Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for Alignment to the CCSSM. In Gateway 1, the materials meet expectations for focus and coherence, and in Gateway 2, the materials partially meet expectations for rigor and meet expectations for practice-content connections.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
16
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
17
24
27
24
24-27
Meets Expectations
18-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for focus and coherence. For focus, the materials assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. For coherence, the materials are coherent and consistent with the CCSSM.

Criterion 1a - 1b

Materials assess grade-level content and give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for focus as they assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Indicator 1a

Materials assess the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for assessing grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. 

Each Grade Level consists of 12 modules. Each module contains three types of summative assessments. Check-ups assess concepts taught in the module, and students select answers or provide a written response. Performance Tasks assess concepts taught in the module with deeper understanding. In Interviews, teachers ask questions in a one-on-one setting, and students demonstrate understanding of a module concept or fluency for the grade. In addition, Quarterly Tests are administered at the end of Modules 3, 6, 9, and 12.

Examples of assessment items aligned to Grade 1 standards include:

  • Module 2, Check-Up 1, Problem 1, “Solve each problem. Show your thinking. a. Jose scored 2 points in the first half of the game and 6 points in the second half. How many points did he score in total? b. 5 guests are at a party. 2 more guests arrive. How many guests are there in total?” (1.OA.1)

  • Module 7, Performance Tasks, Problem 1, “Look at the gray blocks. a. Write the matching numeral. b. write the matching number name.” (1.NBT.1)

  • Module 12, Quarterly Test A, Problem 14, “Choose the object that matches these clues. I can stack. I have exactly 5 surfaces.” (1.G.1)

There are some assessment items that align to standards above Grade 1; however, they can be modified or omitted without impacting the underlying structure of the materials. Examples include: 

  • Module 11, Check-Up 2, Problems 1 and 2, assess above grade-level content. Problem 1, “Solve each problem. Write an equation to show your thinking.” Part c, “I have 5 cents. How much would I have with 2 extra nickels?” Problem 2, “Figure out the total amount of each collection of coins.” Part b provides pictures of a quarter and a nickel, and students write the total.

  • Module 11, Performance Task, “Katherine spent (pictures for 3 quarters, 1 dime, and 1 nickel). Write or draw the toys you think she bought. Show more than one answer.”  These problems align to 2.MD.8.

Indicator 1b

Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for the materials giving all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Extensive work is provided as students engage with different types of problems in each lesson. There is a Student Journal with problems in three sections: Step In, Step Up, and Step Ahead. Maintaining Concepts and Skills include additional practice opportunities, including Computation Practice, Ongoing Practice, Preparing for Module _, Think and Solve, and Words at Work. Each Module includes three Investigations and all grade-level standards are present within materials. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Module 2, and Module 3 engage students in extensive work with 1.NBT.1 (Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.) In Module 1, Lesson 4, Number: Representing quantities (11 to 20), Student Journal, Step Up, page 15, Question 2, students match numbers to quantities within 20. Directions state, “Count the fruit. Write the matching numeral.” In Module 1, Lesson 5, Number: Writing teen number names, Student Journal, Step Up, page 19, Question 2, students practice writing teen number names. Directions instruct students to, “Write each number name.” In Module 2, Lesson 5, Addition: Reviewing the think big, count small strategy, Step 2, Starting the Lesson, Teachers notes, “Have the students count from 50 to 100. Say, We are going to play a listening game with the numbers we know. We need to clap when we say the numbers 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100. Have the students count from 50 to 100 again, clapping for each multiple of ten. Repeat the activity clapping for the numbers that have a five (for example, fifty-five, sixty-five, and seventy-five). Select students to give number suggestions and repeat as time allows.” In Module 3, Lesson 3, Number: Writing tens and ones, and number names (without zeros), Student Journal, Step Up, page 88, Question 1, students represent larger quantities with written numerals and number names. Directions instruct students to, “Look at the number of counters on and off the frames. Write the matching number on the expander. Then complete the number frame.”

  • Module 2, Module 5, Module 8, and Module 9 engage students in extensive work with 1.OA.3 (Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.) In Module 2, Lesson 6, Student Journal, Step Up, page 59, Question 2, students see pictures of dominoes with a numeral on one side, and dots on the other. Directions challenge students to, “Write the addition fact. Then write the turnaround fact.” In Module 5, Lesson 1, Addition: Introducing the double-plus-1 strategy, Student Journal, Step Up, page 159, Question 2, students see pictures of dominoes. Students are then asked to, “Write the doubles fact. Draw one more dot on one end. Then write the doubles-plus-one fact and it’s turnaround.” In Module 8, Lesson 2, Addition: Using the associative property, Student Journal, Step Up, page 284, Question 1, students see 3 pictures of 3 containers with different quantities of objects in them. Students are then instructed to, “Draw an arrow to show two groups that make 10. Write an equation to show how you add to find the total. ___+___+___=___” In Module 9, Lesson 4, Addition: Any two-digit number and 1, 2, 3 or 10, 20, 30 (hundred chart), Student Journal, Maintaining Concepts and Skills, page 331, Ongoing Practice, Question 1, students see pictures of dominoes. Next students are asked to, “Write an addition fact to match each picture. Then write the turnaround fact.”

  • Module 6, Lessons 8-11 engage students in extensive work with 1.G.3 (Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.) In Lesson 8, Common fractions: Identifying examples of one-half (length model), Student Journal, Step Up, Question 1, page 216, students are given pictures of paper strips with a line segmenting the strips into 2 parts. Directions instruct students to, “Color red one of the parts in each strip, then circle the strips that show one-half in red.” In Lesson 10, Common fractions: Identifying examples of one-fourth (length model), Student Journal, Step Up, Question 1, page 222, students are given pictures of strips. Students are then asked to, “Draw lines on each strip to show fourths.”

The instructional materials provide opportunities for all students to engage with the full intent of 1st grade standards through a consistent lesson structure, including sections called Step In, Step Up and Step Ahead. Step In includes a connection to prior knowledge, multiple entry points to new learning, and guided instruction support. Step Up engages all students in practice that connects to the objective of each lesson. Step Ahead can be used as an enrichment activity. Examples of meeting the full intent include:

  • Module 7, Lessons 10, 12, and More Math engage students with the full intent of 1.MD.3 (Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.) In Lesson 10, Time: Introducing half-past the hour (analog), Student Journal, page 270, Question 1a, students see a picture of an analog clock with the hands showing 2:30. “Write the time showing on each clock. half-past ___ o’clock.” In More Math, Problem Solving Activity 3, students see pictures of analog and digital clocks showing half-hour increments between 1:00 and 7:00. “Cut out all the pieces. Then read the times and place the cards in order.” In Lesson 12, Time: Relating analog and digital, Student Journal, Step Up, page 276, Question 1c, students see a picture of an analog clock showing 4:30 and a picture of a blank digital clock. “Write each time on the digital clock.”

  • Module 8, Lessons 7, 8, and 9 engage students with the full intent of 1.OA.7 (Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false.) In Lesson 7, Equality: Reviewing concepts, Student Journal, Step Ahead, page 301, students see a picture of a pan balance with two blank cubes on one side of the balance, and a cube with the number 17 on it on the other side of the balance. “Write three different equations that would make this balance picture true.” In Lesson 8, Equality: Working with balance situations, Reflecting on the Work, students are shown the equation, 5 + 3 = 6 + 4. The teacher asks, “Is this equation true? How do you know? What would the pan balance look like if we used blocks to show the equation?” In Lesson 9, Equality: Balancing equations, Student Journal, Step Up, page 307, Question 2d, “Write true or false beside each equation. 7 = 9 - 2.”

  • Module 9, Lessons 4, 9, and 11 engage students with the full intent of 1.NBT.4 (Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.) In Lesson 4, Addition: Any two-digit number and 1, 2, 3, or 10, 20, 30 (hundred chart), Student Journal, page 329, Question 2a, “Figure out and write the totals. 88 + 10 = ___.” In Lesson 9, Addition: One- and two-digit numbers (composing tens), Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, students are given a picture of the equation 63 + 8 = ___ and the corresponding base-ten blocks. “I would like you and your partner to try to find the total using the blocks.” In Lesson 11, Addition: Reinforcing place-value strategies (composing tens), Maintaining Concepts and Skills, Investigation 3, students see a picture of two large circular targets. Inside target 1 are base-ten representations for 34, 28, and 36. Inside target 2 are base-ten representations for 22, 17, and 12. “What possible totals could you get if you tossed one bean bag onto each target?”

Criterion 1c - 1g

Each grade’s materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGOo Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for coherence. The materials: address the major clusters of the grade, have supporting content connected to major work, make connections between clusters and domains, and have content from prior and future grades connected to grade-level work.

Indicator 1c

When implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations that, when implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade.

  • The approximate number of modules devoted to, or supporting, major work of the grade is 6 out of 12, which is approximately 50%.

  • The approximate number of lessons devoted to major work, or supporting, major work of the grade is 100 out of 144, which is 69%. 

  • The number of days devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 112 out of 156, which is approximately 71%. 

A lesson-level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials because this calculation includes all lessons with connections to major work with no additional days factored in. As a result, approximately 71% of the instructional materials focus on major work of the grade.

Indicator 1d

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations that supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Materials are designed so supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. These connections are sometimes listed for teachers on a document titled, “Grade __ Module __ Lesson Contents and Learning Targets” for each module. Examples of connections include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 11, Data: Reviewing yes/no graphs, Student Journal, Step In, page 36, connects the supporting work of 1.MD.4 (Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.) to the major work of 1.OA.8 (Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ - 3, 6 + 6 = __.) “Complete this equation to show how many more students have been to a farm than those who have not been to a farm. __ - __ = __.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 11, Time: Reading and writing half-past the hour (digital), Student Journal Step Up, page 275, connects the supporting work of 1.MD.3, (Tell and write time in hours and half-hours) to the major work of 1.NBT.1 (Read and write numbers to 120). Students tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. Question 2b, students are shown a digital clock showing 10:30 as the time. “Write each time in words.”

  • Module 8, Lessons 10-12 connect the supporting work of 1.MD.4 (Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another) to the major work of 1.OA.1 (Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.) In Lesson 10, Data: Recording in a tally chart, Student Journal, Step Up, page 309, Question 3, students are given a tally chart with pictures of buttons that are a square, a triangle, and a circle. They count how many of each shape, complete the tally chart, and use it to answer questions. “b. How many buttons are shaped like a square or a triangle? c. How many buttons are shaped like a triangle or circle? d. How many more buttons are shaped like a circle than a square?”

Indicator 1e

Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for including problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade.

Materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards. Examples of connections include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 6, Adding: Using the commutative property, Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, students write and solve equations within 20 (1.OA.C) while using the commutative property (1.OA.B).

  • Module 5, Lesson 1, Addition: Introducing the double-plus-1 strategy, Teaching the lesson Lesson notes students write and solve equations within 20 (1.OA.C) while using the commutative property  (1.OA.B).

  • Module 6, Lesson 4, Subtraction: Introducing the think-addition strategy (count-on facts), students subtract, Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, (1.OA.D) and use the missing addend to find the difference (1.OA.B).  

  • Module 7, Lesson 7, Subtraction: Introducing the think-addition strategy, Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, students subtract to find the missing numeral (1.OA.D) then complete the addition facts (1.OA.B).

However, there are a few missed opportunities to foster coherence through connections at a single grade. Examples include:

  • Module 3, Lesson 11, Length: Counting non-standard units to measure, Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, students use various objects to identify lengths (1.MD.A). There is a missed connection to 1.NBT.A where students count to 120.

  • Module 7, Lesson 10, Time: Introducing half-past the hour (analog), Teaching the lesson, Lesson notes, students identify half past on an analog clock (1.MD.B), a missed connection to 1.G.A where students can view the hour hand as partitioning the circle into halves i.e. half past.

Indicator 1f

Content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations that content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. 

Materials relate grade-level concepts from 1st Grade explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. These references are consistently included within the Topic Progression portion of Lesson Notes and within each Module Mathematics Focus. At times, they are also noted within the Coherence section of the Mathematics Overview in each Module. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 1, Addition: reviewing concepts, Lesson Notes connect 1.OA.6 (Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.), 1.OA.8 (Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers.), and 1.NBT.1 (Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.) to Kindergarten standards (K.CC.1 and  K.CC.2,  K.OA.1 and K.OA.2) “In Lesson K.10.4, students use the technique of starting with the greater number and counting on the lesser number, regardless of the order presented in the addition fact. In this lesson, (2.1), students review the concepts of add to and put together addition.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 10, 3D objects: Identifying and sorting objects, Lesson Notes connect 1.G.1 (Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes) to the work from kindergarten (K.G.3). “In Lesson K.9.6, students compare and sort 2D shapes and 3D objects. In this lesson (10.10), students examine some features of basic 3D objects.”

  • Module 11, Mathematics, Focus, Coherence table “identifies the prerequisite standards and learning targets needed for Grade 1, Module 11.” Specific Lessons, Standards, and Learning Targets from previous grades are listed. For example, “Lesson 10.4, Standard K.OA.A.1, Learning Target: Represent addition situations”. 

Content from future grades is identified within materials and related to grade-level work. These references are consistently included within the Topic Progression portion of Lesson Notes and within the Coherence section of the Mathematics Overview in each Module. Examples include:

  • Module 4, Lesson 12, 2D Shapes: composing shapes, Lesson Notes connect 1.G.2 (Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape) to the work of grade 2 (2.G.1). “In this lesson, students join 2D shapes together to make and name new shapes. In Lesson 2.7.9, students are introduced to the term polygon to describe a closed 2D shape that has only straight sides.”

  • Module 7, Mathematics Overview, Coherence, “Lessons 7.1-7.6 focus on reading, writing and representing three-digit numbers to 120.” This “serves as a foundation for representing three-digit numbers to 999 (2.1.5-2.1.8).”

  • Module 9, Lesson 12, Addition: Solving word problems, Lesson Notes connect 1.NBT.4 (Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten) to the work of grade 2 (2.NBT.7, 2.NBT.9). Lesson Notes, “In this lesson, students choose from a range of materials to solve problems that involve addition. In Lesson 2.9.1, students extend the count-on strategy to add two-digit multiples of ten to three-digit numbers.”

Indicator 1g

In order to foster coherence between grades, materials can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 foster coherence between grades and can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification. 

There are a total of 156 instructional days within the materials.

  • There are 12 modules and each module contains 12 lessons for a total of 144 lessons.

  • There are 12 days dedicated to assessments.  

 In addition, each module includes three investigation problems and four problem solving activities. These are embedded into lesson activities.

According to the publisher, “The Stepping Stones program is set up to teach 1 lesson per day and to complete a module in approximately 2\frac{1}{2} weeks. Each lesson has been written around a 60 minute time frame but may be anywhere from 30-75 minutes depending upon teacher choice and classroom interaction.”

Gateway Two

Rigor & the Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for rigor and balance and practice-content connections. The materials help students develop procedural skills, fluency, and application. The materials also make meaningful connections between the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Criterion 2a - 2d

Materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students’ conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications.

6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 partially meet expectations for rigor. The materials give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency and spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of mathematics. The materials partially develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts and partially balance the three aspects of rigor.

Indicator 2a

Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 partially meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings.

The materials include some problems and questions that develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade level. Students have few opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade.

Cluster 1.OA.A includes representing and solving problems involving addition and subtraction. Modules 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 explore a variety of real-world applications using a few mathematical representations. 

Some opportunities exist for students to work with addition and subtraction that address conceptual understanding through the use of some visual representations and different strategies. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 2, Addition: Counting on, rather than counting all, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students are shown how to count on starting at 5. “Invite one student to come to the front and use their fingers to show a number from five to ten, starting from the class’s left, Make sure they use both hands to show each number. For example, to show six, they show five fingers raised on their right hand and one finger raised on their left.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 2, Number: Writing three-digit numbers to 120 (without teens), Student Journal, Step Up, pages 246 and 247, students use base ten blocks to determine the number, then write the number on the number expanders, and write it on the expander without it expanded.

  • Module 8, Lesson 1, Addition: Exploring combinations of ten, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Allow time for pairs to explore the different combinations of ten, then paste groups of animals onto paper, and write the matching equation next to each group (MP2). Afterward, have them leave their work at their desk and move around to look at the combinations made by other pairs. Then lead a discussion about the different combinations. Ask students to share observations about making ten.”

  • Module 11, Lesson 5, Algebra: Counting in steps of two, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Organize students into pairs. Open the Flare Number Board online tool. Ask the students to identify patterns on the hundred chart (MP7). Afterward, invite pairs to show and explain the patterns they identified. Reset the hundred chart and work with the students to shade the numbers you say when you start at 5 and count by fives. Repeat for the multiples of ten, using a different shade. Then have a student shade the multiples of two in a third shade to match the chart, as shown. Then discuss the points below: What do you notice about these numbers on our chart? (MP7) Why do you think the tens column has three colors on each number? (The numbers are in the twos, fives, and tens patterns.)  When looking at these patterns, are these the only numbers we can say when we count by twos, fives, or tens? Why do you think that?” This lesson addresses conceptual understanding of addition by examining the patterns on a 100s chart. 

However, the instructional materials do not regularly provide students opportunities to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade-level. Examples include:

  • Module 7, Lesson 7, Subtraction: Introducing the think-addition strategy (near-doubles facts), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Project slide 3, as shown, and discuss the points below: What do you see in this picture? How is it the same as the previous picture? (It is a think-addition card.) How is it different? (It has different numbers and one flap is down.) What equations could we create from this card? (8 +___ = 17, 17 - 8 = ___.) (MP2) What strategy could we use if we wanted to think addition? (MP5) Who can tell us how you use the strategy to find the missing number” This lesson addresses filling in the blanks instead of the conceptual understanding of using addition to solve subtraction problems. 

  • Module 8, Lesson 5, Addition: Reinforcing the commutative property, Student Journal, page 294, Step Up, “Write an addition fact to match each picture. Then write the turnaround fact.” This worksheet gives students a domino and students are to write 2 addition facts based on the dots on the dominoes. These problems address the commutative property but not a conceptual understanding of the commutative property and when to best use it. 

  • Module 10, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Writing related facts, Student Journal, page 358, Step Up, Question 1, “Write numbers to match each picture.” The worksheet has students count the animals in the pictures and fill in the blanks instead of building conceptual understanding of subtraction.

Indicator 2b

Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation for procedural skill and fluency.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for giving attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. Materials attend to the First Grade expected fluencies, add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. 

The instructional materials develop procedural skills and fluencies throughout the grade-level. Opportunities to formally practice procedural skills are found throughout practice problem sets that follow the units. Practice problem sets also include opportunities to use and practice emerging fluencies in the context of solving problems. Ongoing practice is also found in Assessment Interviews, Games, and Maintaining Concepts and Skills.

The materials attend to the Grade 1 expected fluencies: 1.OA.6 add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. In addition, the instructional materials embed opportunities for students to independently practice procedural skills and fluency. Examples include:

  • Module 5, Lesson 1, Addition: Introducing the double-plus-1 strategy, Maintaining concepts and skills, students practice adding within 10 and subtracting within 5. 

  • Module 7, Lesson 7, Subtraction: Introducing the think-addition strategy (near-doubles facts) Student Journal, Question 2, “Figure out the number of dots that are covered. Then complete the facts.” Students are practicing subtraction fluency within 10. 

  • Module 8, Lesson 1, Addition: Exploring combinations of ten, Maintaining concepts and skills, “This lesson provides projectable practice that is designed to foster fluency of basic facts. Project or read the facts to the students, allowing a few seconds between each fact that you show or read. Be sure to alternate this delivery from one lesson or module to the next. Roll over the image below to reveal the focus of the content.” Students are practicing fluency with 10. 

  • Module 11, Lesson 3, Addition/subtraction: Reinforcing basic fact strategies, Student Journal, Question 2, “Write the answers on the race track.” Students are practicing subtraction and addition fluency.

  • Maintaining Concepts and Skills lessons incorporate practice of previously learned skills from the prior grade level. For example, Maintaining Concepts and Skills in Module 2, Lesson 1, Addition: Reviewing concepts, provides practice for adding within 10 and subtracting within 5. 

  • Each module contains a summative assessment called Interviews. According to the program, “There are certain concepts and skills, such as the ability to route count fluently, that are best assessed by interviewing students.” For example, in Module 7’s Interview 1 has students subtracting within 10 and Interview 2 has students counting from 86 to 120. 

  • “Fundamentals Games” contain a variety of computer/online games that students can play to develop grade level fluency skills. For example Add ‘em up, students demonstrate fluency of adding within 20 (1.OA.6). 

  • Some lessons provide opportunities for students to practice the procedural fluency of the concept being taught in the “Step Up” section of the student journal.

Indicator 2c

Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

Materials include multiple routine and non-routine applications of the mathematics throughout the grade level. Teachers routinely engage students in single and multi-step application problems during the Step In Discussion at the beginning of lessons. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 12, Data: Creating and Interpreting graphs, Student Journal, page 38, Step In Discussion, students represent and interpret data in routine problems. (1.MD.4) “A group of students voted for their favorite animal at the zoo. They each placed a counter beside their favorite animal to show their vote. What does the graph tell you? What is the most popular animal at the zoo? How many students voted for each animal? How many students voted in total? How many more students voted for the tiger than the giraffe?”

  • Module 4, Lesson 6, Subtraction: Solving Word Problems, Student Journal, page 134, Step In Discussion, students solve subtraction word problems in a real-world routine problem. (1.OA.1) “This puzzle has 10 pieces. Kuma takes out 2 pieces. How many pieces are left in the box? Write an equation to show your thinking. This puzzle costs 4 dollars to buy. Anya pays with a 5 dollar bill. How much money should she get back? Write an equation to show your thinking.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 9, Subtraction: Solving word problems (using comparisons), Student Journal, page 382, Step In Discussion, students solve non-routine real-world problems as they use number tracks as a strategy for subtraction. (1.OA.1) “Manuel compares the number of blocks in each box. How many more blocks does the bigger box hold? What equation could you write to figure out the difference? Hannah buys the bigger box of blocks. She takes out 5 blocks. How many blocks are left in the box? What equation could you write?” Two containers are provided and labeled 9 blocks and 12 blocks.

Materials consistently provide opportunities for students to independently engage with routine and non-routine applications of mathematics. These are found across the grade level within Thinking Tasks, Problem Solving Activities, and Investigations. Examples include:

  • Module 8, More Math, Investigation 2, students organize and write multiple addition equations using one digit numbers in a non-routine problem. (1.MD.4) “How many different ways can you make this addition equation true using only one-digit numbers? __ + __ = 12.” 

  • Module 9, More Math, Thinking Tasks, Questions 1 and 2, students add two digit numbers and write an equation for a non-routine problem. (1.NBT.4 and 1.OA.8). The question includes an image of an apple with 45 cents on a price tag and asks, “Chloe has 25 cents. How much more does she need to buy the apple? You can draw pictures to help.” Question 2, “Write an addition equation to show what you did in Question 1.”

  • Module 11, More Math, Problem Solving Activity 4, students reason about addition or subtraction and choose a strategy to solve a routine word problem. (1.OA.1) “Reece is cleaning out his fish tank. He has 12 fish in total. Nine of the fish are swimming around the tank, and the rest are hiding behind plants. How many fish are hiding?”

Indicator 2d

The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the three aspects of rigor within the grade.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 partially meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. All three aspects of rigor are present in the materials, but there is an over-emphasis on procedural skills and fluency.

The curriculum addresses conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application standards, when called for, and evidence of opportunities where multiple aspects of rigor are used to support student learning and mastery of the standards. There are multiple lessons where one aspect of rigor is emphasized. The materials have an overemphasis on fluency, procedures, and algorithms. 

Examples of conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application presented separately in the materials include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 4, Number: Representing quantities (11 to 20), Step 3, Teaching the lesson, students draw number cards and represent the number with cubes, counters, coins, or drawing a picture.

  • Module 9, Lesson 7, Addition: Introducing place-value methods, Student Journal, Step Up, students use conceptual understanding to solve addition problems. “1. Add the two groups. Then write the matching equation. Use blocks to help you. a. 50 + 20” Under 50 and 20 are base ten blocks representing the numbers. 

  • Module 10, More Math, Problem Solving Activities, Activity 4, “Dad has baked 12 muffins for the soccer team. There are four muffins leftover. How many muffins has the soccer team eaten?” (1.OA.1)

  • Module 12, Lesson 1, Number: Working with place value (hundred chart), Step 3, Teaching the lesson, students use conceptual understanding to solve number puzzles and see patterns in a 100s chart. “I am thinking of a number that has a nine in the ones place and a four in the tens place. Which number is it?”

 Examples of students having opportunities to engage in problems that use two or more aspects of rigor include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 9,  Number: Reading ordinal number symbols, Step 3, Teaching the lesson, application and conceptual understanding are treated together. Students read the book Paint a Rainbow, students put each other in order, using the “numeral one and ordinal symbol 1st.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 6, Subtraction: Exploring the comparison model, application and conceptual understanding are treated together. Students read the book Bear and Badger, “They use cubes to model the subtraction story show on the spread” (pages 4 and 5) “introduce the language associated with comparison subtraction.”

Criterion 2e - 2i

Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for practice-content connections. The materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Indicator 2e

Materials support the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. Students have opportunities to engage with the Math Practices across the year and they are often explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical Practice Overview, Module Mathematical Practice documents and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within lesson notes.

MP1 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students make sense of problems and persevere in solving them as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 8, Number: Working with position, Student Journal, Step Up, page 27, students make sense and persevere in solving a word problem involving number position between 1 and 20. “Three friends collect baseball cards. Felipe has one more card than Samantha. Jamal has one fewer card than Felipe. How many cards could each person have?”

  • Module 3, Lesson 8, Number: Solving Puzzles, Lesson Notes, Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, students make sense of a number puzzle and persevere in solving it. The teacher is instructed to project a slide with the following word problem: “I am a two-digit number. My tens digit is greater than my ones digit. My number ends with a 7. What number could I be?” “Project slide 1, as shown. Read the clues and repeat each clue slowly. Then ask the problem-solving prompts below: What information do we know? How can it help us to solve the problem? What do we need to find out? What could you use to help solve the problem?

  • Module 7, Lesson 9, Subtraction: Reinforcing all strategies, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students make sense of problems involving subtraction and persevere in solving them. In small groups, students are given word problem cards. The teacher asks “students to discuss a solution plan, then follow it to find the solution. Help them make sense of their problem by discussing the points below: How would you describe what is happening in your own words? What strategy do you think would be helpful?”

  • Module 9, Lesson 1, Addition: Extending the count-on strategy, Student Journal, page 321, students “make sense of count on addition problems and persevere in solving them”. Students use a number track from 84 to 94 to solve, “Valentina has 87 cents. Noah has 2 cents more than Valentina. Mary has 3 cents more than Noah. Ryan has 2 cents more than Mary. How much money does Ryan have? ___ cents” “If some students have difficulty, have them restate the problem in their own words to ensure understanding.”

MP2 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students reason abstractly and quantitatively as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 1, Addition: Reviewing concepts, Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, students reason quantitatively and abstractly as they decontextualize addition problems using connecting cubes. “Read the problem to the students. Ask, How could you use your cubes to show the addition in this problem? Read the problem again, and allow time for the students to model the problem using their connecting cubes. Then say, Turn to the student on your left and talk about how you used the cubes to show the problem. After, ask a few students to give the total and explain their thinking. Highlight examples where an addition equation is provided as part of the explanation. Repeat for the remaining two problems (slides 5 and 6). (MP2)”

  • Module 5, Lesson 3, Addition: Introducing the doubles-plus-two strategy, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students reason abstractly and quantitatively as they write equations to match domino addition facts. “Project slide 1 and ask, What do you see on this card? (Dot arrangements, numbers.) How can you figure out the total? (Use a strategy, or count the dots.) What double will help you? (Double 4.) Invite individuals to describe their thinking. Project slide 2 to support the thinking that begins with double 4. As a student describes their thinking, project slide 3 to reinforce the thinking “4 plus 6 is double 4 add 2 more.” Ask, What addition fact helps us figure out the total? What addition fact can we write? What turnaround fact can we write? Have individuals write the facts 4 + 4 = 8, 4 + 6 = 10, and 6 + 4 = 10 on the board and relate each to the thinking above (MP2). Repeat the activity with 6 + 8 (slides 4 to 6).”

  • Module 8, Lesson 2, Addition: Using the associative property, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students reason abstractly and quantitatively when they reason about the quantities in addition problems and how they are related, then represent them symbolically. Students make three different colored trains out of connecting cubes. The teacher asks, “How many cubes are in each train? How many cubes are there if the three trains are joined together? How do you know? What equation can we write to show the three numbers?”

  • Module 10, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Writing related facts, Step 4 Reflecting on the lesson, students contextualize and decontextualize as they write word problems and equations to match subtraction situations. Students view the big book, How Many Legs?, and “create various pictures using the animals. Encourage students to create stories to match the pictures and write the related subtraction facts (MP2).”

Indicator 2f

Materials support the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. 

Students have opportunities to meet the full intent of MP3 over the course of the year as it is explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical Practice Overview, Module Mathematical Practice documents and within specific lessons, and alongside the learning targets or embedded within lesson notes.

Teacher guidance, questions, and sentence stems for MP3 are found in the Steps portion of lessons. In some lessons, teachers are given questions that prompt mathematical discussions and engage students to construct viable arguments. In some lessons, teachers are provided questions and sentence stems to help students critique  the reasoning of others and justify their thinking. Convince a friend, found in the Student Journal at the end of each module and Thinking Tasks in modules 3, 6, 9, and 12, provide additional opportunities for students to engage in MP3. 

Students engage with MP3 in connection to grade level content, as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • Module 5, Student Journal, page 195, Convince a friend, students construct a viable argument as they compare place value for two digit numbers. “Nadia says 29 is greater than 32 because 9 is greater than both 3 and 2. Is she correct? Show your thinking.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 4, Number: Writing numbers and number names to 120, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students construct viable arguments when they use base-ten blocks or pictures to justify their thinking about the value and representation of three-digit numbers. Given the numbers 117 and 107, the teacher asks, “How are these numbers the same? How are they different? Which number is greater? How do you know?” The teacher encourages “students to use base-ten blocks or draw pictures of base-ten blocks on the board to justify their thinking (MP3). Ask other students to respond using sentence stems such as: I agree/ disagree because ... , I don’t understand …, I figured it out by …”

  • Module 9, Lesson 11, Addition: Reinforcing place-value strategies (composing tens), Student Journal, page 351, Step Ahead, students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others as they analyze an error in a two-digit addition problem. Students are given 27 + 14 = 311 with a picture of 3 base-ten ten rods and 11 unit cubes. “Jacinta added these two groups. Write the correct total. Then talk about the mistake that was made with the student beside you.”

  • Module 10, Student Journal, page 395, Convince a friend, students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others as they reason about addition and subtraction. A picture includes a ten frame with 7 counters on the frame and 3 counters off the frame. “Chloe says she sees 7 + 3 = 10. Marvin says he sees 10 - 3 = 7. Who do you agree with? Show your thinking.”

  • Module 11, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Introducing the think-addition strategy (make-ten facts), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others as they reason about and solve subtraction equations. “Project the equation 15 - 9 = __ and the number track (slide 7). Instruct students to solve the problem using think-addition and make-ten strategies. . . Encourage students to listen attentively to others' answers and strategies. Prompt critique (MP3) with questions such as: Do you agree with the strategy that (Maka) used? Why or why not? Does anyone need (Maka) to explain something they heard in (his) answer? How is your strategy the same as (Maka’s) strategy? How is it different?”

Indicator 2g

Materials support the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Choose tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Use appropriate tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

Students have opportunities to engage with the Math Practices throughout the year. The MPs are often explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical practice overview, Module Mathematical practice documents, Mathematical modeling tasks, Thinking tasks, and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within lesson notes.

MP4 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have many opportunities to solve real-world problems, identify important quantities to make sense of relationships, and represent them mathematically. Students model with mathematics as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 4, Addition: Reinforcing the count-on strategy, Student Journal, page 52, Step In, students model with mathematics as they reason about addition facts. “There are 6 pennies in the purse and some outside the purse. How could you figure out the total number of pennies? What addition fact could you write?”

  • Module 4, Lesson 3, Subtraction: Writing equations, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students model with mathematics as they create and model subtraction stories. “Organize students into small groups and distribute the resources. Explain that each group is going to create and solve their own Cupcake Capers story, using one of the following: the Cupcake Capers online tool, concrete materials like connecting cubes, paper to draw pictures, or by acting out the story (MP4). Afterward, invite each group to present their subtraction story to the class, highlighting the tool or strategy they used to solve the problem, and how it was modeled (MP4).”

  • Module 7, Lesson 3, Number: Writing numbers and number names to 120 (without teens), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students model mathematics as they “compare the different models they have used and recognize that they all represent the value in each place of a three-digit number.” “Distribute the expanders and markers to each group. Have them choose a number between 101 and 110, then represent their number with base-10 blocks, on the expander, and in words.” The teacher says, “You represented your number in three different ways. How are they the same? How are they different? Students should notice that each model represents the number of hundreds, tens, and ones in their number. (MP4)”

  • Module 8, More math, Problem solving activity 4, Word problems, students model with math as they represent addition and subtraction word problems.“ Directions state, “Project slide 1 and read the word problem with the students. Ask, what do we need to solve the problem? Is there information we do not need? How could you show your thinking? (For example, act it out, draw a diagram, or write an equation.”  Question d, “Amber has 3 green beads, 4 blue beads, 4 red beads, and 5 white beads. She wants to put the beads into two groups so they each have an equal number of beads. How many of each color could Amber put into each group?”

MP5 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have multiple opportunities to identify and use a variety of tools or strategies, working with the support of the teacher and independently, throughout the modules to support their understanding of grade level math. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 1, Number: Representing quantities (up to ten), Step 2 Starting the lesson, students use appropriate tools in order to represent five. “Organize students into pairs to explore the different ways they can represent five. Allow them to choose from a variety of hands-on resources to support their thinking (MP5). Invite pairs of students to share and model their answers. Record the different representations around the numeral 5 on the board. Connect each representation to the numeral to form a number web.”

  • Module 7, Lesson 7, Subtraction: Introducing the think-addition strategy (near-doubles facts), Student Journal, page 262, “students choose between the think-addition strategies of doubles-plus-1 and doubles-plus-2 to solve subtraction problems, and choose math tools to support their thinking”. Question 1b, students are given a picture of a domino with 5 dots on one side with the number 5 above it and no dots on the other side with a fill-in-the-blank space above it. The total 12 is written below the domino as is ___ + 5 = 12. Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Inform students that they can use math tools such as connecting cubes, counters, ten-frames, and number tracks to support their thinking (MP5).”

  • Module 10, Lesson 3, Subtraction: Writing related equations (multiples of ten), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students select tools to solve a real world problem involving subtraction. On slide 6, students see pictures of snacks with price tags attached: apples 20¢, pear 10¢, banana 30¢, orange 40¢, and nuts 50¢, “I have 50 cents. If I buy the ____. How much money will I have left? Encourage students to select a tool they could use to solve the problem. If necessary suggest things such as a hundred chart, base-10 blocks, dimes, or their fingers. (MP5) Students may apply counting or place-value strategies and figure out the answer in their head.”

  • Module 11, More math, Problem solving activity 4, Word problems, students choose different strategies as tools to solve real world problems involving addition and subtraction. Slide 1, “Natalie has 15 balloons. Some of the balloons are yellow and some of the balloons are red. How many of each color might Natalie have?” The teacher asks, “How could you show your thinking? (For example, act it out, draw a diagram, or write equations.)”

Indicator 2h

Materials attend to the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. MP6 is explicitly identified for teachers in several places: Mathematical practice overview, Module Mathematical practice documents, Mathematical modeling tasks, Thinking tasks, and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within whole class lesson notes. 

Students have many opportunities to attend to precision in connection to grade level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 4, Lesson 12, 2D Shapes: Composing shapes, Student Journal, page 153, Step Up, Question 2, students attend to the precision of mathematics by accurately tracing shapes to create new shapes. “2) Choose 3 different pattern blocks. a) Join them. Then trace around them. b) How many sides does your new shape have?”

  • Module 5, Lesson 10, Number: Introducing comparison symbols, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students attend to the precision of mathematics by accurately using mathematical symbols when comparing two-digit numbers. “Write the numbers of cubes on the board with the great number first, then with the smaller number first. Allow space to write is less than or is greater than between each pair of numbers. Ask, What words can we write between the numbers to describe how they compare? Encourage students to suggest writing is greater than and is less than. Write the appropriate phrase between each pair of numbers. Say, We can write symbols instead of writing all those words. Does anybody know the symbols that we can write? Write the matching symbolic sentence below each word sentence, for example, 8 > 5 and 5 < 8. Ask, What is different about the two symbols? Bring out that the symbols point in opposite directions. (MP6)”

  • Module 8, Lesson 10, Data: Recording in a tally chart, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students attend to precision when they “accurately record data and interpret a tally chart.” Pairs of students collect five to ten crayons. The teacher says, “I want you to count the total number of crayons you have and represent them using tally marks. If students are struggling, discuss the points below (MP6): How many crayons do you have? How many tally marks would you draw to show one crayon? Two crayons? What does a tally mark look like? How many tally marks are shown in each group? (5.)”

Students have frequent opportunities to attend to the specialized language of math in connection to grade level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the modules. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 5, Number: Writing teen number names, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, students attend to the specialized language of mathematics by defining a teen number. Discuss the students’ answers to Student Journal 1.5. Ask the students to share and justify the number names they colored for Step Ahead. Ask, Why did you not color the word twenty? Why did you not color the word eight? How did you decide what numbers to color? How would you tell someone what a teen number is? Organize students into pairs to discuss the questions. Then invite students to share their definitions with the class. (MP6) Compare the varying definitions. In context, many students will consider a teenager as somebody whose age ends in teen, while those who adopt a more mathematical standpoint may consider a teen number as a number that is represented with one ten and some more ones. Welcome each of the perspectives as they are each socially or mathematically correct.” 

  • Module 2, Lesson 8, Addition: Introducing the doubles strategy, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students engage in the specialized language of mathematics by accurately reading a doubles fact. “Open the Addtron online tool. Invite a student to drag pictures onto the work area to show a double. Have the class say the double using correct language and without counting. (MP6) For example, “Double five is ten,” or “Five add five is ten.” Then ask another student to use the writing tool to write the doubles fact in the white panel. Repeat for different doubles.”

  • Module 3, Module overview, Vocabulary development, students can attend to the specialized language of math as teachers are provided a list of vocabulary terms. “The bolded vocabulary below will be introduced and developed in this module. These words are also defined in the student glossary at the end of each Student Journal. A support page accompanies each module where students create their own definition for each of the newly introduced vocabulary terms. The unbolded vocabulary terms below were introduced and defined in previous lessons and grades. Addition, balance, cents, clock, coins, corners, count on, dime, double, equals, equation, fact, fewer, hour, length, less, longer than, longer, longest, measure, minute hand, more, number name, number, ones, order, penny, shape, shorter, shortest, sides, smallest, subtract, tens, total.” Students are provided with a Building Vocabulary support page. The page includes: Vocabulary term (the bolded terms), Write it in your own words, and Show what it means.

While there are examples of the intentional development of MP6, Attend to precision, throughout materials, there is also evidence of imprecise language or content connections that are not grade-specific. Example include:

  • Module 9, Lesson 3, Addition: Exploring patterns (hundred chart), Step 4 Reflecting on the work, the term “turnaround” is used for the commutative property and “add” is used in place of the word, “plus”. “Write 2 + 46 = ___ on the board and ask, How could you figure out the total? As students explain their strategy, encourage thinking that uses the turnaround. Ask, What is the turnaround for 2 add 46? What is the total?”

  • Module 11, Lesson 9, Money: Relating all coins, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, connects to grade 2 content. “MP6 - when students accurately describe the trade between coins”. The teacher asks, “How many nickels could you trade for one quarter? (5) Have each group count out 25 pennies to represent the value of one quarter. The 25 pennies are then split into groups or stacks of five to determine the equivalent number of nickels. The same reasoning is then applied to figure out the number of nickels that can be traded for one dime. (MP4 and MP6)” This connects to 2.MD.8, solving word problems involving money.

Indicator 2i

Materials support the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. Students have opportunities to engage with the Math Practices throughout the year and they are often explicitly identified for teachers in several places:  Mathematical practice overview, Module Mathematical practice documents, Mathematical modeling tasks, Thinking tasks, and within specific lessons, alongside the learning targets or embedded within whole class lesson notes.

MP7 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have many opportunities throughout the modules to look for, describe, and make use of patterns within problem-solving as they work with support of the teacher and independently. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 6, Number: Representing teen numbers, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students look for and make use of structure while representing teen numbers on ten-frames. “Distribute a ten-frame and 20 counters to each pair. Ask, How many counters do you need to fill the frame? How can you show a number that is greater than ten? Establish that 10 counters fill the frame and that loose counters can be placed beside the frame to show a number that is greater than ten. Say, Use the frame to show 14. What does it look like? How many counters are on the frame? How many counters are beside the frame? Reinforce the language of 10 and 4 more. Repeat for 17 and 12. (MP7)”

  • Module 2, Lesson 9, Addition: Reinforcing the doubles strategy, Student Journal, page 68, Step Up, Problem 1a, students look for and make use of structure when completing problems using the doubles strategy. “Use the same strategy to figure out these.” Students are given a picture of 2 identical bead strings with the bead segmented into 5 and 2 beads. “Double 5 is ___. Double 2 is ___. So Double 7 is ___.”

  • Module 9, Lesson 7, Addition: Introducing place-value methods, Student Journal, page 338, Step Up, Question 1a, students look for and make use of structure as they “use known facts and place value thinking to solve addition problems.” Students see a picture of the numeral 50 and 5 base-ten rods and the numeral 20 and 2 base-ten rods. “Add the two groups. Then write the matching equation. Use blocks to help you.” Reflecting on the work, “Discuss the students’ answers to Student Journal 9.7. Encourage students to explain their thinking. Ask, Is it easy to add tens? Why? Prompt several responses such as “Adding 50 and 20 is just like adding 5 and 2, because 50 is 5 tens and 20 is 2 tens.” (MP7)”

  • Module 10, Lesson 4, Subtraction: Writing related addition and subtraction facts, Step 2 Starting the lesson, students look for and make use of structure when they “use the structure of the same parts and total to write related addition and subtraction facts.” Students are given a picture of a domino with 6 dots on one side and one dot on the other side, the teacher asks, “What two addition facts can we write to show the total of these two numbers? (6 + 1 = 7 and 1 + 6 = 7.) What two subtraction facts can we write to match? (Yes. Either 7 - 1 = 6 and 7 - 6 = 1.) What do you notice about all four facts? (The same numbers are used in different positions.) (MP7)”

MP8 is identified and connected to grade level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have multiple opportunities throughout the materials, with support of the teacher or during independent practice, to use repeated reasoning in order to make generalizations and build a deeper understanding of grade level math concepts. Examples include:

  • Module 4, Lesson 2, Subtraction: Reviewing concepts (take from), Step 2 Starting the lesson, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning by counting orally forward and backward. “Distribute one numeral card to each student. Say, Today we are going to play a game called I have, who has? I will start and when you hear a question that your card answers, you stand up and continue the game. Ready? I have (19), who has 18? Prompt the student with the card for 18 to stand up and repeat the question for their number. Afterward, have students exchange cards, and start the game with a different number, such as 9 and counting forward. Repeat as time allows (MP8)”

  • Module 6, Lesson 5, Subtraction: Reinforcing the think-addition strategy (count-on facts), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning by using the known count-on strategy to find the missing part in a subtraction situation. “Write the two equations that match the card on the board, discussing the think-addition strategy as 4 add what makes 5. Point out that the unknown number can be one of the parts and does not have to be the total. Invite the students to talk about which strategy they would use to solve the problem. Encourage students to share their thinking with the class. Repeat the discussion for slides 3 to 5. (MP8)”

  • Module 7, Lesson 10, Time: Introducing half-past the hour (analog), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning when they “make connections between half-past the hour shown on an analog clock and one-half represented with an area model (circle).” Students view the Flare Clocks online tool showing 4:00. The teacher asks, “Where would the minute hand point if it went halfway around the clock? What do you think that would tell us about the time? Prompt students to discuss and describe the position of the minute hand when it points at the 6, as halfway between one on-the-hour time and the next on-the-hour time.” The teacher asks, “When have you heard the words half and one-half before? Encourage and highlight responses that refer to one-half as one of two equal parts that make one whole. Students who make connections between concepts like this are demonstrating flexible thinking. (MP8)”

  • Module 12, Lesson 5, Subtraction: Exploring patterns, Student Journal, page 447, Step Up, Questions 2a-b, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning when they “extend subtraction patterns to find unknowns in equations.” Directions state, “Think about the numbers between 1 and 50. a. Write all the numbers that have 6 in the ones place. b. Write the numbers that are 2 less than the numbers you wrote.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, the teacher asks, “What is the answer when you subtract 2 from 11? What do you think will be the answer when you subtract 2 from 21? What will be the answer if you subtract 2 from 61? What happens in the ones place? What happens in the tens place? (MP8)”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for Usability. The materials meet expectations for Criterion 1, Teacher Supports, partially meet expectations for Criterion 2, Assessment, and meet expectations for Criterion 3, Student Supports.

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

9/9
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for Teacher Supports. The materials: provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for enacting the student and ancillary materials; contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current grade so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject; include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series; provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies; and provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

Materials provide comprehensive guidance that will assist teachers in presenting the student and ancillary materials. Examples include:

  • ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Comprehensive Mathematics, Teacher Edition, Program Overview, The Stepping Stone structure, provides a program that is interconnected to allow major, supporting, and additional clusters to be coherently developed. “One of the most unique things about ORIGO Stepping Stones is the approach to sequencing content and practice. Stepping Stones uses a spaced teaching and practice approach in which each content area is spaced apart, the key ideas and skills of these topics have been identified and placed in smaller blocks (modules) over time. In the actual lessons, work is included to help students fully comprehend what is taught alongside the other content development. Consequently, when students come to a new topic, it can be easily connected to previous work.”

  • Module 2, Resources, Preparing for the module, Focus, provides an overview of content and expectations for the module. “The first lesson of this module uses the example of bears on/off a school bus to review the idea of addition. The students write equations to show how they would calculate the unknown amount. Lessons 2 to 7 develops the use of the count-on strategy to add. This strategy is initially used to help students learn many of the addition number facts. To ensure students become fluent with addition, it is important for them to realize that they can count on from the number of one collection to figure out the total, rather than counting every item in both collections. For numbers less than ten, students are encouraged to sight recognize (subitize), and use important benchmarks such as five fingers to help them count on. In Lesson 3, domino cards are used to formally introduce the count-on strategy. Pennies are used in Lesson 4 to reinforce the count-on strategy. The students cannot see the starting number, so they must visualize the strategy. Students use the strategy to solve word problems. The number track is also used as a model to help count on for numbers to 20. The count-on strategy helps students add when one of the addends is small. This module introduces the commutative property (or turnaround idea), another method that helps with any pair of addends. Lessons 6 and 7 use connecting cubes, dominos, or clothespins to demonstrate the commutative property, and then turn the picture around to show that both representations have the same total (for example, 7 + 2 = ___ has the same total as 2 + 7 =___.) The focus of Lessons 8 and 9 is doubling one-digit numbers. Students will analyze real-life situations to find and then create examples that show doubles. It is important that students begin to learn doubles at this stage as this knowledge is the basis for more addition facts in Module 5. After a thinking strategy has been introduced and reinforced, it is essential to practice the number facts that can easily be solved using the strategy. The maintaining concepts and skills in this and later modules provide valuable practice, but it is a good idea to also provide additional practice when time allows.”

Materials include sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions that are presented within the context of the specific learning objectives. Several components focus specifically on the content of the lesson, such as the Step In, Step Up, Step Ahead, Lesson Slides, Step 1 Preparing the Lesson, while other components, like the Step 2 Starting the lesson, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, and Step 4 Reflecting on the work, serve to ensure teachers have the support and knowledge they need to successfully implement the content.” Lesson notes can also highlight potential misconceptions to support teacher planning and practice. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 6, Number: Representing teen numbers, Step 2 Starting the lesson, teachers provide context with representing teen numbers. “Project slide 1 as shown below and ask, How many dots are there? How do you know? If students counted, have them explain their counting. Through the discussion, encourage students to use their subitizing skills instead of individually counting the dots. Repeat for the remaining domino dot and scattered dot arrangements for one to six (slides 2 to 12).”

  • Module 5, Lesson 2, Addition: Reinforcing the double-plus-1 strategy, Step 3 Teaching the lesson provides teachers guidance on how to work with addition and subtraction equations. “Organize students into groups of three and distribute the dominoes. Then ask, Who has a domino that shows a double? How do you know? What addition fact could you write for that double? Invite students to write the facts across the board for all the doubles dominoes from 1 + 1 = ___ to 9 + 9 = ___. Highlight that examples such as 1 + 1 = 2 and 2 + 2 = 4 are both doubles facts and count-on facts. Ask, Who has a domino that shows a double-plus-1 fact? What is the total for your domino? Which fact on the board could help you figure out the total? Allow time for the groups to talk about their domino. Then have volunteers write their double-plus- 1 fact and its turnaround below the related double on the board. Project the Flare Number Track online tool and say, Choose a number between one and ten. When you double your number, what total do you get? As the students identify their doubles, draw a check above each number on the track. Ask, When you double and add one to your number, what total do you get? How do you know? As the students identify the totals, draw a check below each number. Refer to the checked numbers and ask, What do you notice? Encourage a variety of observations. For example, the doubles totals can be found with jumps of two, and every double-plus 1 total falls between two doubles totals. Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 5.2 and work through the questions with the whole class. Read the Step Up and Step Ahead instructions with the students. Make sure they know what to do, then have them work independently to complete the tasks.”

  • Module 9 Lesson 8, Addition: Two-digit numbers, Lesson overview and focus, Misconceptions, include guidance to address common misconceptions with place value understanding in addition problems. “One common misconception for students in this module revolves around continued development of place-value understandings. For example, when adding 39 + 3 students may write 312. An effective strategy is to return to the base-10 blocks or hundred chart that are the models presented in this module. Encourage students to model the addition and keep the focus on counting-on using the hundred chart, and on composing a group of ten with the base-10 blocks. Remember that Grade 1 students should not rely on a written standard algorithm, but rather figure out the total using physical models and place-value strategies.”

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Origo Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for containing adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current grade so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

Within Module Resources, Preparing for the module, there are sections entitled “Research into practice” and “Focus” that consistently link research to pedagogy. There are adult-level explanations including examples of the more complex grade-level concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. Professional articles support teachers with learning opportunities about topics such as ensuring mathematical success for all, early understanding of equality, and repeating patterns. There are also professional learning videos, called MathEd, embedded across the curriculum to support teachers in building their knowledge of key mathematical concepts. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Preparing for the module, Research in practice, Teen numbers, supports teachers with context for work beyond the grade. “As the Mathematics Focus suggests, this module provides a strong foundation for addition (Modules 2, 5, 8, and 9) and for subtraction (Modules 4, 6, 7, 11, and 12) throughout Grade 1. It also prepares students for extending the representation and comparison of number to within 120 (Modules 3, 5, and 7). In preparation for representing and comparing numbers within 1,000 in Grade 2 (Modules 1–3), develop students’ number sense by encouraging them to use many different representations of numbers and to explain how they are the same and how they are different. Read more about making connections in the Research into Practice section of Grade 1 Modules 5 and 7.”

  • Module 3, Research into Practice, Length Measurement, supports teachers with context for work beyond the grade. “In preparation for work with standard units of length (both customary and metric) in Grade 2, students are beginning to understand transitivity and the importance of a standard tool for both measurement and comparison. Read more about the ways transitivity develops in the Research into Practice section for Grade 2 Module 4.”

  • Module 5, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, includes explanations and examples of addition strategies. To learn more includes further references where teachers can build knowledge. “Addition, Research shows that basic fact mastery is grounded in firm number sense, including a student's ability to recognize patterns among numbers and decompose them into usable pieces. Number sense should emerge in a predictable order. Students may at first use a counting-on strategy to find a sum. For example, 6 + 4 may be figured as 6 (shows six fingers) 7, 8, 9, 10 (raising one more finger for each number) “It's 10!” Instruction should then emphasize patterns within the facts that can be easily recalled and expanded upon. For example, doubles and doubles plus one (and doubles plus two) are strategies that typically grow out of pattern recognition activities. The lessons in Module 5 give students opportunities to connect their growing knowledge of doubles-based facts to different representations of number they have used in the past: dominoes, number tracks, and base-10 blocks.” To learn more, “Baroody, Arthur J. 2006. “Why Children Have Difficulties Mastering the Basic Number Combinations and How to Help Them.” Teaching Children Mathematics 13 (1): 22–31.”

  • Module 9, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, includes explanations and examples of addition concepts. “The goal for addition in Grade 1 is to use place-value structure and properties of addition to add two-digit numbers. This standard comes from extensive research that shows that students who build meaning for numbers and the value of the numbers in a place-value system are more successful over the long term than those who rely solely on a rote procedure for adding. Students make sense of the place-value system as they acquire extensive experience counting and creating groups of ten. The process of flexibly perceiving a group of ten objects as both a set of ten individual objects as well as a single group of one ten is called unitizing, and it is a critical skill for learning to compose and decompose numbers in the process of adding. In Module 3, students explored units of one and ten, composing groups of ten using their fingers, the expander, and base-10 blocks. Also important to learning to add is decomposing place values in order to add and subtract numbers. Considered a critical learning phase, learning to add multiples of ten easily and flexibly is an important precursor skill to adding two-digit numbers. By spending much of Grade 1 breaking apart and recomposing groups of tens and ones to add, students build the capacity to establish a standard algorithm for adding at a later stage. For now, building flexibility with place-value strategies is the goal.”

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for including standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series. 

Correlation information is present for the mathematics standards addressed throughout the grade level/series and can be found in several places, including the curriculum front matter and program overview, module overview and resources, and within each lesson. Examples include:

  • Front Matter, Grade 1 and the CCSS by Lesson includes a table with each grade level lesson (in columns) and aligned grade level standards (in rows). Teachers can search any lesson for the grade and identify the standard(s) that are addressed within.

  • Front Matter, Grade 1 and the Common Core Standards, includes all Grade 1 standards and the modules and lessons each standard appears in. Teachers can search a standard for the grade and identify the lesson(s) where it appears within materials.

  • Module 2, Module Overview Resources, Lesson Content and Learning Targets, outlines standards, learning targets and the lesson where they appear. This is present for all modules and allows teachers to identify targeted standards for any lesson.

  • Module 4, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Reviewing concepts (take apart), the Core Standards are identified as 1.OA.C.6, 1.OA.D.8 and 1.NBT.A.1. The Prior Learning Standards are identified K.OA.A.1 and K.OA.A.2,. Lessons contain a consistent structure that includes Lesson Focus, Topic progression, Formative assessment opportunity, Misconceptions, Step 1 Preparing the lesson, Step 2 Starting the lesson, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, and Maintaining concepts and skills. This provides an additional place to reference standards, and language of the standard, within each lesson.

Each module includes a Mathematics Overview that includes content standards addressed within the module as well as a narrative outlining relevant prior and future content connections. Each lesson includes a Topic Progression that also includes relevant prior and future learning connections. Examples include:

  • Module 1, Mathematics Overview, Numbers and Operations in Base Ten, includes an overview of how the math of this module builds from previous work in math. “In the Kindergarten year of Stepping Stones, students worked with key concepts and skills to develop confidence with numbers to 20. For numbers to ten, they matched number names and numerals to collections of objects, and vice versa; matched number names to numerals, and vice versa; wrote numerals to match a collection and/or number names; and were encouraged to sight recognize (subitize) collections up to nine. For numbers 11 to 20, students represented teen numbers as a group of ten and some ones; used coins to represent teen numbers with pennies or one dime and pennies; and matched numerals and number names to collections, and vice versa. This module reviews and builds on the above concepts and skills. It introduces new models for students to use to represent numbers and numerals, and then extends the applications of numbers to writing teen numbers, and comparing and ordering numbers to 20. They use ten-frames to help make their decisions. The ten-frame and the number track are used to extend the language to making a specific comparison, e.g. ___ is 2 less than 9. In Kindergarten, students used counters, number tracks, and their fingers to represent numbers to 20. In this module, a new resource, sets of cards showing outstretched fingers, is used to make it easier to work with the finger picture of numbers. This means students can quickly show the number 14 by selecting a card with ten fingers and a card with four fingers. This is a speedy way to build a place-value picture for teen numbers. The cards provide a meaningful picture of place value, and are used in other modules when students work with two-digit numbers up to 100.”

  • Module 9, Mathematics Overview, Coherence, includes an overview of how the content in 1st grade connects to mathematics students will learn in second grade. “Lessons 9.1–9.12 focus on addition of one-digit and two-digit numbers, then two two-digit numbers using the count-on strategy and place-value strategies. This extends prior work with the count-on addition strategy (1.2.1–1.2.6) and serves as a foundation for addition with two-digit numbers using a number line (2.5.1–2.5.7).”

  • Grade 1, Module 7, Lesson 8, Subtraction: Reinforcing the think-addition strategy (near- doubles facts), Topic Progression, “Prior learning: In Lesson 1.7.7, students use the think- addition subtraction strategy to solve problems involving near-Doubles. 1.OA.B.4, 1.OA.C.6, 1.OA.D.8; Current focus: In this lesson, students practice the think-addition subtraction strategy to solve problems involving near-doubles. 1.OA.B.4, 1.OA.C.6, 1.OA.D.8; Future learning: In Lesson 1.7.9, students practice all strategies to solve word problems. 1.OA.A.1.” Each lesson provides a correlation to standards and a chart relating the target standard(s) to prior learning and future learning.

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provides strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. 

ORIGO ONE includes 1-minute videos, in English and Spanish that can be shared with stakeholders. They outline big ideas for important math concepts within each grade. Each module also has a corresponding Newsletter, available in English and Spanish, that provides a variety of supports for families, including the core focus for each module, ideas for practice at home, key glossary terms, and helpful videos. Newsletter examples include:

  • Module 2, Resources, Preparing for the module, Newsletter, Core Focus, “Addition: Counting on (within 20), Addition: Using the commutative property,  Addition: Introducing the doubles strategy, Time: Reading on the hour with analog and digital clocks. Counting on - When asked what comes after a number, students often start at one and count up to the number. They need to “count all” every time. But with experience, they begin to count on or count back from any number. Students learn the count-on strategy. For example, when combining 5 and 2, they count on from 5 (“5, 6, 7”), or count on from 2 (“2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7”). The result is the same, but starting with the larger number is quicker and, for some students, easier. Commutative property - Counting on is recorded as an addition number sentence (e.g. 5 + 2 = 7). The turnaround addition fact is also recorded (e.g. 2 + 5 = 7). Students learn that changing the order of numbers being added does not change the final result. When the two addends are close to the same size, the doubles strategy can be used. Doubles are easily connected to familiar situations, e.g. two hands show that double 5 is 10, and an egg carton shows double 6 is 12. Time - Although digital clocks are more common and easier for students to read, an analog clock is a visual model that shows the passing of time and parts of an hour, helping students better understand the concept of time. Students read and write times that are on-the-hour (when the “big hand“ is on the 12) on an analog clock and read on the hour on a digital clock.”

  • Module 4, Resources, Preparing for the module, Newsletter, Glossary, “Related subtraction equations help students see the relationship among numbers in equations, which sets the stage for algebra in later school years. The count-back strategy is an approach to subtraction where a student starts at the greater number, then counts the lesser number back from the greater to find the difference. In 10 − 3, for example, a student would start at 10 on a number track, then count back 3 to arrive at the difference: 7. A two-dimensional (2D) shape can have straight sides, curved sides, or both straight and curved sides.” Module 4, Newsletter, Helpful videos, “View these short one-minute videos to see these ideas in action. go.origo.app/lfcew. go.origo.app/46939.”

  • Module 8, Resources, Preparing for the module, Newsletter, Ideas for Home, “Ensure your child already knows pairs of numbers that total 10 (e.g. 1 + 9, 2 + 8), plus their associated turnaround facts (e.g. 9 + 1, 8 + 2). Make 10 in everyday situations by asking, “How many more will make 10?” Discuss with your child how they think about numbers in everyday addition situations. Encourage the use of 10 to figure out totals greater than 10. E.g. “There are 4 eggs. How many more are needed to fill a carton that holds 12 eggs?” Their answer could be 4 + 6 = 10, 10 + 2 = 12, or 4 + 6 + 2 = 12. An understanding of equality and inequality can be developed by experiences with everyday items. E.g. place two apples (cookies, carrots, anything that is countable) on one plate and two on another. Ask, “Will these two groups balance?” or “Are these groups the same amount?” Tally the kinds of fruit in a fruit bowl and graph the number using a tally chart. Tally the number of cars in a parking lot by color and make a tally chart. At your next family gathering, help your child conduct a survey of family members. E.g. “What is your favorite ice-cream flavor: chocolate, vanilla, or strawberry?” Make a tally chart.”

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies. 

Instructional approaches of the program are described within the Pedagogy section of the Program Overview at each grade. Examples include:

  • Program Overview, Pedagogy, The Stepping Stones approach to teaching concepts includes the mission of the program as well as a description of the core beliefs. “Mathematics involves the use of symbols, and a major goal of a program is to prepare students to read, write, and interpret these symbols. ORIGO Stepping Stones introduces symbols gradually after students have had many meaningful experiences with models ranging from real objects, classroom materials and 2D pictures, as shown on the left side of the diagram below. Symbols are also abstract representations of verbal words, so students move through distinct language stages (see right side of diagram), which are described in further detail below. The emphasis of both material and language development summarizes ORIGO's unique, holistic approach to concept development. A description of each language stage is provided in the next section. This approach serves to build a deeper understanding of the concepts underlying abstract symbols. In this way, Stepping Stones better equips students with the confidence and ability to apply mathematics in new and unfamiliar situations.”

  • Program Overview, Pedagogy, The Stepping Stones approach to teaching skills helps to outline how to teach a lesson. “In Stepping Stones, students master skills over time as they engage in four distinctly different types of activities. 1. Introduce. In the first stage, students are introduced to the skill using contextual situations, concrete materials, and pictorial representations to help them make sense of the mathematics. 2. Reinforce. In the second stage, the concept or skill is reinforced through activities or games. This stage provides students with the opportunity to understand the concepts and skills as it connects the concrete and pictorial models of the introductory stage to the abstract symbols of the practice stage. 3. Practice. When students are confident with the concept or skill, they move to the third stage where visual models are no longer used. This stage develops accuracy and speed of recall. Written and oral activities are used to practice the skill to develop fluency. 4. Extend. Finally, as the name suggests, students extend their understanding of the concept or skill in the last stage. For example, the use-tens thinking strategy for multiplication can be extended beyond the number fact range to include computation with greater whole numbers and eventually to decimal fractions.” 

  • Program Overview, Pedagogy, The Stepping Stones structure outlines the learning experiences. “The scope and sequence of learning experiences carefully focuses on the major clusters in each grade to ensure students gain conceptual understanding, a high degree of procedural skill and fluency, and the ability to apply this knowledge to solve problems inside and outside the mathematics classroom. Mathematics contains many concepts and skills that are closely interconnected. A strong curriculum will carefully build the structure, so that all of the major, supporting, and additional clusters are appropriately addressed and coherently developed. One of the most unique things about ORIGO Stepping Stones is the approach to sequencing content and practice. Stepping Stones uses a spaced teaching and practice approach in which each content area is spaced apart, the key ideas and skills of these topics have been identified and placed in smaller blocks (modules) over time. In the actual lessons, work is included to help students fully comprehend what is taught alongside the other content development. Consequently, when students come to a new topic, it can be easily connected to previous work. For example, within one module students may work on addition, time, and shapes, addressing some of the grade level content for each, and returning to each one later in the year. This allows students to make connections across content and helps students master content and skills with less practice, allowing more time for instruction.”

Research-based strategies within the program are cited and described regularly within each module, within the Research into practice section inside Preparing for the module. Examples of research- based strategies include:

  • Module 2, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, “Counting on: Counting objects efficiently and accurately is a primary goal in Kindergarten, but in Grade 1 students begin to discover strategies for joining quantities of objects. There are many kinds of addition reasoning strategies that students can be expected to utilize. One research group distinguished between perceptual counting, figural counting, and the initial number sequence stages of addition to describe this change. Students who are perceptual counters are able to count a set of joined objects only in the presence of physical materials, and they will most likely need to start from 1 to count the joined set. When figural counting students are shown two sets of joined objects, which are then hidden, they can still imagine the objects and count efficiently, even if they start at 1. Students who are beginning the initial steps of the number sequence stage recognize a numerical composite, a quantity that they can be maintained in a whole chunk. For example, shown 8 blocks and 3 blocks, the student is able to recognize and hold 8 blocks as a numerical composite and count on three more to eleven, with or without fingers accompanying their count: “8. 9, 10, 11!” This strategy is called counting on. There is ample evidence that students who demonstrate proficiency counting on may still turn to the counting all strategy at times, long after it is expected, but this is a normal occurrence. Telling time: Using a clock to tell time is not a superficial task. Unlike length, time itself is not tangible and is therefore more challenging to measure. A student can lay a block next to an object and compare lengths. However, nothing can be laid next to time for comparison. Marking the passage of hours increases awareness both of the clock and of time itself. To learn more: Eisenhardt, Sara, Molly H. Fisher, Jonathan Thomas, Edna O. Schack, Janet Tassell, and Margaret Yoder. 2014. “Is it counting, or is it adding?” Teaching Children Mathematics 20(8): 498-507. Reinke, Kay, and Pat Lamphere-Jordan. 2002. “Working Cotton: Toward an Understanding of Time.” Teaching Children Mathematics 8(8): 475-79. Van de Walle, John A., Karen S. Karp, and Jennifer M. Bay-Williams. 2010. Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. 7th ed. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon. References: Long, Kathy, and Constance Kamii. 2001. “The Measurement of Time: Children’s Construction of Transitivity, Unit Iteration, and Conservation of Speed.” School Science and Mathematics 101 (3): 125–32. Tzur, Ron, and Matthew Allen Lambert. 2011. “Intermediate participatory stages as zone of proximal development correlate in constructing counting-on: A plausible conceptual source for children’s transitory ‘regress’ to counting-all.” Journal for Research in Mathematics Education 42 (5): 418–50. Wright, Robert J., Jim Martland, and Ann K. Stafford. 2006. Early numeracy: Assessment for teaching and intervention. London: Sage.”

  • Module 9, Preparing for the module, Research into practice, “Addition: The goal for addition in Grade 1 is to use place-value structure and properties of addition to add two-digit numbers. This standard comes from extensive research that shows that students who build meaning for numbers and the value of the numbers in a place-value system are more successful over the long term than those who rely solely on a rote procedure for adding. Students make sense of the place-value system as they acquire extensive experience counting and creating groups of ten. The process of flexibly perceiving a group of ten objects as both a set of ten individual objects as well as a single group of one ten is called unitizing, and it is a critical skill for learning to compose and decompose numbers in the process of adding. In Module 3, students explored units of one and ten, composing groups of ten using their fingers, the expander, and base-10 blocks. Also important to learning to add is decomposing place values in order to add and subtract numbers. Considered a critical learning phase, learning to add multiples of ten easily and flexibly is an important precursor skill to adding two-digit numbers. By spending much of Grade 1 breaking apart and recomposing groups of tens and ones to add, students build the capacity to establish a standard algorithm for adding at a later stage. For now, building flexibility with place-value strategies is the goal. To learn more: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2010. Common Core State Standards Mathematics. Washington, D.C.: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School. Van de Walle, John A., Karen S. Karp, and Jennifer M. Bay-Williams. 2010. Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. 7th ed. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon. References: Baroody, Arthur J. 2006. “Why Children Have Difficulties Mastering the Basic Number Combinations and How to Help Them.” Teaching Children Mathematics 13 (1): 22–31. Clements, Douglas H. and Julie Sarama. 2009. Learning and Teaching Early Math: The Learning Trajectories Approach. 1st ed. Studies in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. New York: Routledge. Richardson, Kathy. 2012. How Children Learn Number Concepts: A Guide to the Critical Learning Phases. Bellingham, Washington: Math Perspectives Teacher Development Center.”

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

1/1
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. In the Program Overview, Program components, Preparing for the module, “Resource overview - provides a comprehensive view of the materials used within the module to assist with planning and preparation.” Each module includes a Resource overview to outline supplies needed for each lesson within the module. Additionally, specific lessons include notes about supplies needed to support instructional activities, often within Step 1 Preparing the lesson. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 6, Addition: Using the commutative property, Lesson notes, Step 1 Preparing the lesson, “You will need: 2 pieces of tagboard, each 8 inches by 10 inches, clothespins; Each student will need: Student Journal 2.6 ”

  • Module 3, Preparing for the module, According to the Resource overview, teachers need, “pan balance, paper clip and strips of paper for lesson 9, permanent marker, small resealable plastic bags in lesson 6, soccer ball or similar in lesson 4, string in lessons 9 and 10, Support 37 in lesson 12, The Number Case in lessons 3, 4, 5, and 6. Each group of students needs counters and base-10 blocks (tens and ones), non-permanent marker, play dimes and pennies, The Number Case in lesson 2, lengths of string, scissors in lesson 9, and a tub of connecting cubes in lesson 11. Each pair of students needs base-10 blocks (tens and ones) and The Number Case in lesson 8, and play dimes and pennies in lesson 7. Each individual student needs connecting cubes in lesson 11, glue and strips of paper in lesson 9, paper in lesson 3, scissors and adhesive tape and Support 37 in lesson 12, string in lesson 10, and the Student Journal for each lesson.”

  • Module 3, Lesson 9, Length: Making direct comparisons, Lesson notes, Step 1 Preparing the lesson, “You will need: string, measuring cup, pan balance, paper clip, craft stick, strips of paper. Each group of three students will need: length of string (approximately 1 yard) and scissors. Each student will need: 12 strips of paper (approximately \frac{1}{2} inch by 8 inches), glue, and Student Journal 3.9.” Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Display the string, measuring cup, pan balance, paper clip, and craft stick and say, Today we are going to measure some distances. Which of these measure tools do you think we can use?

  • Module 7, Preparing for the module, According to the Resource overview, teachers need, “base-10 blocks (hundreds, tens, and ones) in lesson 6, non-permanent marker in lesson 5, ORIGO Big Book: The Cat Nap in lesson 10, resources such as connecting cubes, counters, containers, base-10 blocks, and drinking straws in lesson 1, Support 63 in lesson 8, Support 64 in lesson 9, Support 67 in lesson 12, and The Number Case in lessons 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9. Each group of students needs base-10 blocks (hundreds, tens, and ones) in lessons 2, 3, 4, and 6, non-permanent markers in lessons 2, 3, and 6, paper in lesson 6, and The Number Case in lessons 2, 3, and 6. Each individual student needs the Student Journal in each lesson.”

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

7/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 partially meet expectations for Assessment. The materials identify the standards, but do not identify the mathematical practices assessed for the formal assessments. The materials provide multiple opportunities to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance but do not provide suggestions for follow-up. The materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and mathematical practices across the series. 

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 partially meet expectations for having assessment information included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

While Check-ups, Quarterly tests, Performance tasks, and Interviews consistently and accurately identify grade level content standards within each Module assessment overview, mathematical practices are not identified. Examples from formal assessments include:

  • Module 2, Preparing for the module, Module assessment overview, Check-up 1, denotes standards addressed for each question. Question 1, 1.OA.1, “Solve each problem. Show your thinking. a. Jose scored 2 points in the first half of the game and 6 points in the second half. How many points did he score in total? b. 5 guests are at a party. 2 more guests arrive. How many guests are there in total?” 

  • Module 6, Assessment, Quarterly test, Test A, denotes standards for each question. Question 8, 1.NBT.3, “Choose the true statement. A. 29 > 40, B. 29 < 40, C. 40 < 29.”

  • Module 8, Preparing for the module, Module assessment overview, Performance task denotes the aligned grade level standard. Question 1,1.OA.6, “a. Draw more dots in the frame on the right. b. Write numbers to match the picture. 9 + ___ = ___. c. Write another way to figure out the answer. 10 + ___ = ___ .” 

  • Module 10, Preparing for the module, Module assessment overview, Interview 1, denotes standards addressed. 1.NBT.5, “Steps: Ask the student to start at 100 and count back by tens to 10. Ask the student to start at 80 and count back by tens to 10. Ask the student to start at 76 and count back by tens to 6. Ask the student to say the number that is 10 less than the following numbers: 86, 64, 19, 27, 13. Draw a ✔ beside the learning the student has successfully demonstrated.”

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 partially meets expectations for including an assessment system that provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students’ learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. 

Summative Assessments, such as Check-ups and Quarterly tests, provide an answer key with aligned standards. Performance Tasks include an answer key and a 2-point rubric, which provides examples of student responses and how they would score on the rubric. A student achievement recording spreadsheet for each module learning target is available that includes: Individual Achievement of Learning Targets for this Module, Whole Class Achievement of Learning Targets for this Module and Individual Achievement of Learning Targets for Modules 1 to 12. While some scoring guidance is included within the materials, there is no guidance for teachers to interpret student performance or suggestions for teachers that could guide follow-up support for students. Examples from the assessment system include:

  • Module 2, Assessments, Check-up 2, Question 3, “Write each time for each clock. The answers are a. 9 o’clock. b. 11 o’clock.” The answer key aligns this question to 1.MD.3.

  • Module 6, Assessments, Quarterly test B, Question 7, “Choose the true statement. A. 45 is greater than 54. B. 59 is greater than 70. C. 37 is greater than 18.” The answer key shows the answer as C and aligned to 1.NBT.3.

  • Module 10, Assessments, Performance task, students use fact families to solve addition and subtraction problems. “Question 1. Color some circles red. Write the fact family to match the picture. Question 2. Choose your own numbers to complete two related facts. You can draw a picture of circles to help you. ___ - ___ = 6. ___ + ___ = ___.” The Scoring Rubric and Examples state, “2 Meets requirements. Shows complete understanding. Identified two addition and two subtraction facts to match the picture in Question 1. Wrote matching facts for Question 2. A picture may not have been necessary. 1 Partially meets requirements. Identified at least two addition facts or two subtraction facts to match the picture in Question 1. May have written only one equation for Question 2. 0 Does not meet requirements. Shows no understanding.”

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing assessments that include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and practices across the series.

Formative Assessments include Pre-test, Observations and discussions, and Journals and Portfolios. Summative Assessments include Check-ups, Interviews, Performance tasks, and Quarterly tests. All assessments regularly demonstrate the full intent of grade level content and practice standards through a variety of item types: multiple choice, short answer, and constructed response. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Check-up 2 and Module 4, Performance task, develops the full intent of 1.OA.8, determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. Check-up 2, Question 2, “Complete the equation to match each domino. You can draw more dots on the domino to help. a. 5 + ___ = 8, b. ___ + 2 = 8.” Module 4, Performance task, “a. Write two numbers to complete this equation. 7 - ___ = ___ . b. Draw a picture of some people on the bus and some people off the bus to match your equation.”

  • Module 6, Quarterly test questions support the full intent of MP7, look for and make use of structure, as students use fact strategies to solve a complex problem. For example, Question 3, “Choose the pair of facts that match the picture. 8 dots in total. A. 8 - 8 = 0, 8 + 0 = 8, B. 6 - 2 = 8, 6 + 2 = 8, C. 8 - 4 = 4, 4 + 4 = 8.”

  • Module 9, Quarterly test A questions support the full intent of MP6, attend to precision, as students read and calculate a total from a tally chart. Question 15, “Look at the tally chart. How many first graders picked yellow as their favorite color? A. 12, B. 7, C. 13” A tally chart titled, “First Grade Students Favorite Color” shows tallies for Blue, Red, Green, and Yellow. 

  • Module 11, Interview 2 and Check-up 2, develops the full intent of 3.G.1, distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes. Interview 2, “Resources: 1 copy of Support 11, Building blocks like those shown on Support 11. Steps: Give the student the blocks. Have them choose one block and describe the surfaces of that block. Display a rectangular-based prism and ask the student to join some of the blocks together to make a longer version of that prism. Display a triangular-based prism and ask the student to join some of the blocks together to make a larger version of that prism. Show the student the support page and ask them to recreate the object using the blocks. Draw a ✔ beside the learning the student has successfully demonstrated.”

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Origo Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide assessments which offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment. According to the Program overview, Grade assessment overview, “ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 provides online student assessments for each instructional quarter, Grades 1–5. Each assessment offers a variety of technology-enhanced item types, such as open-response visual displays, to monitor and guide achievement.” In addition to technology- enhanced items, the online assessments include the ability to flag items, magnify the screen, and utilize a screen reader for text to speech. The digital assessments are authored through Learnosity and the screen readers are an add-on feature, housed outside of the Origo platform.

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for Student Supports. The materials provide: strategies and supports for students in special populations and for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics, multiple extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity, and manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level/series mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics.

Materials regularly provide strategies, supports, and resources for students in special populations to help them access grade-level mathematics. In each Module Lesson, Differentiation notes, there is a document titled Extra help, Extra practice, and Extra challenge that provides accommodations for an activity of the lesson. For example, the components of Module 5, Lesson 5, Addition: Comparing all strategies, include:

  • Extra help, “Activity: Organize students into groups and distribute the dominoes. The dominoes are placed facedown and mixed around. The students take turns to select a domino and identify whether it represents a count-on fact or a use-doubles fact (or neither). Make sure they explain how they decided.”

  • Extra practice, “Activity: Organize students into pairs and distribute the cubes. The students take turns to roll both cubes, add the numbers, and write the matching addition equation. If the equation involves using the double-plus-1 or double-plus-2 strategy, the student scores a point. The first student to score five points wins.”

  • Extra challenge, “Activity: Organize students into groups and distribute the cards. Direct the students to draw two columns on a piece of paper, and label them count on and use doubles. The cards are mixed and placed facedown in a central pile. The students take turns to select a card and identify the addition strategy they could use to have that number as the total. They then write a matching equation in the appropriate column. For example, if a student selects a card for 9, they could write 7 + 2 = 9 or 8 + 1 = 9 in the count on column or 5 + 4 = 9 or 4 + 5 = 9 in the use doubles column. The activity continues until there are five different equations in each column.”

Indicator 3n

Materials provide extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level/course-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

While there are no instances where advanced students do more assignments than classmates, materials do provide multiple opportunities to investigate the grade-level content at a higher level of complexity. The Lesson Differentiation in each lesson includes a differentiation plan with an extra challenge. Each extra challenge is unique to an activity completed in class. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 7, Addition: Extending the count-on strategy (within 20), Differentiation, Extra Challenge, “Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. One student writes a count-on-1 or count-on-2 equation involving a teen number. The other student then writes the turnaround equation to match. Roles are alternated and the activity continues until all the cards are used. The students then use the cards to play matching games such as Memory.”

  • Module 5, Lesson 11, Number: Recording comparisons (with symbols), Differentiation, Extra Challenge, “Organize students into small groups and distribute the resources. Students take turns to roll both cubes. They then write the numbers they roll in any of the empty boxes on their support page to make true balance scenarios. The activity is repeated until one student successfully completes four balance scenarios.”

  • Module 11, Lesson 10, Money: Determining the value of a collection of coins, Differentiation, Extra Challenge, “Organize students into groups and distribute the resources. Have the students identify pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters and give their value in cents. Then have them work together to create five bags of coins that have a total value of 75 cents. Each bag should show a different combination of coins.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide various approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning, but do not provide opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Students engage with problem-solving in a variety of ways: Student Journal Steps, Investigations, Problem-solving Activities, Step It Up 2.0, and within Thinking Tasks, a key component for the program. According to the Program Overview, “ORIGO Thinking Tasks break this mold by presenting students with rigorous, problem-solving opportunities. These problems may become messy and involve multiple entry points as students carve out a solution path. By placing emphasis on the complexity of problem solving, we strive to create a culture for all learners that engages and inspires while developing their confidence and perseverance in the face of challenging problems.” Examples of varied approaches include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 7, Number: Making groups to show greater or less (up to 20), Student Journal, page 25, Step Ahead, students make one more or one less using strategies. “Read the problem. Then color the bubble beside the true statement. David has 18 cards in his collection. He has one more card than Trina. Bubble: Trina has more cards. Bubble: Trina has 19 cards. Bubble: Trina has 17 cards.”

  • Step It Up Practice, Grade 1, Module 4, Resources, Lesson 9, 2D Shapes: Sorting shapes, Question 3, students sort shapes and explain how they are different. “Circle two of these shapes. What is different about them?” 

  • Module 6, More Math, Thinking Tasks, Question 1, students use different strategies to count forward to ten and backwards from ten to solve word problems. “Look at this picture. [Show a picture of 3 eggs in an opened 10-egg carton.] How many eggs can the egg carton hold? Write the number.” 

  • In Module 11, More math, Investigation 3, students find different ways to compose twenty with coins. The materials state, “Project slide 1 and read the investigation question. Discuss the context and review the value of each coin. Make sure students understand they can use a combination of 1, 2, or 3 types of coins to make twenty cents. Organize students into small groups and distribute the play coins. Have students work together to find all the possible solutions.”

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Suggested grouping strategies are consistently present within lesson notes and include guidance for whole group, small group, pairs, or individual activities. Examples include:

  • Module 2, Lesson 7, Addition: Extending the count-on strategy (within 20), Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Organize students into groups of four. Say, Today we are going to count from one to 100 in our groups.”

  • Module 5, Lesson 9, Number: Comparing to order two-digit numbers, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “Seat the students in front of the track. Place the numeral cards 1−9 facedown in a pile on the floor. Ask four students to take one card from the pile. Organize the four students into pairs and have each pair use their cards to compose a two-digit numbers. Ask each pair to share their number with the class and locate their number on the number track.“ Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 5.9 and work through the questions with the whole class.”

  • Module 12, Lesson 6, Subtraction: Multiples of ten from any two-digit number (hundred chart), Step 1 Preparing the lesson, “Each pair of students will need: 1 hundred chart from The Number Case, 1 transparent counter, base-10 blocks (tens and ones). Each student will need: Student Journal 12.6.” Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “Organize students into pairs and project the food items for sale (slide 6). Have a volunteer choose one item from those for sale. Project the Step In discussion from Student Journal 12.6 and work through the questions with the whole class. Read the Step Up and Step Ahead instructions with students. Remind them they can select any tool or model from those available to support their thinking (MP5). Make sure they know what to do, then have them work independently to complete the tasks.”

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

Although strategies are not provided to differentiate for the levels of student language development, all materials are available in Spanish. Guidance is consistently provided for teachers to support students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English, providing scaffolds for them to meet or exceed grade-level standards.  According to the Mathematics Overview, English Language Learners, “The Stepping Stones program provides a language-rich curriculum where English Language Learners (ELL) can acquire mathematics in a natural second-language progression by listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Each lesson includes accommodations to be aware of when teaching the lesson to ensure scaffolding of content and misconceptions of language are addressed. Since there may be several stages of language development in your classroom, you will need to use your professional judgement to select which accommodations are best suited to each learner.” Examples include:

  • Module 1, Lesson 7, Number: Making groups to show greater or less (up to 20), Lesson notes, Step 2 Starting the lesson, “ELL: Provide students with a number track up to 20 to scaffold the before, between, and after understanding of number.” Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “ELL: Pre-teach the phrases one more and one less to the students by providing them with a number track and three different colored counters. Say, I would like for you to point to the number seven. Place the (red) counter on the number seven. What is the number after seven? (8.) Eight is one more than seven. Ask the students to place their (green) counter on the number eight and count the number of spaces between one and eight. Emphasize how eight is one more space on the number track than seven. Ask, What number comes before seven? (6.) Six is one less than seven. Ask the student to place their (blue) counter on the number six and count the number of spaces between one and six. Emphasize how six is one less space on the number track than seven. Repeat with other examples, if necessary. Encourage the students to use non-verbal cues (such as thumbs down) if they are confused by the concept or the language they hear. Pair the students with fluent English-speaking students. During the activity, have the students discuss the concepts in their pairs, as well as repeat the other student’s thinking. Allow the pairs to work together to complete the Student Journal, if necessary.” Step 4 Reflecting on the work, “ELL: Provide the students with counters to help them justify their thoughts during the reflection.”

  • Module 5, Lesson 10, Number: Introducing comparison symbols, Lesson notes, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, “ELL: Give students a visual aid, such as an index card with the symbols and picture for them to reference. Create an anchor chart showing the comparison symbols for students to reference. Provide adequate time for students to process the questions, formulate their answer, and share their thoughts with the other student before presenting their ideas to the class. During the activity, have them discuss the concepts in their pairs, as well as repeat the other student’s thinking. Have the pairs work together to read the Student Journal.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

The characters in the student journal represent different races and portray people from many ethnicities in a positive, respectful manner, with no demographic bias for who achieves success in the context of problems. Names include multi-cultural references such as Kinu, Felipe, Kuma, and Hernando and problem settings vary from rural, to urban, and international locations. Each module provides Cross-curricula links or Enrichment activities that provide students with opportunities to explore various demographics, roles, and/or mathematical contexts.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 do not provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

While there are supports in place to help students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English, there is no evidence of intentionally promoting home language and knowledge. Home language is not specifically identified as an asset to engage students in the content nor is it purposefully connected within mathematical contexts.

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0, Grade 1 provide some guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Spanish materials are consistently accessible for a variety of stakeholders, including ORIGO ONE Videos, the Student Journals, the glossary, and the Newsletters for families.

Indicator 3u

Materials provide supports for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide some supports for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

Each module provides support specific to vocabulary development, called ‘Building vocabulary’. Each Building vocabulary activity provides: “Vocabulary term, Write it in your own words, and Show what it means”. While the Lesson overview, Misconceptions, and Steps within each lesson may include suggestions to scaffold vocabulary or concepts to support access to the mathematics, these do not directly address accessibility for different student reading levels. Examples of vocabulary supports include:

  • Module 1, Mathematics overview, Common errors and misconceptions, Teen numbers, “When writing number names, students may overgeneralize the structure of teen numbers, inventing words such as fiveteen and threeteen. This is a positive development because it indicates that the student understands the ten and some more composition of teen numbers. Of course it is important to point out the standard spelling and pronunciation, while still acknowledging the child’s understanding. On the other hand, some students may not recognize the ten and some pattern in the numbers. Continue to emphasize decomposing the number names, highlighting the suffix teen, reiterating that it means ten.” 

  • Module 2, Lesson 8, Addition: Introducing the doubles strategy, Step 3 Teaching the Lesson, “Open the Addtron online tool. Invite a student to drag pictures onto the work area to show a double. Have the class say the double using correct language and without counting. (MP6) For example, “Double five is ten,” or “Five add five is ten.” Then ask another student to use the writing tool to write the doubles fact in the white panel. Repeat for different doubles.”

  • Module 6, Lesson 1, Subtraction: Identifying the parts and total, Lesson overview and focus, Misconceptions, “Many students will struggle to interpret and make sense of the missing addend problem. But some of the research suggests that this may be simply because students have fewer experiences with that problem structure. (See Research into Practice.) Throughout the module different representations offer students strategies to make sense of the missing addend context.”

Indicator 3v

Manipulatives, both virtual and physical, are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 meets expectations for providing manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

The materials consistently include suggestions and/or links, within the lesson notes, for virtual and physical manipulatives that support the understanding of grade level math concepts. Examples include: 

  • Module 1, Lesson 3, Number: Matching representations (up to ten), Step 3 Teaching the lesson, identifies DecaCards and a support handout as strategies for students to match number names and their representations. “Organize students into pairs and distribute the resources. Then say a number from zero to ten, such as four. Direct one student in each pair to find the matching DecaCard and the other student to write the matching number name on the paper.”

  • Module 6, Lesson 2, Subtraction: Exploring the unknown-addend idea, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, describes the use of wire coat hangers, clothespins and a handout to show subtraction problems with missing addends. “Organize students into four small groups and give each group a hanger and some clothespins. Encourage them to create different unknown-addend equations and show their thinking on the hanger.”

  • Module 10, Lesson 5, Subtraction: Writing fact families, Step 2 Starting the lesson, references an online Fundamentals game to review creating addition equations. “Organize students into two groups and open the online Fundamentals game, Add ’em Up. Explain that the class is going to play a game. Groups take turns to roll the cubes and for each roll, they create an addition equation where the total appears on the board.”

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology, when applicable, with guidance for teachers.

0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 integrate some technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level standards, and the materials do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other. The materials have a visual design that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic, and the materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning. 

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 integrate some technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable. Examples include:

  • While all components of the materials can be accessed digitally, some are only accessible digitally, such as ORIGO Big Books, Interactive Student Journal, Fundamentals Games and Flare Online Tools.

  • ORIGO ONE videos describe the big math ideas across grade level lessons in one minute clips. There is a link for each video that makes them easy to share with various stakeholders.

  • Every lesson includes an interactive Student Journal, with access to virtual manipulatives and text and draw tools, that allow students to show work virtually. It includes the Step In, Step Up, Step Ahead, and Maintaining Concepts and Skills activities, some of which are auto-scored, others are teacher graded. 

  • The digital materials do not allow for customizing or editing existing lessons for local use, but teachers can upload assignments or lessons from the platform.

  • Digital Student Assessments allow for Progress Monitoring. Teachers can enter performance data and then monitor student progress for individual students and/or the class.

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable. 

While teacher implementation guidance is included for Fundamentals games and Flare online tools, there is no platform where teachers and students collaborate with each other. There is an opportunity for teachers to send feedback to students through graded assignments.

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide a visual design (whether in print or digital) that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

There is a consistent design within modules and lessons that supports student understanding of the mathematics. Examples include:

  • Each lesson follows a common format with the following components: Step 1 Preparing the lesson, Step 2 Starting the lesson, Step 3 Teaching the lesson, Step 4 Reflecting on the work, Maintaining Concepts and Skills, Lesson focus, Topic progression, Observations and discussions, Journals and portfolios, and Misconceptions. The layout for each lesson is user-friendly as each component is included in order from top to bottom on the page. 

  • The font size, amount and placement of directions, and print within student materials is appropriate. 

  • The digital format is easy to navigate and engaging. There is ample space in the Student Journal and Assessments for students to capture calculations and write answers. 

  • The ORIGO ONE videos are engaging and designed to create light bulb moments for key math ideas. They are one minute in length so students can engage without being distracted from the math concept being presented.

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for ORIGO Stepping Stones 2.0 Grade 1 provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

The Program Overview includes a description of embedded tools, how they should be incorporated, and when they can be accessed to enhance student understanding. Examples include:

  • Program Overview, Additional practice tools, “This icon shows when Fundamentals games are required.” Lessons provide this icon to show when and where games are utilized within lesson notes.

  • Program Overview, Additional practice tools, “This icon shows when Flare tools are required.” Lessons provide this icon to show when and where these tools are utilized within lesson notes.

  • Program Overview, ORIGO Big Books, “This icon shows when ORIGO Big Books are required.” Lessons provide this icon to show when and where these tools are utilized within lesson notes. “Characters and concepts from the Big Books are brought to life in ORIGO Big Book online tools. These easy-to-use tools set the stage for purposeful play and learning.” Lessons provide opportunities for teachers and students to utilize the Big Book and tools. Each Big Book includes lesson notes for the teacher to use within the classroom.

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Report Published Date: 2021/12/15

Report Edition: 2022

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Math K-8 Review Tool

The K-8 review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations