Two-digit numbers bridging tens (number line), Step 3 Teaching the lesson provides teachers guidance about how to solve problems using place value to add two digit numbers. “Invite students to model their strategy on the board. Establish that it is easier to start with the greater number and then add on the lesser number. Talk about the different ways to break the lesser number (25) into parts to make it easier to add. For example, students might split the number by place value and think 48 + 20 + 5, while others may decompose the five and think 48 + 20 + 2 + 3. Discuss each of the strategies to highlight that each strategy aims to break one of the numbers into parts to make it easier to add. Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Ask them to use their number line to figure out the total cost of the items and to write an equation to match the steps they followed. Move around the room to observe their strategies and models. Ask questions such as, How did you break the numbers into parts to make it easier to add? What jumps will you draw to show your thinking? Can you think of a different way to figure out the total? Bring the students together to share their strategies and equations, and describe how they both show the quantities in the problem. Encourage respectful critique (SMP3) by asking, Do you agree with this strategy? How is it different from the strategy you used? How is it the same? If time allows, the price tags can be exchanged among the students, and the activity repeated. Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 5.5 and work through the questions with the whole class. Read the Step Up and Step Ahead instructions with the students. Make sure they know what to do, then have them work independently to complete the tasks.”

  • Module 9 Lesson 9, Length: Introducing centimeters, Lesson overview and focus,  Misconceptions, include guidance to address common misconceptions with measurements. “Measurement using centimeter cubes has the advantage of being firmly grounded in the use of everyday objects. The drawbacks are the potential for overlapping units and allowing gaps between units while measuring. Model correct measurement strategies, explicitly highlighting these possible errors early in the measuring lesson by intentionally leaving gaps or overlapping cubes and gauging students' responses. Later, when students measure the same object and get different answers, the ideal opportunity for more discussion can arise. Examine your class set of rulers to determine if they are appropriate. If possible, avoid rulers with millimeter markings at this grade level: centimeter-only rulers are commercially available or can be printed on card stock. If the class rulers have a space between the end of the object and the zero point, teach students to start at the zero point, not just at the end of the ruler.”

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Origo Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for containing adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current grade so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

Within Module Resources, Preparing for the module, there are sections entitled “Research into practice” and “Focus” that consistently link research to pedagogy. There are adult-level explanations including examples of the more complex grade-level concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. Professional articles support teachers with learning opportunities about topics such as ensuring mathematical success for all, early understanding of equality, and repeating patterns. There are also professional learning videos, called MathEd, embedded across the curriculum to support teachers in building their knowledge of key mathematical concepts. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Preparing for the module, Focus, Number and operations in base ten, explains concepts connected to the introduction of the number line and the relative position of numbers. MathEd RTN3 Teaching number: Relative position, provides additional professional learning for teachers. “The number line is introduced in this module. This is a streamlined version of the number track that helps students work with relative position. At this stage, it is important to stress the idea that a number on a number line is a length; in other words, it is a distance from 0 (the origin or start). So the position of a number (for example, 39) is determined by its distance from 0. In Lesson 2, the placement of a number line just below a number track helps students see that the spaces on the track are the same as the distances between the individual marks on the number line. This also helps to show that 0 does not have any length. One of the first observations to make about the number line is that it is a good tool for comparing and ordering numbers, because greater numbers are farther away from 0. The number line is also handy for finding numbers that are nearby, and for rounding. As students become confident with the number line, they will see it is also useful for reinforcing place value. For example, encourage students to explain the thinking they would use to locate 39 on the number line, and to describe what part of the number they will consider first before making a "jump" from 0. Through discussion, students will see that they can make three jumps of ten, and then nine jumps of one, using the place-value idea. In time, students will use other strategies, but this is a good way to establish how a number line represents numbers. A variety of types of number lines are used in this module. In Lesson 6, students work with empty number lines, which only have marks showing one or two benchmark numbers. This type of number line will help students move away from counting strategies that they might want to use to help figure out answers.” MathEd, “For professional learning in relation to this content, select the following videos from the support resources online. RTN3 Teaching Number: Relative position.”

  • Module 5, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, Subtraction, includes explanations and examples of common problem types for subtraction. To learn more includes further references where teachers can build knowledge. “There are three common problem types that can be represented through the subtraction operation, and each of these types of problems mirrors a story context: the separate type (take from), the part/part/total type (take apart), and the compare type. An example of the part/part/total problem type is the following: There are 22 children in Kylie's class. Some of the children take a bus to school and some walk to school. 10 of the children take the bus to school. How many children walk to school each day? A feature of the part/part/total problem type is that the situation can be represented as either a subtraction equation or as an addition equation. The example above can be represented by the following equations: 10 + ? = 22, 22 − 10 = ?, or even 22 − ? = 10. When the problem is thought of as an addition equation, students often count on from one part to the total in order to find the missing addend. When the problem is interpreted as a subtraction situation, students may count back from the total to the known addend to find the difference. It is an effective strategy grounded in the context and therefore accessible through a variety of representations, particularly with the number line and hundred chart.” To learn more, “Common Core Standards Writing Team. 2011. Progressions Documents for the Common Core Math Standards: Draft K–5 Progression on Counting and Cardinality and Operations and Algebraic Thinking. http://ime.math.arizona.edu/progressions/” 

  • Module 6, Preparing for the module, Research in practice, Addition, supports teachers with concepts for work beyond the grade. “As the Mathematics Focus suggests, this work forms the foundation to extending the count-on strategy to three-digits numbers in Module 9 then sets the stage for the introduction of the standard addition algorithm in Grade 3 Module 7. In preparation for this work, provide many opportunities for students to practice place-value strategies that split the numbers into tens and ones before adding. For example, to solve 76 + 58, thinking 70 + 50 + 6 + 8 = 12 tens + 14 ones then regrouping 10 tens as 1 hundred and 10 ones as 1 ten to get the total 134. Read more in the Research into Practice section of Module 9 and Grade 3 Modules 2 and 7.”

  • Module 9, Research into Practice, Addition, supports teachers with concepts for work beyond the grade. “As the Mathematics Focus suggests, this work forms the foundation to the introduction of the standard addition algorithm in Grade 3 Module 7, following a review of Grade 2 addition work in Module 2. In preparation for this work, use every opportunity for students to demonstrate and explain their addition thinking. For example, to solve 302 + 129, adding the places and thinking 4 hundreds + 2 tens + 11 ones = 400 + 30 + 1 after regrouping 10 ones as 1 ten. Read more in the Research into Practice section of Grade 3 Module 7.

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for including standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series. 

Correlation information is present for the mathematics standards addressed throughout the grade level/series and can be found in several places, including the curriculum front matter and program overview, module overview and resources, and within each lesson. Examples include:

  • Front Matter, Grade 2 and the CCSS by Lesson includes a table with each grade level lesson (in columns) and aligned grade level standards (in rows). Teachers can search any lesson for the grade and identify the standard(s) that are addressed within.

  • Front Matter, Grade 2 and the Common Core Standards, includes all Grade 2 standards and the modules and lessons each standard appears in. Teachers can search a standard for the grade and identify the lesson(s) where it appears within materials.

  • Module 5, Module Overview Resources, Lesson Content and Learning Targets, outlines standards, learning targets and the lesson where they appear. This is present for all modules and allows teachers to identify targeted standards for any lesson.

  • Module 4, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Reviewing concepts, the Core Standards are identified as 2.OA.A.1 and 2.NBT.B.5. The Prior Learning Standard is identified 1.OA.D.8. Lessons contain a consistent structure that includes Lesson Focus, Topic progression, Formative assessment opportunity, Misconceptions, Step 1 Preparing the lesson, Step 2 Starting the lesson, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, and Maintaining concepts and skills. This provides an additional place to reference standards, and language of the standard, within each lesson.

Each module includes a Mathematics Overview that includes content standards addressed within the module as well as a narrative outlining relevant prior and future content connections. Each lesson includes a Topic Progression that also includes relevant prior and future learning connections. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Mathematics Overview, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, includes an overview of how the math of this module builds from previous work in math. “In Grade 1, students learned to use doubling as a strategy to help add numbers that are near each other, for example, 7 + 7 = 14, so 8 + 7 = 15. This strategy is reviewed and reinforced. The number facts in the count-on and use-doubles clusters of facts are merged and reinforced. Practice for all these facts is included in the maintaining concepts and skills activities, but it is always good to practice addition facts early in Grade 2, as time allows.”

  • Module 9, Mathematics Overview, Coherence, includes an overview of how the content in 2nd grade connects to mathematics students will learn in third grade. “Lessons 9.1–9.8 focus on addition of up to two three-digit numbers using count-on, make-ten, and place-value strategies. This builds on prior work with addition of up to two two-digit numbers (2.6.1–2.6.9) and serves as a foundation for developing written methods and applying addition strategies to solve problems (3.2.1–3.2.5).”

  • Module 11, Lesson 7, 3D objects: Identifying pyramids, Topic Progression, “Prior learning: In Lesson 2.11.6, students use the term polyhedron to describe 3D objects that have only flat surfaces. The ORIGO Big Book: Muddy, Muddy Mess is used to support students’ development of the concept. 2.G.A.1; Current focus: In this lesson, students identify pyramids by examining their features. 2.G.A.1; Future learning: In Lesson 2.11.8, students analyze 3D objects and record information about their faces, edges, and vertices. 2.G.A.1.” Each lesson provides a correlation to standards and a chart relating the target standard(s) to prior learning and future learning.

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provides strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. 

ORIGO ONE includes 1-minute videos, in English and Spanish that can be shared with stakeholders. They outline big ideas for important math concepts within each grade. Each module also has a corresponding Newsletter, available in English and Spanish, that provides a variety of supports for families, including the core focus for each module, ideas for practice at home, key glossary terms, and helpful videos. Newsletter examples include:

  • Module 1, Resources, Preparing for the module, Newsletter, Core Focus, “Number: Writing two-digit numbers, Number: Exploring the properties of odd and even numbers, Number: Working with three-digit numbers, Addition: Using the commutative property. Two-digit numbers - Hands-on tools and visual aids help students develop a firm understanding of the base-10 number system (i.e. two-digit numbers are made up of tens and ones). Odd and even numbers - Students define odd and even numbers. They explore what happens when two even numbers are added, when two odd numbers are added, and when an even number and an odd number are added. Three-digit numbers - Once students have mastered two-digit numbers through grouping by tens and place value, they then apply this understanding to three-digit numbers. Students read 463 as four hundred sixty-three. The word hundred is said after reading the number in the hundreds place, but the tens and ones are said together as sixty-three. Addition - Students continue to build their understanding of addition and subtraction by thinking about putting parts together to make a total, as well as separating a total into parts. It is important to see that the order does not matter when two parts are put together. This characteristic is called the commutative property, illustrated by turnaround facts.”

  • Module 3, Resources, Preparing for the module, Newsletter, Glossary, “Base-10 blocks and numeral expanders model place value in diff erent ways, helping students deepend their understanding of the base-10 number system. Make-ten strategy - The make-ten strategy is a mental calculation method for adding numbers that are close to ten. For example, using this strategy, students see 9 + 6, but think 10 + 5.” Module 3, Newsletter, Helpful videos, “View these short one-minute videos to see these ideas in action. go.origo.app/lfcew. go.origo.app/46939.”

  • Module 7, Resources, Preparing for the module, Newsletter, Ideas for Home, “Counting back in tens or ones from any number is a key skill for subtraction. Take turns at naming a number between 51 and 99. Roll a standard number cube and count back that many tens or ones. Comparing the prices of similar items of food is a practical way to think about subtraction as comparison. Ask your child to find the difference between the prices of two similar items. Ask if they counted on or counted back, and to explain why. Knowing the combinations that make 10 (1 and 9, 2 and 8, 3 and 7, 4 and 6, 5 and 5) helps your child count on using a number line. Jumping to the next multiple of 10 is an efficient strategy. Ask, “How far from 63 to 70?” or “How far from 24 to 50?” Children can easily count on or count back by ones, or use a known fact, to subtract when they do not need to bridge a multiple of ten (e.g. 68 − 5). However, counting past a multiple of ten can be difficult. Name any two-digit number with the ones place less than 5 and have your child subtract 7, 8, or 9 (e.g. “What is 73 take away 8?”) Listen as your child explains how they solved the problem. Ask your child to look for shapes in the home and environment. Doors and windows are often rectangles, but look for other shapes, such as triangles, and shapes with more than 4 sides, such as hexagons and pentagons. Take turns at giving directions to draw shapes by naming the number of sides and corners, and whether the sides are the same length or have diff erent lengths. E.g. say, “Draw a shape with five sides and five corners with different side lengths.”

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies. 

Instructional approaches of the program are described within the Pedagogy section of the Program Overview at each grade. Examples include:

  • Program Overview, Pedagogy, The Stepping Stones approach to teaching concepts includes the mission of the program as well as a description of the core beliefs. “Mathematics involves the use of symbols, and a major goal of a program is to prepare students to read, write, and interpret these symbols. ORIGO Stepping Stones introduces symbols gradually after students have had many meaningful experiences with models ranging from real objects, classroom materials and 2D pictures, as shown on the left side of the diagram below. Symbols are also abstract representations of verbal words, so students move through distinct language stages (see right side of diagram), which are described in further detail below. The emphasis of both material and language development summarizes ORIGO's unique, holistic approach to concept development. A description of each language stage is provided in the next section. This approach serves to build a deeper understanding of the concepts underlying abstract symbols. In this way, Stepping Stones better equips students with the confidence and ability to apply mathematics in new and unfamiliar situations.”

  • Program Overview, Pedagogy, The Stepping Stones approach to teaching skills helps to outline how to teach a lesson. “In Stepping Stones, students master skills over time as they engage in four distinctly different types of activities. 1. Introduce. In the first stage, students are introduced to the skill using contextual situations, concrete materials, and pictorial representations to help them make sense of the mathematics. 2. Reinforce. In the second stage, the concept or skill is reinforced through activities or games. This stage provides students with the opportunity to understand the concepts and skills as it connects the concrete and pictorial models of the introductory stage to the abstract symbols of the practice stage. 3. Practice. When students are confident with the concept or skill, they move to the third stage where visual models are no longer used. This stage develops accuracy and speed of recall. Written and oral activities are used to practice the skill to develop fluency. 4. Extend. Finally, as the name suggests, students extend their understanding of the concept or skill in the last stage. For example, the use-tens thinking strategy for multiplication can be extended beyond the number fact range to include computation with greater whole numbers and eventually to decimal fractions.” 

  • Program Overview, Pedagogy, The Stepping Stones structure outlines the learning experiences. “The scope and sequence of learning experiences carefully focuses on the major clusters in each grade to ensure students gain conceptual understanding, a high degree of procedural skill and fluency, and the ability to apply this knowledge to solve problems inside and outside the mathematics classroom. Mathematics contains many concepts and skills that are closely interconnected. A strong curriculum will carefully build the structure, so that all of the major, supporting, and additional clusters are appropriately addressed and coherently developed. One of the most unique things about ORIGO Stepping Stones is the approach to sequencing content and practice. Stepping Stones uses a spaced teaching and practice approach in which each content area is spaced apart, the key ideas and skills of these topics have been identified and placed in smaller blocks (modules) over time. In the actual lessons, work is included to help students fully comprehend what is taught alongside the other content development. Consequently, when students come to a new topic, it can be easily connected to previous work. For example, within one module students may work on addition, time, and shapes, addressing some of the grade level content for each, and returning to each one later in the year. This allows students to make connections across content and helps students master content and skills with less practice, allowing more time for instruction.”

Research-based strategies within the program are cited and described regularly within each module, within the Research into practice section inside Preparing for the module. Examples of research- based strategies include:

  • Module 2, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, “Number line: The number line can be a powerful tool for students to create a visual model of the sequence of numbers. Equally spaced tick marks partition a number line, and can show as little or as much density on the number line as desired. Density refers to the idea that no matter what two numbers are placed on a number line, there is always more that can be placed in between them. One noted problem with the number line is that the focus is often on the numbers labeling the increments, while the power and structure of the number line is focused on the distance between those marks. That distance between two points is a measurement: the distance from zero is a particularly good tool for comparing whole numbers on the number line, especially in later grades. Time: Time is an abstract concept — to measure time is to measure something that cannot be seen or touched. Clocks help us make sense of time. The benefit of using an analog dial to teach time is that when it is, say, 1:58, students can see that it is almost 2:00. A digital clock, however, requires a more in-depth knowledge for students to understand approximately what 1:58 is time-wise. To learn more: Bobis, Janette. 2007. “The Empty Number Line: A Useful Tool or Just Another Procedure?” Teaching Children Mathematics 13(8): 410-413. Van de Walle, John A., Karen S. Karp, and Jennifer M. Bay-Williams. 2010. Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. 7th ed. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon. References: Gunderson, Elizabeth A., Gerardo Ramirez, Sian L. Beilock, and Susan C. Levine. 2012. “The Relation between Spatial Skill and Early Number Knowledge: The Role of the Linear Number Line.” Developmental Psychology 48(5): 1229-41. Klein, A. S., M. Beishuizen, and A. Treffers. 1998. "The Empty Number Line in Dutch Second Grades: Realistic Versus Gradual Program Design." Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 29(4): 443-464.”

  • Module 8, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, “Subtraction: The subtraction strategies presented in Module 8 introduce composing and decomposing numbers into and out of groups of ten. This content moves away from the basic recall of facts (DOK Level 1) to emphasize the basic application of skills and concepts (DOK Level 2). It requires the conceptual understanding of regrouping by encouraging students to regroup 1 ten as 10 ones when needed. For this reason, base-10 blocks continue to be an important tool for building a strong understanding of the process of decomposing a group of ten to subtract. While the goals for Grade 2 include fluency in calculations within 100, calculations beyond 100 depend on a more secure understanding of decomposing and composing tens and ones, and so fluency is reserved for Grade 3. To learn more: Common Core Standards Writing Team. 2011. Progressions Documents for the Common Core Math Standards: Draft K–5 Progression on Counting and Cardinality and Operations and Algebraic Thinking http://ime.math.arizona.edu/progressions/, Fuson, Karen C. and Sybilla Beckman. 2013. “Standard Algorithms in the Common Core State Standards.” NCSM Journal of Mathematics Education Leadership 14 (2): 14–30., Reinke, Kay and Pat Lamphere-Jordan. 2002. “Working Cotton: Toward an Understanding of Time.” Teaching Children Mathematics 8 (8): 475–79. References: Fosnot, Catherine and Maarten Dolk. 2001. Young Mathematicians at Work: Constructing Number Sense: Addition, and Subtraction., Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Fuson, Karen C., Diana Wearne, James C. Hiebert, Hanlie G. Murray, Pieter G. Human, Alwyn I. Olivier, Thomas P. Carpenter, and Elizabeth Fennema. 1997. “Children's Conceptual Structures for Multidigit Numbers and Methods of Multidigit Addition and Subtraction.” Journal for Research in Mathematics Education 28 (2): 130–62., Vakali, Mary. 1991. “Clock Time in Seven to Ten-Year-Old Children.” European Journal of Psychology of Education 6 (3): 325–36

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

1/1
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. In the Program Overview, Program components, Preparing for the module, “Resource overview - provides a comprehensive view of the materials used within the module to assist with planning and preparation.” Each module includes a Resource overview to outline supplies needed for each lesson within the module. Additionally, specific lessons include notes about supplies needed to support instructional activities, often within Step 1 Preparing the lesson. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Preparing for the module, According to the Resource overview, teachers need, “base-10 blocks (tens and ones) for lesson 5, container for lessons 2 and 5, ORIGO Big Book: Jumping Jacks for lessons 2, 3, and 6, stick tack, Support 29 and Support 30 for lesson 2, Support 34 for Lesson 8, Support 35 for lesson 10, Support 37 for lesson 12, and The Number Case for lessons 2 and 5. Each pair of students needs counters and a cube labeled: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 in lesson 10. Each individual student needs base-10 one blocks and counters in lesson 1, cubes or counters, glue, scissors, Support 28 for lesson 1, Support 26 for lesson 12, the Student Journal for each lesson, Supports 32 and Support 33 for lesson 7.” 

  • Module 2, Lesson 1, Number: Exploring position on a number track, Lesson notes, Step 1 Preparing the lesson, “Each student will need: 1 copy of Support 28, scissors, glue, base-10 blocks, counters, and Student Journal 2.1.” Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Distribute the resources and direct the students to cut out the four strips.”

  • Module 5, Preparing for the module, According to the Resource overview, teachers need, “cube labeled: 10, 10, 20, 20, 30, 30 in lesson 3, a cube labeled 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 in lesson 6, non-permanent marker in lesson 2, and resources such as hundred charts, number lines, and ten frames from The Number Case, connecting cubes, counters and small objects such as toys and stones placed in a central position in the classroom for students to access as need in lessons 10 and 11. Each group of students needs a cube labeled: 30, 35, 42, 45, 51, 55 and a cube labeled: 55, 62, 65, 74, 75, 81 in lesson 7. Each pair of students needs counters in lesson 10, non-permanent marker and Support 55 in lesson 5, The Number Case in lessons 1, 4, 5, and 10, and transparent counters in lesson 1. Each individual student needs a 12 inch ruler in lesson 7, paper in lessons 7, 11, and 12, Support 48 in lesson 10, and the Student Journal in each lesson.”

  • Module 8, Lesson 4, Subtraction: Reinforcing two-digit numbers (decomposing tens), Lesson notes, Step 1 Preparing the lesson “ You will need: 10 bundles of 10 straws in a container; Each student will need: Student Journal 8.4”

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

7/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 partially meet expectations for Assessment. The materials identify the standards, but do not identify the mathematical practices assessed for the formal assessments. The materials provide multiple opportunities to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance but do not provide suggestions for follow-up. The materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and mathematical practices across the series. 

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 partially meet expectations for having assessment information included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

While Check-ups, Quarterly tests, Performance tasks, and Interviews consistently and accurately identify grade level content standards within each Module assessment overview, mathematical practices are not identified. Examples from formal assessments include:

  • Module 2, Preparing for the module, Module assessment overview, Check-up 1, denotes standards addressed for each question. Question 2, 2.OA.2, 2.NBT.5, “Write each total. a. 7 + 7 = ___ , b. 7 + 5 = ___ , c. 3 + 5 = ___.” 

  • Module 6, Assessment, Quarterly test, Test A, denotes standards for each question. Question 15, 2.MD.2, “Sheree measured the length of her bed in inches then in feet. Choose the correct statement. A. The length will have fewer inches than feet. B. The length will have fewer feet than inches. C. The length will have the same number of feet as inches.”

  • Module 8, Preparing for the module, Module assessment overview, Interview, denotes standards addressed. 2.OA.1, “Steps: Place the 15 counters and the support page in front of the student. Say, Twelve birds are on the ground. Some of the birds fly into the tree. Now there are eight birds on the ground. How many birds flew into the tree? Encourage students to choose and arrange counters to represent the problem. Ask them to explain how they figured out the answer. Repeat the previous steps with the following stories: Thirteen birds are at a park. Six are in a tree and the rest are on the ground. How many birds are on the ground? Some birds are in a tree. Five birds fly to the ground. There are nine birds left in the tree. How many birds were in the tree in the beginning? Eleven birds are in a tree. Three fly to the ground. Then another four fly down. How many birds are left in the tree? Draw a ✔ beside the learning the student has successfully demonstrated.“

  • Module 10, Preparing for the module, Module assessment overview, Performance task denotes the aligned grade level standard, 2.NBT.7. Question 1, “a. The blocks below show 225. Draw blocks to show how to regroup to subtract 132 from 225. b. Complete this equation.225 - 132 = ___.

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 partially meet expectations for including an assessment system that provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students’ learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. 

Summative Assessments, such as Check-ups and Quarterly tests, provide an answer key with aligned standards. Performance Tasks include an answer key and a 2-point rubric, which provides examples of student responses and how they would score on the rubric. A student achievement recording spreadsheet for each module learning target is available that includes: Individual Achievement of Learning Targets for this Module, Whole Class Achievement of Learning Targets for this Module and Individual Achievement of Learning Targets for Modules 1 to 12. While some scoring guidance is included within the materials, there is no guidance for teachers to interpret student performance or suggestions for teachers that could guide follow-up support for students. Examples from the assessment system include:

  • Module 2, Assessments, Check-up 1, Question 3, “Color the bubble beside the true statement. If you double a number from 1 to 9 the total is always even. If you double a number from 1 to 9 the total might be odd or even. If you double a number from 1 to 9 the total is always odd.” The answer, if you double a number from 1 to 9 the total is always even. The answer key aligns this question to 2.OA.3.

  • Module 6, Assessments, Quarterly test B, Question 11, “Color blocks to help you figure out the total. Then complete the equation. 34 + 18 = ___.” The answer key shows the answer as 52 and aligned to 2.NBT.5 and 2.NBT.7.

  • Module 9, Assessments, Performance task, students use addition strategies to solve word problems. “Question 1. Draw jumps on the number line to figure out the total cost of these two items. Bicycle $185, scooter $132. Question 2. Draw jumps on the number line to figure out the total cost of these two items. Skateboard $34, Rollerskates $118.” The Scoring Rubric and Examples state, “2 Meets requirements. Shows complete understanding. For both questions, wrote one addend on the numberline. For both questions, showed the other addend as a series of efficient jumps. For both questions, calculated the correct total. For Question 2, placed the greater addend on the number line first. 1 Partially meets requirements. For both questions, wrote one addend on the number line. For both questions, showed the other addened as a series of jumps. The jumps may not have been efficient. For both questions, there may have been simple errors in calculations. 0 Does not meet requirements. Shows no understanding.”

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing assessments that include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and practices across the series.

Formative Assessments include Pre-test, Observations and discussions, and Journals and Portfolios. Summative Assessments include Check-ups, Interviews, Performance tasks, and Quarterly tests. All assessments regularly demonstrate the full intent of grade level content and practice standards through a variety of item types: multiple choice, short answer, and constructed response. Examples include:

  • Module 3, Check-up 2 and Performance task, develop the full intent of standard 2.NBT.4, compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. Check-up 2, Question 1, “Write < or > to complete each of these. a. 485 ___ 619, b. 520 ___ 531, c. 349 ___ 342.” Performance task, Question 2, “Look at these numbers below. Write two more numbers so that all five numbers are in order. 387, ___, 423, ___, 502.”

  • Module 6, Quarterly test questions support the full intent of MP7, look for and make use of structure, as students use fact family strategies to solve a complex problem. Question 9, “Choose the missing fact from this fact family. 14 - 5 = 9, 14 - 9 = 5, 9 + 5 = 14. A. 9 - 5 = 14, B. 5 + 9 = 14, C. 9 + 14 = 23.”

  • Module 9, Quarterly test A questions support the full intent of MP5, use appropriate tools strategically, as students choose a subtraction strategy to solve a word problem. Question 2, “Solve the problem. Show your thinking. There are 67 people at a zoo. 10 people leave on the first bus and 12 people leave on the second bus. How many people are left at the zoo?” 

  • Module 11, Interview 1 and Check-up 2, develop the full intent of 2.MD.8, solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Interview 1, “Resources: play money: one $1, 6 quarters, 12 dimes, 25 nickels, and 30 pennies. Steps: Provide the student with the dollar bill and coins. Ask, How many cents are there in one penny? Repeat for the other coins and the dollar bill. Ask the student to use the coins to demonstrate their answer to the following questions. Ask, How many nickels have the same value as one dime? How many nickels have the same value as one quarter? How many dimes have the same value as one dollar? How many quarters have the same value as one dollar? Ask the student to show a combination of coins that equals 78 cents. Draw a ✔ beside the learning the student has successfully demonstrated.” Check-up 2, Question 2, “Figure out and write how much each person has. a. Katherine has two quarters, three dimes, and a penny. b. Samuel has two dimes, five pennies and a nickel. c. Sara has three nickels, two dimes, and two quarters.”

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Origo Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide assessments which offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment. According to the Program overview, Grade assessment overview, “ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 provides online student assessments for each instructional quarter, Grades 1–5. Each assessment offers a variety of technology-enhanced item types, such as open-response visual displays, to monitor and guide achievement.” In addition to technology- enhanced items, the online assessments include the ability to flag items, magnify the screen, and utilize a screen reader for text to speech. The digital assessments are authored through Learnosity and the screen readers are an add-on feature, housed outside of the Origo platform.

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for Student Supports. The materials provide: strategies and supports for students in special populations and for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics, multiple extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity, and manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level/series mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics.

Materials regularly provide strategies, supports, and resources for students in special populations to help them access grade-level mathematics. In each Module Lesson, Differentiation notes, there is a document titled Extra help, Extra practice, and Extra challenge that provides accommodations for an activity of the lesson. For example, the components of Module 5, Lesson 8, Subtraction: Reviewing the think-addition strategy (doubles facts), include:

  • Extra help, “Activity: Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Have the students cut out all the cards. They can then mix and match the cards.”

  • Extra practice, “Activity: Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Have the students cut out all the cards. The dominoes are mixed and placed facedown in a central pile. Students take turns to select a domino, keeping it hidden from the other student, and calculate the total in their head. They then cover one end of the domino, show the other end to the other student, and say the total. The other student figures out how many dots are covered, and then they explain how they figured it out. The students alternate roles and repeat the activity several times.”

  • Extra challenge, “Activity: Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Have the students cut out all the cards. The dominoes are mixed and placed facedown in a central pile. Students take turns to select a domino, keeping it hidden from the other student, and calculate the total in their head. They then say their total and the other student must say what the two parts of the domino show. If they are correct, the card remains upturned in a new pile. If they are incorrect, the card is returned facedown to the bottom of the pile. The students alternate roles and repeat the activity several times.”

Indicator 3n

Materials provide extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level/course-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

While there are no instances where advanced students do more assignments than classmates, materials do provide multiple opportunities to investigate the grade-level content at a higher level of complexity. The Lesson Differentiation in each lesson includes a differentiation plan with an extra challenge. Each extra challenge is unique to an activity completed in class. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 1, Number: Exploring position on a number track, Differentiation, Extra Challenge, “Distribute the resources. Have the students cut out all the number-track sections and tape them together to form a number track from 1 to 64. Organize students into pairs. They then take turns to say a missing number that the other student must identify on the track. They then both write the number on their own track.”

  • Module 5, Lesson 5, Addition: Two-digit numbers bridging tens (number line), Differentiation, Extra Challenge, “Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Have the students cut out the purse cards. The cards are then scattered facedown on the floor. Students take turns to select a card, roll the cube, and calculate the total. Encourage the students to perform a mental calculation but allow them to use a number line to help, if necessary. They then place a counter on the matching total on the game board and return the purse card facedown. If an answer is unavailable, the student misses a turn. Play continues until one student has placed three adjacent counters in a horizontal or vertical line.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 8, Two-digit numbers from three-digit numbers (decomposing tens and hundreds), Differentiation, Extra Challenge, “This activity builds upon the Extra Practice activity. Open Flare Number Line (b) and write these digits on the board: 6, 9, 4, 5, 3. Have the students arrange the digits to form a subtraction equation (a two-digit number being subtracted from a three-digit number) that they are unable to solve mentally. Students can then use the number line to figure out the difference, adjusting the range of the number line as needed. Repeat the activity for other subtraction equations.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide various approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning, but do not provide opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Students engage with problem-solving in a variety of ways: Student Journal Steps, Investigations, Problem-solving Activities, Step It Up 2.0, and within Thinking Tasks, a key component for the program. According to the Program Overview, “ORIGO Thinking Tasks break this mold by presenting students with rigorous, problem-solving opportunities. These problems may become messy and involve multiple entry points as students carve out a solution path. By placing emphasis on the complexity of problem solving, we strive to create a culture for all learners that engages and inspires while developing their confidence and perseverance in the face of challenging problems.” Examples of varied approaches include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 1, Number: Exploring position on a number track, Student Journal, page 44, Step Up, students match numbers and their names to their correct position. Question 1 states, “Draw a line to show where each number and number name is located on the track.”

  • Step It Up Practice, Grade 2, Module 4, Resources, Lesson 5, Subtraction: Writing fact families (count-on facts), Question 3, students use what they know about the relationship between addition and subtraction in order to match fact families. “Use the same color to show the number facts that belong in the same fact family. 4 + 2 = 6, 12 - 3 = 9, 0 + 8 = 8, 2 + 4 = 6, 3 +7 = 10, 8 - 8 = 0, 10 - 7 = 3, 9 + 3 = 12, 8 - 0 = 8, 6 - 2 = 4, 3 + 9 = 12, 10 - 3 = 7, 12 - 9 = 3, 7 + 3 = 10, 6 - 4 = 2, 8 + 0 = 8.” 

  • Module 6, More Math, Thinking Tasks, Question 3, students use estimation strategies to solve word problems. “Lisa has $100 and wants to buy her three children a different ball each. Which balls can she buy? Write an equation to show how you add the numbers to figure out the total cost of the three balls. How much money will Lisa have left over after she buys the balls? Show your thinking.” 

  • Module 11, More Math, Investigation 2, students use arrays to show multiplication. “How many different arrays can be made with 48 counters? Project slide 1 and read the investigation question. Discuss the context and make sure the students understand the question and that they should record each array in the form ___ rows of ___. Organize students into pairs and distribute the counters. Have them work together to find and record all the different arrays.”

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Suggested grouping strategies are consistently present within lesson notes and include guidance for whole group, small group, pairs, or individual activities. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 7, Time: Reviewing on the hour, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Organize students into groups of three so all the students in a group have cards that show different times.”

  • Module 5, Lesson 4, Addition: Extending the make-ten strategy (number line), Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Organize students into pairs and distribute the number lines.“ Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 5.4 and work through the questions with the whole class.”

  • Module 12, Lesson 5, Common fractions: Showing the same fraction with wholes of different size, Step 1 Preparing the lesson, “Each group of three students will need: 1 copy of Support 93 (3 pages), scissors. Each pair of students will need: 40 cubes or counters. Each student will need: Student Journal 12.5.” Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Organize students into pairs to act out the problem with cubes or counters then share their findings.” Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Organize students into groups of three and distribute the first page of the support. Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 12.5 and work through the questions with the whole class.”

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

Although strategies are not provided to differentiate for the levels of student language development, all materials are available in Spanish. Guidance is consistently provided for teachers to support students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English, providing scaffolds for them to meet or exceed grade-level standards. According to the Mathematics Overview, English Language Learners, “The Stepping Stones program provides a language-rich curriculum where English Language Learners (ELL) can acquire mathematics in a natural second-language progression by listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Each lesson includes accommodations to be aware of when teaching the lesson to ensure scaffolding of content and misconceptions of language are addressed. Since there may be several stages of language development in your classroom, you will need to use your professional judgement to select which accommodations are best suited to each learner.” Examples include:

  • Module 3, Lesson 7, Number: Comparing to order three-digit numbers, Lesson notes, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “ELL: Allow the students to watch the game for a few rounds to understand the directions. Then invite them to engage in the activity.” Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “ELL: Pair the students with fluent English-speaking students. During the activity, have students discuss the concepts in their pairs, as well as repeat the other student’s thinking. Allow students to discuss the words least, greatest, and first before moving on with the activity. Allow the students to work in their pairs to complete the Student Journal, if necessary.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “ELL: Pair the students with fluent English- speaking students to enhance language acquisition. Invite the students to explain their thinking to each other before speaking to the group.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 8, Subtraction: Two-digit numbers from three-digit numbers (decomposing tens and hundreds), Lesson notes, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “ELL: Allow the students to process their answer, and encourage them to say the number in English. Project the number 107 (slide 1) and ask one volunteer, What number is shown? (107.) What number is 10 less than that number? (97.) What number is 20 less than the number shown? (87.) What number is 30 less than the number shown? (77.) Repeat with the remaining numbers (slides 2 to 30), as needed, so every student has a turn.” Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “ELL: Pair the students with fluent English-speaking students. Encourage them to discuss the concepts with their partner, as well as repeat the other student’s thinking. Allow the students to formulate an answer and discuss their thoughts with their partner before presenting them to the class. Allow the students to use hand gestures (such as thumbs up or down) to show they understand, or are confused by, the language being used. Allow pairs to complete the Student Journal, if necessary.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “ELL: Provide sentence stems such as, “The number in the boxes should be ___ because …”.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

The characters in the student journal represent different races and portray people from many ethnicities in a positive, respectful manner, with no demographic bias for who achieves success in the context of problems. Names include multi-cultural references such as Jie, Fatima, Jacinta, and Nam and problem settings vary from rural, to urban, and international locations. Each module provides Cross-curricula links or Enrichment activities that provide students with opportunities to explore various demographics, roles, and/or mathematical contexts.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 do not provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

While there are supports in place to help students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English, there is no evidence of intentionally promoting home language and knowledge. Home language is not specifically identified as an asset to engage students in the content nor is it purposefully connected within mathematical contexts.

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0, Grade 2 provide some guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Spanish materials are consistently accessible for a variety of stakeholders, including ORIGO ONE Videos, the Student Journals, the glossary, and the Newsletters for families.

Indicator 3u

Materials provide supports for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide some supports for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

Each module provides support specific to vocabulary development, called ‘Building vocabulary’. Each Building vocabulary activity provides: “Vocabulary term, Write it in your own words, and Show what it means”. While the Lesson overview, Misconceptions, and Steps within each lesson may include suggestions to scaffold vocabulary or concepts to support access to the mathematics, these do not directly address accessibility for different student reading levels. Examples of vocabulary supports include:

  • Module 5, Lesson 12, Subtraction: Writing fact families (doubles and make-ten), Lesson overview and focus, Misconceptions, “Many students will struggle to make sense of writing equations that include a missing addend. Similarly, some students may not recognize the part/part/total problem type as a subtraction problem at all. Missing-addend problems have been shown to be challenging for students in general. But research suggests that this may be simply because students have had fewer overall experiences with the problem structure. (See Research into Practice.) Throughout the module, different representations offer students strategies to make sense of the missing-addend context, including the introduction of the empty number line. The domino representation, introduced in earlier grades, allows students to count the dots. Counting on or counting back can then be manipulated. Watch for students who perform unexplained operations on the numbers given; it is likely they are not actively modeling the context of the problem or modeling the values on the visual representations. Continue to offer students number lines or dominoes and model the strategies for finding the missing addend.”

  • Module 11, Lesson 7, 3D objects: Identifying pyramids, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Invite five students to each identify a polyhedron from the collection of 3D objects. Have them explain why their object is a polyhedron and ask them to describe the shape of each face. Make sure they use correct mathematical vocabulary in their descriptions. (MP6)”

  • Module 12, Mathematics overview, Common errors and misconceptions, Division “As students work with the division models, note that most older students, and even adults, have solid partitive models (sharing) because it is the model most often expressed in word problems. Conversely, even many adults do not recognize the grouping model as a valid method of division. Since this lack of understanding is due to inexperience, it is important to offer students a balanced set of division problems. In this grade, use objects to act out and directly model the equal distribution taking place.”

Indicator 3v

Manipulatives, both virtual and physical, are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 meet expectations for providing  manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

The materials consistently include suggestions and/or links, within the lesson notes, for virtual and physical manipulatives that support the understanding of grade level math concepts. Examples include: 

  • Module 1, Lesson 4, Number: Exploring the properties of odd and even numbers, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, counters are identified as a tool to build an understanding of odd and even numbers. “Project the T-chart (slide 1) and have the students list the numbers that are odd and even. Then form the students into small groups and provide each group with twenty counters. Ask the students to share their counters into groups of two to identify the numbers between 10 and 20 that are odd or even. They should record their results on a sheet of paper.”

  • Module 4, Lesson 4, Subtraction: Reinforcing the think-addition strategy (count-on facts), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, references dominoes and a support handout for working with subtraction facts. “Organize students into pairs and distribute the dominoes.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 6, Addition: Two- and three-digit numbers (composing tens and hundreds), Step 2 Starting the lesson, references the online Flare tool for problems involving regrouping. “Open the Flare Place Value (a) online tool and review how to regroup when there is more than 9 in any single place. Ask a student to demonstrate how to regroup 14 ones to make 1 ten and 4 ones. Repeat for 3 hundreds, 17 tens, 5 ones; 4 hundreds, 2 tens, 18 ones; and 2 hundreds, 11 tens, 1 one.”

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology, when applicable, with guidance for teachers.

0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 integrate some technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level standards, and the materials do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other. The materials have a visual design that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic, and the materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning. 

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 integrate some technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable. Examples include:

  • While all components of the materials can be accessed digitally, some are only accessible digitally, such as ORIGO Big Books, Interactive Student Journal, Fundamentals Games and Flare Online Tools.

  • ORIGO ONE videos describe the big math ideas across grade level lessons in one minute clips. There is a link for each video that makes them easy to share with various stakeholders.

  • Every lesson includes an interactive Student Journal, with access to virtual manipulatives and text and draw tools, that allow students to show work virtually. It includes the Step In, Step Up, Step Ahead, and Maintaining Concepts and Skills activities, some of which are auto-scored, others are teacher graded. 

  • The digital materials do not allow for customizing or editing existing lessons for local use, but teachers can upload assignments or lessons from the platform.

  • Digital Student Assessments allow for Progress Monitoring. Teachers can enter performance data and then monitor student progress for individual students and/or the class.

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable. 

While teacher implementation guidance is included for Fundamentals games and Flare online tools, there is no platform where teachers and students collaborate with each other. There is an opportunity for teachers to send feedback to students through graded assignments.

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide a visual design (whether in print or digital) that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

There is a consistent design within modules and lessons that supports student understanding of the mathematics. Examples include:

  • Each lesson follows a common format with the following components: Step 1 Preparing the lesson, Step 2 Starting the lesson, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, Maintaining Concepts and Skills, Lesson focus, Topic progression, Observations and discussions, Journals and portfolios, and Misconceptions. The layout for each lesson is user-friendly as each component is included in order from top to bottom on the page. 

  • The font size, amount and placement of directions, and print within student materials is appropriate. 

  • The digital format is easy to navigate and engaging. There is ample space in the Student Journal and Assessments for students to capture calculations and write answers. 

  • The ORIGO ONE videos are engaging and designed to create light bulb moments for key math ideas. They are one minute in length so students can engage without being distracted from the math concept being presented.

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 2 provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

The Program Overview includes a description of embedded tools, how they should be incorporated, and when they can be accessed to enhance student understanding. Examples include:

  • Program Overview, Additional practice tools, “This icon shows when Fundamentals games are required.” Lessons provide this icon to show when and where games are utilized within lesson notes.

  • Program Overview, Additional practice tools, “This icon shows when Flare tools are required.” Lessons provide this icon to show when and where these tools are utilized within lesson notes.

  • Program Overview, ORIGO Big Books, “This icon shows when ORIGO Big Books are required.” Lessons provide this icon to show when and where these tools are utilized within lesson notes. “Characters and concepts from the Big Books are brought to life in ORIGO Big Book online tools. These easy-to-use tools set the stage for purposeful play and learning.” Lessons provide opportunities for teachers and students to utilize the Big Book and tools. Each Big Book includes lesson notes for the teacher to use within the classroom.

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Report Published Date: 2021/12/15

Report Edition: 2022

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Math K-8 Review Tool

The K-8 review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations