Alignment: Overall Summary

The Open Court Reading Foundational Skills Kits for Kindergarten meet the expectations for alignment to standards and research-based practices for foundational skills instruction. Materials include a defined sequence and explicit instruction for all 26 uppercase and lowercase letters and includes both whole group and independent activities for students to identify, locate and name all 26 letters. Materials include explicit instructional support for general concepts of print and provide a variety of physical books for student practice. Materials include explicit instruction and student practice in phonological awareness and include multimodal and multisensory approaches for student practice. Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters in writing tasks; however, on some Student Skills Pages, students write the word that completes each sentence, but the students choose from a set of words and are not encoding the word on their own. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to read high-frequency words in context; however, there is very limited practice, if any, for writing high-frequency words in context. Materials include explicit instruction of word analysis strategies and some opportunities for explicit instruction and practice of word solving strategies to decode unfamiliar words. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding of decodable books.

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Standards and Research-Based Practices

0
28
50
58
52
50-58
Meets Expectations
29-49
Partially Meets Expectations
0-28
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment

0
24
44
50
38
44-50
Meets Expectations
25-43
Partially Meets Expectations
0-24
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Alignment to Standards and Research-Based Practices for Foundational Skills Instruction

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Open Court Reading Foundational Skills Kits for Kindergarten meet the expectations for alignment to standards and research-based practices for foundational skills instruction. Materials include a defined sequence and explicit instruction for all 26 uppercase and lowercase letters and includes both whole group and independent activities for students to identify, locate and name all 26 letters. Materials include explicit instructional support for general concepts of print and provide a variety of physical books for student practice. Materials include explicit instruction and student practice in phonological awareness and include multimodal and multisensory approaches for student practice. Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters in writing tasks; however, on some Student Skills Pages, students write the word that completes each sentence, but the students choose from a set of words and are not encoding the word on their own. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to read high-frequency words in context; however, there is very limited practice, if any, for writing high-frequency words in context. Materials include explicit instruction of word analysis strategies and some opportunities for explicit instruction and practice of word solving strategies to decode unfamiliar words. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding of decodable books.  Materials provide a limited purpose for reading primarily through a picture walk and prediction before reading; however, the materials contain no explicit directions for the teacher to model how to engage a text to emphasize reading for a purpose.

Criterion 1a - 1b

Materials and instruction provide embedded support with general concepts of print, and systematic and explicit instruction and practice for letter recognition.
10/10
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials include a defined sequence and explicit instruction for all 26 uppercase and lowercase letters and includes both whole group and independent activities for students to identify, locate and name all 26 letters. Student practice during Daily Warm Ups, Student Skill Practice Pages, The Alphabet Book, and a daily Secret Pass letter which is used as a way to reinforce recognition of a particular letter. Materials include clear directions and modeling of all 26 letters, including the teacher stating the strokes of the letters while demonstrating proper letter formation. Materials include explicit instructional support for general concepts of print and provide a variety of physical books for student practice. 

Indicator 1a

Letter Identification

Indicator 1a.i

Materials provide explicit instruction for letter identification of all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase) (K).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials provide explicit instruction for letter identification of all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase). (K)

Open Court Reading (OCR) Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, provides instruction for all 26 uppercase and lowercase letters. Letter identification is explicitly taught in the Unit 1, Getting Started section, and continues in the Alphabetic Knowledge and Alphabetic Principle sections of Units 1 - 9, but is explicitly taught in Unit 1. Unit 1, including the Getting Started days, is completed in 25 days.

  • Materials contain isolated, systematic and explicit instruction for all 26 letters (recognize and name uppercase and lowercase) 

    • Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet

      • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Course Map, provides the sequence of letters. All 26 letters are initially presented in Unit 1. Initial identification lessons teach two to three letters in one lesson.

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher displays the Aa and Bb sound cards. The lesson progresses from identifying uppercase and lowercase letters in student names, identifying differences in shapes between the uppercase and lowercase letter, and finding uppercase and lowercase letters Aa and Bb in an alphabet book.

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 4, the teacher displays the Xx. Yy, and Zz sound cards. The lesson progresses from identifying uppercase and lowercase letters on the card, writing words on the board and having students identify the capital and lowercase letters, to students responding when they see an Xx, Yy, or Zz in the corresponding alphabet book text. 

  • There is a defined sequence for letter instruction to be completed in a reasonable time frame over the school year. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Course Map, provides the sequence of instruction for letter names. All 26 letters are initially presented in Unit 1 in alphabetic order. Initial identification lessons teach two to three letters in one lesson. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Scope and Sequence for Sound and Spelling Introduction shows that letter instruction continues throughout Grade K in regard to the different positions the letter can be found in words. This can be found in the Alphabetic Knowledge section of Unit 1 and Unit 2 and then Alphabetic Principle section of Unit 3-Unit 9.

Indicator 1a.ii

Materials engage students in sufficient practice of letter identification.(K)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials engage students in sufficient practice of letter identification.

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K includes both whole group and independent activities for students to identify, locate and name all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase). During Warm Up, students identify letters on the Alphabet Sound Card and then look around the room to find labeled items that begin with their letter. There are Student Skill Practice pages for students to locate the letters of the day from the day’s learning. Students use The Alphabet Book to locate letters being taught for that day’s learning.

  • Materials provide students with frequent opportunities to engage in practice identifying all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 1, Warm Up, Find the Words and Letters, the teacher assigns each student a letter and has the student identify their letter on the Alphabet Sound Card. Students look for and identify their letter on various classroom items. The teacher repeats the sequence for all letters Aa-Mm.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson1, Day 1, Warm Up, The Alphabet, the teacher tells the student to name the letters as the teacher points to the card. The teacher repeats the sequence for all letters Nn-Zz.

  • Materials provide opportunities to engage in practice locating all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 4, Alphabetic Knowledge, Alphabet Book H, Skills Practice, students identify Gg by coloring them all one color and Hh by coloring them all a different color on a page full of boxes and letters.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 5, Warm Up, The Alphabet, students look for labels in the classroom that contain the letters Gg or Hh.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 4, Alphabetic Knowledge, Alphabet Book P, Skills Practice, students find and circle the letters Oo and Pp.

  • Materials provide opportunities to engage in naming all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

    • In Unit 1, Lesson1, Day 1, Warm Up, The Alphabet, the teacher tells the students to name letters as the teacher points to the card.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, Warm Up, Letter Recognition, the teacher points to a letter on an Alphabet Sound Card, and students name the letter and stand up if it is an uppercase letter and sit down if it is a lowercase letter.

Indicator 1a.iii

Materials embed letter identification practice in meaningful print use.(K)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials embed letter identification practice in meaningful print use.

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, provides students with frequent opportunities to engage in practice identifying all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase). The letter names are initially taught in Unit 1, Getting Started Unit. In Unit 1, students practice identifying letters by name. Student practice continues during Daily Warm Ups, Student Skill Practice Pages, The Alphabet Book, and a daily Secret Pass letter used as a way to reinforce recognition of a particular letter.

  • Materials provide students with frequent opportunities to engage in practice identifying all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 2, Alphabetic Knowledge, Letter Names-Ss, Tt, and Uu, the lesson includes two sets of Letter Cards: one set with uppercase letters A through T and the other with the lowercase letters a through t. Each student is given one card with an uppercase letter. The teacher holds up a lowercase card in random order. The student who is holding a card with the matching uppercase letter stands and says the letter's name. This is continued until all letters have been identified, presenting lowercase t card last. The Alphabet Sound Cards Ss and Tt are shown, and students identify the upper- and lowercase letters, repeating the names aloud with the teacher.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 5, Alphabetic Knowledge, Reviewing Letter Names-Aa-Zz, students work with partners to play the Ordering Letters game, Qq through Zz. Each student is given a set of Letter Cards Qq through Zz. The teacher reminds students that they should arrange their cards, so that they show either all uppercase letters or all lowercase letters and that they should then give the set to their partner to check. Partners work together to match uppercase letters with lowercase letters. The students then read the letter names in order.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 1, Alphabetic Knowledge, How the Alphabet works, Letter Order Make a Word, students receive letter cards with one of the letters Ss, Mm, Tt, Pp. Students arrange themselves in letter order of the word written on the board. Students then spell the word orally using knowledge of the letters.

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, Day 3, Alphabet Book V, the teacher points to the title letters Vv and has the students say and name each of the letters, uppercase V and lowercase v.

  • Materials provide opportunities to engage in practice locating all 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 3, Alphabetic Knowledge, Letter Names - Mm and Nn. As part of the lesson, volunteers point to the uppercase M or the lowercase m on classroom labels, signs, or students’ Name Necklaces. The activity continues in the same way for uppercase N and lowercase n.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 2, Alphabetic Knowledge, Letter Names - Ss, Tt, and Uu, Alphabet Book-Ss, a rhyme is read aloud as the teacher points to each word. This is repeated but this time, the students say “stop!” when the teacher touches a word that begins with s.

Indicator 1a.iv

Materials provide explicit instruction to print and to practice forming the 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).(K-1)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials provide explicit instruction to print and to practice the 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K includes clear directions and modeling of all 26 letters, including the teacher stating the strokes of the letters while demonstrating proper letter formation. Students have opportunities to practice writing all uppercase and lowercase letters, and students use multimodal methods during instruction.

  • Materials include clear directions for the teacher concerning how to explain and model how to correctly form each of the 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters

      • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Penmanship, has a Penmanship/Handwriting document which shows hand and paper positioning. The document provides both ball-and-stick and continuous stroke penmanship models with formation instructions for all uppercase and lowercase letters.

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Penmanship, there is a video clip demonstrating how to form letters in the ball-and-stick model for each uppercase and lowercase letter. The videos do not include voice directions, only visuals. 

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher reviews how to form the capital S by demonstrating, saying how to form the strokes, and having students practice writing the capital S on a paper or a board. The process is repeated for the lowercase s.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 1, the teacher models how to form the uppercase I by demonstrating, saying how to form the strokes, repeating the letter name, and having students practice writing the capital I on a paper or a board. The process is repeated for the lowercase i.

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, penmanship/handwriting activity, the teacher reviews how to form an uppercase and lowercase j and the students practice writing a row of uppercase Js and a row of lowercase js on their paper. 

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 1, penmanship/handwriting activity, the teacher reviews how to form an uppercase and lowercase w, and the students practice writing a row of uppercase Ws and a row of lowercase ws on their paper. 

  • Materials include frequent opportunities for students to practice forming all of the 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase)

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher leads students through guided practice of writing the uppercase and lowercase letter Ss on paper, circling their best formation. The lesson progresses to writing the uppercase and lowercase letter Ss underneath pictures that begin with the /s/ sound.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 2, guided practice, the teacher guides students in skills practice of naming each picture on the worksheet and writing the letter d in the correct location, either at the beginning or end of the word.

  • Materials include frequent opportunities for students to practice forming letters using multimodal and/or multisensory methods. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 2 to introduce sounds and letters. The teacher writes the letter Jj on the board and asks the students to make the letter in the air while the teacher writes it. Teacher writes the letter, and says, "Start here, and draw a short horizontal line across the top. Then go back, and draw a vertical line straight down.”

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 2 to introduce sounds and letters. The teacher writes the letter Ww on the board and asks the students to make the letter in the air while the teacher writes it.

Indicator 1b

Materials provide instructional support for general concepts of print and connect learning of print concepts to books (K-1) and provide cumulative review of print concepts, letter identification, and printing letters. (K-early Grade 1)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials provide instructional support for general concepts of print and connect learning of print concepts to books (K-1) and provide cumulative review of print concepts, letter identification, and printing letters. (K-early Grade 1).

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, provides explicit instructional support for general concepts of print, including print carries meaning, reading left to right, and words are made of letters. The materials include a variety of physical books that are suitable for the teaching of print concepts including Big Books, Pre-Decodable Books, Core Decodable Books, and Core Pre-Decodable and Decodable Takehome books.

  • Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction for all students about the organization of print concepts (e.g., follow words left to right, spoken words correlate sequences of letters, letter spacing). 

    • Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resources, TE Routines, Routine 1, Reading a Pre-Decodable, students learn that a book is read without stopping with the teacher moving a finger beneath the words and rebuses to show the progression of print. Students follow along as the teacher reads.

      • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 2, Print and Book Awareness, Pickled Peppers: “The Mulberry Bush”, the teacher displays the Big Book, Pickled Peppers, and reads with students, accentuating the repeated words and moving their finger from left to right and top to bottom. 

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 1, Print and Book Awareness, “Peter Piper”, the teacher reads the rhyme slowly, accentuating the rhyming words and moving their finger from left to right under the words as they are read. The teacher reminds students to read from the left side of the page to the right side.

    • Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters.

      • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 3, Environmental Print, The Alphabet, the teacher explains to students that words are made of letters. The teacher points to a few of the labeled items in the classroom and names the letters used to write the words. The teacher pronounces the entire word after naming the letters, moving a hand from left to right to track the text. 

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, Alphabetic Knowledge, Letter Order: Make a Word, the teacher writes the word map on the board in large lowercase letters and says the word, map. The teacher asks students, “Do you have the first letter in the word map as your Special Letter?” The student with the Special Letter m comes up and stands in front of the m written on the board. The student holds their letter so the class can see it.. When students are in the correct order, the teacher says, “m-a-p spells map.” The students repeat spelling the word, m-a-p. The materials include a note to the teacher, “Though students have not yet attached the sound to their Special Letter, students can learn from this activity that the order of letters is very important to the spelling of words. Students will begin to understand how letters combine in a certain order to make words.” 

    • Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 5, Print and Book Awareness, Pickled Peppers, the teacher displays “Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear” and reads it aloud. The teacher draws students' attention to the rhyme's first line and points out that the line is the same as the rhyme's title. The teacher reads the line aloud, alternating pointing to the words in the title and in the first line. The teacher asks the students how many words are in the line and then has students count the words aloud as they are pointed to. The teacher points to the spaces between the words in the line and explains that in print, words are separated by spaces. The students count the number of spaces in the first line.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Lesson 1, Print and Book Awareness, Pickled Peppers, while working with familiar rhymes, the teacher reminds the students that words are separated by spaces. The teacher calls on volunteers to point first to the words, and then to the spaces before and after each word. The number of words and spaces is counted in the first line.

  • Materials include frequent and adequate lessons, tasks, and questions for all students about the organization of print concepts (e.g., follow words left to right, spoken words correlate sequences of letters, letter spacing). 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Program Overview, page 12, “Teachers use Big Books in this program to make students aware that letters can be put together to form words, words can make up a sentence, and sentences can be added together to create paragraphs. Spaces appear between words to separate them from one another. In addition, students find out that sentences have some distinguishing characteristics: capital letters appear at the beginning of each separate sentence, and each sentence ends with some sort of punctuation, depending upon the type of sentence it is. Students also learn that paragraphs are usually indented, which is how they know when a new paragraph begins.”

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 1, Warm Up, Name Necklaces, the teacher shows the student a Name Necklace and says the name, while moving a hand from left to right under the name.

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 3, Environment and Print Awareness, students point to items and places labeled in the classroom. Each label is read, tracking the print from left to right as the teacher reads.

  • Materials include a variety of physical books (teacher-guided, such as big books) that are suitable for the teaching of print concepts.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, Big Books, includes the Alphabet Book and Pickled Peppers. The Alphabet Book has a poem for each letter of the alphabet. Pickled Peppers includes 15 familiar rhymes including “Jack and Jill”, “Hickory Dickory Dock”, and “Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear”.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, Pre-Decodables, includes 14 Practice Pre-Decodable books and 14 Core Pre-Decodable Books. The books contain rebuses and words.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, Core Decodables, includes 28 Core Decodable books

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, Core Decodables, includes14 blackline masters for Core Pre-Decodable  and 28 Decodable Take Homes.

  • Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction about the organization of print concepts (e.g., follow words left to right, spoken words correlate sequences of letters, letter spacing) in the context of a book.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, Identifying and Counting Words in Spoken Sentences, the teacher draws two connected boxes on the board and tells students to listen carefully as they say a sentence made of two one-syllable words, such as, Dogs bark. Students repeat the sentence with the teacher. The teacher points to the boxes, and tells students that each box represents a word in the sentence. Students count the boxes and identify which word is in each box. This is repeated with other examples of two-word sentences, such as, Cats meow. A third box is drawn on the board, and the teacher says a three-word sentence, such as, Meg likes dogs The sentence is repeated while the teacher points to a box, left to right, as each word is said. Students identify the number of words in the sentence. Volunteers say the first, middle, and last words in the sentence. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, the teacher points to the title on the cover, and discusses how readers follow the text from top to bottom and left to right. Students turn to page 3, and the teacher asks, "What is the first word on the page?” Students point to the word. Students track the text from left to right and identify the last word on the page.

  • Materials consistently include opportunities for students to engage in authentic practice using print concepts in the context of student books.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 4, Alphabetic Principle, Alphabet Book -/m/, the teacher tells the class that when they are ready to read the rhyme, they begin reading at the top and on the left of the rhyme with the word Monkey.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 3, Print and Book Awareness, Pickled Peppers, the Table of Contents of Pickled Peppers is displayed. The teacher points to the title “The Mulberry Bush” and has a volunteer run their hand under the title from left to right, leading to the page number. Students say the page number and turn to that page. A student tracks the title from left to right.. Another volunteer points to the first word in the poem. The teacher discusses how the size of this print is smaller than the title. Students point to the last word on the page. The teacher reminds students that when we read, we read the words from top to bottom and from left to right of the page.

  • Materials contain periodic cumulative review opportunities during which the teacher reminds students about previously learned grade level print concepts, letter identification, and letter formation.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 2, Alphabetic Principle, Alphabet Book, the teacher reminds students that letters make up words and words are used to tell stories and share ideas. A volunteer points to a letter on page 18, and says its name. Another volunteer points to a word on the same page and says it aloud (with teacher help, if necessary)

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 1, Penmanship/Handwriting, the teacher reviews how to form an uppercase B using the established procedure. The teacher places a pen at the starting point on the board and asks students to place their fingers in the air. While writing the letter, the teacher says, “Start at the top, and make a vertical line. Start at the top again, and go around to the middle, then around again to the bottom. Uppercase B.” Students make the letter in the air and say the letter’s sound. 

  • Materials include students’ practice of previously learned print concepts, letter identification, and letter formation.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 4, each student gets one set of building blocks and places the blocks in front of them. The teacher says a sentence, and students push a block forward each time they hear a word. The teacher reminds them that we read print from left to right, so the first block they move should be on their left. Students are called on to say the sentence after they have moved the blocks, pointing to each block that represents each word. Students tell how many words are in each sentence. The entire class repeats the sentence as everyone points to their blocks. This is continued with other three or four-word sentences.

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 2, Alphabetic Principle, Guided Practice, students complete Skills Practice page 140 for additional practice in writing the letter Aa and identifying /ā/.

Criterion 1c - 1e

Materials emphasize explicit, systematic instruction of research-based and/or evidence-based phonological awareness.

12/12
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials include explicit instruction and student practice in all phonological awareness standards. For each unit, students have three to five practice opportunities to master skills such as substituting, phoneme blending, oral blending onset and rime, and oral segmenting. Materials include a variety of multimodal and multisensory approaches to student practice such as Elkonin boxes, e-learning activities, magnetic boards, and oral practice.

Indicator 1c

Materials have frequent opportunities for students to engage in phonological awareness activities during Kindergarten and early Grade 1.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials have daily opportunities for students to engage in phonological awareness activities through Kindergarten and early Grade 1.

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, contains phonological awareness activities consistently through each five-day instructional sequence and uses routines to introduce new concepts. Students have ample opportunity to orally practice blending onset and rimes as well as using Elkonin boxes to practice naming individual phonemes.

  • Materials include a variety of activities for phonological awareness. 

    • In Unit 1 eActivity, Lesson 1, Foundational Skills Blending, the students listen to a word and drag a red marker for each sound they hear.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonological Awareness, the teacher uses the provided lion puppet to guide students through orally blending words together. The puppet (teacher) says the first consonant sound(s) and then the ending of the word. The teacher asks students to orally blend the parts of the word (e.g.,/pl/..ay play).

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, Phonological Awareness, the teacher uses the lion puppet to say the first part of a word, and the teacher says the final sound. The teacher asks the students to orally blend both parts of the word together. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 2, Phoneme Matching: Initial Sounds use Pocket Chart Picture Cards 57—frog, 132—top, and 55—fish, the students say the name for each picture. The directions state, “Display the Pocket Chart Picture Cards in a row, and then ask a student to point to and say the names for the two pictures that begin with the same sound. Have the student hold up the two Pocket Chart Picture Cards that she or he has named. Have the class repeat the names and the sound. For the example cards, students should say frog, fish, /f/.”

  • There are frequent opportunities for students to practice phonological awareness.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Course Map, indicates that Phonological and Phonemic Awareness begins on the eleventh day of school in Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1 and continues in every lesson through the entire K level.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Unit 1-12, Unit Plan, every lesson begins with a phonological or phonemic awareness activity.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, through the menu, teachers can access the course map which shows what is taught during each day regarding skills.

Indicator 1d

Materials provide explicit instruction in phonological awareness through systematic modeling across the K-1 grade band.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials provide explicit instruction in phonological awareness through systematic modeling across the K-1 grade band.

Instructional materials provide teachers with systematic, explicit modeling for instruction in syllables, sounds, and spoken words. Teachers can access videos in the professional learning section in the menu for examples on instruction in syllables, sounds (phonemes), and spoken words called for in grade-level standards along with written examples in the Teacher Edition.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide the teacher with systematic, explicit modeling for instruction in syllables, sounds (phonemes), and spoken words. 

    • Recognize and produce rhyming words.

      • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 2, Oral Language, the teacher explains that rhyming words are words with the same sounds at the end. Materials provide examples of rhyming words, such as blue and two

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 1, the materials provide the teacher with pocket chart picture cards that rhyme including goose/juice, bee/tree, cat/hat, and the teacher displays the cards in the pocket chart and says a sentence with each rhyming pair.

    • Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 4, Phonemic Awareness, Word Part Blending, the teacher explains to students that as they learn to read and write they must learn to listen carefully to how words sound. The teacher tells them they will play a listening game. The teacher says a word in two parts and the students listen carefully and tell what the word is. Using the dinosaur puppet, the teacher says “dino...saur” “What’s the word”. Puppet: “dinosaur”.

      • In Unit 5, Day 1, Lesson 2, Warm Up, Syllable Segmentation, the teacher says a student’s name syllable by syllable and says the name again clapping out the syllables announcing the number of syllables in the name (ex. Madison- Mad...i...son - three, Jacob-Ja...cob, two. 

    • Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonological Awareness, Orally Blend Onset and Rime, the teacher uses the Lion Puppet to tell students he wants to play a new blending game. Materials explain the game, “you will say the beginning of a word and the puppet will say the end. Tell students to listen carefully because sometimes the first part of the word will only be one sound. Teacher /s/, Puppet - ad. “What’s the word? Everyone- sad. Do this with the list of words provided.”

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 1, Phonemic Awareness, Oral Segmenting Onset and Rime, using the Lion Puppet, the teacher tells the students that they are going to play a new game. The materials explain that the puppet(teacher) will say a word, and the students will repeat the word. The teacher says the first part of the word and the students repeat the first part. Then the teacher says the last part of the word and the students repeat the last part.

        • Teacher/ Puppet:The word is sack

        • Everyone: sack

        • Teacher: The first part of the word is /s/

        • Everyone: /s/

        • Teacher: The last part of the word is ack

        • Everyone: ack. The teacher then uses the puppet to model and change the first part of the word and the students repeat the new word. 

    • Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonemic Awareness, Phoneme Matching/ Initial Sounds, the teacher tells the students they are going to play a game in which they try to find two words that begin with the same sound. “Explain that you want them to listen closely as you say pairs of words and to give a thumbs-up signal if a pair of words begin with the same sound and the thumbs-down signal if the words do not begin with the same sound. Then they should say the beginning sound if it is the same. Try these word pairs: happy, hurry /h/.”

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, Day 1. Phonemic Awareness, Phoneme Segmentation- Final Sounds, the teacher says three words: laugh, half, proof. The teacher tells the students that these words end with the same /f/ sound. The teacher says the words again, stretching out the final sound. 

      • In Unit 8, Lesson 2, Day 2, Phonemic Awareness Phoneme Segmentation, the teacher is instructed to tape Pocket Chart Picture Card 58 (picture of a gate) onto the board. Materials state, “Beneath the picture, draw three connected boxes. Have ready several sticky notes. Point to each box, from left to right, and tell students each box stands for a sound in the word. Use the following procedure to isolate and pronounce each sound in the word: 

        • Teacher: What is the name of the picture?

        • Everyone: gate 

        • Teacher: What is the first sound you hear in the word gate?

        • Everyone: /g/. Place a sticky note in the first box as everyone says /g/. Continue the procedure guiding students to isolate and pronounce the medial vowel and final consonant sounds.”

    • Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.

      • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonemic Awareness Phoneme Substitution: Initial Sounds,the materials state that the Lion Puppet(Teacher) tells the students he wants to teach them something new. The puppet/teacher will say a word and a new beginning sound and he wants them to use the sound to make a new word from the old one. “Say the word hill. Have students repeat the word hill. Then say /m/, and ask students what word they make when they replace the first sound in hill with /m/. mill Continue changing the initial phonemes to /s/ and /p/, sill, and pill.”

      • In Unit 10, Lesson 2, Day 5, Phonemic Awareness Phoneme Addition: Internal Sounds,the materials state that the Lion Puppet (Teacher)tells students he wants to play a new game. He explains that for this game, students will add a sound to a word to make a new word. The lion/teacher says a word, and students repeat the word. The lion/teacher says a sound and tells where he wants the sound to be added to the word. Then, everyone says the new word.

  • Materials provide the teacher with examples for instruction in syllables, sounds (phonemes), and spoken words called for in grade-level standards.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, through the menu, teachers have access to professional learning videos about phonological/phonemic awareness, phoneme manipulation, and medial sound. Teachers can watch a teacher utilizing the Lion Puppet with students to complete a section of the lesson.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, provides examples of each of the phonological/phonemic awareness lessons.

Indicator 1e

Materials provide practice of each newly taught sound (phoneme) and sound pattern across the K-1 band.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials provide practice of each newly taught sound (phoneme) and sound pattern across the K-1 band. 

Instructional materials include ample opportunities for students to practice each new sound and sound pattern. For each unit, students have three to five practice opportunities to master skills such as substituting, phoneme blending, oral blending onset and rime, and oral segmenting. Materials include a variety of multimodal and multisensory approaches to student practice such as e-learning activities, magnetic boards, and oral practice.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice each new sound and sound pattern.

    • Recognize and produce rhyming words.

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Common Core Standards Correlation, there is a range of three to five opportunities per unit for student practice in Units 3-12. In Units 1-2, there are eight to twenty-six practice opportunities.

        • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 2, Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, Substituting Words in Rhymes, students practice substituting words in rhymes.

        • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 5, Warm Up, Oral Language, students practice producing rhyming words.

    • Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Common Core Standards Correlation, there is a range of two to nine opportunities per unit for student practice in Units 2-9. 

        • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 5, Phonological Awareness, Phoneme Blending: Final Sounds, students practice phoneme blending of final sounds.

        • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 2, Warm Up, Syllable Segmentation, the teacher says a word and claps the syllables. Students tell how many syllables the word has.

        • In Unit 8, Lesson 2, Day 3, Pickled Peppers is displayed and turned to Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”. Students sing the song. The teacher says the words from the song and students clap out the syllables of each word and then tell how many syllables they heard. The class says the words again, stressing each syllable and repeating until they can blend the words smoothly.

        • In Unit 10, Lesson 2, Day 3, Warm Up, Phoneme Blending: Initial Sounds, students practice phoneme blending of initial sounds.

    • Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Common Core Standards Correlation, there is a range of one to seven opportunities per unit for student practice in Units 3-12.

        • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1-3, students practice oral blending of onset and rime.

        • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 2, the materials state that the teacher explains to the students that they will say the beginning of a word and the puppet will say the end. The teacher repeats the process for ten single-syllable words and has the students blend the onset and rime and say the whole word.

    • Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Common Core Standards Correlation, there is a range of three to five opportunities per unit for student practice in Units 3-12. The range in Units 1-2 is eight to twenty-six practice opportunities.

        • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 2, Phonemic Awareness, Phoneme Matching: Initial Sounds, students practice phoneme segmentation of blending of initial sounds.

        • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 4, Phonemic Awareness, Phoneme Segmentation: Final Sounds, students practice phoneme segmentation of blending of final sounds.

        • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher draws boxes beneath picture cards, one box for each sound.  The teacher has the students “name the picture, and then pronounce the isolated initial, medial vowel, and final sounds” in three-phoneme words/pictures.

    • Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.

      • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Common Core Standards Correlation, there is a range of seven to twenty opportunities per unit for student practice in Units 9-12. 

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 2, Warm Up, Phoneme Manipulation: Initial Sounds, students practice phoneme manipulation of initial sounds.

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, Day 5, Phonemic Awareness, Phoneme Manipulation: Final Sounds, students practice phoneme manipulation of final sounds.

      • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Day 1, Warm Up, the teacher uses the lion puppet to substitute medial vowel sounds by modeling with switching the /a/ in bake to /e/ and asks the students to substitute the medial vowel sound in four additional long vowels, single-syllable words. 

  • Materials include a variety of multimodal/multisensory activities for student practice of phonological awareness. 

    • In Unit 1, eActivity Lesson 1, Foundational Skills, Blending, this interactive activity provides the student with the practice of how to use markers to represent sounds to then prepare for blending.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 4, the teacher leads students through pushing a block forward for each sound they hear in the word mad, starting on the left. The teacher asks the students to say the sounds in the word sound by sound and blend the word. The teacher continues having students practice with five additional three-phoneme words.

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, Day 1, Phonemic Awareness, Phoneme Segmentation, students use magnetic boards with a grid. Students move counters to spaces on the grid to represent each phoneme in a given word.

Criterion 1f - 1j

Materials emphasize explicit, systematic instruction of research-based and/or evidence-based phonics.

18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. Materials include explicit instructional routines for Sound-by-Sound Blending, Word Building, Whole-Word Blending, and Blending Sentences which are used frequently throughout the unit lessons. Materials include lessons that provide students with frequent opportunities to decode phonetically spelled words, read complete words, and review previously taught grade-level phonics daily through word-building routines, phoneme blending activities, and oral language warm-ups. Students have frequent opportunities to decode words in sentences through materials in the ePresentation resources, PreDecodables, Core Decodables, Practice Decodables, and through student Skills Practice Pages. Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to build, manipulate, spell, and encode newly taught sound and spelling patterns. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters in writing tasks; however, on some Student Skills Pages, students write the word that completes each sentence, but the students choose from a set of words and are not encoding the word on their own.

Indicator 1f

Materials emphasize explicit phonics instruction through systematic and repeated modeling.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials emphasize explicit phonics instruction through systematic and repeated modeling.

Materials include explicit instructional routines for Sound-by-Sound Blending, Word Building, Whole-Word Blending, and Blending Sentences which are used frequently throughout the unit lessons. Sound/Letter cards are used for many activities. Additionally, routines are consistent for the introduction of each new sound pattern and students have the opportunity to hear, say, encode, and read each pattern within the same lesson.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards.

    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1 the teacher introduces the sound of s, explicitly stating “the sound of the letter sS is /s/. The word sausages starts with /s/.” The teacher continues the lesson by pointing to the alphabet card and saying /s/ repeatedly.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 3, the teacher introduces the sound of m, explicitly stating “the sound of the letter Mm is /m/. The word monkey starts with /m/” and points to the letter card Mm, repeatedly saying the sound /m/. 

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, Day 4, Alphabetic Principle, Listening for /kw/, each student gets Letter Card Qq. Students say /kw/ as they take their cards. The teacher says a word and students listen for /kw/ in the word. If they hear /kw/, they hold up the Qq card when given the signal. Words include quit, quake, package, carrot, lotion, queen, mission, quill, quaint, watch, quintet, quick.

    • Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 4, Alphabetic Principle, Alphabet Sound Card Short /i/ is displayed. Students tell what they remember about Giggles the Pig. The teacher plays the sound, then the story. Students join in with “/i/ /i/ /i/ /i/ /i/.” 

      • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher introduces blending long /a/ words that are spelled a_e. The teacher writes the word cap and guides students to blend the word. The teacher writes the word cape and asks students to blend the word, explicitly underscoring the a_e pattern in the word cape.

      • In Unit 8, Lesson 2, Day 5, the teacher introduces blending long /i/ words spelled i_e. The teacher writes the word hid and guides students to blend the word. The teacher writes the word hide and asks students to blend the word, explicitly underscoring the i_e pattern in the word hide.

      • In Unit 12, Lesson 2, Day 5, Phonics, the teacher uses Routine 6, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Routine 7, the Sentence Blending Routine, for this activity. Before working with the word lines, the teacher points to Alphabet Sound Cards Long Aa, Short Ee, Long Ee, Short Uu, Bb, Gg, Ll, Nn, Pp, Rr, Ss, Tt, Vv, and Ww and reviews the sound and the letter for each card. Students then blend these words and one sentence: beg, best, Steve, even, gave, brave, rewet, and replug; He gave Steve his best.

    • Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 3, Alphabetic Principle, Blending, the students blend the word land using the sound-by-sound blending routine. Then, they change the l to s, making the word sand. The students blend and read the new word. The teacher focuses on each sound individually before helping students to blend the sounds. 

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 3, Alphabetic Principle, Blending, the students blend the word rip using the sound-by-sound blending routine. Then, they change the r to s to make the word sip. The students blend and read the new word and use each word in a sentence to show the different meanings. This is continued with run/fun, load/road, rain/pain, night/right/, and peach/reach.

  • Lessons provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher introduces the sound of the /h/. The teacher asks students to listen for the /h/ sound in a poem read aloud, The teacher asks the students to make the sound of the /h/ several times. The lesson progresses with the teacher saying a word and asking students to hold up their Hh card if they hear the word starts with the /h/. The teacher points to a pair of words, with only one starting with the letter h, and asks students which word starts with the sound /h/ and how they know it begins with the sound /h/. The teacher guides students in a workbook page, asking students to write the letter h if the picture begins with the sound /h/. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher introduces the sound of the /j/. The teacher asks students to listen for the /j/ sound in a poem read aloud, The teacher asks the students to make the sound of the /j/ several times. The lesson progresses with the teacher saying a word and asking students to hold up their Jj card if they hear the word starts with the /j/. The teacher points to a pair of words, with only one starting with the letter j, and asks students which word starts with the sound /j/ and how they know it begins with the sound /j/. The teacher guides students in a workbook page, asking students to write the letter j if the picture begins with the sound /j/.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics, Building and Reading Words, each student is given the a, m, p, s (2), and t Letter Cards. They place all the cards in a row at the top of their desk. The teacher follows  Routine 5, the Word Building Routine, to complete this activity. The teacher says mats, and then uses it in a sentence. The students say the word and then tell the  first sound they hear in the word mats. The students check the Alphabet Sound Card and tell which letter says /m/. The teacher points to Alphabet Sound Card Mm. and has students pull down Letter Card m. The students tell what sound they hear next in mats. And then check the Alphabet Sound Card and tell which letter says /a/.  The teacher points to Alphabet Sound Card Short Aa and the  students pull down Letter Card a. The teacher uses the same procedure to have students identify the final two sounds in mats, checking the Alphabet Sound Cards, and then pulling down Letter Cards t and s. The teacher displays mats and has students proofread their word, correcting their spelling if necessary. 

Indicator 1g

Materials include frequent practice opportunities for students to decode words that consist of common and newly-taught sound and spelling patterns and provide opportunities for students to review previously taught phonics skills.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials include frequent practice opportunities for students to decode words that consist of common and newly taught sound and spelling patterns and provide opportunities for students to review previously taught phonics skills.

Materials include lessons that provide students with frequent opportunities to decode phonetically spelled words, read complete words, and review previously taught grade-level phonics daily through word-building routines, phoneme blending activities, and oral language warm-ups. There are numerous activities to decode words at the phoneme level and read complete words by saying the entire word as a unit using newly taught phonics skills through the use of the Whole-Word Blending Routine and Sentence-Blending routine when working with Alphabet Sound Cards, letter cards, and word lists/sentences from the ePresentation Resources. The review activities found throughout the lessons provide students an opportunity to review previously learned grade-level phonics.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to decode (phonemes, onset, and rime, and/or syllables) phonetically spelled words.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics Building and Reading Words, the teacher gives each student the a, m, p, s (2), and t Letter Cards. The teacher follows Instructional Routine 5, Word Building Routine, to complete this activity. The teacher says, “We sit on mats.” The students say the word and tell the first sound they hear in the word mats. /m/ They check the Alphabet Sound Card and tell which letter says /m/. Mm. Students then pull down Letter Card Mm and say what sound they hear next in mats. /a/ The teacher uses the same procedure to have students identify the final two sounds. 

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 5, Alphabetic Principle, Blending Words with Long Aa, the students begin blending with /ā/ written a_e. The teacher writes a_e on the board and the word cap. Students blend the word using Routine 3, the Sound-by-Sound Blending Routine /k/ /a/ /p/ . The teacher writes the letter c next to cap. Students say the letter’s sound. The teacher writes a_e, making sure to underscore the blank between the letters a and e. The class says the sound of a_e. If necessary, the teacher reminds students that a_e says /ā/. The teacher blends the sounds with students and points to the blank between a and e, and tells students we need another letter to make a word. The teacher writes p in the blank. Students say the letter’s sound /p/, and then blend the word. Students read both words on the board (cap, cape). 

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics Blending, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 6, Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Instructional Routine 7, Sentence-Blending Routine, for this activity. The teacher points to Alphabet Sound Cards Cc, Gg, Jj, Ll, Mm, Nn, Pp, Rr, Ss, Tt, and Short Uu. They review the sound and the letter for each card. Using the ePresentation Resources, the teacher displays the word run. Students sound out /r/, then /u/, then /n/ and use the blending motion to blend all three sounds, and say the word run. The teacher repeats the routine with the words jump, plug, and plus. They repeat the routine with the words just and unjust

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to read complete words by saying the entire word as a unit using newly taught phonics skills. 

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Day 1, Alphabetic Principle, Building and Reading Words, students engage in the Word Building Routine in which they read the complete word they spelled and proofread for spelling.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, Day 5, Phonics Blending, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 6, Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Instructional Routine 7, Sentence Blending Routine, for this activity. The teacher displays the word zap from the ePresentation Resources, and students sound out /z/, then /a/, then /p/. They use the blending motion to blend all three sounds, and students say the word zap. They repeat the routine with the words yap, yams, and flags. Students repeat the routing with the word size. They repeat the routine with the words nose, froze, and zone.

  • Materials contain opportunities for students to review previously learned grade-level phonics.

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher reviews the sounds of /w/ and /k/ introduced in prior lessons. Students hold up a letter card when they hear a word that begins with the sound of /w/ or /k/.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Day 2, Alphabetic Principle Reviewing the Sound of Long Uu, the teacher points to Alphabet Sound Card Long Uu and has a volunteer say the name of the letter. They remind students that vowels are special because every syllable or word needs a vowel. Students recite the rhyme for the sounds of Uu: Two sounds I use: Short /u/ in cub, Long /u/ in fuse.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Day 5, the teacher reviews the long and short /e/. Students hold up a letter card when they hear a word that contains the sound of the long or short /e/ sound. The teacher asks students to write Consonant Vowel Consonant (CVC) words that match pictures. 

  • Materials contain a variety of methods to promote students’ practice of previously taught grade-level phonics.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Sounds cards are used to review letter names and sounds. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Alphabet books are used to review letter names and sounds.

Indicator 1h

Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to practice decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials promote frequent opportunities for students to practice decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence.

Materials provide explicit, systematic practice for decoding regular words in sentences and frequent student opportunities to decode words in sentences. Student materials include pre-decodable and decodable books and routines include reading and re-reading the books to build fluency. Students have frequent opportunities to decode words in sentences through materials in the ePresentation resources, PreDecodables, Core Decodables, Practice Decodables, and through student Skills Practice Pages.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide explicit, systematic practice for decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 4 and guides students through reading a decodable book. The routine includes reminders about syllabication patterns with blending. Students read and re-read. The decodable includes the words Jim, grab, jam, pot, flip, among other decodable words read in complete sentences. 

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 2, Day 5, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 4 and guides students through reading a decodable book. The routine includes reminders about syllabication patterns with blending. Students read multiple times. The decodable includes the words cab, flat, get, gas, van among other decodable words read in complete sentences. 

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 3, Phonics Blending, the teacher uses Routine 6, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Routine 7, the Sentence Blending Routine, for this activity. The teacher displays the blending sentence, and students read the words cakes and case, using whole-word blending if necessary. The teacher points to the high-frequency word the. Students read the word and then spell the together. Students point to the other word the in the sentence. They repeat the procedure to identify the high-frequency words are and in. After all the words have been blended or read, students reread the sentence naturally.

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to decode words in a sentence.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Instructional Routine 4, Reading a Decodable Routine, students read a page silently and then read the page aloud. Students apply their knowledge of spelling and syllabication patterns to blend decodable words. They refer to the Alphabet Sound Cards as necessary. They repeat this procedure for each page. After this reading, students respond to the story, by discussing unfamiliar words. retelling the story and responding to questions by pointing to the answers in the text.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 3, Day 5, Reading the Decodable, students browse through the books and look at the illustrations, commenting on what they see and making predictions about the story. The teacher uses Instructional Routine 4, the Reading a Decodable Routine, for the remainder of the procedure for reading the decodable book.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 2, Guided Practice, the students complete Skills Practice for additional practice in blending and writing words. They read aloud each sentence, and students blend each word as much as necessary. Students write the word on the line before moving on to the next word.

Indicator 1i

Materials include frequent practice opportunities for students to build/manipulate/spell and encode grade-level phonics, including common and newly-taught sound and sound patterns.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials include daily practice opportunities for students to build/manipulate/spell and encode grade-level phonics, including common and newly-taught sound and sound patterns.

The materials provide teacher-level modeling using structured and repeated routines. Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to build, manipulate, spell, and encode newly taught sound and spelling patterns. Students use letter cards to build words and write letters and words on workbook pages. Students engage in frequent opportunities to encode words in isolation through word-building routines.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • The materials contain teacher-level instruction/modeling for building/manipulating/spelling and encoding words using common and newly taught sound and spelling patterns of phonics.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Day 1, the teacher’s materials guide the teacher in modeling how to build a word. The teacher gives the students letter cards and uses the Word Building Routine to model how to sound out and spell the word cap.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher uses the Word Building Routine. The materials include a video demonstrating how to use the Word Building Routine and how to organize materials for the instruction. Materials provide explicit instruction for the teacher to say the word mats, use it in a sentence, ask the student to find the sound card, and build the word. The teacher then writes the word and asks students to check their spelling. 

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 2, Day 2, Phonics, Building, and Reading Words, the teacher says each sound of the word. Students point to the Alphabet Card that corresponds with the sound and then pull the cards next to each other to spell the words stone, notes, nose, and tones.

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to build/manipulate/spell and encode words in isolation based on common and newly taught phonics patterns.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Day 1, the teacher gives the students individual letter cards and uses the Word Building Routine for the students to build the words cap and cape

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher gives the students individual letter cards and uses the Word Building Routine for the students to build the words: mats, maps, taps, pats, and stamps

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 2, Day 3, Alphabetic Principle, Building and Reading Words, students engage in the Word Building Routine in which they use Alphabet Sound Cards to spell the words moles, mold, told, and lone.

Indicator 1j

Materials provide application and encoding of phonics in activities and tasks. (mid K-Grade 2)
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials promote application and encoding of phonics in activities and tasks. (mid K-Grade 2)

The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters in writing tasks. The teacher models how to form the letter, reviews the Alphabet Sound Card, and the sound the letter makes. The teacher references and reminds students to use the Alphabet Sound Cards when writing words and thinking through the letter/sound correspondence. Students have frequent activities that apply phonics as they encode words into sentences or phrases through penmanship/handwriting and Student Skills Pages at the letter/sound level. On some Student Skills Pages, students write the word that completes each sentence, but the students choose from a set of words and are not encoding the word on their own.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of teacher modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters and words in writing tasks. 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, penmanship and handwriting, Review how to form a capital or uppercase, S using the established procedure: The teacher places their pen or chalk at the starting point on the board, and tells students to place their fingers in the air. As they write the letter, say, “Begin here. Then curve to the left, curve to the right, and curve to the left again. Uppercase S.” They repeat the steps for lowercase s. The teacher reminds students that the letter Ss makes /s/. They display the Alphabet Sound Card Ss, review its name and letter, and have students say its sound aloud. /s/ /s/ /s/ /s/ /s/ /s/.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 3, Day 5, the teacher reminds students that when they are writing words on their own, they should say the word to themselves, think about the sounds in words, and then write the letters. They should always check the Alphabet Sound Cards if they are unsure of the letter for a sound.

  • Lessons provide students with limited activities and tasks to promote application of phonics as they encode words in sentences or in phrases based on common and newly taught phonics patterns.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 5, Guided Practice, students complete Skills Practice pages for additional practice writing the letters h and t and identifying initial /h/ and /t/. Some of the items shown in the pictures begin with /h/ and some begin with /t/. The teacher names each picture and asks students if it begins with /h/ or /t/. They write an h or a t to complete each word. This is only a partial encoding activity and does not include sentences or phrases

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Day 2, Phonics, Guided Practice, the teacher guides students in completing Skills Practice page for additional practice blending and writing words. The teacher says, “Listen as I read each sentence. Look at the picture. Blend and read each word. Circle the best word to fill the blank and then write the word on the line.” This is only a partial encoding activity and does not include sentences or phrases.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 2, Day 3, students complete Skills Practice page for additional practice in blending and writing words. The teacher reads aloud each sentence. Then students blend and read each word to the right of the sentences. Finally, students write the word that completes each sentence before moving on to the next word. This is only a partial encoding activity.

Criterion 1k - 1m

Materials and instruction support students in learning and practicing regularly and irregularly spelled high-frequency words.
6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide systematic instruction of high-frequency words with words introduced throughout the year. Although there are frequent opportunities for students to read the high-frequency words, and many instances of teachers modeling the reading of the words, there are not frequent opportunities for the teacher to model spelling for the students. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to read high-frequency words in context; however, there is very limited practice, if any, for writing high-frequency words in context. Materials include explicit instruction of word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition) and some opportunities for explicit instruction and practice of word solving strategies (e.g., whole-word blending) to decode unfamiliar words.

Indicator 1k

Materials include systematic instruction of high-frequency words and opportunities to practice reading of high-frequency words to develop automaticity.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials include systematic instruction of high-frequency words and practice opportunities of high-frequency words to develop automaticity.

Materials provide systematic instruction of high-frequency words with words introduced throughout the year. Although there are frequent opportunities for students to read the high-frequency words, and many instances of teachers modeling the reading of the words, there are not frequent opportunities for the teacher to model spelling for the students. In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, teachers do not model the spelling as part of introducing high-frequency words. Students spell a high-frequency word with the teacher if it is in the sentence they are reading during Phonics Blending and Sentence Extension, and they spell by typing them in during eActivities.There are sufficient high-frequency words in the Kindergarten materials.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials include systematic and explicit instruction of high-frequency words.

    • Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does).

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 4, the teacher introduces the sight word the. The teacher writes the on the board, points to it, says the, and asks students to say the word the. The teacher uses the word in a sentence and points to it again, asking students to read the word the. The teacher asks the students to find the word the in environmental print around the room. The lesson progresses to the teacher guiding students to read the decodable book “The Lunch”, which focuses on the sight word the.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading a Pre-Decodable, Core Pre-Decodable 7: “The Zoo”, the teacher writes the high-frequency word had on the board. The teacher points to the word and says it. Then students say it with the teacher. Students are told that the word had can be used to describe what someone or something owned. Students use had in a sentence. For review, the class reads each high-frequency word in the Word Bank, and students select one to use in a complete sentence.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 5, the teacher introduces the word of. The teacher writes the word of on the board, points to it, says of, and asks students to say the word of. The lesson progresses to the teacher guiding students to read the decodable book “We Carry”, which includes the previous high-frequency word the and also includes the word of

  • Materials include limited opportunities for the teacher to model the spelling and reading of high-frequency words in isolation.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher writes the high-frequency word for on the board and reads it. Similarly, in Unit 7, Lesson 3, Day 5, the teacher writes the high-frequency words was and were on the board and reads them. The teacher is modeling the reading of the words but is not modeling the spelling in instances like these.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher points to the word we and asks the students to “spell we together.” The teacher repeats the process for the word and

    • In Unit 12, eActivity: Lesson 2, Foundational skills, students read, spell, and type high-frequency words. How to spell and type the word is modeled in the eActivity.

  • Students practice identifying and reading high-frequency words in isolation.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 4, Reading a Pre-Decodable, High-Frequency Word: he, the teacher writes the word he on the board and reads it aloud. Students say it with the teacher and then say it again independently. Later in the lesson, the teacher is directed to review, by reading each high-frequency word listed in the Word Bank, including the newly added he. The high-frequency words are also listed on the inside back cover of Core Pre-Decodable 8. 

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 2, Day 5, the teacher points to individual high-frequency words in a poem and asks students to read each word. The teacher points to the words little, boy, the, in, is, a, you him, I, for, if, do and to. The teacher points to individual words in a word bank and asks students to read the words is, on, a, the, with, at, go, you, and, was, can, and up. The teacher pulls high-frequency word flashcards from a bag and has the students read the individual words a, and, at, can, go, is, on, the, up, was, with, and you.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher reviews the high-frequency words as, some, were, then, but, a, can, at, in, he, and and. The teacher writes each word on the board and asks students to read each word individually.

  • Materials include a sufficient quantity of grade-appropriate high-frequency words for students to make reading progress 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Appendix, page 21, High-Frequency Word Lists, Section 4, lists 50 high-frequency words for Kindergarten.

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Day 5, the class reviews high-frequency words little, to, did, said, all, do, of, we, am I, a, and, at, on,and  go, taught in previous lessons.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 2, Day 5, the class reviews high-frequency words be, what, a, am, of, can, I, he, have, do, them, and on, taught in previous lessons.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide frequent practice opportunities to read and write high-frequency words in context (sentences).
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials provide frequent practice opportunities to read and write high-frequency words in context (sentences).

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read high-frequency words in Pre-Decodables and Decodables, from the Word Bank, flashcards, in some blending word lists and sentences, written on the board, within the environment, and eGames. There are references that a list of high-frequency words is located on the inside back cover of each decodable, but this was not noted in the eBooks for teachers or students. There is very limited practice, if any, for writing high-frequency words in context. There is no evidence of students writing on paper or whiteboards.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Lessons provide students with opportunities to read grade-level high frequency words in a sentence.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading a Pre-Decodable, Checking Comprehension, the teacher displays the High-Frequency Flash Card for had. Students find and point to the high-frequency word had in the story. Students review the other high-frequency words a, the, and, and go. Students find and point to any of these high-frequency words in the story. 

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 2, Day 1, Phonics Blending and Sentence Extension, the teacher displays the sentence. They point to the words win and hit and students read the words, blending again if necessary. The teacher points to the high-frequency word We. Students read the word and then spell we together. They repeat the procedure with the high-frequency words can, with, and a. After all the words have been blended or read, students reread the sentence naturally, saying it with expression and natural intonation.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 5, Warm Up High-Frequency Word Review, the teacher holds up the High-Frequency Flash Card of and has students read the word. Another volunteer finds the high-frequency word of in the rhyme, “Peter Piper”, and touches the High-Frequency Flash Card of to the word in the rhyme. A few volunteers use the word of in complete sentences. The activity is repeated with the rhyme “Little Boy Blue” using the High Frequency Flash Card boy.

  • Lessons provide students with limited opportunities to write grade level high frequency words in tasks (such as sentences) in order to promote automaticity in writing grade appropriate high-frequency words.

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 2, Day 1, students practice writing the number word two in isolation. In Unit 9, Lesson 2, Day 3, students practice writing the number word nine in isolation. These opportunities occur infrequently in the Grade K materials.

    • In Unit 12, eActivity: Lesson 2, Day 4, Foundational skills, students read, spell, and type high frequency words in isolation. If the student is using a tablet or interactive whiteboard, they write the letters with their finger. How to spell and type the word is modeled in the eActivity.

  • Materials provide explicit instruction in how to use student-friendly reference materials and resources and reading high-frequency words (e.g., word cards, word lists, word ladders, student dictionaries).

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 2, Teacher Tip: Create a Word Bank of the high frequency words to which students are introduced, when a Pre-Decodable introduces a new word, the teacher adds it to the Word Bank; and students read all the words in the bank. The inside back cover of each decodable book also contains a list of high-frequency words that students have learned so far. However, the word lists are not present in either teacher or student eBooks.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 5, students review the high frequency words introduced in previous lessons. Students read each high frequency word in the Word Bank or the list on the inside back cover of Core Decodable 8. 

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 5, Teacher Tip, Word Bank, the teacher adds the words look and with to the high-frequency Word Bank. Volunteers read each of the words in the Word Bank, including the new additions look and with.

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Day 5, Warm Up, High-Frequency Word Review, the teacher displays the rhyme “Jack and Jill” and points to the high-frequency words. Students read and, up, the, to, a, of, down, his. The teacher distributes High-Frequency Flash Cards to pairs of students and has each pair walk around the room to find the words in print, looking at signs, calendars, posters, and bulletin board notes.

Indicator 1m

Materials explicitly teach word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition, syllabication, morpheme analysis) based on the requirements of the standards and provide students with frequent practice opportunities to apply word analysis strategies.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials explicitly teach word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition, syllabication, morpheme analysis) based on the requirements of the standards and provide frequent practice opportunities for students to apply word analysis strategies.

Materials include explicit instruction of word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition) and some opportunities for explicit instruction and practice of word solving strategies (e.g., whole-word blending) to decode unfamiliar words. When the teacher uses the Whole-Word Blending and Blending Sentences Routine, students complete the decoding of unfamiliar words without the teacher modeling prior.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials contain frequent explicit instruction of word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition, syllabication, morpheme analysis).

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 2, Alphabetic Principle, Alphabet Book, the teacher points to the letters Ww and has students say the name of each letter. Also, the teacher calls students’ attention to the book to point to words that have the letters Ww such as Walruses, Wildcats, and woof.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics Building and Reading Words, the teacher gives each student the a, m, p, s (2), and t Letter Cards. They place all the cards in a row at the top of their desk or table. The teacher follows Routine 5, the Word Building Routine, to complete this activity. The teacher says mats, and then uses it in a sentence. Students say the word. The teacher asks students each sound they hear in the word mats. /m/ Students proofread their words, correcting their spelling if necessary. Students repeat the process with the words maps, taps, pats, and stamps.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics, Blending, the teacher points to Alphabet Sound Cards for Cc, Gg, Jj, Ll, Mm, Nn, Pp, Rr, Ss, Tt, and short Uu. The teacher reviews the sound and letter for each card.

  • Materials contain explicit instruction of word solving strategies to decode unfamiliar words.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Scope and Sequence at the beginning of Units 10-12 Teacher Edition, the materials highlight phonics in each day’s activities, blending letters to read words and sentences from the ePresentation Resources.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, resources, Routine 5, Word Building Routine; Routine 6, Whole-Word Blending Routine; and Routine 7, Sentence-Blending Routine are utilized frequently when decoding.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 5, Phonics, Blending, students engage in the Whole-Word Blending Routine to analyze the graphemes in the following words: hum, coups, squid, and humid. The directions state, “Display the word hum. Have students sound out /h/, then /u/, then /m/. Use the blending motion to blend all three sounds, and have students say the word hum.”

  • Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis strategies.

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 2, Alphabetic Principle, Alphabet Book, students point to words in the book that have the letters Ww such as Walruses, Wildcats, and woof.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 1, Student Edition, Guided Practice, the students complete the Skills Practice page  for additional practice blending and writing words. The teacher reads aloud each sentence and helps students blend each word as much as necessary.

Criterion 1n - 1q

Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding in K and 1, and rate, expression, and accuracy in mid-to-late 1st and 2nd grade. Materials for 2nd grade fluency practice should vary (decodables and grade-level texts).

6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding through the use of Pre-Decodable and Decodable Books. Materials provide a limited purpose for reading primarily through a picture walk and prediction before reading; however, the materials contain no explicit directions for the teacher to model how to engage a text to emphasize reading for a purpose. 

Indicator 1n

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity in K and Grade 1.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials provide opportunities for students to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity in Kindergarten and Grade 1.

Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding through the use of Pre-Decodable and Decodable Books along with the use of the Pickled Pepper big book and Pocket Chart Word Cards. Students utilize Routine 4: Reading a Decodable when engaging in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity. The use of this routine is in Units 11 and 12 as the units before that focused on fluency and automaticity of letters, sounds, and phonological awareness skills based on the scope and sequence and kindergarten expectations.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resource Library, Reading a Decodable Routine, Reread the Decodable has partner reading, choral reading, turn-taking, which are all used to build fluency.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Sound-by-Sound Blending Routine, the teacher guides students through a process in which they spell a given word in a sentence sound-by-sound. Once the word has been spelled, the students reread the word to build fluency. Once the entire sentence has been written, the students reread the entire sentence to build fluency.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Whole-Word Blending Routine, the teacher guides students through a process in which they say the sound of each part of the word and then read the word again naturally. After the entire line of words has been decoded, the teacher directs students to reread the line to build fluency.

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Day 1, Teacher Edition, Teacher Tip, Blending, if students find the whole-word blending difficult with the new blending sentences activity, they should drop back to sound-by-sound blending until they can blend with fluency.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, Day 1, Warm Up, Reviewing Word Order, the teacher assigns the words in the top line of page 9 (the rhyme “Little Boy Blue” on pages 8–9 of Pickled Pepper) to individual students and gives them the corresponding Pocket Chart Word Card. They stand in a row, hold up their card, and repeat their words in order from left to right several times until they can do it with fluency.

  • Materials provide opportunities for students in Kindergarten to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 4, students use the whole-word blending routine for the following words: cut, nut, rut, run, and bun.

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 3, Day 2, Warm Up, Reviewing Word Order, page 20 of Pickled Peppers, “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep”, the teacher assigns the words in the first line to individual students and gives them the corresponding Pocket Chart Word Card. Students stand in a row, hold up their cards, and repeat their words in order from left to right several times until they can do it with fluency.

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 1, students use the whole-word blending routine for the following words: run, cut, jump, plug, plus, uncut, just, and unjust.

Indicator 1q

Materials provide teacher guidance to support students as they confirm or self-correct errors (Grades 1-2) and emphasize reading for purpose and understanding.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials provide teacher guidance to support students as they confirm or self-correct errors (Grade 1-2) and emphasize reading for purpose and understanding.

Materials provide a limited purpose for reading primarily through a picture walk and prediction before reading; however, the materials contain no explicit directions for the teacher to model how to engage a text to emphasize reading for a purpose. While students do discuss illustrations, make predictions, and text-to-self thinking, there is no evidence found that materials contain explicit directions and/or think-alouds for the teacher to model how to engage with a text to emphasize reading for purpose and understanding.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Some opportunities are provided over the course of the year for students to read emergent-reader texts (K) for purpose and understanding.

    • Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading a Pre-Decodable, students browse through the Pre-Decodable Book “The Zoo, and look at the illustrations, and comment on what they see to make predictions about the story. After reading the book following the Reading a Pre-Decodable Routine, the teacher leads the students in a group discussion to talk about the characters and events in the illustrations. Students connect the story to any zoo experiences they may have had. They also name other animals at a zoo and tell what they know about them.

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Pre-Decodable, students browse “Cal Can Bat” to look at illustrations to make predictions about the story. There is no purpose for reading.

      • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, students browse the decodable book, “Kim and Sam, and look at the illustrations and comment on what they see, and make predictions about what they think the story will be about. Although they do make predictions, students are not given a purpose for reading this story.

      • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Pre-Decodable, students browse “Cute Little Mule” to look at illustrations to make predictions about the story. The materials do not provide a purpose for reading.

  • Materials contain limited explicit directions and/or think-alouds for the teacher to model how to engage with a text to emphasize reading for purpose and understanding.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Routine 1 and 4 have the teacher modeling how to read (i.e.,top, bottom, right, left) and comprehend/find answers in the story.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Pre-Decodable, the directions tell the teacher to read the title, author, and illustrator while pointing to the words.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Pre-Decodable, the directions tell the teacher to explain how dashes tell the reader to pause while reading and have students point to the dashes in the story.

Gateway Two

Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The Open Court Reading Foundational Skills Kits for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for implementation, support materials, and assessment. Materials provide a Digital Teacher Edition that contains content for that day based on each skill being taught through ePresentation. The program includes a Program Overview that is comprehensive. Materials are designed to be implemented with a whole group of students according to a clear structure and include 190 days of instruction. Units are designed to be taught within a given amount of time and each lesson should take one day, however evidence was found only in an ancillary Professional Development video for the suggested pacing of an individual lesson. Materials include a researched-based scope and sequence for phonological awareness and phonics. There are multiple opportunities to assess foundational skills; however,  materials include limited instructional suggestions were noted for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Materials include differentiated suggestions as well as a photo library to support language development and comprehension of vocabulary. English Language (EL) Tips are integrated throughout the lesson at the point of use. Although the program overview indicates differentiated instruction occurs in small group settings, and differentiated instruction guides are provided in daily lessons, no mention of changing from the whole group to small group exists in the digital guide.

Criterion 2a - 2e

Materials are accompanied by a systematic, explicit, and research-based scope and sequence outlining the essential knowledge and skills that are taught in the program and the order in which they are presented. Scope and sequence should include phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, fluency, and print concepts.
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials provide a Digital Teacher Edition that contains content for that day based on each skill being taught through ePresentation. The program includes a Program Overview that is comprehensive. The materials contain a Resource Library that clearly provides adult-level definitions of each of the foundational skills and the reason that each skill is an important contributor to building fluency. Research-based reasoning is provided along with examples and a complete program overview.

Materials are designed to be implemented with a whole group of students according to a clear structure and include 190 days of instruction. Units are designed to be taught within a given amount of time and each lesson should take one day, however evidence was found only in an ancillary Professional Development video for the suggested pacing of an individual lesson.

Materials include a  research document, “Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading” which delineates a phonemic awareness sequence of instruction and practice for the expected hierarchy of phonemic awareness competence.Materials include a research report, “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading”, which provides a clear, evidence-based rationale for phonics instruction and the progression of skills. Also, the Unit Planner for each unit provides a cohesive scope and sequence for phonics instruction based on the evidence-based rationale in the research report.

Indicator 2a

Materials contain a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials contain a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The Open Court Reading (OCR) Foundational Skills Kit, Grade Kindergarten provides a Digital Teacher Edition that contains content for that day based on each skill being taught through ePresentation. The program includes a Program Overview that is comprehensive.The Teacher Edition includes additional notations for English Learners and differentiation by flipping the toggle on at the top of the digital page. There are links in the materials box and also in the individual skills to routine cards that explain the routine(s) needed for that day and the skills being taught. Also found in the Teacher Edition at the top of each day (if needed) are Show Me How videos that go over routines and information for teachers. The technology pieces to support and guide teachers do not create an additional layer of complication as they are readily available in the day’s digital page.

  • Materials provide a well-defined, teacher edition for content presentation. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, consists of twelve units that are divided into lessons and days within the lessons. Each unit contains instruction in Phonological and/or Phonemic Awareness, Alphabetic Knowledge in Units 1 and 2, Alphabetic Principle in Units 3-12, Print and Book Awareness in Units 1 and 2, and Reading Pre-Decodables and Decodables in Units 3-12. Each lesson contains at least one assessment.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, each day of the week/lesson contains a separate digital page in which the teacher can find the standards being taught, links to materials needed, objectives, along with Show Me How videos to review and gather prior to beginning that days’ lesson. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, there is a Warm Up section on Syllable Segmentation, a Phonological Awareness section for Phoneme Blending: Final Sounds, an Alphabetic Principle section for Introducing the Sound of Oo, Listening for /o/, Linking the Sound to the Letter, Penmanship/Handwriting, and Guided Practice. There are also ePresentation Resources provided.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 4, the foundational skills addressed are enumerated, along with the materials, objectives, standards, and the order of the lesson with several lessons coupled with ePresentation resources.

  • The teacher resource contains detailed information and instructional routines that help the teacher to effectively implement all foundational skills content (i.e., phonological awareness, print concepts, letters, phonics, High Frequency Words (HFW), word analysis, decoding). Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K Teacher Edition contains detailed teacher resources with information and instructional routines for each lesson are in the margins and at the top of the page to help the teacher effectively implement all foundational skills content. The Resource Library provides all routines for teacher use.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 1, the Show Me How Videos review instructional routines, such as teaching Phoneme Segmentation,needed for that lesson, and also contain a link to the Portable Document Format (PDF) of routines needed for skills/routine being taught in that lesson.

  • Any technology pieces included provide support and guidance for the teacher and do not create an additional layer of complication around the materials. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K Teacher Edition includes technology pieces that provide support and guidance for the teacher through ePresentations of professional learning, as well as opportunities provided in margin of Teacher Edition  to embed in the instruction of the lesson to support the Grade K Student Edition. These resources do not create an additional layer of complication around the materials.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, ePresentation resources are right at the point of need in the lesson based on the skill being taught and can be quickly accessed as needed.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain full, adult-level explanations and examples of the foundational skills concepts included in the program so teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials contain full, adult-level explanations and examples of the foundational skills concepts included in the program so teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition contains a Resource Library that clearly provides adult-level definitions of each of the foundational skills and the reason that each skill is an important contributor to building fluency. Research-based reasoning is provided along with examples and a complete program overview. Though the Resource Library is separate from the daily teacher planner, the planner also includes videos with brief explanations of the foundational skill and how to teach the skill. In each lesson, examples are given for the teacher to use when teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, or word analysis.

  • Complete, detailed adult-level explanations are provided for each foundational skill taught at the grade level. Evidence includes, but is not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition shows daily lessons on one digital page with drop-down boxes for each skill. Directions show how to deliver the lesson and, if appropriate, an explanation of the skill being taught. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition Resource Library includes “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading”. The 36-page guide provides definitions for print awareness, phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics, word analysis, and fluency. The guide also explains research-based explanations regarding the development of the foundational skills and provides explanations of strategies for fluency practice, such as oral reading, assisted reading, reading aloud, and independent reading. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition Professional Learning Environment includes a module on implementation which explains at Grade K that students need to understand phonemes and how to create spoken language, concepts of print, and phonological and phonemic awareness. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition Resource Library contains a program overview with a glossary of reading terms, pages 136-141 with adult-level explanations of literacy terms used in the program.

  • Detailed examples of the grade level foundational skill concepts are provided for the teacher. Evidence includes, but is not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Program Overview Portable Document Format (PDF) explains and gives examples of phonemic awareness, oral blending and segmentation, and alphabetic principle.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, includes Differentiated Instruction Tips at point of use in each lesson. These tips give teachers concise activities to use with students who would benefit from extra support or extended practice.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 2, a Differentiation Instruction Guide is included for Phoneme Blending: Initial Sounds. The guide provides instructions and suggested words to use with the lion puppet.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 3, Day 3, the lesson highlights phonemic awareness using phoneme addition. Examples include changing jut to just, gut to gust, mutt to must, by orally stating the new sound to be inserted in between the medial vowel and the ending consonant. 

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 1, Day 3, the lesson focuses on blending whole words. The teacher writes the word cast and cues students with a blending hand motion to state the sounds of the word and blend them together. The teacher repeats the process with the words crabs, cubs, and bask. The teacher then introduces blending with long vowel words cakes, cubes, and bakes using the same routine.

Indicator 2c

Foundational skills lessons are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Content can reasonably be completed within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for foundational skills lessons are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Content can reasonably be completed within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. 

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, is designed to be implemented with a whole group of students according to a clear structure. According to the Program Overview, small group lessons occur during Workshop time, but there is no information about planning or implementing Workshop time in the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K. Units are designed to be taught within a given amount of time and each lesson should take one day, however evidence was found only in an ancillary Professional Development video for the suggested pacing of an individual lesson. It takes 190 days to complete all lessons.

  • Lesson plans utilize effective, research-based lesson plan design for early literacy instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Research Library provides research by Marsha Roit, EdD, “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading.” The author states that “Open Court has had a long and successful history of teaching the critical foundational skills using materials that integrate knowledge from research on the learning theory and cognitive science as well as language and literacy development combined with instructional practice and teacher expertise.” The references cited include R.L. Allington (2006), A.L. Archer & C.H.Hughes (2011), and L.C. Ehri (2002).

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading”, explains the research behind the sequence of teaching letters d, p, b, and q separately as they are easily confused due to their formation. The reasoning also explains the variety of phonological awareness activities students should be exposed to, including listening games, rhyming, segmenting words and syllables, and blending, deleting, and segmenting phonemes. 

  • The effective lesson design structure does not include both whole group and small group instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Program Overview, Workshop Overview PDF page10 (print page 6) refers to Workshop small groups which may last 15-30 minutes but the Workshop model is not mentioned in the Teacher Edition. This section addresses how workshop time for small group reading can be built into language arts time for 15-30 minutes before or after core instruction, which is the whole group instruction time.

  • The pacing of each component of daily lesson plans is somewhat clear and appropriate. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Program Overview addresses the possible time allotted to the Workshop, but the expected total time for a day of lesson activities was not noted in the Teacher Edition nor was there a breakdown of time for each skill.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 1, phonemic awareness and alphabetic principle are whole group activities using the puppet to help students find words with the same beginning sound and using the sound/spelling cards to introduce the sound of the letter /h/.

    • Information about daily pacing was only found in an ancillary Professional Development video for Grades Kindergarten and 1.

  • The suggested amount of time and expectations for maximum student understanding of all foundational skill content (i.e., phonological awareness, print concepts, letters, phonics, HFW, word analysis, decoding) can reasonably be completed in one school year and should not require modifications. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, includes twelve units each with three lessons to be completed over fifteen days. There is also a Getting Started Unit which takes ten days. The entire Scope and Sequence requires 190 school days to complete.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Planner and Course Map listed under the menu lays out week-by-week and day-by-day for the teacher to see what is being taught each day and can be completed in one school year.

Indicator 2d

Order of Skills
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Indicator Rating Details

Indicator 2d.i

Scope and sequence clearly delineate the sequence in which phonological awareness skills are to be taught, with a clear, evidence-based explanation for the expected hierarchy of phonemic awareness competence. (K-1)

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for scope and sequence delineate the sequence in which phonological awareness skills are to be taught, with a clear, evidence-based explanation for the expected hierarchy of phonemic awareness competence.

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, explains the phonological awareness skills hierarchy in the Program Overview. The included research document, “Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading” delineates a phonemic awareness sequence of instruction and practice for the expected hierarchy of phonemic awareness competence. The Appendix has a detailed Phonemic Awareness Scope and Sequence.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials contain a clear, evidence-based explanation for the expected hierarchy for teaching phonological awareness skills. 

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Supporting Research, “Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading”, page 8, states that, Thus, effective phonological awareness instruction for kindergarten and first-grade students follows a sequence of difficulty that begins with larger linguistic units—sentences, words, and syllables— and progresses through onsets and rimes (the initial consonant or blend of a syllable is called an onset; the remainder of the syllable is called a rime) to the smallest linguistic unit—phonemes or individual sounds.” 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Teacher Tip, Onset and Rime: “An onset is the initial consonant(s) sound of a syllable. The onset of big is /b/, and the onset of stop is /st/. A rime is the part of a syllable that contains the vowel and all that follows it. The rime of big is -ig, and the rime of stop is -op. Now that students have learned that spoken words can be broken down into syllables, they are ready to learn that even syllables can be broken down into smaller pieces of sound. With this activity, they will begin to blend one-syllable words from the onsets and rimes.”

  • Materials contain a phonemic awareness sequence of instruction and practice based on the expected hierarchy.

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Appendix, Scope and Sequence, page 2, provides a detailed Scope and Sequence which includes Long and Short Vowel Differentiation, Phoneme Addition, Phoneme Blending, Phoneme Isolation, Phoneme Substitution, Phoneme Matching, Phoneme Pronunciation, Producing Rhyming Words, Recognizing Rhyming Words, and Segmentation.

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Program Overview, page 10, states, “Students progress by identifying sentences, identifying words, working with rhymes, exploring compound words, listening for syllables, blending syllables, oral blending, deleting and substituting sounds, segmenting phonemes.”

    • In Unit 5, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression from oral segmenting and blending.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 4, Phonemic Awareness, Oral Segmenting: Onset and Rime, the teacher engages students in a blending game of onset and rime. Students have to identify and segment the onset of words (e.g., cold, map, bump).

  • Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness instruction based on the expected hierarchy to build toward students’ application of the skills.

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Course Map, indicates that Phonological and Phonemic Awareness begins on the eleventh day of school in Unit 1, Week 1, Day 1 and continues in every lesson through the entire K level (Unit 12, Lesson 3, Day 5).

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, the Unit Planner on the first pages of each unit, provides a cohesive sequence of phonemic awareness. For example, on page 37, the Unit Planner indicates the following order of Phonemic Awareness skills: for Lesson 1: Listening for Sounds; 

      • Day 1: Rhythm.

      • Day 2: Rhythm

      • Day 3: Rhythm

      • Day 4: Listening for First and Last Sounds; Rhythm

      • Day 5  Listening for First, Middle, and Last Missing Sound; Rhyme.

    • In Unit 7, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression from phoneme blending, phoneme segmentation of initial sounds, and phoneme manipulation of initial sounds.

    • In Unit 10, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression from phoneme deletion to segmentation, addition, and substitution of initial, internal, and final sounds.

Indicator 2d.ii

Scope and sequence clearly delineate an intentional sequence in which phonics skills are to be taught, with a clear explanation for the order of the sequence.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for scope and sequence clearly delineate an intentional sequence in which phonics skills are to be taught, with a clear explanation for the order of the sequence.

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, includes a research report, “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading,” which provides a clear, evidence-based rationale for phonics instruction and the progression of skills. Also, the Unit Planner for each unit provides a cohesive scope and sequence for phonics instruction based on the evidence-based rationale in the research report. Patterns and generalizations are presented and then reviewed for students to have a manageable number of phonics patterns to learn deeply.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials clearly delineate a scope and sequence with a cohesive, intentional sequence of phonics instruction and practice to build toward application of skills.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Scope and Sequence for Sound and Spelling Introduction, indicates the sequence for introducing each consonant and vowel sound. The pattern is to introduce a sound as an initial sound, final sound, and then a review of two or three sounds at a time. The sounds introduced correspond with the decodable words in a core and practice decodable book.

    • In Unit 3, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the following sounds with corresponding letters: s/s/, m/m/, d/d/, p/p/, and a/a/. The unit culminates with a review of all the sounds of the unit.

    • In Unit 6, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the following sounds: j/j/, f/f/, x/x/, z/z/, and u/u/. The unit culminates with a review of all the sounds of the unit.

    • In Unit 10, Unit Planner, Lesson 1, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the building and reading words with the following letters and sounds: a, m, p, s, t, d, n, i, b, c, r, u.

  • Materials have a clear research-based explanation for the order of the phonics sequence.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Foundational Skills: “Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading”, page 12, states that “there is no single best sequence for introducing sounds and letters” but that the sequence “should begin with relationships that have high utility in making words” and “short vowels should be introduced gradually, followed by digraphs, inflectional endings and long vowels.”

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Foundational Skills: “Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading” research report, the author Marsha Riot explains that the hierarchy of difficulty ranges from consonants whose sounds can be produced in isolation with the least distortion, high utility consonants, short vowels, digraphs, inflectional endings, and long vowels.

  • Phonics instruction is based on high utility patterns and/or common phonics generalizations.

    • In Unit 3, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the following high-utility sounds: /s/, /m/, /d/, /p/, and /a/. 

    • In Unit 8, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the following common long vowel sounds: /a/, /i/, and /o/.

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics, the teacher uses a whole-word blending routine and asks the students to blend the words at, mat, sat, and Sam.

  • Patterns and generalizations are carefully selected to provide a meaningful and manageable number of phonics patterns and common generalizations for students to learn deeply. 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 4, the teacher reviews the letter and sound t/t/ and guides students through skills practice. The teacher names the pictures on a workbook page and asks students to write a t if the picture ends with the /t/ sound.

    • In Unit 8, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a weekly progression (learn the sound, blend, review) of the following spelling pattern: a and a_e, i and i_e, and o and o_e.

    • In Unit 9, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a weekly progression (learn the sound, blend, review) of the following spelling pattern: u and u_e, and e and e_e.

Indicator 2e

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the Foundational Skills program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten contain limited strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. 

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition provides students, parents, or caregivers with access to online resources including activities, songs, games, cards, pre-decodable and decodable books, and e-books. There are directions on activity pages for the students both in printed form and text-to-speech. There is no evidence of letters to parents or caregivers about the program overall or what is being taught in each unit. Opportunities are missed for materials to fully explain the activities to parents and caregivers and strategies they can use with the child.

  • Materials contain jargon-free resources and processes to inform all stakeholders about foundational skills taught at school. Examples include but are not limited to

    • Neither the OCR Foundational Skills, Grade K, Teacher Edition nor the Program Overview show evidence of an intentional home connection. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, for written activities, directions are not directed to parents, but can be understood by students, parents, or caregivers who read and understand English. Directions are in writing and text-to-speech. In the Student Edition, parents or caregivers have access to their student’s account to view each lesson, which gives them access to all student resources which include videos/songs, cards, decodables, ebooks, games, and activities.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library contains blackline masters for pre-decodable and decodable takehome books. A parent letter in English inside the book provides the purpose of shared reading and ways to practice outside of school. The parent letter is not included in the online decodables.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, directions on the games and activities are spoken aloud in English such that students and parents can understand what to do.

  • Materials provide stakeholders with strategies and activities for practicing phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, fluency, and print concepts that will support students in progress towards and achievement of grade level foundational skills standards. Examples include but are not limited to:

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library includes Core Decodable Takehomes. The takehomes include fourteen pre-decodable and twenty-eight decodable books. There are no strategies included for parents to work with their child.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, Resources, Songs contains thirteen songs to support phonological awareness and phonics. There are no strategies included for parents to work with their child.

    • OCR Foundational Skills, Grade K, Practice Pre-Decodable & Decodable Take Home Blackline Masters (BLM), page 7 provides a Parent Letter in English advising parents,“Do not expect your child to read each story perfectly, but concentrate on sharing the book together. Participate by doing some of the reading. Talk about the stories you read, give lots of encouragement, and watch as your child becomes more fluent throughout the year!” 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, includes a section describing how teachers could send assignments to the students although it is not clear how that would work and what the role of parents would be in those assignments.

Criterion 2f - 2f.ii

Program includes work with decodables in K and Grade 1, and as needed in Grade 2, following the grade-level scope and sequence to address both securing phonics.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials include the use of decodable texts aligned to the program’s scope and sequence for phonics skills and high-frequency words. Students have multiple opportunities to reread decodable texts independently and with partners. 

Indicator 2f

Aligned Decodable Texts

Indicator 2f.i

Materials include decodable texts with phonics aligned to the program’s scope and sequence and opportunities for students to use decodables for multiple readings.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials include decodable texts with phonics aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

Materials include the use of decodable texts aligned to the program’s scope and sequence. Also, students have multiple opportunities to reread decodable texts independently and in partnership with their peers to build fluency.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials include decodable texts to address securing phonics.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Core Decodables, there are twenty-eight books with decodable texts for students to practice phonic skills. The Takehome Decodables include twenty-eight books with decodable texts, and the Practice Decodables include twenty-eight books with decodable texts.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 5, students read a decodable book. The lesson focus reviews sounds of /b/ and /c/. The decodable includes the words Cal, bat, and cap among others. 

  • Decodable texts contain grade-level phonics skills aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Core Decodables, Books 1-9, contain texts that are aligned to the following graphemes: b, c, o, r, and g. Books 10-19 contain texts that are aligned to the graphemes: j, f, w, k, and ae. Books 20-28 contain texts that are aligned to the graphemes: e, g, h, n, s, t, and v. This sequence is aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

    • In Unit 6 the initial and final /j/ are presented and there is a  review of /ks/,/u/, and /f/.The decodable includes the words Jim, jam, flip, fig, Fran, fog, pot, among others. 

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, Blending, the teacher reviews Routine 6, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, with students before reading Core Decodable 17, “Cute Little Mule”. They blend the words go, pole, use, mule, and excuse. This aligns with the Scope and Sequence for Unit 9, Lesson 1, which focuses on Initial /ū/, Initial and medial /ū/, Medial /ū/ and u_e, and Review /ū/.

  • Materials include detailed lesson plans for repeated readings of decodable texts to address securing phonics skills.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 5, students read a decodable including the words Cal, at, bat, Tim, tips, cap among other decodable words. Students read a decodable using a decodable routine. The routine includes directions asking students to re-read the decodable to build fluency. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, students engage in Routine 4 in which they reread the decodable “Ron Hops.”

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, students engage in Routine 4 in which they reread the decodable “Kim and Sam.”

Indicator 2f.ii

Materials include decodable texts with high-frequency words aligned to the program’s scope and sequence and opportunities for students to use decodables for multiple readings.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials include decodable texts with high frequency words aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

Materials include decodable texts with high-frequency words aligned to the scope and sequence. Students use a consistent routine when reading the decodables and re-read the decodable during each routine. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials include decodable texts that utilize high-frequency/irregularly spelled words.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 4, the decodable book includes the high-frequency word go in a rebus formatted pre-decodable.

    • In Unit 7 “Glad Pam”, the text highlights the high-frequency words: did and girl.

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 5, students read a decodable book with the words take, said, you

    • In Unit 13, the decodable book “Vic Yelps”, highlights the high-frequency words: was and were.

  • Decodable texts contain grade-level high-frequency/irregularly spelled words aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

    • The Core Decodables, Books 1-9, contain texts aligned to the graphemes: b, c, o, r,and g and the following high-frequency words: as, have, his, on, did, and girl. Books 10-19 contain texts aligned to: j, f, w, k, and ae and the high-frequency words: was, were, her, what, said, that, down, and they. Books 20-28 contain texts aligned to: e, g, h, n, s, t, and v and the high-frequency words: when,some, but, can, we, and her. These are aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 4, the word the is the high-frequency word for the lesson. Students read the pre-decodable book, “The Lunch”. The high-frequency word the is in the pre-decodable on each page in a rebus formatted pre-decodable.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 2 the word has is the high-frequency word for the lesson. Students read the decodable book, “The Tree”. The pre-decodable book has the words the, has, and in using rebus formatted sentences. 

  • Materials include detailed lesson plans for repeated readings of decodable texts to address securing reading high-frequency words/irregularly spelled words in context.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 5, the students read a decodable book with the words can, his, is. Students read the decodable using Reading a Decodable routine, in which students reread the decodable with a partner, taking turns, or choral reading. 

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 5, students read a decodable book with the words you, can, said, and, that, see in sentences. Students read the decodable using Reading a Decodable routine, in which students reread the decodable with a partner, taking turns, or choral reading. 

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, students engage in Routine 4 in which they reread the decodable, “Jake Plants Grapes”. This text reviews the following high-frequency words said and that.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 2, Day 5, Reading a Decodable, students engage in Routine 4 in which they reread the decodable, “We Did It!”. This text reviews the high-frequency words be and she.

Criterion 2g - 2i.iii

Materials provide teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Materials also provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that students demonstrate independence with grade-level standards.
12/22
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials include Diagnostic and Benchmark Assessments. There are multiple opportunities to assess print concepts and letter recognition, but there were no assessments found for letter formation. Materials provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate students’ progress toward mastery and independence in phonological awareness, decoding, and word recognition and analysis. 

Materials do not include assessment results guidance in the following areas: determining the proficiency level of students based on stages of reading development and specific, concrete instructional suggestions on how to support students’ progress toward mastery. Limited instructional suggestions were noted for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Materials do  not include materials that specifically denote the standards assessed on formative or summative assessments.

Materials include differentiated suggestions as well as a photo library to support language development and comprehension of vocabulary. English Language (EL) Tips are integrated throughout the lesson at the point of use. Each digital lesson has a toggle that can be switched on for differentiation support strategies and lesson extensions/adaptations. These activities can also be found in the Differentiated Instruction Guide in the Resource Library. Although the program overview indicates differentiated instruction occurs in small group settings, and differentiated instruction guides are provided in daily lessons, no mention of changing from the whole group to small group exists in the digital guide.

Indicator 2g

Regular and Systematic Opportunities for Assessment

Indicator 2g.i

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress through mastery of print concepts (K-1), letter recognition (K only), and printing letters (as indicated by the program scope and sequence) (K-1).

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress through mastery of print concepts (K-1), letter recognition (K only), and printing letters (as indicated by the program scope and sequence) (K-1).

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K Unit Planner, far right column identifies which days of the lessons contain assessments located in the Assessment Book. The Assessment Book and Benchmark Assessment Book provide teachers with information regarding students’ current level of understanding and skills along with instructional suggestions for assessment-based steps to help students progress toward mastery. The Assessment Blackline Masters Books provide student copies of assessments to view as teachers note responses on pages in the Assessment and Benchmark Assessment Book. There are multiple opportunities to assess print concepts and letter recognition, but there were no assessments found for letter formation. Limited instructional suggestions were noted for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in print concepts, letter recognition, and letter formation.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate students’ progress toward mastery and independence of print concepts, letter recognition. No evidence was found for the assessment of letter formation. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Unit Planner, in the front of each Unit,an assessment column on the right identifies which lessons contain the assessments that can be found in the Assessment book but do not carry instructional suggestions.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment Book, T-12-T15 contains pages for the teacher to use to record student responses regarding letter identification. The Assessment Blackline Masters Book is what the student views during the assessment.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment, and Foundational Skills Assessment also provide resources for the assessment of letter identification.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment Book, T-32 provides a checklist to use to assess a student’s ability in print concepts utilizing the Pickled Peppers Book.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resources, Assessment, Assessment TE, Unit 2, Print Concepts, is administered individually. Students demonstrate an understanding of eighteen print concepts including front and back of book, title, author, table of contents, page number, letters, words, space between words, illustration, first and last word on the page, and moving finger indirection words are read.

  • Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information concerning students’ current skills/level of understanding of print concepts, letter recognition, and letter formation. 

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment Book, T 11, suggests that if any students do not meet the recommended performance level, they should repeat the assessment after intervention or additional instruction.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment, cutoffs are provided for assessment, in this case, letter recognition cutoffs based on this assessment administered after units 2, 6, and 12

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment Book, vi, provides criteria expectations for letter identification and print concepts.

  • Materials provide limited support to teachers with instructional suggestions for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in print concepts, letter recognition, and letter formation.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment, suggests that if students score below the cutoff for any Benchmark Assessment, teachers can use one or more of the following to help students get back on track: 

      • Reteach students who need extra help.

      • Provide practice opportunities to students within the Skills Practice Workbooks, Decodable books, eGames, and Language Arts Handbook

      • Differentiate instruction during Workshop. Intervention should be assigned to students who need more intensive help.

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment Book, Class Assessment Record, is used to identify students who have not mastered specific skills clusters. Students can be grouped for additional instruction and practice in the skills they have not yet mastered.

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonological awareness (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (K-1)

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress of phonological awareness (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). 

The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, includes a Unit Planner that indicates where assessments are located in the Assessment Book. There are Diagnostic and Benchmark Assessments. The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K does not include assessment results guidance in the following areas: determining the proficiency level of students based on stages of reading development and specific, concrete instructional suggestions on how to support students’ progress toward mastery. There is a missed opportunity for providing teacher guidance for instructional strategies for assessment area deficits.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate students’ progress toward mastery and independence in phonological awareness.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Unit Planner, shows the frequency of formal and informal assessments. There are three Lesson Assessments and one Unit Assessment per unit.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Phonemic Awareness: Word Sequence, the teacher says a group of words, asks the positionality of one of those words, and the student provides the word’s position in the group (i.e., first, middle, or last).

    • In Unit 6 Assessment, Phonemic Awareness: Phoneme Segmentation, the teacher says a word and the student must say the word again sound by sound.

    • Unit 7, Lesson 3, Day 5, Progress Monitoring, Assessment, pages 80-83, assesses students’ understanding of skills taught in the unit including beginning and ending sounds.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment, Test 1, Rhyming, the teacher says a word and the student must supply a word that rhymes.

  • Assessment materials provide teachers and students with some information concerning students’ current skills/level of understanding of phonological awareness.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment Teacher Edition, Performance Expectations: Lesson and Unit Assessments, 80 percent mastery is considered an acceptable level of mastery (e.g., four out of five items correct).

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Benchmark Assessments, Diagnosis, page v, “Because each segment of the Benchmark Assessments provides a separate score for that strand of the curriculum, the strand scores can be used to identify the specific curriculum areas that are strengths or weaknesses for a student or across a classroom.”

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Benchmark Assessments, pages 52-54, the teacher has a Benchmark Tracking Chart for each student. Plotting student scores gives a quick visual appreciation of progress, standing, and student trends.

  • Materials support teachers with limited instructional suggestions for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in phonological awareness.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resources, Assessments, Benchmark Assessments, Screening, it states, “At the beginning of the year, and then periodically throughout the year, any student who falls below the cutoff score on the 100-Point Skills Battery or Oral Fluency assessments should be considered for intervention. The student’s progress should be closely monitored through weekly oral fluency assessments.”

    • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Benchmark Assessments, Diagnosis, page v, only offers general suggestions. The guide states, “If students score below the cutoff for any Benchmark Assessment, use one or more of the following to help students get back on track: Reteach students who need extra help; Practice opportunities are available to students within the Skills Practice Workbooks, Decodable books, eGames, and Language Arts Handbook; Differentiate Instruction during Workshop; Intervention should be assigned to students who need more intensive help.”

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonics in- and out-of-context (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (K-2)

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonics (as indicated by the program scope and sequence).

Materials include a variety of assessment opportunities such as diagnostic, benchmark, unit, and daily assessments in which students demonstrate their mastery of decoding skills. The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K does not include assessment results guidance in the following area: concrete instructional suggestions on how to support students’ progress toward mastery.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide resources and tools to collect ongoing data about students’ progress in phonics. 

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Diagnostic Assessment, there is one Phonics and Decoding assessment in which students are to identify letters that represent a given sound, and one Oral Reading Fluency assessment in which students provide the sound of the associated letter.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Benchmark Assessment, Letter Sounds Test 1, provides a recording sheet for the teacher to document student knowledge of letter sounds for r, b, e, w, f, h, s, t, a, and p and an area to note errors and/or self-corrections.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment, Test 2, Oral Fluency, students provide the sound the letter makes.

  • Materials offer assessment opportunities to determine students’ progress in phonics that are implemented systematically.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Unit Planner for each unit indicates when assessments are done. For example, Unit 4, Lesson 2, Unit Planner, Assessment column, notes Formal Assessment pages 45-46 on Day 5. Part of the assessment asks students which letter begins a word. Students point to the letter from a choice of three.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Assessment Book, phonics assessment is at the letter/sound level and not the word level. Assessments include Unit 3, Lesson 3, Letters and Sounds; Unit 4, Lesson 3, Short-Vowel Sounds; Unit 5, Lessons 1, 2, and 3, Letter Sounds; Unit 6, Lessons 1, 2, and 3 Letter Sounds; Unit 7, Lesson 3, Letter Sounds; Unit 8, Lesson 2, Letter Sounds; Unit 9, Lessons 1,2, 3, Long-Vowel Sounds; and Unit 11, Lesson 1, 2, and 3, Beginning and Ending Sounds.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Assessment Book, Table of Contents, indicates that teachers will assess students at the end of each lesson and unit. Instructions ask the teacher to familiarize themselves with instructions and to record answers during the assessment.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment, each unit has three lesson-level assessments and one unit assessment that primarily focuses on out-of-context phonics skills.

  • Multiple assessment opportunities are provided regularly for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence with phonics.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Benchmark Assessment 3, assesses students on oral reading fluency of letter sounds. Teachers assess students on a mixture of thirty capital and lowercase letter sounds.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, students select the letter that represents the initial sound of the given word.

    • In Unit 5, the assessment provides an assessment for the sounds /k/, /b/, /o/, /r/ and /g/,

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 5, there are two formal assessments. One is for the understanding of the skills taught in the lesson and the other for skills taught in the unit. Page T69 covers Letter Sounds, in which the students choose from three  letters for an initial sound. Page T74 also assesses Letter Sounds but students only say a letter or sound,

    • In Unit 11, Lesson 3, students select the word that represents the new word produced when changing the letters of the original word.

  • Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information about students’ current skills/level of understanding of phonics.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment, Performance Expectations: Lesson and Unit Assessments, the benchmark is six correct out of eight assessment items on letter recognition.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment Grade K,  Oral Fluency: Letter Sounds Tracking Chart, Benchmark Test 1 has a cutoff of 0 Letter Sounds. Benchmark Test 2 has 12 Letter Sounds. Benchmark 3 has 30 Letter Sounds.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2 the materials provide teachers information regarding students' knowledge of the letters that represent beginning sounds in hat, let, and nap and ending sounds in nap, but, and hen.

    • In Unit 10 Class Assessment Record, there are several columns including Phoneme Addition of Internal Sounds, Unit 10 Assessment for Word Building, and Unit 10 Assessment for Blending and Sentence Extension.

  • Materials genuinely measure students’ progress to somewhat support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in phonics.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Benchmark Assessment, SRA Open Court Reading Foundational Skills Benchmark Assessment Overview, Diagnosis, states that if students score below the cutoff for any Benchmark Assessment, teachers should use one or more of the following general suggestions to help students get back on track: reteach students who need extra help, practice opportunities are available to students within the Skills Practice Workbooks, Decodable books, eGames, and Language Arts Handbook, differentiate Instruction during Workshop, and intervention should be assigned to students who need more intensive help.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Diagnostic Assessment indicates students who do not meet expectations will need support in intervention.

Indicator 2g.iv

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of word recognition and analysis (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (K-2)

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of word recognition and analysis (as indicated by the program scope and sequence).

Materials provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year. Points of assessment are indicated in the Unit Planner and Teacher Edition. Assessments are provided in the Assessment Book, Diagnostic Assessment Book, and the Benchmark Assessment Book. The Assessment Blackline Masters provide student copies of each assessment. Teachers are provided with both a Student Assessment Record and a Class Assessment Record. Students use eActivities and eGames for informal assessment. A Teacher Resource Book with interventions is provided but not cross-referenced with each assessment. There is a lack of direct, explicit information on how to provide intervention for each assessment.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate students’ progress toward mastery and independence of word recognition (high-frequency words or irregularly spelled words) and analysis.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Unit Planner for each unit indicates when assessments are completed. For example, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Unit Planner, Assessment column, notes Assessment pages 2-3 on Day 3 and Assessment pages 4-6 on Day 5.

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 3, Day 5, the teacher completes a formal assessment of sight words. The teacher asks students to read a list of sight words including the words he, his, him, is, on, of, can, girl, have, to, it, did, were, him, and is.

    • In Unit 7 Assessment, page 89, students underline the high-frequency word the teacher says from a choice of three words. The words are: look, what, with, her, was. 

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 1, Day 5, there are both an Informal Assessment and a Formal Assessment. The Informal Assessment has students use the Unit 8 eActivity, Lesson 1, Foundational Skills, Blending, and also the Unit 8 eGame, Lesson 1, Foundational Skills. The Formal Assessment has students count phonemes in spoken words.

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 3, Day 5, page T99, a formal assessment of medial sounds is given. There are five questions. The first one is “Teacher: This activity is about sounds in the middle of words. Listen carefully to what I say. Draw a line under the letter you think is correct. The word in the box is met. Which letter can replace e in the middle of the word to make the new word mat? The students have three vowels to choose from.” On page T101, students read five high-frequency words there, do, be, little, she.

  • Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information concerning students’ current skills/level of understanding of word recognition and word analysis. 

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resources, Assessment, Assessment Book, page 5, notes: “The primary purpose of the lesson assessments is to allow the teacher to monitor student progress regularly. This process makes it less likely that a student will fall behind because it allows teachers to adapt or repeat instruction as needed.”

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, Assessment, Benchmark Assessment, page 54, High-Frequency Word Reading Tracking Chart, the number of high-frequency words read correctly in one minute is plotted. There are targets for the number of words read correctly that are expected by each of the three benchmark assessments (first assessment - 5 words, second assessment - 15 words, third assessment - 38 words).

    • In Unit 12, Lesson 3, Day 5, a recording sheet for high-frequency words is provided for the class. The teacher makes one copy of page 41 for students to use during the assessment and a copy of the chart to record results. The teacher circles the words a student reads incorrectly. The teacher notes students’ strengths and weaknesses, the types of errors they make, and when they self-correct.

  • Materials support teachers with limited instructional suggestions for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in word recognition and word analysis.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Foundational Skills Benchmark Assessment, Diagnosis, the directives are for students who score below benchmark are as follows and these are general: reteach students who need extra help, use Skills Practice Workbooks, differentiate during Workshop, and assign students to intervention who need intensive help.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resources, Assessment, Assessment Book, page vii, provides some general suggestions for students to help them progress, but they are not specific. The materials state, “The High-Frequency Word assessments are based on five words plus an automaticity rating for a total score of six. The acceptable level of performance is four out of six. Also, you may choose to examine a student’s performance on the High-Frequency Word assessments at the word level. Here are some patterns of performance you might consider. 

      • Misreading regular vowels and consonants suggests that the student needs more practice in reading highly decodable words.

      •  A student who reads highly decodable words well but has difficulty with less decodable words probably understands the most common sound spellings. The student probably needs practice in reading common words that have uncommon sound spellings. 

      • When a student reads words correctly but slowly or with hesitation, the student likely lacks confidence. Paired reading with an adult or older student who reads will help to build confidence and fluency. 

      • Frequent self-corrections imply that the student is not yet reading automatically. Paired reading with an adult or older student who reads will help to build automaticity.”

Indicator 2h

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment and assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet the criteria for assessment materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment and assessment materials denote which standards are being emphasized.

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K does not include materials that specifically denote the standards assessed on formative or summative assessments. There is an alignment document that contains how lessons correlate to Common Core State Standards, but it does not include questions and tasks. When assessments are mentioned in the lesson, the directives suggest that the assessment aligns with the overall lesson standards; however, what is cited in the lesson is not consistently assessed on the assessment. The program overview indicates assessments are aligned with classroom instruction, though specific alignment documents are absent in the program. There is standards alignment information carried in the print version which is not carried in the digital version.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials do not include denotations of the standards being assessed in the formative assessments.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, each day’s activities have a list at the top right of standards for that day, but it does not denote which standard goes with the formative/lesson assessment.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 5, there is a Benchmark Assessment but there are no denotations to the standards either on the assessment or in the Teacher’s Edition. 

  • Materials do not include denotations of standards being assessed in the summative assessments.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 5, there is a formal assessment for Lesson 3 and a formal assessment for Unit 2. Neither assessment includes denotations to the standards either on the assessment or in the teacher edition.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 5, there is a Benchmark Assessment but there are no denotations to the standards either on the assessment or in the Teacher’s Edition. 

  • Alignment documentation is not provided for all tasks, questions, and assessment items.

    • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resource Library, Assessment Book, lists the skill at the top of the page of the formative assessment for each End-of-Unit assessment.

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 10 there is a formal diagnostic assessment. Standards addressed on Day 10 are located at the top of the digital page but do not include all tasks, questions, and assessment items. 

  • There is no alignment documentation containing specific standards correlated to specific lessons.

    • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Common Core State Standards Correlation, provides alignment for foundational skills by unit and indicates the page number of print version only.

Indicator 2i

Differentiation for Instruction: Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding grade-level standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

Indicator 2i.i

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards. 

Materials include differentiated suggestions as well as a photo library to support language development and comprehension of vocabulary. English Language (EL) Tips are integrated throughout the lesson at the point of use. The materials also provide an EL Appendix and a Newcomers English Language Development Teacher’s Guide with eight board games to support those lessons. Routines are clear in the English Learner teacher’s guide, and routine names match the names of routines for the whole class (e.g. whole-word blending).

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide support for English Language Learner (ELL) students.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, English Learner Appendix, Contrastive Analysis Chart for Speakers of Other Languages: Phonemes, this is a correlation chart that compares English phonemes to other languages.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 5, the teacher repeats word cards blending with additional picture cards to demonstrate compound words. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher instructs students on the sound of the /j/. Materials provide instructions for teachers for four different English learner levels, with different prompts according to English language proficiency level. 

  • General statements about ELL students or strategies are noted at the beginning of a unit or at one place in the teacher edition are then implemented by the materials throughout the lessons.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, English Learner Appendix, provides information to teachers on contrastive analysis with students’ first language provided for 13 languages, visuals for forming consonant sounds, and explanation of routines and activities to guide students who are English language learners. 

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Newcomers English Language Development Teacher’s Guide, provides guidance and activities for teachers to use for students who are newly arrived in the United States. Materials are used as a supplement or instead of other supplementary materials and include sentence stems, suggestions to pair students, and teacher tips for additional and independent work. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonological and Phonemic Awareness, English Learner, directions tell the teacher to supply another example sentence using the words wall and green. This is to help students know and identify a spoken sentence.

Indicator 2i.ii

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade-level with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards. 

Materials guide teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or at the OCR “Approaching Level”. Each digital lesson has a toggle that can be switched on for differentiation support strategies and lesson extensions/adaptations. These activities can also be found in the Differentiated Instruction Guide in the Resource Library. The Program Overview refers to small groups as part of Workshop time, but there is no guidance in the Foundational Skills Kit that explains how or when to do Workshop small groups. Although the program overview indicates differentiated instruction occurs in small group settings, and differentiated instruction guides are provided in daily lessons, no mention of changing from the whole group to small group exists in the digital guide.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide opportunities for small group reteaching.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Program Overview, page 7, refers to Workshop time to allow for small groups, but there is no elaboration of this in the lessons.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Program Overview, page 21, indicates that differentiated instruction tips in the teacher guide should be used in small groups, but these do not show up in the lessons.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 5, materials provide a differentiated instruction guide for the sections labeled word part blending and how the alphabet works.

  • Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level in extensive opportunities to learn foundational skills at the grade-level standards.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Intervention, Differentiated Instruction Guide, contains all of the leveled lesson differentiation that can be accessed individually in the Digital Teacher Edition including an “Approaching Level”.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 1, in oral segmenting and materials, includes a differentiated instruction guide. The materials include word sets for teacher use. 

    • In Unit 9, Lesson 1, Day 5, materials provide teachers with differentiated instruction guides in three of ten activities on Day 5. Materials include using sound-by-sound blending routines to scaffold whole-word blending routines in the lesson.

Indicator 2i.iii

Materials regularly provide extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade-level.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the criteria for materials regularly provide extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Materials provide a Supplemental Word List in the Appendix found in the Resource Library to extend learning in the lesson. The Program Overview references lessons containing detailed suggestions for differentiated instruction for those Beyond Level. Although there is a toggle switch for differentiated learning in the digital teacher edition, differentiation for beyond level was noted in the printed teacher edition labeled as beyond level at the bottom margin. The differentiated activities for Beyond Level are only evident in the print Teacher Edition, not the Digital Teacher Edition. Many of the above-grade-level activities are not seen as doing more than their classmates, but rather different activities based on skill level.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide multiple opportunities for advanced students to investigate grade-level foundational skills at a greater depth.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resource Library, Appendix, Supplemental Word List, can be used in several ways to extend the lessons. Words are listed by beginning sounds, ending sounds, and medial vowel sounds.

    • In the OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Resource Library, Program Overview, every lesson contains detailed suggestions for differentiating instruction for the following groups of students: Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level This is seen in the print materials but not online materials.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 2, Alphabetic Principle, students Beyond Level come up with words and explain if they start with the s/s/.

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 2, Day 4, Phonemic Awareness, students Beyond Level come up with their own words to segment using Elkonin boxes.

  • There are few instances of advanced students simply doing more assignments than their classmates.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 1, Differentiated Instruction, High - Frequency Words, “Approaching Level, if students have difficulty hearing the sound at the beginning of the word, the teacher says the onset first, then the rime, and then the whole word, such as /g/...oat, goat.” “On Level - For additional practice, students continue linking the sound to the letter with rhyming word pairs such as sack, pack, sit, pit; sock, tock; sap, map, tap.” “Beyond Level - Students come up with their own words and indicate whether or not the word begins with s/s/.”

    • In Unit 8, Lesson 2, Day 2, Differentiated Instruction: Letter Sound Recognition, the students Beyond Level come up with their own words and indicate whether or not the word has the /ī/ sound.

    • In Unit 10, Lesson 1, Day 3, the printed version provides differentiated instruction for students At Grade Level to recreate a rhyme and students Beyond Level to create their rhyming pairs.

Criterion 2j - 2n

Materials support effective use of technology and visual design to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials are provided for both teachers and students through a digital means. ePresentation Resources found in the teacher edition can be projected along with other resources found in the Resource Library. Materials are compatible with many Internet browsers, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of the Android mobile device. Materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students through assigning specific tasks and assessments to the student-facing materials.

Indicator 2j

Digital materials (either included as a supplement to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten contain digital materials (either included as a supplement to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g.,Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, both teacher and student digital materials are web-based, compatible with many Internet browsers, follow universal programming style, and allow the use of the Android mobile device. It is challenging to get student pages on an iPhone. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • Digital materials are compatible with desktop Windows 8.1 and 10 platforms.

  • Digital materials are compatible with the android phone, Samsung 9+. Both teacher and student digital materials are accessible on an Android phone.

  • ConnectEd Mobile App is available for all decodable texts. Texts can be downloaded on a student's device so they can be read without an Internet connection.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition is accessible with Safari (MacBook), Google Chrome, and Firefox browser on laptop and desktop devices. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 5, the lesson presents a digital book with optional automated read-aloud technology and is accessible with Safari, Google Chrome, and Firefox browsers.

Indicator 2k

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten contain materials that support effective use of technology and visual design to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms. 

Open Court Reading Grade K materials are provided for both teachers and students through a digital means. ePresentation Resources found in the teacher edition can be projected along with other resources found in the Resource Library. Student Skill Pages have a built-in reader that will read aloud the directions and words on the page to students. Students can write answers to questions or type answers using the tools in the Student Skill Pages.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, each day’s teacher directions and resources are available digitally by clicking on the Unit, Lesson, and Day for access.

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, word lists, sentences, big books, student skills pages, and decodable readers are available through the ePresentation Resources found linked in each day’s activities as needed based on the lesson. EL Photo Library Cards, High-Frequency Flash Cards, Sound Spelling cards, games, assessment resources, and teacher videos can all be found under the menu in the Digital Teacher Edition.

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, a Student Edition is also available online. The teacher can push certain resources and assessments out to the whole class or certain students.

Indicator 2l

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten contain digital materials that include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K includes opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students through assigning specific tasks and assessments to the student-facing materials.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition includes options for teachers to assign individual content or lessons to students. 

  • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Assessment drop-down menu includes options for teachers to assign individual assessments and the option to create individual assessments.

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assignment Tracker, the teacher assigns specific decodable texts, eActivities, Sound Spelling Cards to specific students or groups of students.

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Assessment, the teacher uses an item bank to create assessments to assign to students.

Indicator 2m

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

Some of the materials reviewed for Kindergarten materials can be easily customized for local use.

Open Court Reading Grade K materials provide the ability to customize assessment materials for local use. Although the option to assign individual skills practice, digital books, and activities to students exists, the content itself is not customizable.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Menu, Assessment, tests can be created by selecting questions from a question bank, question by standard, or question from a passage bank to meet the local curriculum scope and sequence for testing purposes.

  • In OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Menu, Assignment Tracker, the teacher can choose certain materials and when to send them out to students digitally (e.g.,EL Photo Library Cards, Activities,Core Decodables.). The materials can be sent to the whole class or selected students.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Assessment drop-down menu provides the option for teachers to create their assessments using a question bank, choose questions by standard, and create their assessment questions.

Indicator 2n

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten includes a visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. 

OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K digital platform design allows for ease of student navigation and learning. These are not distracting or chaotic, and support students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, print and digital materials are well-organized by units, lessons, and days.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, pages in the Student Edition, Student Practice Pages, and decodable stories are an easy-to-read font size.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher and Student Edition, the use of color is not distracting. 

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, Core Decodables are laid out both through picture and word formatting in a way that is easy for the reader to utilize through digital means.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Teacher Edition, ePresentation resources of word lists and sentences are in color, font, and format that is readable through a digital and projectable means.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, Student Skill pages are laid out in a way that is easy for students to understand the flow of questions and where answers are needed.

  • OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade K, Student Edition, Activities, have a layout of Elkonin boxes, counters, and directions in a way that does not overwhelm students. 

abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/10/07

Report Edition: 2015

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Grade K FSK Teacher Guides: Volume 1 978‑0‑0213‑5413‑9 McGraw-Hill Education 2015
Grade K: Foundational Skills Kit 978‑0‑0213‑5417‑7 McGraw-Hill Education 2015

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA Foundational Skills Review Tool

The ELA foundational skills review criteria identifies the indicators for high quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

The ELA foundational skills review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Alignment to Standards and Research-Based Practices for Foundational Skills Instruction

  • Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

NOTE: The ELA foundational skills review criteria contains only two gateways. The structural pieces that we normally review as a part of Gateway 3 (e.g. differentiation) in our comprehensive reviews are critical to the success of a program, and are, therefore, interspersed and combined with other indicators in Gateway 2.

The ELA foundational skills rubric contains only two gateways: Alignment to Standards and Research-Based Practices for Foundational Skills Instruction (Gateway 1) and Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment (Gateway 2). The structural pieces that we normally review as a part of Gateway 3 (e.g. differentiation) in our comprehensive reviews are critical to the success of a program, and are, therefore, interspersed and combined with other indicators in Gateway 2.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations