Alignment: Overall Summary

The Open Court Grade 5 materials partially meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the expectations of the standards. Materials include high-quality texts of appropriate complexity throughout the year. Some strategies and routines, including those for independent reading may need to be supplemented to align with the standards.

Text-based opportunities, protocols, questions and tasks support students as both listeners and speakers. On-demand and process writing opportunities encompass all the genres set forth in the standards, though informative/explanatory writing has greater coverage. The program includes explicit instruction in and practice of grammar skills.

Materials contain explicit instruction in and assessment of grade-appropriate foundational skills across the year. However, the materials lack teacher guidance for remediation and support of students who are not performing at grade level. The continued growth and application of foundational skills is not supported in all parts of the reading program.

Not all units in the program effectively build students’ knowledge on a topic. While text analysis is well-covered, including some analysis of knowledge and ideas within and across texts, not all questions and tasks compel students to return to the text to support their contentions and conclusions.

Students engage in frequent writing tasks across the year however they may not achieve the full balance of writing genres outlined in the standards. 

The Inquiry projects that conclude each unit teach some research skills but do not provide adequate growth in those skills. These projects also fall short of demonstrating the growth of students’ knowledge and skills from the unit.  

The materials provide coverage of the standards throughout all units and over the course of the year, however, the preponderance of repetitive, unaligned reading strategies throughout the program moves the focus of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessments away from a tight focus on grade level standards alignment. The program also contains a large volume of material without a suggested daily schedule; therefore, a full and standards-aligned implementation could be challenging.

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality and Complexity

0
20
37
42
30
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
16
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
15
23
25
N/A
23-25
Meets Expectations
16-22
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality and Complexity and Alignment to the Standards with Tasks and Questions Grounded in Evidence

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The Open Court Grade 5 materials include high-quality texts that meet the expectations of the standards. Texts are appropriately complex, growing in complexity over the course of the year, but do not include comprehensive text complexity analysis information. The texts grow in complexity over the course of the year, but the strategies and routines may need to be supplemented to assure students are reading grade-level text independently by the end of the year. There is minimal support for independent reading and accountability.

The program provides text-based opportunities, protocols, questions and tasks to support students as both listeners and speakers.

Students engage in daily writing opportunities over the course of the year, including opportunities for process writing, including editing and revision and the use of digital resources. While the writing opportunities encompass all the genres set forth in the standards, there is a greater emphasis on informative/explanatory writing. The program includes explicit instruction in and practice of grammar skills.

Materials contain explicit instruction in and assessment of grade-appropriate foundational skills across the year. However, the materials lack teacher guidance for remediation and support of students who are not performing at grade level.

Instruction, practice, and application of word analysis skills is found within the foundation skills materials, but the application of these skills is not supported within the anchor texts that are found in the Reading and Responding lessons.

Criterion 1a - 1e

Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade.

Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.

13/18
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The Open Court Grade 5 materials include a wide range of high-quality and high-interest texts that include rich language and key academic vocabulary. The historical fiction, myths, poetry, biographies and dramas meet the expectations of the standards and present a 50/50 balance between literary and informational texts. 

The overall complexity of the texts is appropriate to meet the instructional needs for Grade 5, however, the materials do not include a description of the qualitative measures, features, or analysis for the texts, nor do they include a rationale for the purpose and placement of the texts. Additionally, while the complexity of the texts grows over the course of the year, the comprehension strategies and routines remain static and do not provide a clear path to grade-level reader independence. While students engage in reading a broad swath of texts, including a number of science and social studies texts, there are few suggestions, supports, and accountability measures designed to support independent reading.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of high quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests.

4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1a. 

The materials contain a variety of publishable anchor texts that span the year’s worth of materials. The texts include a wide range of student interests such as weather, science fiction, adventure, Greek Mythology, and biographies. Colorful and engaging illustrations are common among the texts. Texts include rich language that builds on key academic vocabulary that is highlighted throughout the text. Texts cover a variety of historical events and human interest. Texts and topics allow students to relate and/or reflect on themselves, their world and their actions. The texts are well-crafted and content-rich. 

Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, students read The Marble Champ by Gary Soto. This realistic fiction story tells a story about a girl who plays marbles. This text contains colorful illustrations. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, students read the rhyming narrative nonfiction, Salmon Creek by Annette LeBox. This text describes the salmon life cycle and demonstrates a range of vocabulary that supports the topic. 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, students read My Librarian is a Camel: How Books are Brought to Children Around the World by Margriet Ruurs. This informational text contains interesting facts about how kids from around the world receive books. Colorful graphics show students key information about the countries highlighted in the text. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, students read the informational text, Midnight Forests: A Story of Gifford Pinchot and Our National Forests by Gary Hines. This text includes academic vocabulary as well as knowledge demands of how the branches of government work.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, students read Thomas Jefferson Grows a Nation by Peggy Thomas. This biography contains engaging illustrations while the text centers around the metaphor of planting and cultivating a garden.

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, students read The Storyteller by Saki. This classic short story contains colorful illustrations and teaches a unique perspective on fairy tales. 

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1b. 

The materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Text types include, but are not limited to, historical fiction, myths, poetry, biographies, and dramas. The materials also reflect a 50/50 balance between informational texts and literary texts. Core texts demonstrate a comprehensive collection of informational and literary texts integrated throughout units. Some units may place more emphasis on informational or literature, but the overall year’s worth of material contains a balance. For example, Unit 6 contains four literary anchor texts with two informational anchor texts while Unit 5 contains four informational anchor texts and two literary anchor texts. However, over the course of the year’s worth of materials students read a balance of text types. In addition, supplemental texts included to enhance core reading also provide a variety of genres including biographies, dramas, fables, historical fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, realistic fiction, and informational texts.

Materials reflect the distribution of text types/genres required by the grade-level standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, during Reading and Responding, students read the biography, Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman, Olympic High-Jump Champion by Heather Lang. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, during Reading and Responding, students read a rhyming narrative nonfiction text, Salmon Creek by Annette LeBox and Karen Reczuch.

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, during Reading and Responding, students read an autobiography, The House Baba Built: An Artist’s Childhood in China by Ed Young. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, during Reading and Respond, students read an informational text, Midnight Forests: A Story of Gifford Pinchot and Our National Forests by Gary Hines. 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, during Reading and Responding, students read the historical fiction text, A Spy by Chance by Dennis Fertig. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, during Reading and Responding, students read the poem, Today is Very Boring by Jack Prelutsky. 

Materials reflect a 44/56 balance of informational and literary texts with 15 literary and 22 informational texts.

  • Examples of informational include but are not limited to, the following:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students read an informational text, One Small Step by Vidas Barzdukas.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, students read an informational text, A Handful of Dirt by Raymond Bial.

    • In Unit 5 Lesson 6, students read an informational text, Building the Transcontinental Railroad by Samantha Paterson.

  • Examples of literature include but are not limited to, the following:

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, students read the realistic fiction text, Just 17 Syllables by Dennis Fertig.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, students read the literary text, Alejandro’s Gift by Richard E. Albert.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, students read the literary text, Arts Work! By Dan Alvarez.

Indicator 1c

Core/Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Documentation should also include rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1c.

Materials include texts that are of an appropriate quantitative level for the grade according to the Grade 5 Lexile band of 740L-1010L. For the first quarter, texts have a quantitative Lexile range from 780-1040. In the second quarter, texts have a quantitative Lexile range from 830-1210. During the third quarter, texts range quantitatively from 840-1120. For the final quarter, texts have a quantitative Lexile range from 730-1250. Overall, these ranges are appropriate for the grade level. Each unit includes a “Preview the Selection” Lexile tab on Day 1 under the Reading and Responding Tab. Each Unit has an accompanying Lexile Reference Guide that lists the Unit, Lesson, Selection title and Lexile Score. Each unit provides a Scope and Sequence that also references the Lexile Score. The qualitative measure for complexity is limited. The Teacher Edition does introduce the anchor text with a scale of complexity from simple to complex that does not include numerical ratings but does have a brief paragraph description. The Build Background/background information section gives some purpose to what students will be reading about but the information is limited. The educational purpose and placement within the unit and scope and sequence are not explicitly stated.

Most anchor/core texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read Ookpik: The Travels of a Snowy Owl by Bruce Hiscock, which has a Lexile level of 800. According to the materials, the text is moderately complex due to the need “...to visualize the challenges of the animal world, knowledge of Arctic animals and locations, and use of animals as main characters in a realistic fiction genre.”

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read What’s the Buzz: Keeping Bees in Flight by Merrie-Ellen Wilcox. This text has a Lexile level of 990 and is very complex based on academic vocabulary and background knowledge of animals, plants, and geography. 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, during Reading and Responding, students read So You Want to Be President? by Judith St. George, which has a Lexile level of 810. The text is moderately complex due to geographic vocabulary and historical knowledge needed to understand the setting. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights by Russell Freedman. This text has a Lexile level of 1250 and is complex due to knowledge needed of historical social constructs and references, as well as academic language and vocabulary.

Rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

  • There is no rationale for educational purpose and placement provided by the materials. Lexile level is provided as well as a complexity slider that indicates how complex the text is and why it is complex. The qualitative information is provided in the Teacher’s Guide in Preview the Selection. 

Indicator 1d

Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1d. 

The instructional materials provide texts that cover the appropriate Lexile band for Grade 5. The Lexile levels of the texts range from 710-1250. The majority of texts are within the appropriate Grade 5 band of 740-1010. Text complexity falls within the grade level band and does not build over the course of the year. Throughout the course of the year, comprehension strategies that are modeled earlier on are revisited later with less modeling by the teacher. More complex texts have more modeling by the teacher, or use strategies previously taught in the materials. The texts require students to read and reread each text multiple times within the week. The first read of the core text is with strong teacher support, whereas on the third read, students do the reading independently with limited support, if needed. As the year progresses, the routines for reading and analyzing texts are similar and do not change based on the complexity of the text, making it difficult to see how the materials build independence in the reader throughout the year. Reader and task demands frequently focus primarily on comprehension strategies, such as predicting and making connections, that do not align with the standards. Over the course of the year, the materials transition from teacher modeling to teacher prompting when reading and rereading text selections. 

The complexity of anchor texts students read provides an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The texts in Unit 1 range in Lexile from 710 to 1040 and include the text Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. This text has a Lexile of 780.

  • The texts in Unit 2 range in Lexile from 800-1210 and include the text A Handful of Dirt by Raymond Bial. This text has a Lexile of 1210.

  • The texts in Unit 3 range in Lexile from 860-1180 and include the text My Librarian is a Camel: How Books are Brought to Children Around the World by Margriet Ruurs. This text has a Lexile of 960.

  • The texts in Unit 4 range in Lexile from 840-1010 and include the text Alejandro’s Gift by Richard E. Albert and Sylvia Long. This text has a Lexile of 920.

  • The texts in Unit 5 range in Lexile from 910-1120 and include the text Thomas Jefferson Grows a Nation by Peggy Thomas and Stacy Innerst. This text has a Lexile of 1120.

  • The texts in Unit 6 range in Lexile from 820-1250 and include the text The Voice that Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights. This text has a Lexile of 1250.

As texts become more complex, appropriate scaffolds and/or materials are provided in the Teacher Edition (e.g., spending more time on texts, more questions, repeated readings, skill lessons). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read A Year on Bowie Farm by Jen Russell. This text has a Lexile level of 830. During the first read, students work on the comprehension strategies of making connections and summarizing. The Teacher Edition provides modeling for the teacher during the first read.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, the teacher does a read-aloud with the anchor text, Making Waves: Going Under the Surface with Ocean Currents by Phil Moskowitz, modeling the comprehension strategies of summarizing and clarifying. This text has a Lexile of 970. Sentence stems are provided in the Teacher Edition. On Day 2 students reread the selection and classify and categorize details from the text with teacher guidance. They also identify cause and effect from various sections of the book with multiple questions, such as, “Think about the information about gyres on pages 140 and 141. What are several effects that gyres have?” “What is the effect of the minerals being kicked up from the sea floor?” “What is the effect of the plankton being well-fed?” On Day 3 students do these tasks independently using a graphic organizer. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read Midnight Forests: A Story of Gifford Pinchot and Our National Forests by Gary Hines. This text has a Lexile level of 1010, with a moderate complexity level based on “academic language and knowledge demands of how the branches of government work, particularly the passing of a bill into law and roles of Congress and the President.” During the second read students work on cause and effect, main idea and details, and compare and contrast. Graphic organizers are provided as well as a prompt for the teacher in the Teacher Edition.

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, the teacher does a read-aloud with the text, More than Meets the Eye by Amanda Oldman, reviewing comprehension strategies, such as visualizing, clarifying, and making connections. This text has a Lexile of 1080. The teacher prompts students during the reading about these strategies. On Day 2, students read the second half of the text and compare and contrast, identify main ideas and supporting details, and make inferences in various sections of the text. On Day 3, students reread sections of the text to compare and contrast, identify main idea and details, and make inferences using graphic organizers. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read The Last Leaf by O.Henry. This text has a Lexile level of 870. During the first read, students work on the comprehension strategies of clarifying, making predictions, and making connections. Students have used these strategies previously in the year’s worth of materials. The Teacher Edition provides prompting for the teacher, but not modeling as it did in earlier units. 

Indicator 1e

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year, including accountability structures for independent reading.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1e.

The materials provide some opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading. Each unit contains a variety of texts and genres, including an anchor text and a Science or Social Studies Connection, with many lessons containing a third text to support the anchor text. Students also have opportunities to read a variety of texts during small group instruction. The materials provide some supports and scaffolding for the teacher to foster independent reading; however, the prompts frequently focus on various comprehension strategies. The materials provide limited independent reading procedures. There is no independent reading accountability system available for the teacher or students to use, nor are there recommendations for the amount of time students should spend reading, or a suggested schedule to provide students adequate opportunities to engage in independent reading. 

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of text types and genres. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Over the course of the year, students read a variety of genres including biographies, informational texts, myths, narrative nonfiction, adventure tales, legends, fantasies, historical fiction, realistic fiction, science fiction, and poetry. Students also read a variety of text types including articles, excerpts, plays, and a speech.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read the realistic fiction text A Year on Bowie Farm by Jen Russell. In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 3, Reading and Responding, students read the poems “Months” by Christina Rossetti and “Hope” by Oliver Herford. In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 4, Reading and Responding, students read the informational text “Cattle in North America” for the Social Studies Connection. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read the biography John Muir: America’s Naturalist by Sarah Middleton. In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, Reading and Responding, students read the poem A Winter Scene by Henry David Thoreau. In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, Reading and Responding, students read the informational text “The Legacy of John Muir” for the Social Studies Connection.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in a volume of reading. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read The Mystery of Washington Park by Jorge Almazan. In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 3, Reading and Responding, students read the poem “A Bird Came Down the Walk” by Emily Dickinson. In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 4, Reading and Responding, students read the informational text “What’s for Dinner?” for the Science Connection. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students hear the read-aloud “Rosie the Riveter-Art That Inspires!” by Karen Martin. In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading and Responding, students read the anchor text Art Works! By Dan Alvarez. In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 4, Reading and Responding, students read “Town Council” for the Social Studies Connection. 

There is limited teacher guidance to foster independence for all readers (e.g., independent reading procedures, proposed schedule, tracking system for independent reading). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The Teacher Edition provides the teacher with a scope and sequence and daily reading and responding lessons used along with the Student Anthology Anchor text, Science/Social Studies Connection, and Vocabulary stories.

  • The Resource Library contains “Challenge Novels” for students reading above-level, which gives additional novels for these students to read. 

  • Few independent reading procedures are included in the lessons.

    • Leveled reading passages are suggested to be read independently with the On Level and Beyond Level passages. The Approaching Level readers are suggested to work in a small group with the teacher. Teachers are not provided step-by-step procedures for this portion of the lesson.

    • On Day 4 of each weekly lesson, within most units, during the Reading and Response portion, students are asked to read the anchor text a third time independently. Students are asked to read for specific information, such as, “Read specific parts of the story to identify ‘writer’s craft’ or to read the text all the way through.” 

  • There is no proposed schedule for independent reading.

  • Independent reading is embedded into daily lessons. Examples include but are not limited to multiple reads of anchor texts and fluency.

  • There is no tracking system to help monitor independent reading. The Scope and Sequence provides information on the amount of reading done in class by students.

Criterion 1f - 1m

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

13/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The questions and tasks included in the Open Court Grade 5 materials include text-based questions and tasks coupled with protocols and opportunities for students to discuss and explore the materials they are reading. Students draw information from texts to support their discussions, including opportunities to question speakers and engage more deeply as listeners. 

The materials include frequent writing opportunities (both on-demand and process-driven) over the course of the year, however the on-demand opportunities infrequently require students to draw from the texts they are reading. Additionally, students are not provided frequent evidence-based writing opportunities outside of performance assessments. Students engage in editing and revision of their writing and use digital resources, when appropriate. While all writing types called for in the standards are taught in Grade 5,  there is a greater emphasis on informative/explanatory writing. 

The program includes explicit instruction in grammar usage and opportunities for students to practice grammar skills in-context. However, there is a missed opportunity for students to learn and practice using reference materials to support correct spelling.

Indicator 1f

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and/or text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1f. 

The materials include multiple opportunities for students to engage with text-dependent questions and tasks. The materials provide text-dependent questions throughout the week through the Access Complex Text, Essential Questions, Text Connections, and Anchor and Supporting text within the Teacher Edition and Student Anthology Student Book. During the first read, most questions are addressed through teacher-led discussions, but move toward students writing the responses on Days 3 and 4. The materials provide comprehension questions in the Student Anthology that ask students to refer to the text to answer. The Teacher Edition provides prompts, modeling, and possible answers that show how to refer to the text to respond to questions. These prompts help the teacher plan and implement the use of text-dependent questions and tasks with their reading. 

Text-specific and text-dependent questions and tasks support students in making meaning of the core understandings of the texts being studied. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. In the Student Anthology, students answer prompts under the Look Closer section. These include, “Infer why Brian dreams about certain people, and use quotes from the text to support our inference” “Compare and contrast Brian’s reactions to the porcupine quills in his leg and his struggles to make fire. Infer what lesson Brian has learned.”

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students reread the anchor text Monsoons: From Myth to Modern Science by Elaine David. The Student Anthology section,Text Connections, includes text-dependent questions at the end of the reading selection for students such as, “In the myth at the beginning of ‘Monsoons,’ what is the conflict in the narrative, and what does it cause? How does the map on page 125 help you better understand the monsoon cycles in Vietnam? Identify personification of forces of nature in both ‘Monsoons’ and the Read-Aloud ‘Chinook!” How do you think the invention of modern meteorology has changed the way people in Vietnam think about monsoons?”

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read My Librarian Is a Camel: How Books are Brought to Children Around the World by Margriet Ruurs. In the Student Anthology, students answer text connection questions such as, “Which librarians have the hardest job in My Librarian Is a Camel and why do you think so?” “How does having library access change the lives of one town or group of people in My Librarian Is a Camel?”

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, Access Complex Text section, after students reread page 390-391 of Alejandro’s Gift by Robert Albert, students are directed to answer questions such as, “The animals were no longer fearful is an effect. What is a cause?” Students then reread page 391 to determine the main idea.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students are asked, “Why did Jefferson want to purchase the Louisiana Territory? Give specific reasons.” “Also, in ‘The Starving Time’, you read about the challenges that colonists faced when they tried farming. What farming challenges did Jefferson overcome in this selection?”

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read the anchor text The Last Leaf by O. Henry. According to the Discuss the Selection section, students engage in discussion by answering the following text-specific questions, “How do the characters respond to challenges? What are some themes of this story? Use details from the text to support your answer.” In addition, on Day 2, students focus on the close reading skill of sequencing. Students respond to the following examples of text-specific questions, “Sequence is the order in which events happen in a story. Sometimes the events are not told in the order they occur, so readers must pay attention to words that tell time and order. What time words on page 648 tell the sequence? Using these time words as clues, what event on page 648 happened first?”

Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-based questions, tasks, and assignments. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 2 ,Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman Olympic High-Jump Champion by Heather Lang. The Teacher Edition provides the following prompt in the Access Complex Text section, “Have students reread pages 32-33. Discuss as follows: Let’s determine the main idea for page 33. We learn about Alice Coachman’s drive to run and jump. Despite all the obstacles in her way -- her papa’s disapproval, society saying it isn’t ladylike, many chores to do, and a lack of access to gyms where she could practice -- Alice just kept on running and jumping. I think the main idea is that Alice Coachman would not let anything stop her from running and jumping. What details on this page support that main idea?” The materials then provide possible student answers. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, the Teacher Edition provides models and prompts for the comprehension strategies “A Handful of Dirt,”including Making Connections, Summarizing, and Clarifying. Discussion starters engage students in discussion by asking them questions including, “What is the most interesting information you learned about soil? Why do you think so? How will you think about soil differently after reading the selection? What is the most important thing someone should know or understand about dirt? Why?”

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read The Pot That Juan Built by Nancy Andrews-Goebel. Under the Look Closer section, the Teacher Edition states, “Read each question with the class.” One of the questions is, “Describe how Juan shapes his pots. Quote details from the text to support your answer.” The Teacher Edition provides possible answers with examples from the text. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, the Teacher Edition provides a model and prompt for the use of the following strategies during the first read of the text, Why Is the World Green? by Susan Miller. Discussion starters include, “What information surprised you from the text? Why? Besides flooding, what other events might disrupt an ecosystem? Why do you think so? How are the overall structures of ‘Why is the World Green?’ similar to My Librarian is a Camel - how do the authors organize the information?”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read Thomas Jefferson Grows a Nation by Peggy Thomas. Under Access Complex Text, the Teacher Edition gives the following information for the teacher, “Have students reread pages 520-521. Discuss as follows: An author thinks about the main ideas to construct sections of a text. Then, the author provides details to strengthen the main idea of a piece. Let’s determine the main idea of the last paragraph on page 521.” The Teacher Edition continues to model determining the main idea of the text. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students are asked the following questions about the text, The Last Leaf by O’ Henry, “What words and details best describe Mr. Behrman’s character? How would you describe Sue’s character based on story details on page 654? How is Sue different from Mr. Behrman in how they interact with others?” Earlier in the Teacher Edition, the materials direct the teacher to, “Remind students that character traits are revealed through thoughts, words, and actions of the characters, as well as the thoughts and reactions that the other characters have toward them. Authors can also use descriptive words to make the characters come to life.” Possible answers are provided. 

Indicator 1g

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1g. 

Materials provide opportunities for students to use speaking and listening skills to apply their knowledge with a partner or whole group class discussions. In the Resource Library,  teachers can find procedures for a variety of speaking and listening protocols, including Selection Vocabulary, Clues, Problems, and Wondering, Reading the Selection, Know, Want to Know, Learned, and Handing-Off. The materials provide explicit “routines” throughout each unit. Although there are explicit protocols, the protocols have only slight variations over the course of the year. Variations in complexity occur through different types of student discussions, an increase of student independence, and question complexity.

Materials provide varied protocols to support students’ developing speaking and listening skills across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Getting Started, students learn about the Discussion Rules. This routine is continued after the first read of the text selection of every lesson in the unit. According to Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 2, students review the general rules of discussion and the teacher models how to ask for clarification about a topic that is being discussed. As the year progresses, students will take more responsibility during the discussion. They should connect conversations, explain their own ideas, clarify when necessary, summarize when appropriate, and ask additional questions. They begin discussing the selection. Discussion rules include:

    • Listen carefully as others speak. 

    • Do not interrupt a speaker. 

    • Raise their hands when they want to speak. 

    • Ask questions to get more information from a speaker. 

    • Respect others when they are speaking. 

    • Take turns speaking. 

    • Keep questions and responses focused on the idea that is being discussed.

  • The Know, Want to Know, Learned Routine supports students as they browse the story and encourages student discussion of possible things that may be learned, questions and connections to content or topic. 

  • The Handing-Off Routine is carried out in groups or with a partner, utilizing sentence stems for discussion such as: “I didn’t know that….” or “This selection made me think of…” or “I think this connects to the theme because…”. This routine encourages students to take control and lead the discussions, while the teacher periodically “checks in.” Over time, students are directed to take over more of the protocols and discussions as the teacher decreases their participation/scaffolding.

  • The Reading the Selection routine provides explicit teacher modeling of student expectations for before reading, during reading, and after reading, including speaking and listening protocols. 

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Day 1, students browse Hatchet by Gary Paulson using the Clues, Problems, and Wonderings Routine. The teacher gives a short background about the selection. According to Instructional Routine 12, students use a graphic organizer to record any clues about the selection using text features such as charts, graphs, pictures or illustrations.Students write any possible problems anticipated (e.g., unknown words, confusing content, or text features). Students record wonders about the selection in the third column of the graphic organizer, including connections to the theme or other stories. During the reading, students add to their Clues, Problems, and Wonderings graphic organizer. After reading, students review and discuss what they have written with the whole class. The Teacher Guide directs, “Have students explain their thoughts and what they have learned from the discussion. Tell them they can return to the CPW chart to determine whether any of their questions were answered or whether they learned any new information from reading this selection. Let students decide which items need further discussion.”

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 1, students read Salmon Creek by Annette LeBox and use the Handing-Off Routine. The materials state, “Students should come to discussions prepared with their Student Anthology, so they can explicitly draw on the text throughout the discussion. Remind students to follow the agreed-upon rules for discussions, as necessary.”

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 1, students read The Pot That Juan Built by Nancy Andrews-Goebel. In the Preview the Selection section, students begin a KWL chart. Under the Discuss the Selection section, the Teacher Edition states, “Have students explain their thoughts and what they have learned from the discussion. Tell them they can return to the KWL chart to determine whether any of their questions were answered or whether they learned any new information from reading this selection. Let students decide which items need further discussion.” The materials include a completed KWL chart and Routine 8: Know, Want to Know, Learned as models.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 2, after reading the text selection, students are asked to discuss the selection. As a class, the students share their observations about the text and then hand-off leadership to a peer to share their ideas, thus allowing the students to manage the discussions without teacher intervention. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 1, students read The Voice that Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights and the teacher uses the Handing Off Routine. Teacher directions state, “Students should come to discussions prepared with their Student Anthology, so they can explicitly draw on the text throughout the discussion. Remind students of the agreed-upon rules for discussions, as necessary. Engage students in a discussion by asking them the questions that follow.” Questions are provided with possible answers. 

Speaking and listening instruction includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The Program Overview provides general guidance on the facilitation of speaking and listening instruction. It states, “Listening and speaking skills are integrated throughout the lessons in Open Court Reading,” and then lists that the focus skills are “listening, speaking, interaction, and presenting information.” Throughout the program, tips are provided for the teacher to utilize when integrating these focus areas into classroom instruction including facilitating discussions, monitoring skills, and scaffolding support. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, materials provide guidance to the teacher to support discussing the text selection. For example, materials state, “TELL students to summarize the Read Aloud and then begin a discussion of the selection using Routine A, the Handing-Off Routine. Remind students to make comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. Prompt students to pose questions related to other students’ comments or to the topic of discussion.”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, materials provide teacher guidance to support student discussions of the text selection. For example, materials state, “USE Routine A, the Handing-Off Routine, to discuss “A Spy by Chance” as a class, carrying out assigned roles as leaders of the discussion. Students should come to discussions prepared, with their Student Anthology, so they can explicitly draw on the text throughout the discussion. Remind students to follow the agreed-upon rules for discussions, as necessary.”

Indicator 1h

Materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1h.

Throughout the year’s worth of materials, students have opportunities to discuss what they are reading through varied speaking and listening opportunities. Discussions are incorporated into all the lessons under Discuss the Text. Students engage in conversations throughout each unit through the Reading and Responding portion of the lesson plan. Opportunities can be found within Reading and Responding in Access Complex Text, Text Connections, Close Reading, Comprehension Strategies, Discuss the Selection, Look Closer, and Inquiry Steps. These opportunities vary depending on the lesson and day within each unit. Many comprehension questions ask the students to discuss their answers and provide follow-up and related questions. Students discuss the theme and the Big Ideas in relation to the texts they are reading. Speaking and listening work requires students to utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and sources. Many of the discussions ask for evidence from the text that students are reading in the lesson. Students orally deliver their findings from the research they conduct during the inquiry process. A rubric is provided to assist in expectations for both the speaker and listeners during presentations. During the inquiry process, the teacher and students ask follow-up questions related to text previously read in the unit. 

Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading through varied speaking and listening opportunities. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, Discuss the Read-Aloud, students listen to The Inventor’s Secret: What Thomas Edison Told Henry Ford by Suzanne Slade. Students listen for elements of informational text and discover what advice Thomas Edison gave Henry Ford. After the read-aloud, students answer questions such as, “Why was Henry Ford so determined to build a gas car? Why did Henry Ford have deep respect for Thomas Edison? Is perseverance necessary for success? Why or why not?” Students are asked to revisit the purpose of reading by responding to,  “What elements of informational text did you notice? What did Henry Ford learn from Thomas Edison?”

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, Text Connections, students answer questions in the Student Anthology. The Teacher Edition states, “Call on various students to respond to each other’s questions and ask new ones when relevant to the topic.” Some of the questions include, “According to the life cycle section at the end of ‘Salmon Creek,’ why do Coho salmon have different colors and patterns at different life stages? Based on ‘Critter’s Crossing!’ and ‘Salmon Creek,’ what type of human-made crossing might be useful for spawning salmon?”

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, Discuss the Selection, students read The Pot that Juan Built by Nancy Andrews-Goebel. After reading the selection, students engage in a discussion using the Handing Off Routine within Discuss the Selection by answering questions such as, “What is the most interesting thing you learned about Juan’s pottery? Why do you think so? Do you think it is important to preserve arts in a community? Why or why not? Do you think the author’s use of rhyming lines was effective in telling Juan’s story? Why or why not?” 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, Science Connection, students read “Kinds of Maps” as a class. Afterwards, students work with a partner to answer the questions, “How do maps help us understand people, places, and environments? Why do you think people decide to live where they do or move to other places? Think about the features Lewis and Clark mapped in the West: rivers, forests, and mountains. How might these physical characteristics have led to the creation of regions?”

Speaking and listening work requires students to utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and/or sources. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, Text Connection, students read “The Great Serum Race” by Debbie S. Miller. Students are directed to turn to page 82 of the Student Anthology. The teacher reads over each text-specific question and calls on students to answer and discuss. Prompts include, “Explain why the sled dog teams in ‘The Great Serum Race’ were the only way to get the serum to Nome in the winter of 1925. Describe one event from the text that proves the argument of the final stanza in the poem “It Couldn’t Be Done.”

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, Inquiry: Step 6-Deliver Presentations,  students present on research they have conducted throughout the unit. The directions state, “After the presentations, have other students summarize and recount key ideas and details from the information presented orally and through other media. They should note how each speaker’s claims are supported by evidence.”

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, Look Closer: Keys to Comprehension, students complete a second read of the text and are expected to cite evidence when answering comprehension questions. The teacher calls on students to orally answer questions such as, “Based on ‘John Muir’ and ‘Midnight Forests’, what did Muir and Pinchot have in common? On what did they disagree? Support your answer with text details.”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read Thomas Jefferson Grows a Nation by Peggy Thomas. Under the Discuss the Selection section, students answer the question, “How was the account of the Federalist point of view described in this selection similar to how it was described in ‘The Search for the Mysterious Patriot’? How are the accounts different?” The Teacher’s Edition provides a possible answer with evidence from the text.

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read The Last Leaf by O. Henry. During the Discuss the Selection section, one of the questions students discuss is, “How do the characters respond to challenges? What are some themes of this story? Use details from the text to support your answer.” Possible answers are provided for the teacher with text evidence included. 

Indicator 1i

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1i. 

The materials provide opportunities for both on-demand and process writing over the course of the year. On-demand opportunities are typically provided in the Reading and Responding section. Under the Look Closer section, students respond to a writing prompt located in the Student Anthology. Students also respond to prompts provided in the Skills Practice book that provide opportunities for on-demand writing.  However, on-demand writing opportunities infrequently require students to draw upon the texts in the unit. Process writing, including revising and editing,  occur during the Language Arts section of the lessons. The teacher models revising and editing and the students are given time to revise and edit their pieces.  The Skills Practice provides a revision and editing checklist for students. There are opportunities to use digital resources for typing, editing, and presenting throughout the materials. The Language Arts Handbook provides tips for writing on a computer.

Materials include on-demand writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction. However, on-demand writing opportunities infrequently require students to draw upon the texts in the unit. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read The Great Serum Race: Blazing the Iditarod Trail by Debbie S. Miller. Under the Look Closer section, students answer comprehension questions and then complete the writing section on their own. In the Student Anthology, the writing section states, “The mushers in ‘The Great Serum Race’ depended on one another to complete their task. Working with others can be both challenging and rewarding. Write an opinion paragraph explaining why you prefer to work on tasks with a team or by yourself.” Students are not required or encouraged to draw upon texts to support their opinions.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 4, during the Reading and Responding, Look Closer section, students answer comprehension questions orally as a class. Students then complete the following Write activity, “Think about a moment in your life that required knowledge, truth, and courage. Describe the moment and how it changed you.” Students can easily complete the writing activity without having read the texts and are neither required nor encouraged to use the reading to support their writing. 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read The Pot That Juan Built by Nancy Andrews-Goebel. Under the Look Closer section, students answer comprehension questions and then complete the Write section on their own. In the Student Anthology, the Write section states, “Write a nursery rhyme telling a story from your own experience.” Students are not required or encouraged to draw upon texts to support the elements of their nursery rhyme.

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, during the Reading and Responding, Look Closer section, students answer comprehension questions orally as a class. Students then complete the following Write activity, “Write an opinion paragraph about the animal defense adaptation you think is most effective. Be sure to include reasons that support your opinions.” Students are not required or encouraged to draw upon texts to support their opinions.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read The Search for the Mysterious Patriot by Vidas Barzdukas. Under Practice Comprehension, students complete a Skills Practice page. One of the questions states, “Write instructions for a simple card or board game. Describe the game from start to finish in the correct sequence.” Students are not required or encouraged to draw upon texts to support their writing.

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 4, during the Reading and Responding, Look Closer section, students answer comprehension questions orally as a class. Students then complete the following Write activity, “Write an explanation telling how ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ is a useful story for teaching children to be cautious.” Students are not required or encouraged to draw upon texts to support their contentions.

Materials include process writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction. Opportunities for students to revise and edit are provided.Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 3, during the Language Arts block, students start prewriting their opinion piece. In this lesson, students  plan their opinion writing. The Teacher Edition states, “Display a TREE graphic organizer, and review with students why it is a useful tool for planning and organizing a strong opinion essay. Refer students to the Language Arts Handbook for more information and an example of a TREE graphic organizer.” 

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Day 2, during the Language Arts block, students work to revise their opinion writing pieces. During Guided Practice, students are placed into groups and given guiding questions. The materials state, “Have students take turns reading aloud their drafts as the other students in the group listen and provide feedback. Circulate among groups to make sure students are taking notes about the feedback they receive.” During the Apply section, students revise their opinion writing based on the feedback. 

  • In Unit 2, during the Language Arts block, students work with informational writing pieces throughout the entire unit. For example, in Lessons 5 and 6, students write an informational piece about the arts. They research their topics and follow the steps in the writing process.

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, Day 4, during the Language Arts block, students draft their Narrative Writing piece. The Teacher Edition provides a model narrative to demonstrate drafting. In the Apply section, the Teacher’s Edition states, “Have students begin writing the drafts of their personal narratives, using the provided graphic organizer, and the writer’s goals to guide them. Remind students to think about which parts of their story should be told in the beginning, the middle, the climax, or the ending.” 

  • In Unit 3 Lesson 3, Day 5, during the Language Arts block, students edit their narrative piece. The materials state, “Have students edit and proofread their revised tall tales, using proofreading marks and the editing checklist on Skills Practice.” The Skills Practice page provides a checklist for the students to use regarding editing/proofreading.

  •  In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 5, during the Language Arts block, students revise their nonfiction piece. A Skills Practice page is provided for the students to use, which includes a checklist for revising. The checklist includes items such as “Have you presented all of your ideas clearly so the reader will understand them? Is the conclusion strong and effective?” 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, Day 3, during the Language Arts block, students publish their Describing an Event piece. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell students that today they will be publishing and presenting their new stories describing an event. If they have not already done so, they will need to produce a final, clean copy of their writing to share with others.” A Presenting Writing routine is provided, as well as a Skills Practice page with a publishing checklist. The Language Arts Handbook page with examples of multimedia sources to use when publishing work is also provided.

Materials include digital resources where appropriate. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students work on Inquiry: Step 5-Develop Presentations. The Teacher Edition states, “Give groups time to rehearse their presentations. If any groups have created a slideshow, help them practice the computer skills needed to click through the slides while using a projector, and make sure they practice the timing of their presentation.” 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, Day 3, during the Language Arts block, students edit their narrative. While editing, students have the option to use the computer to edit. The Teacher Edition states, “Some students may choose to write and edit using computers. Remind them that editing and proofreading software can miss many types of errors, so they will still need to carefully read through a copy of their writing to look for mistakes. Refer students to the Language Arts Handbook for information about using computers for writing and editing.”

Indicator 1j

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1j. 

The materials provide many opportunities for students to learn, practice, and apply the required writing types; however. there is no balance among the required writing types across the year. Each six-week unit provides a language arts section that focuses on process writing. Students typically work on 4-5 pieces in the unit. The units often focus on a text type, such as opinion, but those text types come up again in other units, as well as with the on-demand writing prompts in the Reading and Response section. Students learn to write opinion statements, informative/explanatory texts (informative reports, descriptions, explanations, summaries, book reviews), and narrative texts (personal narratives, autobiographies, biographies, realistic stories, fairy tales). With multiple process writing prompts and on-demand writing prompts throughout each unit, there are sufficient writing opportunities to cover the course of a year. 

Materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Approximately 32% of the writing in Grade 5 is opinion. 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Day 3, during the Language Arts block, students begin writing an Opinion Writing piece. Under Instruct, the Teacher Edition states, “Remind students that they are writing an opinion essay about the invention they think has had the most impact on human society. Explain that they will need to look in a source for facts related to the invention they have chosen. They will include at least one fact in their opinion essay.” 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students respond to the Write prompt in their Student Anthology, which states, “Write a letter to your own imaginary descendants, explaining what you think is most important in life. Give evidence to support your argument.” 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 3, during the Language Arts block, students begin drafting a persuasive letter. While drafting, the teacher reminds them about the goals they should have in mind as they draft. Some of the goals are, “Use persuasive techniques, including an emotional appeal” and “Write with an effective voice that is appropriate for the purpose and audience.”

  • Approximately 41% of the writing in Grade 5 is informative/explanatory. 

    • In Unit 2, during the Language Arts block, students engage in informational writing throughout the unit.The writing is guided by the teacher with the students taking over responsibility to “complete all the steps of the writing process individually” on the final writing piece of the unit.

    • In Unit 4, Lessons 4-6, during the Language Arts block, students write a research report about a topic that interests them.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Day 4, during the Language Arts block, students draft their describing an event text. Under Instruct, the Teacher Edition prompts the teacher to display goals for the students. Some of the goals are, “Make precise word choices that clearly describe the event” and “Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, clauses, and phrases.”

    • In Unit 6, Lessons 3-4, during the Language Arts block, students write a biography over the next two weeks, including researching their subject and taking notes.

  • Approximately 27% of the writing in Grade 5 is narrative. 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students respond to the Write prompt in their Student Anthology, which states, “From time to time, people have discussed building some type of station on the moon. Write a short science fiction story describing what life might be like in such a station.” 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 3, during the Language Arts block, students conduct prewriting for their tall tale. Under Apply, the Teacher Edition states, “Refer students to the Language Arts Handbook for more information and examples of story grammar, including plot structure.” 

    • In Unit 6, Lessons 1-2, during the Language Arts block, students write an historical fiction piece over a two week period, including researching historical elements to include in their writing.

Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets (either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Day 4, during the Reading and Responding, students respond to the Write prompt in their Student Anthology, which states, “In ‘Hatchet,’ Brian must learn to regulate his sleep as well as his pace of eating and his thoughts about being rescued. Describe things you take for granted in your everyday life that you would have to learn to regulate in a survival situation.” 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 2, during the Language Arts block, students begin to plan for their Response to Literature writing piece. During the Apply section, students complete a page in Skills Practice 2. On this page, they record notes on a character from the literary piece they chose to write about. Students take notes on the character’s traits, motivations, thoughts and feelings, relationships, and conflict and changes. 

Indicator 1k

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1k. 

The materials provide limited opportunities for students to write using text evidence. Opportunities for evidence-based writing typically occur during research projects. Evidence-based writing is not always explicitly called for within the materials. Often, students are asked to discuss, answer or work with a partner, but the materials do not explicitly state that students are to respond with a written answer or a written answer using text evidence. Within every formal assessment in the Reading and Responding section, students answer a constructed-response question that asks them to use evidence from the text. However, there are not many opportunities for students to explicitly practice a text-based written response prior to the assessment. The “Getting Started” Week, Unit 1, provides more explicit directives for students to write using text-evidence; however, the rest of the unit does not include the same explicit directive, leaving the teacher to make assumptions that the text-based evidence discussions should also be responded to in writing. Additionally, many of the tasks and questions do not require text-based evidence. Students are often asked to write in response to a broad topic that does not require a response based on text evidence. Furthermore, during differentiated instruction, all students have explicit directives to write using text evidence, yet only students in the “Beyond Level” group are required to do so.

Materials provide infrequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 2, during Language Arts, after students read Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne, they are asked to write a paragraph that describes Axel. The Teacher Edition states, “Explain that they must use evidence in the text, such as Axel’s thoughts and actions, to support their statements about him.” On Day 4 of the series of lessons, students write a short paragraph about whether or not they would recommend the story to a friend and why. Students are directed to offer reasons and evidence and details from the story for their opinion. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 5, during Reading and Responding, students complete a formal assessment. The prompt, found in Lesson and Unit Assessment 2, states, “Read the item below. Write complete sentences for your answer. Support your answer with evidence from the selection.” The question is, “Describe the role each of the children played in this selection. Use your own thoughts as well as information from the selection.” 

Few writing opportunities are focused around students’ recall of information to develop opinions from reading closely and working with evidence from texts and sources. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students respond to the writing prompt after reading “It Couldn’t Be Done” by Edgar Albert Guest and One Small Step by Vidas Barzdukas. The writing prompt states, “From time to time, people have discussed building some type of station on the moon. Write a short science fiction story describing what life might be like in such a station.” The writing prompt topic is related to the text; however, students are not required to use text evidence to support their writing.    

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students respond to a writing prompt after reading Abraham Lincoln & Frederick Douglass: The Story Behind an American Friendship by Russell Freedman. The prompt states, “With the Emancipation Proclamation, Abraham Lincoln changed our country for the better. Write about the ways that you can make your community better, safer, and more welcoming for all people.” The writing prompt references ideas from the text, but does not require students to use text evidence to support their writing.

Indicator 1l

Materials include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards, with opportunities for application in context.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1l.

Materials provide explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards through the instruction and guided practice sections of the day’s activities that direct the teacher on wording and examples to teach the skill. The Skills Practice pages, Dictation, and Writing Assignments provide opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context, including applying grammar and convention skills to writing.

Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and usage standards for the grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, students each write two sentences with prepositional phrases that function as adverbs and two sentences with prepositional phrases that function as adjectives. Students exchange sentences with a partner and check for any grammar mistakes. Volunteers share their sentences with the class. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Conjunctions, the materials state, “Display the following sentences. Point out the conjunctions. Ryan and Anna visited the Museum of Natural History. and Would you like to play chess or read a book? Explain to students that a conjunction is a word used to connect words or groups of words. The conjunctions in the first sentences are examples of coordinating conjunctions connecting words or groups of words with equal importance in a sentence. Tell students that the second sentence contains an example of a correlative conjunction to join words and groups of words.”

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Guided Practice, sentences are displayed, and students add appropriate interjections. Example: _____! You can’t be serious! Students write a pair of sentences with interjections. One sentence uses an exclamation point after the interjection, and the other uses a comma. Volunteers share their sentences and explain why each interjection was used. 

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Verb Tenses Instruct, the materials state, “Display the following sentence. Aliyah had sung in the choir. Past-perfect, Aliyah will have sung in the choir by this time next year. Future-perfect. Tell students that the present-perfect tense shows an action completed in the present or one that began in the past but continues into the present. The past perfect tense shows an action that began and ended in the past. The future-perfect tense shows an action that begins and ends in the future, usually before another event begins.”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 5, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, students identify the verb tense in each displayed sentence and correct any shifts in verb tense.

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, the teacher writes the following words on separate slips of paper: past, present, present-perfect, past-perfect, future-perfect, and place them in a container. Volunteers provide a simple sentence using a present-tense verb. A different student draws a slip of paper from the container and rewords the sentence using the tense shown. This continues as time allows, or until all students have had a chance to reword a sentence.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Review, the materials state, “The teacher reviews verb tenses and reminds students that a verb tense tells when an action takes place, and the perfect tenses describe actions in terms of when they began and/or ended. Students tell how perfect-tense verbs are formed. The teacher reminds students that they need to be consistent in the verb tenses they use because shifts in verb tense will confuse their readers. A six-column chart is made on the board and labeled present, past, future, present perfect, past perfect, future-perfect. The teacher provides students with a verb, such as wait, and tells the verb form in all six tenses. The verb tenses are recorded on the chart, and volunteers use some of them in sentences.”

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Verb Tenses Instruct, the materials state, “Display the following sentences. Point out the verb tense in each. By the time she finishes, Abbie will have baked six pies. future-perfect tense, The class has begun their unit on the Middle Ages. present-perfect tense, The soldiers march into the field and set up camp. present tense, Pine cones and needles fell to the forest floor. past tense, The United Nations will host a conference on global pollution. future tense, Workers had already removed the bike racks from the park. past-perfect tense.” The teacher reminds the students of the types of verb tenses and talks through how to form the verb in each tense. The teacher explains that when they write, students need to be consistent in the verb tenses they use. Shifts in verb tense confuse readers because they are unsure of which tense is correct.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Guided Practice, the teacher displays sentences and helps students correct the shifts in verb tense. Example: Since I was five years old, I will have been taking piano lessons.

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Conjunctions Instruct, the materials state, “Display the following sentences. Point out the conjunctions. Neither camels nor llamas are native to Canada. neither, nor We cannot leave until you have finished your homework. until Explain to students that a conjunction is a word used to connect words or groups of words. Tell students that the sentences contain an example of a correlative conjunction. Correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join words and groups of words. The correlative conjunctions are either/or and neither/nor. Explain that the fourth sentence has an example of a subordinating conjunction, which joins two clauses, or groups of words, in a way that one clause is dependent on the other.”

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 5, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Review, the students identify the conjunctions and tell whether they are coordinating, subordinating, or correlative. Example: Either the dog jumped the fence, or someone left the gate open. 

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use punctuation to separate items in a series.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Commas Instruct, the materials state, “Display the sentences in the ePresentation slide. Point out the commas in each example. Remind students that commas are punctuation marks that help organize thoughts and items in a sentence. They show the reader where to pause and what thoughts go together. Tell students that commas are used to separate items in a series of words or phrases. A comma is used before or after the noun of direct address to set it off from the rest of the sentence.”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, students work with partners to write two sentences using colons, each in a different way, and one sentence that uses a semicolon. Partners exchange their sentences with another set of partners. Students read the sentences they receive and correct any errors in punctuation. Volunteers read aloud some of the sentences. 

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, students work in small groups and write four sentences using commas in each of the following ways: one with a series of items, one with an introductory phrase, one with a tag question, and one with a noun of direct address. Groups exchange their sentences with other groups and check the sentences for comma usage. Each group corrects any errors and volunteers to share some of the sentences and explain the purpose of the commas.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Capitalization, Sentence Types, Conjunctions, Commas, the materials state, “Remind students that commas help organize thoughts and items in a sentence. They are used to separate three or more items in a series of words or phrases; they are used after long introductory phrases, and they set off tag questions and nouns of direct address.”

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Guided Practice, the teacher writes a sentence on the board, and students explain the role of the commas in the sentence, Maisy, you have read Hatchet, haven’t you? The first comma sets off the direct address. The second comma sets off the tag question.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 5, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Review, the teacher reviews with students that commas help organize thoughts and items in a sentence and are used to separate three or more items in a series of words or phrases, they are used after long introductory phrases, and they set off tag questions and nouns of direct address. The teacher displays sentences, and students add commas where they are needed. Example: You are volunteering at the shelter this spring aren’t you Rose?

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, students review punctuation in titles of works with students. The materials state, “Remind students that titles need to be formatted to set them off from the rest of the sentence. Ask students to tell you how to format longer works, such as books, movies, or the names of TV series. Use underlining or italics. Remind students that they should use italics when they are typing, though they can use underlining when writing by hand. Ask students to tell you how to format shorter works, such as poems, songs, or television episodes. Use quotation marks.” The teacher displays sentences and has students rewrite each sentence, adding correct punctuation for each title.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Guided Practice, the teacher displays sentences, and volunteers tell how to punctuate each title. Examples: My grandpa has a copy of the book Oh! The Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss. Trees is a poem by Joyce Kilmer written in 1913. 

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 5, Spelling, Spelling Assessment, students write words dictated by the teacher. The teacher reads each word, uses it in a sentence, and gives students time to spell it correctly. The words contain the Greek root bio; and Latin roots aud and rupt.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 1, Spelling, Pretest, students write words dictated by the teacher. The teacher reads each word, uses the word in a sentence, and gives students time to spell it correctly and then has them proofread and correct any misspelled words. The words contain the prefixes en-, per-, and semi.

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, Word Analysis Suffixes -ant/-ent and -al/-ial Developing Oral Language, students use the words from the word lines in sentence starters to write sentences. Students expand each sentence by adding more details to demonstrate the word’s meaning. Another student gives an antonym for the same word from the word lines and uses the antonym in a complete sentence.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 2, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Guided Practice, the teacher displays sentences and volunteers correct each run-on or sentence fragment. Example: The Bolshoi Theater is in Moscow, Russia, its ballet company is one of the oldest in the world. 

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 3, Read the Poem, Language Use: Metaphor and Dialect, the teacher tells students that a metaphor is a figure of speech that compares two unlike things, without using the words like or as. Students reread the first two lines of the poem and name the two things being compared. Students describe what a crystal stair might be like and how life is like a crystal stair. Students tell what the author compares to life’s troubles or struggles. The teacher points out examples of dialects like “I’se,” “a-climbin,’” and “kinder.” Students rewrite one sentence from the poem using formal English and compare and contrast how this changes the sentence’s feeling for the reader.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 4, Writer’s Craft Story Elements: Character, students reread pages 654–655. The teacher discusses the following questions with students, “How are the characters similar in how they speak English? Possible Answer: Both address people in a proper way with Miss or Mr. How is Mr. Behrman different from Sue in how he speaks English? Possible Answer: Mr. Behrman has an accent. He says ‘Vy’ instead of ‘why’ and ‘de’ instead of ‘the’.”

Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context, including applying grammar and convention skills to writing. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, students complete Skills Practice 1 pages 93-94. Students rewrite sentences that are missing capital letters. For example: the fourth of july celebrates the signing of the declaration of independence.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics: Verb Tense, students complete Skills Practice 2 pages 27-28. In the Apply section, students rewrite sentences using the correct tense for the underlined verb.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 5, Summary: Editing, students edit their writing using the editing checklist and suggestions from their peers. Included on the editing checklist are these prompts, “Did you use check comma usage in compound and complex sentences? Did you check all of your verb tenses for mistakes? Did you check the writing for misspelled words? Did you check the writing for mistakes in capitalization?”

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 5, Response to Nonfiction: Revising, students use Skills Practice 2 page 132 to revise their writing. The Skills Practice page is a revising and editing checklist that includes, “Did you check for mistakes in pronoun use? Did you correctly punctuate titles of work? Did you check the writing for misspelled words? Did you check for misused homophones?” 

Indicator 1m

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1m.

The teacher materials provide a daily lesson or component for vocabulary development and strategies that are consistent throughout each unit. The Scope and Sequence provides the vocabulary words for each lesson. Lessons contain concept vocabulary that relates to the unit theme as well as selection vocabulary found in the mentor text. The selection vocabulary words are also included in a vocabulary story, in which keywords are used and highlighted throughout the text in the Student Anthology Book. The Social Studies and Science Connection texts contain some of the selection vocabulary words as well. Students discuss vocabulary words together in class and write sentences using vocabulary words in the Skills Practice book. High-value words are incorporated in the vocabulary words, often with concept vocabulary or the words that appear in the Science and Social Studies connection. In the Language Arts portion of the materials, students are encouraged to use their new vocabulary in writing. 

Materials provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year-long vocabulary development component. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Section 4 of the Language Arts Handbook examines a series of vocabulary skills in the form of mini-lessons for students to learn, practice, and apply to their writing. 

  • The Selection Vocabulary Routine provides guidance and support for student instruction which is referenced throughout the year: The routine is as follows:

    • Develop Vocabulary: Display the vocabulary words, pronunciations, and parts of speech. For each vocabulary word, discuss the definition. Have students use the context in the selection or the parts of the word to verify the meaning of the word. Provide examples and clarification as needed. 

    • Practice Vocabulary: As a class, review the selection vocabulary words by completing the vocabulary activity orally. Have students complete the vocabulary Skills Practice individually.

    • Apply vocabulary: Have students read the vocabulary story in Skills Practice. Review the selection vocabulary words and discuss the new forms of the words and any meanings that may have changed. Discuss the Concept Vocabulary Word and its connection to the theme.

    • Extend Vocabulary: As a class, complete the Extend Vocabulary Activity to help students expand their understanding of the selection vocabulary words. If applicable, complete the Multiple-Meaning Words activity to help students identify and understand the multiple-meaning vocabulary words.

    • Review Vocabulary: Complete the vocabulary activity to help students review the words. Provide examples and clarification as needed.

  • The activities in the Intervention Guide can be used to develop and reinforce vocabulary. If students struggle to comprehend the meaning of vocabulary words, it is recommended to develop student-friendly definitions before proceeding with reinforcing activities. Reinforcing activities are grouped by general activities as well as category-specific activities for position words, naming words, action words, descriptive words, and listening, speaking, and viewing.

Vocabulary is repeated in contexts (before texts, in texts) and across multiple texts. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, for the second section of Hatchet by Gary Paulsen, students learn and discuss the Selection Vocabulary, freshwater and regulate and how they are important to understanding the text. In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read “Games of Survival” for the Social Studies connection. The text contains the same vocabulary words. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, Develop Vocabulary, teachers use the Selection Vocabulary Routine, as well as specific directions and examples for each vocabulary word. For example, “The word blustery is defined as ‘characterized by violent winds.’ How do the surrounding sentences on page 155 give clues about the meaning of blustery?” A possible answer is also provided to support the teacher. This routine is done with all the Selection Vocabulary words.

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students complete the activity Finish the Sentence under the Practice Vocabulary section. Students are given sentence stems that contain the vocabulary words and they must complete the sentences to make sense. In Unit 3, Lesson 6, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students complete the activity Multiple-Meaning Words under the Extend Vocabulary section. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell students that devour and promote are multiple-meaning words. Display the given definitions, and read them aloud with students. Then have students use the words in different sentences to demonstrate their various meanings.”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 2, during Reading and Responding for the text The Search for the Mysterious Patriot by Vidas Barzdukas, students review words and definitions in the Develop Strategy section. The Teacher Edition states, “Display the vocabulary words. Read each line with the class and then have students turn to page 491 in Student Anthology. Use the activity below to help students develop their vocabularies.” Students review the vocabulary words found in the text. In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read “The School News Reporter” and circle the vocabulary words they find in the text. The Teacher Edition states, “After students have finished reading the vocabulary story, tell them to use the Student Anthology Glossary to compare and contrast how the words are used in ‘The Search for the Mysterious Patriot’ with how they are used in ‘The School News Reporter.’”

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, Apply Vocabulary, after reading the vocabulary story, students use the Student Anthology Glossary to compare and contrast how the words are used in ‘The Voice That Challenged a Nation’ with how the are used in ‘The Soprano Singing Club.’

Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words (e.g., words that might appear in other contexts/content areas). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Program Overview, Vocabulary, the Teacher Edition provides a vocabulary routine that is followed throughout the year. For example, before reading a selection, the teacher orally introduces the definitions of the Concept Vocabulary Word as well along with any vocabulary words critical to understanding the selection. 

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students discuss the Concept Vocabulary Word in the Build Background section. The Teacher Edition states, “Have students discuss how they think the word ambition relates to the unit theme.” The unit theme is Perseverance. In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students discuss the concept vocabulary in the Apply Vocabulary section. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell students to think about the Concept Vocabulary Word ambition. Say, ambition is a positive trait for a character to possess. We have talked about ambition in relation to Lupe and wanting to be better at a sport and win a championship. When is another time that your ambition could help you?”

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, Concept Vocabulary, students focus on the word instinct. Students discuss the concept word and its definition, “understanding that occurs immediately and does not need to be learned.” Students discuss how they think the word instinct relates to the theme.

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, in the Build Background section for Just 17 Syllables by Dennis Fertig, students discuss the Concept Vocabulary Word artistry. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell them that artistry is defined as ‘being especially artistic or of great quality.’” Throughout the reading, students consider how artistry relates both to the theme as well as the text.

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, Develop Vocabulary, students read the text Midnight Forests by Gary Hines. As students read the text, they notice the highlighted words and identify them as Selection Vocabulary words. Additional words within the text are also used to increase understanding of the science content. For example, students are asked to find the definition for conservation in the text on page 361: “the wise use and scientific management of all the country’s natural resources.” On Day 4, during the Look Closer section, students are asked to write about “some ways you can protect and preserve our forest.”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students discuss the Concept Vocabulary Word. The Teacher Edition states, “Have students discuss how they think the word tribulation relates to the unit theme.” In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students discuss the Concept Vocabulary Word under the Apply Vocabulary section. The materials state, “Tell students to think about the Concept Vocabulary Word tribulation. Say, The word tribulation means ‘a state of incredible suffering’ and we have discussed how this relates to The Civil War and slavery. Can you think of another example of tribulation?”

Students are supported to accelerate vocabulary learning with vocabulary in their reading, speaking, and writing tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Program Overview, Vocabulary, directions state that after reading, “Students review any interesting words they identified and discussed during reading. They record these words in their Writer’s Notebooks and are encouraged to use these words in their discussions and in writing.” Students also use the words in a variety of oral and written activities. Vocabulary review activities can be found regularly throughout the lesson.

  • Visual Vocabulary can be found in the Resource Library. This activity allows students to see and hear the word in the form of a flash card. Students are given the pronunciation of the word, part of speech, definition, and how the word is used in context. In addition, students see the word and an image that can be connected to the word.

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students complete the Multiple-Meaning Words activity under the Extend Vocabulary section. The Teacher Edition states, “Tell students that descending and capsule are multiple-meaning words. Display the given definitions, and read them aloud with students. Then have students use the words in different sentences to demonstrate their various meanings.” 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 3 during Reading and Responding, students use the Selection Vocabulary Routine. Students practice with the selection vocabulary and verify they understand the meaning of each word. Students study the Selection Vocabulary words from “Midnight Forests: A Story of Gifford Pinchot and Our National Forests.” They read each of the sentences and choose the correct answer. Students must explain their responses to the sentences, “If you have a dignified guest, is the person respected or forgotten?” “If you veto the movie suggestion, do you approve or not approve of the suggestion?”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students complete the activity This or That under the Practice Vocabulary section that applies vocabulary taught during the close reading to other contexts. The Teacher Edition states, “Display the selection vocabulary words from ‘The Search for the Mysterious Patriot.’ Ask students to answer each question below with one of the vocabulary words. Have students explain their responses.” Some questions include, “You take time to make your bed. Does it take a mere or considerable two minutes? In the movie, one character is cheating and lying. Is the character a ruffian or a scandal? The city releases some land it owns for a park. Did the city divulge or cede the land?” 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, Words and Definition, students turn to page 473 in Student Anthology to complete the teacher-guided vocabulary lesson which requires students to use the text for better understanding of the vocabulary words being used. For example: The word pushcart is defined as “A small cart that is pushed by hand: a wheelbarrow.” Students use the information on page 473, “What clues do you see that help explain this word’s meaning? Using page 473, what helps you understand the meaning of market square? The word keen means “eager or interested in.” How do the surrounding sentences on page 475 give clues about the meaning of this word?”

Criterion 1n - 1p

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

4/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials contain explicit instruction of phonics, word recognition, and word analysis across the year. Assessment opportunities are provided multiple times throughout Grade 5 to inform instructional adjustments of phonics, word recognition, and word analysis to help students make progress toward mastery; however, materials lack direct, explicit information on how to provide intervention for each assessment. 

Students have a variety of opportunities to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills within the foundational skills-related materials, including the decodable stories. However, there is no support for students to then apply those skills within the anchor texts that are found in the Reading and Responding lessons. The materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice and demonstrate oral reading fluency, however there is a lack of support for the teacher to make instructional adjustments for students to assure they are progressing in their fluency skills.

Indicator 1n

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level foundational skills by providing explicit instruction in phonics, word analysis, and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1n.

Materials contain explicit instruction of irregularly-spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year through the instruction of the teacher’s wording in the areas of word analysis and phonics/decoding sections in the Teacher Edition and also through the use of instructional routines. There are multiple assessment opportunities in the Assessment Book, Diagnostic Assessment Book, and The Benchmark Assessment. There is a Teacher Resource Book with interventions, but it is not cross-referenced with each individual assessment. There is a lack of direct, explicit information on how to provide intervention for each assessment.

Materials contain explicit instruction of letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology consistently over the course of the year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Students have opportunities to learn how to use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to accurately read unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 2, Word Analysis, About the Words, the students are presented with words related to each other for a specific purpose. Many of the words contain the Latin roots loc and flect or the Greek roots cylc and phon, and many of the words are multisyllabic. After students read the words and identify the relationships, the students read two sentences to practice those concepts in context.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, Day 2, students learn to decode r-controlled syllables using Routine 3 Closed Syllable Routine and Routine 4 Open Syllable Routine. The materials state: “Use the ePresentation visual to display one word at a time for students to read. Remind students that r-controlled syllables are often found in unaccented syllables. The most common vowel sound is /er/, but the other r-controlled vowels—/or/ and /ar/—can also make r-controlled syllables in words. Whenever there is a word that has an r-controlled syllable, this syllable is usually at the end of a multisyllabic word.”

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 4, Word Analysis, Apply the Concept, students apply what they have learned about hyphenated compound words and words with the suffix -ic/-ical. The teacher displays word parts, and students put the parts together to create new words that they define and use in a sentence, such as sign+in, rhythm+ic, type+ical.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 4, students apply their learning of the prefixes il-, im-, in-, ir-. The teacher writes words on the board with a missing prefix, and students determine which prefix needs to be added. Words include: illumination, implicit, superimpose, illusory, impending. 

All tasks and questions are sequenced to application of grade-level work (e.g., application of prefixes at the end of the unit/year; decoding multi-syllable words). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Getting Started and Lesson 1, students learn various spelling patterns, after which students transition to word analysis. In Unit 2, students learn: Suffixes -ant /-ent and -al /-ial, Hyphenated Compound Words and Suffixes -ic, -ical, Latin Root terra; Greek Roots geo and photo, Suffixes -ity and -tion /-ation /-ition, Latin Roots sens, spec, and sim. In Unit 3, students learn: Prefix inter-; Suffixes -ish and -ism; Greek Root chron Latin Roots vac and grad/gress; Greek Root meter; Suffixes -ous /-eous /-ious; Greek Root onym; Prefixes anti-, de-, super-, and trans-; Greek Root bio; Latin Roots aud and rupt. In Unit 4, students learn: Prefixes il-, im-, in-, and ir-; Greek Root nav; Prefix e-; Suffix -ive; Latin Roots cred, ordin /ord, anim, and imag; Greek Root path; Latin Roots mem and scrib/scrip; Prefixes en-, per-, and semi. In Unit 5, students learn: Suffixes -ology and -ist; Words with the Same Base; Greek Roots gram, soph, mech, and poli; Synonyms and Antonyms; Suffixes -age, -an, and -ery; Shades of Meaning; Latin Roots claim/clam and jud /jur /jus; Range of Meaning; Greek Roots hydr and opt; Latin roots aqua and opt /optim; Word Relationships. Unit 6 is a review of Units 1-5. 

  • The Resource Library, Scope and Sequence includes a Foundational Skills section for Phonics and Decoding, High-Frequency Words, Fluency, and Word Analysis. The Scope and Sequence outlines the foundational skills instruction over the course of the year. Materials consistently provide opportunities for students to participate in explicit instruction of foundational skills, guided practice, and application using Skills Practice pages, Takehome decodables, and ePresentations. 

  • Students learn to identify and read meaningful chunks of words rather than individual spellings. Word Analysis also supports vocabulary development as students learn how inflectional endings change a word’s tense, number, and so on and how affixes can be added to a root or base word to create or derive a new but related meaning. Students learn how to deconstruct words and construct new words by adding affixes to base words and roots.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year to inform instructional adjustments of phonics, word recognition, and word analysis to help students make progress toward mastery. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Resource Library, Assessment, Lesson and Unit Assessment, Book 1, the Diagnostic Assessment includes a Phonics and Decoding Section. On page iv, it informs teachers that the Diagnostic Assessment can be used as an initial screener with individual students or groups of students. Students’ results can be used to identify a student’s reading needs. The guide indicates that students who score below the expected level in any skill area, including Phonics and Decoding, will need additional scaffolding and support provided in intervention.

  • The Resource Library, Assessment, Lesson and Unit Assessment, page v notes that the Lesson and Unit Assessments Comprehensive assessment will make it easier to identify students who are struggling. The Lesson and Unit Assessments Comprehensive assessment provides teachers with additional instruction and practice and prevents students from falling further behind. The Lesson and Unit Assessments assess word analysis through multiple choice questions with a goal of scoring 4 out of 5.

  • In the Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Assessment, the Benchmark Assessment occurs three times per year. Word Analysis is a strand in the Benchmark Assessment.

  • In the Resource Library, Assessment, Benchmark Assessments are given three times during the year. They provide a means for progress monitoring with a separate score for Word Analysis. On page vii, the Diagnosis section indicates that teachers should provide reteaching, practice opportunities, differentiation during Workshop, and intervention for students who need more intensive help if students score below the cutoff.

  • In the Resource Library, the Intervention Teacher Guide is aligned to the skills taught in each lesson. Materials also include a Formal Assessment on Day 5 for each lesson that assesses the skills taught during Days 1-5. While materials provide these assessment and intervention resources, materials do not provide the teacher with specific guidance on what to do with formal assessment results and when to use intervention materials. 

Indicator 1o

Materials include opportunities for students to practice and apply grade-level phonics, word analysis, and word recognition skills.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1o.

Over the course of the year, the materials provide multiple and varied opportunities for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in Phonics and Decoding lessons and Word Analysis lessons. Students apply skills through word lists and sentences in the ePresentation Resources and some of the Skills Practice pages. There are 90 leveled Reading Passage Cards that connect a comprehension skill and a vocabulary (word analysis) skill to a passage. After reading the passage, students answer comprehension questions and complete an activity that focuses on vocabulary (word analysis) skills. However, there is no evidence of students having opportunities to access different foundational skills in anchor texts in the Anthology for Reading and Responding lessons.

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply phonics, word analysis, and word recognition skills in connected tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 2, Word Analysis, Guided Practice, students study hyphenated compound words and the suffixes -ic/-ical as they complete Skills Practice 1 pages 95-96.

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, Word Analysis, Decoding, the teacher displays words and sentences for students to read. The words include the prefixes non-, pre-, con-, mid-, and the suffixes -ize, -ment, -ize, -ance/-ence. Students identify the prefixes and suffixes in words and tell what they mean. 

  • In the Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Leveled Reading, Reading Passages Comprehension and Vocabulary Activities, Word Analysis Kit, the Leveled Reading Passages give students extra fluency practice. Students apply vocabulary/word analysis skills, comprehension skills, or the strategy for the week. 

  • In the Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Leveled Reading, Reading Passages Comprehension and Vocabulary Activities, Word Analysis Kit, Leveled Reading Passage Card 2, Rivals, the activity targets the comprehension skills of Main Idea and Details and the Vocabulary Skill of Suffixes -ness and -ment.

  • The Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Leveled Reading, Reading Passages Comprehension and Vocabulary Activities, Word Analysis Kit, Leveled Reading Passage Card 35, Wild About Tulips teaches the comprehension skill of Cause and Effect Vocabulary Skill of the Greek Roots cycl and phon.

Materials do not include tasks and questions that provide opportunities for students to access different foundational skills within the anchor text and supporting texts.

  • No evidence found.

Indicator 1p

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in order to read with purpose and understanding.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1p.

Materials include multiple opportunities over the course of the year with the core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading of Phonics and Decoding lessons, Word Analysis lessons, and stories in the Anthology. Fluency is also with some Skills Practice pages. Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills over the course of the year. Benchmark Assessments and the Lesson and Unit Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information about students’ current fluency skills. However, assessment materials do not link teachers directly to instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level text with purpose and understanding; however, that purpose is not consistently connected to grade-level standards.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 1, Reading and Responding, Fluency, Accuracy, the teacher sets the purpose for reading the text “John Muir: America’s Naturalist.” The materials state, “Remind students that it is important to have purposes, or reasons, for reading. These purposes will keep them focused on the important details and help them get more out of their reading. Prompt students to set purposes for reading, such as: ‘I want to learn the difference between preservation and conservation.’ Point out that these purposes can be related to their wonderings, essential questions, or unit inquiry.” Students read a selection of the text with partners to practice reading with accuracy. Students use context, print, and digital sources to confirm or self-correct their pronunciation, rereading if necessary.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 3, Reading and Responding, Fluency, Intonation, the teacher reminds students that part of reading fluently is reading with proper intonation. The teacher reads aloud page 629 of “More Than Meets the Eye” from the Anthology, making sure to read questions with the voice raised at the end and exclamations with obvious emphasis and voice raised. Students pay attention to the ways the teacher’s voice changes throughout the reading. Students practice reading page 629 with a partner. The partners listen for proper intonation as the other student reads. Students discuss their readings when they have finished.

Materials support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Students have opportunities to read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 1, Reading and Responding, Fluency, Accuracy, the teacher reminds students that reading a text accurately is important for comprehension. If students do not recognize a word or mispronounce it, they should stop reading and sound out the word syllable-by-syllable, or they should check the context to understand the word and self-correct their pronunciation. Students reread the entire sentence several times until they can read it accurately and automatically. “One Small Step,” page 52 of the Anthology, is displayed. The teacher models reading with accuracy, tracking with their fingers as they read, and students follow along. The teacher models sounding out unfamiliar words by breaking them into syllables, rereading the word, and then rereading the entire sentence fluently and automatically.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 1, Reading and Responding, Fluency, Accuracy, the teacher reminds students that reading a text accurately is important for comprehension. If students do not recognize a word or mispronounce it, they should stop reading and sound out the word syllable by syllable, or they should check the context to understand the word and self-correct their pronunciation. Students should reread the entire sentence several times until they can read it accurately and automatically. “John Muir: America’s Naturalist,” page 373 of the Anthology, is displayed. The teacher models reading with accuracy, tracking with their fingers as they read, and students follow along. The teacher models sounding out unfamiliar words by breaking them into syllables, rereading the word, and then rereading the entire sentence fluently and automatically.

Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Students have opportunities to use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

    • In the Teacher Edition, Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 1, Reading and Responding, Fluency, Accuracy, the teacher reminds students that reading a text accurately is important for comprehension. If they don’t recognize a word or mispronounce it, they should stop reading and sound out the word syllable by syllable, or they should check the context to understand the word and self-correct their pronunciation. Students reread the entire sentence several times until they can read it accurately and automatically. Students partner up and read aloud page 401 of their Anthology, “Nature’s Laboratory,” focusing on automaticity and accuracy. Students use the context to understand words and to self-correct any mispronunciations.

    • In the Teacher Edition, Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 1, Reading and Responding, Fluency, Accuracy, the teacher reminds students that reading requires reading with accuracy or reading all the words correctly. If students do not recognize a word or mispronounce it, they should stop reading and sound out the word syllable by syllable, or they should check the context to understand the word and self-correct their pronunciation. Students should reread the entire sentence several times until they can read it accurately and automatically. Students partner up and read aloud page 453 of their Anthology, “A Time of Discovery,” focusing on accuracy. Students use the context to understand words and to self-correct any mispronunciations.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current fluency skills. However, materials do not provide teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Assessment, Lesson and Unit Assessment, there is an Oral Reading Fluency strand of each Unit Assessment. The scope of the assessment includes oral fluency development from lesson to lesson and unit to unit. The assessment checks oral reading rate and accuracy and reading prosody. There is a chart to show expected correct words-per-minute for each unit. There is also a checklist for prosody with the end-of-year expectation that students should answer correctly four out of five prosody elements at the average level.

  • The Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Assessment, Diagnostic Assessment can be used as an initial screener with an individual student or groups of students. Oral Reading Fluency is one of the six skill areas assessed. 

  • The Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Assessment, Benchmark Assessment is given three times per year (end of Units 1, 3, and 6). Oral Fluency: Passage Reading is a strand in the Benchmark Assessment. Reading cut-offs are provided in a table on page vi.

  • The Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Intervention Teacher Guide is aligned to lessons for instructional adjustments but not to data from the assessment.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The Open Court Grade 5 materials include six units that are formed around a topic or theme related to the program theme, however not all units effectively build students’ knowledge on a topic. Within the lessons, students analyze the key ideas, details, craft and structure of the texts they are studying, including some analysis of knowledge and ideas within and across texts, however not all questions and tasks compel students to return to the text to support their contentions and conclusions.

Students engage in frequent writing tasks across the year however they may not achieve the full balance of writing genres outlined in the standards. 

The Inquiry projects that serve as the final task for each unit provide research and extension opportunities but fall short of serving as a means for teachers to determine how well students can integrate the standards-aligned knowledge and skills gained from instruction. The option for research tasks to be completed as a group for every unit may not provide enough opportunity for students to build their individual research skills as required by the standards.

The materials provide coverage of the standards throughout all units and over the course of the year, however, the preponderance of repetitive, unaligned reading strategies throughout the program moves the focus of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessments away from a tight focus on grade level standards alignment. The program also contains a large volume of material without a suggested daily schedule; therefore, a full and standards-aligned implementation could be challenging.

Criterion 2a - 2f

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

12/24
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Criterion Rating Details

The Open Court Grade 5 materials include six units that are formed around a topic or theme related to the program theme. Each unit includes a big idea and question that is aligned to a vertical thread that runs across each grade level in the program. However, not all units work toward building knowledge on a topic as some work toward a unifying theme. 

Within each unit, the questions and tasks lead students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft and structure of the texts they are studying. Students also engage in some analysis of knowledge and ideas within and across texts, however not all questions and tasks compel students to return to the text to support their contentions and conclusions.

Students engage in daily writing tasks and have frequent opportunities to grow their writing skills throughout the year. However, the Grade 5 materials do not reflect the balance of writing genres called for in the standards. 

While the Inquiry projects provide an opportunity for students to extend their learning about the topic or theme of each unit, these projects fail to consistently incorporate the knowledge and skills students gain throughout the unit nor do they require the students to incorporate and demonstrate the integration of the knowledge and skills that align to the standards. Since the projects may be done in a group for every unit, they may fail to build each individual student’s research skills as required by the standards.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a cohesive topic(s)/theme(s) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2a.

The materials include six overarching program themes over the course of the year, including Character, Changes, Communities, Life Science, Government and Creativity for Grades K-5. Each grade-level unit focuses on a theme or topic connected to the overall program theme. The grade level-units contain a big idea, theme question, and inquiry. Grade 5 includes both themes and topics including Perseverance, Cycles, Celebrating World Communities, Our Planet, Our Home, Making a Nation and Art and Impact. The series of texts in each unit are mostly cohesive and relate to the overall program theme. All units provide essential questions and a theme connection question. Big Idea and concept boards are used to broaden student knowledge while engaging with complex texts. Each lesson within a unit contains anchor texts that help to build knowledge based on the topic or theme. There is vertical alignment across the program, so similar topics and themes are seen throughout the grades. Although there are connections to both the overarching program themes and vertical alignment within the materials, students are not always building knowledge towards a topic, often students are building knowledge around a theme. 

Texts are connected by a grade-appropriate cohesive topic in some units. Some texts build knowledge and the ability to read and comprehend complex texts across a school year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, texts are connected to the theme Perseverance. The following texts connect to the theme: 

    • In Lesson 2, students read Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman, Olympic High-Jump Champion by Heather Lang (biography) and answer the Essential Questions, "How can overcoming obstacles make us better people? When have you had to overcome an obstacle?”

    • In Lesson 3, students read “One Small Step” by Vidas Barzdukas (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, "How can working as a team lead to great accomplishments? How can a supportive team make it easier to persevere?”

    • In Lesson 4, students read The Great Serum Race: Blazing the Iditarod Trail by Debbie S. Miller (narrative nonfiction) and answer the Essential Questions, "Have you ever had to persevere when helping somebody? Why was it worth it?” 

    • In Lesson 5, students read an excerpt from Hatchet by Gary Paulsen (adventure tale) and answer the Essential Question, “When something does not work the first time, why is it important to keep trying?”

  • In Unit 2, texts are connected to the topic of Cycles. The following texts connect to the theme: 

    • In Lesson 1, students read Monsoons: From Myth to Modern Science by Elaine David (myth and informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, "How do we depend on some cycles? How can other cycles endanger us?”

    • In Lesson 3, students read Ookpik: The Travels of a Snowy Owl by Bruce Hiscock (realistic fiction) and answer the Essential Question, "How do different plants and animals have their own unique cycles?”

    • In Lesson 5, students read A Year on Bowie Farm by Jen Russell (realistic fiction) and answer the Essential Questions, "How does your life change throughout the year? Do you look forward to a specific season? Why or why not?”

    • In Lesson 6, students read A Handful of Dirt by Raymond Bial (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, "How are different creatures connected together in natural cycles? How are you connected to those cycles?”

  • In Unit 3, texts are connected to the topic of Celebrating World Communities. The following texts connect to the theme: 

    • In Lesson 1, students read Island Treasures: Growing Up in Cuba by Alma Flor Ada (autobiography) and answer the Essential Questions, "Have you been told stories about your ancestors or the people in your family? What lessons have you learned from these stories?”

    • In Lesson 2, students read The Pot That Juan Built by Nancy Andrews-Goebel (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, "How do people in your community celebrate art and culture? What inspires you about your community and culture?”

    • In Lesson 5, students read Just 17 Syllables! by Dennis Fertig (realistic fiction) and answer the Essential Questions, "How can art help us connect with people around the world?”

    • In Lesson 6, students read My Librarian is a Camel by Margriet Ruurs (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, "Why are books important? How can a love for reading bring people together?”

  • In Unit 4, texts are connected to the topic of Our Planet, Our Home. The big idea is “What is your relationship with nature?” The following texts connect to the theme:

    • In Lesson 3, students read John Muir: America’s Naturalist by Sarah Middleton (biography) and answer the Essential Questions, “What are the differences between preservation and conservation? How can you show an appreciation for the environment? How are national parks good for nature?”

    • In Lesson 4, students read Why is the World Green? by Susan Martins Miller (explanatory text) and answer the Essential Questions, “What impact do we have on the environment? How do we help the environment? How do we hurt it?”

    • In Lesson 5, students read The Mystery of Washington Park by Jorge Almazan (play) and answer the Essential Questions, “How is nature sometimes hidden? Where can you find nature in your everyday life?”

    • In Lesson 6, students read What’s the Buzz? Keeping Bees in Flight by Merrie-Ellen Wilcox (informational text)  and answer the Essential Questions, “Why is the natural world important to our survival? Why is it important to protect nature? What could happen if it is not protected?”

  • In Unit 6, texts are connected to the theme Art and Impact. The following texts connect to the theme: 

    • In Lesson 2, students read The Storyteller adapted from a work by Saki (realistic fiction) and answer the Essential Questions, “What makes you interested when you listen to a story? What makes a story good?”

    • In Lesson 3, students read More Than Meets the Eye by Amanda Oldman (realistic fiction) and answer the Essential Questions, “How can art inspire us? How can that inspiration lead to acts of creativity?”

    • In Lesson 5, students read The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights, Part 1 by Russell Freedman (biography) and answer the Essential Questions, “Where does discrimination appear in our lives? How do we fight back against discrimination?”

    • In Lesson 6, students read The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights, Part 2 by Russell Freedman (biography) and answer the Essential Questions, “How can art change lives? When was art an important part of your life?”

Texts are connected by a theme in some units. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 5, texts are connected to the theme Making a Nation. The following texts connect to the theme: 

    • In Lesson 1, students read “The Starving Time: The Early Struggle to Survive in America” by Kristine Cruikshank (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, “What does it take to found a new country? What challenges have to be overcome?”

    • In Lesson 3, students read The Search for the Mysterious Patriot by Vidas Barzdukas (play) and answer the Essential Questions, “Why is sharing your opinion an important part of democracy? Why is it necessary for a healthy government?”

    • In Lesson 5, students read Abraham Lincoln & Frederick Douglass: The Story Behind an American Friendship by Russell Freedman (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, “Why is equality important to our society? Why can it be difficult to do the right thing?”

    • In Lesson 6, students read “The Transcontinental Railroad” by Samantha Paterson (informational text) and answer the Essential Questions, “How did the Transcontinental Railroad unite the country? What other feats of engineering have made America great?”

Indicator 2b

Materials require students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft, and structure within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high quality questions and tasks.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 2b.

The materials provide opportunities for students to analyze key ideas, writer’s craft, and text structure. Each lesson provides opportunities through the Access Complex Text section in which students look at main ideas and/or various text structures. Writer’s craft is addressed with every text, typically on Day 4. The Teacher Edition provides prompts and modeling for the teacher to help address the key idea, structure, and craft. The Teacher Edition typically has the teacher model analyzing key details and structure in the first lessons, and later the teacher  prompts students to find key details and structure. The Look Closer section at the end of each selection specifically asks students to analyze the key ideas and details, the writer’s craft, and the text structure of the selection. The type of questions asked in this section require students to delve deeper into the text to help them access the complex text and to make sense of the text.

While most questions and tasks are high-quality, provide a logical sequence, and build in rigor throughout the year, some questions engage students in practices that do not align to the grade-level standards. The teacher models tasks at the beginning of the year and gradually releases more of the task to the students.

For most texts, students analyze key ideas and details and craft and structure (according to grade-level standards). Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The materials contain some coherently sequenced questions and tasks that address key ideas and details.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read One Small Step by Vidas Barzdukas and “It Couldn’t Be Done” by Edgar Albert Guest. During Access Complex Text, students focus on determining fact and opinion and classifying and categorizing. Students answer questions, including, “What would be the benefit of entire Apollo teams working on only one thing at a time, such as a spacesuit or experiment design? Twice Neil Armstrong faced situations where things seemed to be going wrong during a space mission. What character qualities helped him survive?” The comprehension strategies used during Access Complex Text do not build toward helping students answer these questions, and many students could answer these questions without reading the texts. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read the text, Critters Crossing by Nick D’Alto.  Students refer to page 192 of the student anthology to answer Text Connection questions such as, “What predators do salmon face? In what season do salmon eggs hatch? How do you know? According to the life cycle section at the end of ‘Salmon Creek’, why do coho salmon have different colors and patterns at different life stages?”

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read Heading Home by Karen Martin. Under Access Complex Text, students focus on the idea of compare and contrast. The Teacher Edition states, “Have students stop reading at the end of page 267. Have students tell what they do when they compare things. Have students tell what they do when they contrast things. Work with students to make a list of key words in the text that signal compare and contrast, such as same, like, similar, different, but, except.” 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read Why is the World Green? by Susan Martins Miller and answer questions about the key ideas and details such as, “What is the main idea of the second paragraph on page 401? What details support that main idea? Let’s look more closely at pages 408–409. What two events are compared and contrasted? Why did Venezuela build the Guri Dam? When many plants died on the smaller islands the dam created, scientists wanted to figure out why. What was their hypothesis? What happened when the Guri Dam was built?”

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read the text The Starving Time: The Early Struggle to Survive in America by Kristine Cruikshank. After reading the students are asked to identify the main idea and supporting details of a paragraph on four consecutive pages. At this time, it appears the students are working independently with this task. This is an activity done as a discussion with the class. Students do have access to a main idea graphic organizer, if needed.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 1, during Reading and Responding students read More Than Meets the Eye by Amanda Oldman. During the first read, students work on the Comprehension Strategy Making Connections. The Teacher Edition provides the following prompt, “What connections can you make as you read?” The materials have previously taught the Making Connections comprehension strategy, and by Unit 6 the sophistication has not increased to help build knowledge. 

  • The materials contain coherently sequenced questions and tasks that address craft and structure. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students are asked, “In the poem ‘Home’, the poet uses a house as a metaphor for democracy. Find a simile, or a comparison using like or as, in the poem. How does the simile connect to the metaphor of the house? Why do you think the poet chose to divide ‘Home’ into three stanzas? What is the role of each stanza?”

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, students read The Storyteller by Saki and answer questions to reflect the craft and structure of the text selection including, “The word novelty appears on page 608, and is defined as “something that is new or unusual.” What in the story helps you understand the meaning of novelty? Remind students that a stanza is a collection of related lines in a poem that is designated with a space before and after. Have students look closely at the rhyming words in one stanza. Ask students to tell which lines rhyme. Have students look at the meaning in the lines of each stanza. Have students identify the lines of the stanza that express boredom.” 

Indicator 2c

Materials require students to analyze the integration of knowledge within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high quality text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2c.

The materials provide some questions and tasks that support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas. Within the Reading and Responding sections of the lesson such as: Access Context Text, Close Read, Writer’s Craft and Inquiry, Steps 1-6 are paired with Anchor Texts and supporting texts in both the Student Anthology and Science/Social Studies Connection Text. Students have the opportunity to analyze topics and integrate ideas in their discussions, comprehension and writing tasks. Often discussion questions and prompts posed by the teacher help to incorporate knowledge related to the topic or theme with the text being read during class.  Some comprehension questions found in the Student Anthology require students to incorporate knowledge and ideas, although others comprehension questions are surface-level and do not always require the student to access the text. The materials also focus on comprehension strategies that are repeated throughout the course of the year. These comprehension strategies are often focused on helping students build knowledge. 

Some sets of questions and tasks support students’ analysis of knowledge and ideas. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read the poem “It Couldn’t Be Done” by Edgar Albert Guest. Under the Theme Connection, the Teacher Edition states, “Discuss with students what message the poet is trying to convey. Talk about how the author addresses how people in our lives say or think things are impossible or can’t be done. Ask students to explain what this poem says about perseverance.” This discussion links directly to the theme of perseverance. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read A Handful of Dirt by Raymond Bial. Under the Text Connection section, students respond to comprehension questions. These questions are meant to build on one other, but some are surface-level or can be answered without reading the text. “Why would there be no life on Earth without soil? What can a single acre of land contain, according to the text? Why is it ‘best to stay away from mushrooms’ in the wild? What are the benefits of making compost yourself versus purchasing fertilizer in a store?” 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read My Librarian Is A Camel: How Books Are Brought to Children Around the World by Margriet Ruurs. Under the Text Connection section, students answer questions in the Student Anthology, such as, “Why do you think many mobile libraries provide computer and television access, as well as access to books? How does having library access change the lives of one town or group of people in ‘My Librarian Is a Camel’?”

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read The Mystery of Washington Park by Jorge Almazan. In the Access Complex Text section, students focus on Fact and Opinion skills. The Teacher Edition provides the following prompt for teachers, “Have students reread page 414-415. Then have them identify each of these statements from page 415 as a fact or an opinion.” This discussion on fact and opinion emphasizes the comprehension strategy, but not analyzing the text to build knowledge.  

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read Thomas Jefferson Grows a Nation by Peggy Thomas. During the Text Connection section, students answer questions in the Student Anthology such as, “In ‘The Starving Time,’ you read about the challenges that colonists faced when they tried farming. What farming challenges did Jefferson try to overcome in this selection? How do you think Jefferson’s emphasis on agriculture is still reflected in American society today?” 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students read the text The Storyteller by Saki by focusing on the Making Inferences skill and they answer questions such as, “Have students stop reading at the end of page 611. Discuss as follows: What inference can you make about why Bertha “began to wish that she had never been allowed to come into the park”?” During the Close Reading section, students use a “Clues, Prior Knowledge, and Inferences” chart to track their thinking as they read.

Sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze across multiple texts. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. In the Look Close section, students answer questions in the Student Anthology such as, “Brian in ‘Hatchet’ and Lupe in ‘The Marble Champ’ have to overcome very different obstacles, but they both persevere. Compare and contrast how the two stories approach the theme of perseverance.” 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read The House Baba Built: An Artist’s Childhood in China by Ed Young. In the Look Closer section, students respond to prompts in the Student Anthology such as, “Compare and contrast the lessons taught by Baba in ‘The House Baba Built’ and by Abuelito Modesto in ‘Island Treasures,’ and relate them to the shared topic of family.” 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, students read Building the Transcontinental Railroad by Samantha Paterson. In the Look Closer section, students answer the following question in their Student Anthology, “In ‘Thomas Jefferson Grows a Nation,’ you read about Lewis and Clark’s expedition into the Louisiana Territory. How did the Transcontinental Railroad eventually make travel through that part of the country easier? Support your answer with details from the text.” 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 3, during Reading Response, students read the text, The Voice That Challenged a Nation by Marian Anderson and Art Works! By Dan Alvarez. Students are directed to answer the question, “In the story “Art Words” Jordan and Grace believe an arts center will make a positive difference in their community. How did Marian Adnerson make a difference with her voice?”

Indicator 2d

Culminating tasks require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a unit's topic(s)/theme(s) through integrated literacy skills (e.g., a combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for Indicator 2d.

All units conclude with an Inquiry Project that develops around a Unit Theme and Question Board that builds on student knowledge, understanding, and “wonderings” and questions throughout the Inquiry Process. Students learn about a topic that is integrated throughout with specific texts and text sets, including the Read-Aloud, Discussion Starters, Big Idea, Essential Questions accompanying each text, Theme Connection text, Science/Social Studies connection, and Concept Board. However, since students have so much choice in the topic of the Inquiry Project and how they complete the project, this may limit how much topical knowledge is demonstrated and how much reading and writing students complete during the process. The Inquiry Rubric is designed to assess speaking, listening, and research skills. It is not specifically designed to assess reading and writing. The Inquiry Projects process evolves and changes as the units progress, including the extent of teacher modeling, support provided, variations in project ideas, grouping of students, note-taking strategies, and presentation choices. Speaking and listening rubrics can also support the speaking and listening process as it is also used in the Handing-Off Routines. Additionally, students frequently complete the tasks in groups or pairs, therefore it may be difficult to truly determine each student’s knowledge and skills gained from the unit. 

Culminating tasks are not evident across the year. While some Inquiry Projects are multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate one or more standards at the appropriate grade level, and comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics through integrated skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening), the degree to which students are allowed to make choices about the tasks may not provide sufficient evidence for the teacher to assess their progress in relation to the grade-level expectations for reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Additionally, for units that are organized around a topic, the degree of choice left to students may limit the amount of topical knowledge measured in the inquiry tasks. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Inquiry Projects at the end of each unit are related to the theme of the unit, but do not require students to demonstrate mastery of several standards. According to the Program Guide, the Inquiry Projects require students to “conduct an investigation into something related to the theme that interests them.” The Inquiry Projects follow the same process across all units. 

  • In Unit 6, students work on an Inquiry Project that relates to the theme Art and Impact. The Big Idea from the unit, Art Can Change Lives, is a possible focus for the research questions students develop, however it could be answered without students completing the readings or engaging in any of the activities throughout the unit. Additionally, there is no requirement for students to demonstrate mastery and integration of the standards taught throughout the unit. 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2e.

The materials contain a variety of text types addressed over the course of the year, with instruction, guided practice, and independent work in the Language Arts section of the materials. The Scope and Sequence of the Teacher Edition lays out the year-long writing plan for the materials. The first three units have students practice a different type of writing for the full unit. These include persuasive/opinion, informational/explanatory, and narrative writing. These are distributed throughout the school year in later units also, as well as writing in a specific genre; however, they do not reflect the balance called for in the standards. Students write every day during the Language Arts section and the materials include sufficient writing opportunities for students. The materials create a gradual release model by beginning with more guided instruction, and releasing to more independent work as the year goes on. Each lesson includes sections organized into Instruct, Guided Practice, and Apply. Often during the Instruct or Guided Practice section, the materials provide an example text the teacher can use to model instruction. Procedures and routines are provided for the teacher regarding conferencing with students about their writing and modeling writing. The materials provide the teacher with instructional routines, checklists, student writing goals, rubrics, and detailed plans in the Language Arts Lesson Plan found in the Teacher’s Unit Lesson Plan. Editing, revising, and publishing checklists are provided for the students in the Skills Practice book. 

Materials include writing instruction that partially aligns to the standards for the grade level and supports students’ growth in writing skills over the course of the school year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, during the Language Arts section, students focus on opinion writing. Students complete four opinion pieces over the course of six weeks. The first piece is an opinion piece written as a class, then an opinion piece written with a partner. Later, students write two opinion pieces independently. 

  • In Unit 3, during the Language Arts section, students write four narrative pieces over the six-week period. Students write a realistic fictional story, a tall tale, a personal narrative, and a fantasy. The realistic story is written as a class, then the tall tale, personal narrative, and fantasy are written independently. 

  • In Unit 5, during the Language Arts section, students write five pieces. Students write a persuasive essay, a persuasive letter, response to literature, response to nonfiction, and a description of an event. Students write these pieces independently. 

  • In the Look Closer section of the Student Anthology, students respond to an On-Demand writing prompt under the Write section. This typically happens on every Day 4 for every lesson in all the units. 

Instructional materials include a variety of well-designed guidance, protocols, models, and support for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Resource Library, the materials provide an Instructional Routine for Modeling Writing Strategies. The routine includes information such as, “Model how to use the strategy when writing by saying aloud your thoughts and by describing each thing you do. Provide students with assistance in applying the strategy until they can do it on their own.” 

  • In the Resource LIbrary, the materials provide a Management Routine for Writing Conference. The routine includes these steps, “Review any feedback the student has received. Identify positive elements of the student’s writing.” Strategies to help with students' writing are provided as well as writing conference questions about the students’ ideas, organization, voice, and word choice. 

  • Grade 5 students keep writing notebooks. Set-up directions for the writing notebook include a spiral-bound notebook or three-ring binder with four dividers. Each divider includes a Response Journal for students to write their thoughts about each selection as they read, a Vocabulary section for students to record vocabulary words and their definitions from each selection, an Inquiry section for students to organize ideas and record information they find as they research theme-related concepts, and a Writing Ideas section for students to note ideas they have for writing or ideas to improve or add to existing writing. During Workshop, students are able to practice and review what was taught in the lesson, read, work on writing activities, or work on Inquiry projects that relate to the unit theme. Materials include protocols for the Workshop, Modeling Writing Strategies, Presenting Writing, and Writing Conferences.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 4, during the Language Arts section, students work on a draft for their informational writing. During Guided Practice students will work in small groups to review their writing plans. The materials provide a management routine for the teacher, as well as suggestions for the small group work. For example, the materials state, “Organize the class into groups of three or four students apiece. Display the following questions. Does the plan clearly state a topic? Does the plan include a sufficient number of important details to justify a multi-paragraph text? Does the plan have an ending that sums up the topic?”

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 3, during the Language Arts section, students begin planning their draft for explaining a scientific process. In the Instruct section, the teacher demonstrates how to create an outline. The materials provide an example text that the teacher can use as a model. The Language Arts Handbook provides more information for the students regarding how to create an outline. In Lesson 2, Day 5, Language Arts, the students publish their informational piece. The Teacher Edition states, “You will use the Writing Rubrics found in the Level Appendix to evaluate students’ explanations of a scientific process. You may use any of the rubrics for Genre, Writing Process, and Writing Traits. Share with students what you will be looking for when assessing their explanations of a scientific process.”

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 4, during the Language Arts section, students edit their historical fiction piece. During Guided Practice, students use the editing checklist from Skills Practice to edit their piece with a partner. The materials provide the following directions for the teacher, “As students have already done editing work on their narratives, it may be useful to direct their peer-editors to focus on certain areas of the editing and proofreading checklist where the writers believe they could use the most help. Students should instruct their peers to pay close attention to several self-selected checkboxes on the checklist.” 

  • Writing Rubrics can be found at the end of each unit in the Appendix. Different sets of rubrics cover various elements of writing, including genre, writing process, and writing traits.The rubrics are intended to help teachers provide criteria and feedback to students. The program provides a four-point rubric in each of the four areas: 1 point: student is performing below basic level, 2-point: student abilities are emerging, 3-point: student work is adequate and achieving expectations; 4-point: student is exceeding writing expectations.

  • Writing rubrics align with the standards so teachers can monitor students' progress. For example, the materials provide Informative Writing Genres rubrics. One aspect where students may earn a four in the rubric states, “The writer clearly introduces a topic. Main ideas are supported by facts related to the topic. Linking words such as also, another, or but are used appropriately. A conclusion is clearly stated and supports the topic.” 

Indicator 2f

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2f.

The materials include a year’s worth of research projects called Inquiry Projects. During Inquiry portions of the units, students learn more about the unit by investigating the theme or overarching idea. Inquiry begins in Units 1-2 as whole-class instruction. The teacher models the steps of the investigation for students, who apply the steps in future research. In Units 3-4, students work in small groups on investigations of interest to them. Students learn research skills including locating reliable Internet websites and sources for information, interviewing subject-matter experts, collecting information, taking notes, working collaboratively, and presenting information in a variety of ways. While students have opportunities to brainstorm questions, create a conjecture, and conduct research, the research skills remain static across the year and do not grow in sophistication. Inquiry begins with whole class inquiry and then transitions to group work. Over the course of the year, students do not conduct the inquiry process independently; therefore, students never demonstrate individual mastery of the research skills outlined in the standards. The materials provide numerous modeling prompts for the teacher to use, as well as graphic organizers and rubrics to help guide research. Students choose which resources they want to use for research, with a heavy emphasis on online content. Some guidance is provided to assure students are selecting appropriate and adequate resources for their projects. The Inquiry Projects serve as an extension of the unit and are not always tied to the unit texts.

Research projects are somewhat sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills according to grade-level standards. Examples include, but are not limited to the following: 

  • The Inquiry process has the same steps throughout the year: Step 1: Develop Questions, Step 2: Create Conjectures, Step 3: Collect Information, Step 4: Revise Conjectures, Step 5: Develop Presentations, and Step 6: Deliver Presentations.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 2, students complete Inquiry Step 5: Develop Presentations. A list of possible presentation ideas are provided, including, “Write a story. Perform a creative interpretation of a written piece or poem. Create a poster illustrating a process. Perform an experiment related to your research. Plan to create a web page. Stage a panel discussion with audience participation.” These presentation ideas could combine writing, speaking, and technology, but students may not necessarily incorporate all of them.

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 2, students complete Inquiry Step 3: Collect Information. The lesson focuses on taking notes using note cards. The materials state, “Give students additional ideas for taking notes, such as printing out short articles and making annotations in the articles’ margins. Another suggestion is using sticky notes to annotate books they get from school or the library.” 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 4, students complete Inquiry Step 3: Collect Information. In this lesson, students create a plan to collect information. Students discuss what good research involves. The Teacher Edition states, “Remind students the difference between paraphrasing and plagiarism when using source materials by asking them to explain what each term means. Tell students they can avoid plagiarism by coming up with another way of saying what has already been said or by putting direct quotes in quotation marks and citing the source.” 

Materials provide some support for teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge of different aspects of a topic. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 4, the teacher is provided with a possible narrative to guide thinking and learning. Additional lists of questions also stimulate further discussion and to model how to generate questions and ideas for Step 1: Develop Questions. In Lesson 2, Day 3, the teacher displays a Questions and Conjectures organizer to discuss the sample conjectures for Inquiry Step 2. In Lesson 2, Day 4, students begin to do research and collect information for Inquiry Step 3. The teacher displays a list of possible ideas to discuss and other resources students might use, some provided in the Teacher Edition. In Lesson 3, Day 2, students are ready to begin collecting information and note-taking as a part of Step 3. The teacher continues to model strategies using the Combination Notes graphic organizer. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 2, students complete Inquiry Step 2: Create Conjectures. During this lesson students turn their questions into a conjecture. The Teacher Edition provides a model for the teacher to use during instruction. The materials state, “Model doing this by offering the sample question:’ Why are robotic probes more effective than piloted vehicles when studying the deepest parts of the ocean?’ Then say, ‘To make conjectures about this question, I would think about what I already know, or do a little preliminary research, and make an educated guess.” 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 2, students complete Inquiry Step 5: Develop Presentations. The materials provide the following presentation examples for the teacher to suggest: “Produce a photo-essay about the concept. Create a slideshow presentation. Write a magazine article. Create an educational brochure. Write an opinion paper.” The teacher highlights creating an educational brochure and provides details on what a brochure should contain. The material also provides the Word Processing Tech Tutor video in the online resources. 

Materials provide some opportunities for students to conduct research projects that synthesize and analyze content tied to the topics under study as a part of the research process. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, as a part of Inquiry Step 3: Collect information, students organize information to see how it all relates and decide what other ideas they still need to explore. They learn that one way to compile research, especially research gathered through a survey, is by organizing it into a spreadsheet program on a computer. Students view the Spreadsheet Tech Tutor video, available in the online resources, to give them an overview of how a spreadsheet works. Students move through the process of creating a spreadsheet to synthesize their results. 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 4, students explore another way to organize information by creating a list of subtopics. To model the idea of subtopics, the teacher considers the unit theme of Making a Nation, and writes it on the board beside the word Topic. Students identify and list the subtopics represented by selections, such as Early American Colonies for “The Starving Time,” The American Revolution for “A Spy by Chance,” and Federalists and Anti-Federalists for “The Search for the Mysterious Patriot.” Students assign each subtopic a letter and use it to label their notes. Once notes have been labeled with letters, students can also choose to put their notes into piles by subtopic. It is suggested to use this process with note cards, but it can be done with any type of notes.

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, Day 4, students complete Inquiry Step 4: Revise Conjectures. Students work with groups to organize all their information gathered from research. The Teacher Edition states, “Briefly conference with each group and discuss whether its conjecture should be revised again, based on all its research. Make sure students review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of whatever information is shared during the discussion.” 

Criterion 2g - 2h

Materials promote mastery of grade-level standards by the end of the year.

4/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials provide coverage of the standards throughout all units and over the course of the year, however, the preponderance of repetitive, unaligned reading strategies throughout the program moves the focus of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessments away from a tight focus on grade level standards alignment. The program also contains a large volume of material without a suggested daily schedule; therefore, a full and standards-aligned implementation could be challenging.

Indicator 2g

Materials spend the majority of instructional time on content that falls within grade-level aligned instruction, practice, and assessments.

2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2g.

Over the course of each unit, as some of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessment questions align to grade level standards, a significant amount of time is spent on comprehension strategies that do not align to the standards. These comprehension strategies include predicting, cause and effect, making inferences, visualizing, and making connections. Over the course of the year, many of these strategies are repeated and do not support knowledge building and growth toward mastery of grade-level standards. The assessment components may help the teacher to confirm progress toward mastery of some standards; however, they may not provide a strong picture of the depth of the knowledge and skills built during the unit as many assessment questions focus on unaligned comprehension strategies. An intervention guide is provided to differentiate instruction for students, but most differentiated instruction uses the same materials with question or activity scaffolds. Some differentiated activities fall short of meeting the standards, particularly for students working below-level. 

Over the course of each unit, some instruction is aligned to grade-level standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, the teacher models the use of the comprehension strategies, Summarizing and Clarifying, during the first read of Making Waves by Phil Moskowitz. Students stop periodically during the reading to summarize at the ends of paragraphs, chapters, or sections. Summarizing sentence stems may support students as they summarize. Students are also provided with Suggestions for Clarifying text. Students needing additional support may be directed by the teacher’s use of the Intervention Teacher’s Guide during Workshop to reteach the comprehension strategies Summarizing and Clarifying taught in this lesson. These strategies do not align to grade-level standards.

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students make text connections with six comprehension questions asked. These include, “Describe how Juan found ‘the finest clay he had ever seen.’ If this were a fable, what would be its moral?” These strategies do not align to grade-level standards.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 3, during Reading and Responding, students work on making inferences. The Teacher Edition provides this prompt for the teacher, “When we make inferences, we connect what we know with what we read. The connections can be used to make statements about events, characters, and settings in the text. In the fourth paragraph on page 481, we learn that ‘An empty wagon would lead to too many questions.’ Why is Walter concerned about answering questions? We can make an inference. What clues in the text tell you Walter’s thoughts about getting through the checkpoint?” The materials provide possible answers. (RL.5.1)

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 4, Language Arts, students focus on Grammar, Usage and Mechanics. A list of sentences is displayed to identify the conjunction in each sentence. Students are reminded that conjunctions are connecting words and are asked to identify the conjunctions in the sentences by type. In addition, students combine sentence pairs into a single sentence with a conjunction. (L.5.1a)

Over the course of each unit, some of the questions and tasks are aligned to grade-level standards. However, some questions are focused on repeated rounds of comprehension strategies that do not build knowledge nor align to grade-level standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 1, during Reading and Responding, prior to the read-aloud of “A Stormy Day” from Black Beauty by Anna Sewell, the teacher is reminded to teach the following comprehension strategies to students: Predicting, Asking and Answering Questions, Visualizing, Summarizing, Making Connections, and Clarifying on the board. Students tell what they know about each one. These strategies are not aligned to the standards for this grade level, however they form the foundation for roughly a quarter of the questions across the program. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 2, during Reading and Responding, students read A Year on Bowie Farm by Jen Russell. Under Access Complex Text, students are given the task of classifying and categorizing information. The Teacher Edition states, “Suggest to students that we classify and categorize the work on the farm by seasons to help understand the yearly cycle. Have students name the seasons on the farm. Display a four-column chart with the seasons as heading. Work with students to identify story details from the farm tasks on page 98-199. Record information in the Classify and Categorize graphic organizer.” This task does not require students to go beyond a surface-level understanding and does not build to grade-level mastery of the standard. 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, materials include questions that do not align to grade-level standards such as, “What are two main ideas of Abuelito Modesto’s story, as Alma Flor Ada tells it? Explain how the details support them.” 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 4, during Reading and Responding, materials include the questions, “How do the characters in ‘The Search for the Mysterious Patriot’ compare to the characters in ‘The Mystery of Washington Park’? How are their attempts to solve a mystery similar? How are their attempts different?” (RL.3.5)

Over the course of each unit, some of the assessment questions are aligned to grade-level standards. However, they may not address the depth and breadth of the standards nor the knowledge gained from the unit. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, during Reading and Responding, students analyze the selection and use text evidence for support. The materials ask, “Lupe was an excellent student, but she was not very good at sports. Why do you think she wanted to be good at sports? Do you think that all of her marble practice hurt her studies?” (RL.5.2)

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, Day 5, during Reading and Responding, students complete a Formal Assessment under the Monitor Progress section. The assessments include questions to assess student understanding of the topics from the lesson. The questions include, “Put these events from the story in the correct order” (events are listed). Who is telling this story, and how do you know? Why did the author mention the comparison of Japan and China to a silkworm and a mulberry leaf?” The first two questions do not align to grade-level standards. The third question aligns with RL.5.4.

  • In Unit 5 Assessment, the Opinion Writing Task says, “Scientists are talking about sending people to Mars. What is your opinion about this? Is it a good thing, or is it too dangerous and expensive? Imagine that you are writing a letter to a member of Congress. Explain your opinion about sending people to Mars.” (W.5.1, W.5.4)

By the end of the academic year, standards are addressed within and across units; however, the focus on unaligned strategies throughout may not allow students to fully master the depth and breadth of the standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The majority of the RL and RI standards are covered in all units. 

  • W.5.1 (including all substandards) are found primarily in Units 1 and 5 (including all substandards); however, they are only found a few places throughout the year. W.5.2 is found primarily in Units 1, 2, 4, and 5. W.5.2.e only appears a few times over the course of the year. W.5.3 (including all substandards) is found primarily in Units 3, 4, 5 and 6. W.5.4-8 are found across most units. W.5.9 appears primarily in Units 2-6, and sparsely within those units. W.4.10 appears in all units. 

  • SL.5.1-6 appear in all units. 

  • The majority of the language standards are found across the year; however, some language standards are found only a few times throughout the year. 

Indicator 2h

Materials regularly and systematically balance time and resources required for following the suggested implementation, as well as information for alternative implementations that maintain alignment and intent of the standards.

2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2h.

The materials are all grouped into six units over the course of the year. This program is designed for 36 weeks of instruction plus an additional Getting Started week-long lesson in Unit 1. Each lesson contains five days with activities for Foundational Skills, Reading and Responding, and Language Arts. The core instructional materials are all contained within those sections of the materials. While the materials do provide a scope and sequence to help teacher’s plan their year along with highly-structured lessons that follow a similar format week after week, the materials do not include a daily schedule or time allotment for each section of the lesson. The daily plans and instructional routines do not explicitly state a suggested time frame or estimated amount of time per activity. Without suggested times for the various activities, it would be a challenge to fit the activities within these three components into the daily schedule. Workshop Time is the only portion for which a suggested time frame of 15-30 minutes is provided. Within the Workshop Time, the materials suggest including decodables and leveled readers during Workshop Time, as well as providing time to work on the Inquiry project during Workshop. Optional materials do not distract from the core learning, although it can be unclear when optional activities should be incorporated. 

  • Suggested implementation schedules and alternative implementation schedules align to core learning and objectives. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • The materials contain a scope and sequence for each unit. For example, in Unit 3 the materials state the theme, Celebrating World Communities, and then lay out the three components: foundational skills, reading and responding, and language arts. The materials presented in the scope and sequence follow core learning, but a suggested time frame is not provided. 

    • An Intervention Teacher Guide is provided in the Resource Library. These materials provide lessons for all six units. The lessons in the Intervention Guide line up with the lessons in the traditional Teacher Edition, following the same path. 

    • The Curriculum Overview states that Foundational Skills include Phonics and Word Analysis, Oral Language Activities, Reading the Decodables, and Reading Fluency Passages. Recommended time for instruction is not provided.

    • The Curriculum Overview states that during Reading and Responding, students read each selection twice: the first time to practice comprehension strategies, and the second to analyze complex text. Students work with vocabulary every day using the Selection Vocabulary Routine. Students read a science or social studies connection text toward the end of each week. Recommended time for instruction is not provided.

    • The Curriculum Overview states that during Language Arts, students work on the writing process daily during this block. Spelling and grammar are also included in the Language Arts block. Recommended time for instruction is not provided.

  • Suggested implementation times and schedules are not provided for most aspects of the program. The volume of materials may be more than can be completed within the scope of an average school week/year.  Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • The Scope and Sequence provides a color-coded planner which includes Foundational Skills (green), Reading and Responding (red), and Language (blue) in that order. Each day begins with Foundation Skills lessons, then moves to the Reading and Responding lessons, ending with Language Arts. Recommended time for teaching and implementation of daily lessons is not provided. 

    • The Workshop Overview states, “Workshop can be implemented during the reading/language arts timeframe in a flexible manner. This can come before the core instruction begins, sometimes in the middle of the reading/language block, or at the end of that time period. Workshop may last 15-30 minutes, depending on the needs of the classroom.” This is the only time frame mentioned in the materials.

    • There are six units included in the materials. Each unit is made up of six lessons, with each lesson containing five days. There is also a Getting Started lesson at the beginning of Unit 1. 

  • Optional tasks do not distract from core learning. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Letter cards are provided to help students form letters. Penmanship videos are included to help students write cursive letters. The Program Overview suggests that the teacher should create a writing area for Workshop and, “The area should also have various Letter Cards and other handwriting models for those students who want to practice letter formation or handwriting.” These materials do not appear to have specific lessons, and are meant to supplement the materials. 

    • The Social Emotional Learning Content Guide illustrates how Character Lab can integrate with Open Court Reading. The Teacher Tips guide states, “Incorporate the Playbook or SEL outcome as part of building background and discussing the selection around the Essential Question.” 

    • Core and Practice Decodables: Pre-Decodables and Decodables give students practice reading at their own pace and allows them to listen to a fluent model of reading. Decodable Stories Takehome Books allow students to apply their knowledge of phonic elements to read. Each story supports instruction in a new phonic element and incorporates elements and words that have been learned earlier.

    • Genre Practice provides students with additional opportunities to read and respond to a variety of genres. Each activity contains one or two reading selections. Multiple-choice or written-response comprehension questions and a writing prompt follow the reading selection(s).

  • Optional tasks are meaningful and enhance core instruction. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Challenge Novels are intended for beyond-level students and are suggested as additional reading to what students already complete with the normal lessons. The Challenge Novels focus around the unit theme. For example, the Unit 1 theme is Celebrating World Communities. Students read the Challenge Novel Hidden Figures. During Week 1 Think about It, students think about questions such as, “What motivates people to persevere? What makes you want to persevere?” The Challenge Novel also contains comprehension questions such as, “Why does the author think it is important to share these women’s stories? Quote accurately from the text to support your answer.’” There is not a clear expectation on when the students are expected to complete these additional questions. 

  • The Visual Vocabulary provides a brief video for vocabulary words. These videos provide audio of the word, the definition, an example sentence, and a picture to help students better understand the vocabulary. 

  • Technology and Digitally Enhanced Activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • ePresentation can be used during the lesson as a presentation tool of the elements within the lesson.

    • eGames provide students a way to practice skills learned in class from all key sections within the daily lesson including Foundational Skills, Reading and Responding, and Language Arts. These may be found in the Resource Library under “Games.”

    • eActivities give students additional practice with high frequency words, comprehension, grammar, spelling, and writing. These may be found in the Resource Library under “Activities.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their literacy development.

N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

N/A

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

N/A

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

N/A

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

N/A

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

N/A

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

N/A

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level content and to meet or exceed grade-level standards that will support their regular and active participation in learning English language arts and literacy.

N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials regularly provide extensions to engage with literacy content and concepts at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level.

N/A

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for for students to monitor their learning.

N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards to regularly participate in learning English language arts and literacy.

N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

N/A

Indicator 3u

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Indicator 3v

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology (when applicable) with guidance for teachers.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

N/A

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

N/A

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

N/A

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/10/07

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Teacher's Edition Vol 1 978‑0‑0790‑0001‑9 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Teacher's Edition Vol 2 978‑0‑0790‑0002‑6 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Teacher's Edition Vol 3 978‑0‑0790‑0003‑3 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Teacher's Edition Vol 4 978‑0‑0790‑0004‑0 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Teacher's Edition Vol 5 978‑0‑0790‑0005‑7 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Teacher's Edition Vol 6 978‑0‑0790‑0006‑4 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Word Analysis Teacher Guide 978‑0‑0790‑0136‑8 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Program Overview Grade K-5 978‑0‑0790‑0166‑5 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Open Court Reading CORE ELA Teacher's Editions Package 978‑0‑0790‑0405‑5 McGraw-Hill Education 2018
Word Analysis Kit 978‑0‑0790‑0418‑5 McGraw-Hill Education 2018

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA 3-8 Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations