Alignment: Overall Summary

The Open Court Grade 2 materials partially meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the expectations of the standards. Materials include high-quality texts throughout the year; however, the complexity level of the texts remain relatively the same across the year.

Some text-based opportunities, protocols, questions and tasks support students as both listeners and speakers; however, speaking and listening is not varied across the year and primarily takes place in whole group discussions. Process writing opportunities encompass all the genres set forth in the standards, though informative/explanatory writing has greater coverage. There are limited opportunities for students to engage in on-demand writing aligned to the text. The program includes explicit instruction in and practice of most grammar skills; however, there are limited opportunities for students to apply grade-level grammar and usage standards to their individual writing.

Materials include a research-based synthetic approach to teaching foundational skills. Explicit instruction in most phonological and phonics standards is included in the materials; however, there is a lack of encoding practice for both newly taught phonics skills and high frequency words. Materials include decodables aligned to the scope and sequence of phonics and high frequency word instruction. While materials include explicit instruction in fluency focused on accuracy, rate, and expression, there is a lack of teacher level modeling of fluent reading. Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills; however, teacher guidance for instructional strategies for assessment area deficits is lacking.

Not all units in the program effectively build students’ knowledge on a topic. While text analysis is well-covered, including some analysis of knowledge and ideas within and across texts, not all questions and tasks compel students to return to the text to support their contentions and conclusions.

Students engage in frequent writing tasks across the year; however, since informational writing encompasses nearly half of writing instruction, students may not achieve the full balance of writing genres outlined in the standards. 

The Inquiry projects that conclude each unit teach some research skills but due to student choice, do not provide adequate growth in those skills. These projects also fall short of demonstrating the growth of students’ knowledge, standards, and skills from the unit.  

The materials provide coverage of the standards throughout all units and over the course of the year; however, the preponderance of repetitive, unaligned reading strategies throughout the program moves the focus of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessments away from a tight focus on grade level standards alignment. The program also contains a large volume of material without a suggested daily schedule; therefore, a full and standards-aligned implementation could be challenging.

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
26
52
58
37
52-58
Meets Expectations
27-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-26
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
16
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
15
22
25
N/A
22-25
Meets Expectations
16-21
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to the Standards with Tasks and Questions Grounded in Evidence

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The Open Court Grade 2 materials partially meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the expectations of the standards. Materials include high-quality texts throughout the year; however, the complexity level of the texts remain relatively the same across the year. 

Some text-based opportunities, protocols, questions and tasks support students as both listeners and speakers; however, speaking and listening is not varied across the year and primarily takes place in whole group discussions. Process writing opportunities encompass all the genres set forth in the standards, though informative/explanatory writing has greater coverage. There are limited opportunities for students to engage in on-demand writing aligned to the text. The program includes explicit instruction in and practice of most grammar skills; however, there are limited opportunities for students to apply grade-level grammar and usage standards to their individual writing.

Materials include a research-based synthetic approach to teaching foundational skills. Explicit instruction in most phonics standards is included in the materials; however, there is a lack of encoding practice for both newly taught phonics skills and high frequency words. Materials include decodables aligned to the scope and sequence of phonics and high frequency word instruction. While materials include explicit instruction in fluency focused on accuracy, rate, and expression, there is a lack of teacher level modeling of fluent reading. Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills; however, teacher guidance for instructional strategies for assessment area deficits is lacking. Materials guide teachers in scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level. Additionally, English Language (EL) Tips are integrated throughout the lesson at the point of use.

Criterion 1a - 1e

Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.

11/18
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Criterion Rating Details

The Open Court Kindergarten materials partially meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the expectations of the standards. Materials include high-quality texts throughout the year. The complexity of most anchor texts students read provide an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth; however, the complexity level of the texts remain relatively the same.  the materials do not include a description of the qualitative measures, features, or analysis for the texts, nor do they include a rationale for the purpose and placement of the texts.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of high quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests. *This does not include decodables. Those are identified in Criterion 3.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria of Indicator 1a.

The Grade 2 texts are high-quality and are worthy of careful reading. Many of the anchor texts are written by award-winning authors. They consider a range of student interests including sports, gross jobs, earthquakes and volcanoes. The texts are relevant and relatable and include enriching academic vocabulary and quality illustrations.

Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, students read A Cherokee Stickball Game by Trisha Carpenter. This folktale is engaging and the illustrations are detailed and vivid. 

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, students read A River of Ice by Sue Gibbison, which contains real-life photos that feature labels, maps, diagrams, and captions that will hold students’ interest.

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, students read The Langston Times by Karl Mecham. The text, written as a journal, will appeal to students. The text is engaging and gives students an opportunity to build knowledge about the building process. 

  • In Unit 3, lesson 5, students read The Stranger and the Soup retold by Elizabeth Hamilton, which is a variation of the well-known folktale Stone Soup. This story contains interesting characters and rich language. 

  • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, students read Winston and George by John Miller, which is the story of a partnership between a crocodile and a bird in the jungle. The text contains appealing illustrations and rich language.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, students read The Flag We Love by well-known children’s author Pam Munoz Ryan. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, students read Cinderlad by Erika Aldefer, which is about a girl working on a school assignment to rewrite the story of Cinderella. The story contains rich vocabulary and is a complex text. 

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. *This does not include decodable. Those are identified in Criterion 3.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1b.

The materials include opportunities for students to listen to and read both literary and informational texts; however, there is an unequal balance of literary to informational texts. Instead of the 50-50 ratio suggested by the standards, there are roughly 70% literary texts and 30% informational texts. Throughout the year, students listen to and read a variety of genres including explanatory text, fables, folktales, fantasties, realistic fiction, fairy tales, informational texts, myths, poems, and rhyming nonfiction. There are no biographies found within the Grade 2 curriculum. A larger number of literary texts are found in most units. Students have limited opportunities to interact with selections that contain an informational text structure.

  • Materials reflect the distribution of text types/genres required by the grade level standards. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, materials include the literary genres of fantasy, poetry, fable, folktale, and realistic fiction. Unit 1 also includes informational text selections, such as a journal entry and an autobiography/narrative nonfiction, though this is written in the style of a story. Examples of text selections include The Mice Who Lived in a Shoe by Rodney Peppe (literary), Ant and Aphids Work Together by Martha E.H. Rustad (literary), and The Final Game by William Roy Brownridge (informational).

    • In Unit 3, the materials include the literary genres of realistic fiction, folktale, and poetry. It also includes two informational texts. Texts include Gross Jobs by Andre J. Parker (informational), Victor’s Journal by Wendy Reyes (literary), and The Stranger and the Soup retold by Elizabeth Hamilton (literary). 

    • In Unit 6, materials include the literary genres of folktale, poetry, realistic fiction, fairy tales, and fables. It also includes two informational texts. Examples include Aesop and His Fables adapted by Lee Nowalk (literary), Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, Part 2 retold by Rania Atkinson (literary), and The Art of Storytelling by Karen Hermosa (informational).

  • Materials do not reflect a 50/50 balance of informational and literary texts. Examples include 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, students read “Teamwork” by Tanya Anderson (poem) and Ants and Aphids Work Together by Martha E.H. Rustad (informational text). In Unit 1, there are six literary texts and three informational texts. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, students read What Makes the Earth Shake (myth) retold by Chandler Tyrrell, and in Lesson 2, A River of Ice (informational text) by Sue Gibbison. In this unit, there are six literary texts and three informational texts. 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, students read “Our School is Like a City” by Shameka Lee-Shirey (poem) and in Lesson 2, My Community and Me by Lisa Kurkov (informational text). In this unit, there are seven literary texts and two informational texts. 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, students read “Squirmy, Wiggly Earthworms” by Mike Plutkis (poem) and in Lesson 1, Busy Bees by Brighid Lowe (informational text). In this unit, there are five literary texts and two informational texts. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, students read A Brand-New American Family by Karen E. Martin (realistic fiction) and in Lesson 4, students read I Pledge Allegiance by Logan Doyle (informational text). In this unit, there are seven literary texts and two informational texts. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, students read “The Big Bad Wolf Speaks” by Daniel R. Colwell (poem) and in Lesson 5, students listen to Storytelling: A Zulu Tradition by MIcah Carter-Fulton (informational text). In Unit 6, there are eight literary texts and two informational texts.

Indicator 1c

Core/Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Documentation should also include rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1c.

Instructional materials do not include a text complexity analysis for the texts included in the Grade 2 materials. Most texts in Grade 2 have the appropriate level of complexity according to quantitative and qualitative analysis; however, the associated student task for the majority of the texts is for students to practice various reading comprehension strategies such as prediction, connections, and asking questions on the first read of the text. Materials state, “Students read each selection twice—the first time to practice comprehension strategies, and the second to understand not only the kinds of techniques writers use but also how to access complex text by searching for specific types of information. Before, during, and after both reads of the selection, vocabulary development and application is stressed.” 

While most texts meet the requirement for text complexity, the program does not include a rationale for each text and a quantitative analysis is only provided for some texts, while a qualitative analysis is not provided at all. According to the Program Overview, “In Grades 4-5, where text complexity becomes even more difficult, Preview the Selection in the Teacher’s Edition states the Lexile level of the selection, indicates the level of complexity from simple to complex, and provides the reasoning behind why the text is complex.” However this information is not included in the Grade 2 materials.

Most texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task; however, in Grade 2, students also read the text, as opposed to the text being read-aloud. Some texts placed at the beginning of the year have a high level of complexity towards the end of the Lexile band. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, students read Volcano Rising by Elizabeth Rusch, which has a Lexile of 760L. Because of the specific content knowledge, the complexity is considered very complex. After reading the text, students make connections, visualize, and clarify. On the second read, students look for the main idea and details and compare and contrast. This text is towards the end of the Grade 2-3 Lexile band. 

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, students read The Stranger and the Soup retold by Elizabeth Hamilton, which has a Lexile level of 580L, which is appropriate for Grade 2 students. The text is qualitatively complex. It has an implied purpose, figurative language, and multiple themes. The associated tasks include practicing reading comprehension strategies: summarizing and visualizing, discussing the selection, and completing a worksheet on inferences. 

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, students read A Brand-New American Family by Karen E. Martin, which has a Lexile of 620L, which is moderately complex due to the language. Over the course of the two days students engage with the text by applying the comprehension strategies of predicting and visualizing. Students also make inferences using a graphic organizer. 

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, students read Cinderlad retold by Erika Alderfer, which has a Lexile of 690L. The qualitative features include events out of chronological order, complex academic vocabulary, and references to other texts. On the first read, students predict and visualize. When rereading the text, students identify temporal words to help them discuss the sequence of the text.

There is no rationale for the educational purpose and placement of texts in the materials. There is a Lexile Reference Guide for texts in the student anthology, but no qualitative analysis is included in the program.

Indicator 1d

Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1d.

In Grade 2, each unit begins with an anchor read-aloud text and the other texts included in the unit are read by the students. The materials include complex texts that support students’ literacy skills; however, the complexity level of the texts remain relatively the same, making it difficult for them to support growth over the course of the year. Additionally, reader and task demands on the first read of the text focus primarily on comprehension strategies, such as predicting and making connections that do not align with the standards. The tasks across the year remain relatively the same with students practicing a comprehension strategy and then discussing the text. Comprehension strategies and questions are repeated throughout the year and applied to different texts; however, since the texts stay primarily at the same level of complexity, students do not apply skills and strategies to more complex texts as the year progresses. 

In the beginning of the year, materials prompt the teacher to simply model and in the middle of the year, the teacher models and prompts students for answers. By the end of the year, the teacher prompts students, with scaffolds removed.

  • The complexity of most anchor texts students read provide an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, encompassing an entire year’s worth of growth; however, the complexity level of the texts remain relatively the same. For example:

    • The texts in Unit 1 include a Lexile range of 500L-720L The qualitative complexity ranges from low to moderate complexity. Associated tasks are moderate tasks. In Unit 1, students spend time on questions that focus on comprehension strategies such as asking and answering questions and making connections. Some of the texts in Unit 1 include:

      • The Bat, Birds, and Beasts by Mary Ann Rodman, which has a Lexile of 500L and has a high qualitative complexity due to the language. The associated tasks are moderate. The overall text complexity is complex.  

      • The Final Game by William Roy Brownridge, which has a Lexile of 720L. The text has a moderate qualitative complexity. The associated tasks range from low to moderate. The overall text complexity is moderate. 

  • The texts in Unit 3 include a Lexile range of 580L-710L. The qualitative complexity ranges from low to high. Associated tasks are of moderate complexity. In Unit 3, students spend time on questions that focus on comprehension strategies, such as asking and answering questions, making connections, and classifying and categorizing information. Some of the texts in Unit 3 include:

    • My Community and Me by Lisa Kurkov, which has a Lexile of 710L. The text has a low qualitative complexity. The associated tasks are moderate. The overall text complexity is moderate. 

    • Victor’s Journal  by Wendy Reyes, which has a Lexile of 630L. The text has a high qualitative complexity. The associated tasks are moderate. The overall text complexity is complex. 

  • The texts in Unit 6 include a Lexile range of 530L-780L. The qualitative complexity is high across the unit. Associated tasks are of moderate complexity. In Unit 6, students spend time on questions that focus on comprehension strategies such as making, revising, and confirming predictions and summarizing. Some of the texts in Unit 6 include:

    • Cinderella Tales  by Eduardo M. Davaios, which has a Lexile of 700L. The text has a high qualitative complexity. The associated tasks are moderate. The overall text complexity is complex. 

    • The Art of Storytelling by Karen Hermosa, which has a Lexile of 780L. The text has a high qualitative complexity. The associated tasks are moderate. The overall text complexity is complex.

  • As texts become more complex, appropriate scaffolds and/or materials are not provided in the Teacher Edition (i.e., spending more time on texts, more questions, repeated readings). Texts remain relatively at the same complexity and scaffolds are removed throughout the year.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, students read A River of Ice by Sue Gibbison, which has a Lexile of 530L and is qualitatively high. In this unit, the teacher models.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, students read Hungry Little Hare by Howard Goldsmith, which has a Lexile of 600L and is qualitatively moderate in complexity. The teacher moves from modeling to modeling and prompting. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, students read A Brand-New American Family by Karen E. Martin, which has a Lexile of 620L. The teacher no longer models, and instead, prompts the students by asking questions during the read aloud.

Indicator 1e

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year, including accountability structures for independent reading.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1e.

A variety of texts and genres are included in each of the units in Grade 2. Each unit begins with a read-aloud to introduce students to the theme. However, many lessons provide only one text for students to interact with over the course of five days, limiting the opportunity for students to read a volume of texts. No independent reading routine is found in the curriculum.

  • Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of text types and genres. Examples include:

    • According to the Grade 2 Program Guide, “Students have the chance to connect what they have read to a short, cross-curricular selection. This allows students to have multiple opportunities with different text features and with social studies and science content.” 

    • In Unit 2, students read a variety of genres including realistic fiction, informational text, myths, poetry, and fantasy. 

    • In Unit 3, students read a variety of genres including informational text, realistic fiction, poetry, and folktales. Some of the texts include The Little Red Hen by Maria Minnick and Victor’s Journal by Wendy Reyes. In Lesson 2, students read the text My Community and Me by Lisa Kurkov twice in order to apply comprehension skills and fluency skills.

  • Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities and supports for students to engage in a volume of reading. Examples include:

    • In Grade 2, students access 33 central texts via shared reading of a Student Anthology. In addition, they listen to a read-aloud to launch each unit. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, students read D is for Democracy by Elissa Grodin many times for different purposes including applying comprehension strategies, practicing fluency, and identifying writer’s craft. Students read this text over the course of five days. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, students read Storytelling: A Zulu Tradition by Micah Carter-Fulton over the course of five days. Students use this text to apply comprehension strategies, engage in  close reading, practice fluency, and analyze writer’s craft.

There is not sufficient teacher guidance to foster independence for all readers.There is no proposed schedule for independent reading. There is no tracking system to track independent reading. Most texts are not organized with built-in supports/scaffolds to foster independence and independent reading procedures are included in the lessons. The materials provide a Home Connection letter for each lesson and an instructional routine for reading a selection, but there is no schedule or tracking system to help support and foster independent reading for students. Possible additional opportunities for students to engage in reading independently include:

  • The Resource Library contains “Challenge Novels” for students reading above-level, which gives additional novels for these students to read. 

  • Workshop “is the time each day when students work independently, in pairs, or in small groups to review and apply recently learned skills and strategies, practice fluency, work on Inquiry, complete writing assignments, hold peer conferences, and make personal choices.” The goal of this time is to help build student independence but materials suggest that there should be a reading area with books and magazines for students.

Criterion 1f - 1m

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

11/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Some text-based opportunities, protocols, questions and tasks support students as both listeners and speakers; however, speaking and listening is not varied across the year. The majority of discussions are done in the whole group with the teacher asking questions, meaning that all students may not be engaged in speaking and listening about what they are reading. Additionally, some discussion questions do not focus on developing students' speaking and listening skills anchored in what they are reading or listening to, but rather focus on thoughts and opinions. 

Process writing opportunities encompass all the genres set forth in the standards, though informative/explanatory writing accounts for nearly half of instruction. There are limited opportunities for students to engage in on-demand writing aligned to the text. The program includes explicit instruction in and practice of most grammar skills; however, there are limited opportunities for students to apply grade-level grammar and usage standards to their individual writing.

Indicator 1f

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and/or text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria of Indicator 1f.

Throughout the Grade 2 materials, the students respond to a variety of questions. Students read a text multiple times and are asked different questions for each read. During the first read, the questions are often non text-dependent or non text-specific questions; however, the majority of the questions afterwards are text-dependent and help students work towards grade-level standards by the end of the year. During the first read of a Shared Reading, roughly half of the questions are text-dependent and the other half are not. The Shared Reading has a comprehension strategy focus, which may be non text-specific, such as making  connections, or may be text-dependent, such as summarizing. After the first read, questions are also provided within the Discussion Starters, which include questions (both text-dependent and non text-dependent) for the teacher to guide class discussions. While some questions do ask opinions or for students to make connections, the text-dependent questions are aligned to the standards and require students to engage with the text.

  • Most questions and tasks included in the instructional materials within a unit and over the course of the year are text-based. Examples include: 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, students read Ellie’s Long Walk by Pam Flowers, the teacher asks, “How did Pam respond after she fell and hurt her back?”

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, after reading The Stranger and the Soup retold by Elizabeth Hamilton, students respond to the questions, “How did the stranger manage to make soup with a stone? What is the lesson of this folktale?”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, after reading Flower Power by Julia Wall, students answer the questions, “Why do people and plants need each other? How do animals help plants?”

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, after reading Election Day by Viad Barzdukas, students complete a story map and answer questions such as, “What separate series of events occur in the story?” and “How does the classroom discussion at the beginning of the story introduce the action that follows?”

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, students listen to Aesop and His Fables, and the teacher says, “Okay, let us pause to summarize this fable. Who will recount the most important details of the fable for us?”

  • Teacher materials provide support for planning and implementation of text-based questions and tasks. 

    • Some questions include the Depth of Knowledge Levels. The digital materials include the DOK level in parentheses following discussion starter questions; however, the same notations are not present in the PDF of the Teacher Edition. For example:

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, after reading “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” by Samuel F. Smith, students are asked, “How does the author of ‘I Pledge Allegiance’ explain the definition of the word allegiance? (DOK 1)” 

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, after a close read of Aesop and His Fables adapted by Lee Nowak, students answer the question, “Why is Lia so excited to hear Aesop’s stories? (DOK 1)”

    • The materials include possible answers to questions. For example:

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, after reading  The Stranger and the Soup retold by Elizabeth Hamilton, the teacher says, “How did the stranger manage to make soup with a stone? Possible Answer: When the stranger started cooking the stone, it inspired villagers to add other ingredients to the pot. Soup was made from the contributions that the villagers were able to make.”

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, after reading “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” by Samuel F. Smith, students hear the question, “How does the author of ‘I Pledge Allegiance’ explain the definition of the word allegiance? Possible Answers: The author says that allegiance means ‘loyalty’ so pledging allegiance means promising your loyalty to something.”

Indicator 1g

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria of Indicator 1g.

Materials include opportunities across the year for discussions. The Program Overview explains in depth the purpose of several speaking and listening routines including Collaborative Conversation and Discussion, Reflecting on the Selection, and Exploring Concepts Across Selections. The instructional materials also provide rubrics for speaking and listening, as well as teacher guidance for employing speaking and listening opportunities. There are a few instances where students discuss in small groups.

  • Materials provide varied protocols for evidence-based discussions across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials. These include:

    • Collaborative Conversation and Discussion describes the teacher moves to facilitate a discussion. The protocol states, “Initially, model the following examples of discussion starters, but then turn over the responsibility for using these to students.” It also includes sentence stems for students to use when asking open-ended questions and tips for teachers such as, “Students should have texts with them to reference during discussion,” and “Help students see that they are responsible for carrying on the discussion.”

    • Reflecting on the Selection provides students with an opportunity to discuss what they heard. The protocol includes discussion prompts such as, “Discuss any new questions that have arisen because of the reading,” and “Share what they expected to learn from reading the selection and tell whether expectations were met.”

    • Handing Off is a technique to turn over to students the primary responsibility for generating and sustaining a discussion. In this protocol, after a student finishes his or her comment, that student chooses (or hands off) to the next speaker. 

    • Exploring Concepts within the Selection provides an “opportunity for collaborative learning and to focus on the concepts.” Students form small groups “and spend time discussing what they have learned about the concepts from the selection.”

    • DIscussion Starters and Questions provides sentence starters to help guide the discussion such as, “I didn't know that ...” or “I agree with _____ because...” This protocol allows for a gradual release of responsibility by the teacher.

  • Speaking and listening instruction includes facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. Examples include:

    • The Program Overview provides general guidance on the facilitation of speaking and listening instruction. It states, “Listening and speaking skills are integrated throughout the lessons in Open Court Reading,” and then lists that the focus skills are “listening, speaking, interaction, and presenting information.” Throughout the program, tips are provided for the teacher to utilize when integrating these focus areas into classroom instruction, including facilitating discussions, monitoring skills, and scaffolding support.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 4 students discuss the text  All about Earthquakes by Jillian Johnson. Before the discussion, the Teacher Edition states, “You should also model how to ask for clarification about a topic that is being discussed.”

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 4 students discuss the text Cinderella Tales by Eduwardo M. Davalos. The Teacher Edition provides various sentence starters that the teacher could use to facilitate the discussion and provide support to students. 

Indicator 1h

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and support.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1h.

Following the first read of a text, students engage in a whole-group discussion with Discussion Starters provided. Students are encouraged to answer in complete sentences and to build on others’ responses during the Discuss the Selection. At other points in lessons and units, students engage in different forms of speaking and listening tasks. At the end of a unit, students work in small groups to discuss content knowledge and texts they have read in a Theme Wrap-Up and Review discussion. During the Theme Wrap-Up and Review discussion, students retell a favorite selection, review the knowledge learned, and share their thinking with the class. However, students do not have varied opportunities for speaking and listening. The majority of the time, students are speaking and listening during whole group discussions or turn and talk. Because the majority of discussions are done in the whole group with the teacher asking questions, all students may not be engaged in speaking and listening about what they are reading.

  • Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading (or listening to) through speaking and listening opportunities, though they are not varied. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 5, after reading The Final Game by William Roy Brownridge, students meet to discuss the text. The teacher engages students in a discussion by asking them questions and encouraging them to build from each other’s conversations. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, students meet in small groups for the Theme Wrap-Up and Review and students choose one selection they liked best. Then they retell the selection and explain why they liked it. Students identify what they learned about Earth’s natural forces from the selection and explain how the various text features used in the selections helped them understand the text. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, students meet in small groups and have a collaborative conversation to discuss and review the unit selections. Students can use discussion starters such as, “Identify what you learned about citizenship from the selection,” “Explain how the various text features used in the selection helped 

    • you understand the text,” and “Explain why you liked the selection.” 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, students explain how the selections in the unit helped them to answer the Big Idea question, “Why do you enjoy stories?” 

  • Speaking and listening work requires students to marshall evidence from texts and sources.  Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students compare and contrast The Bats, Birds, and Beasts retold by Chad Clark to different versions by different authors, such as the traditional Aesop’s Fable and Bat’s Big Game by Margaret Read MacDonald. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, students compare and contrast texts in this unit and the use of turtles as a character. The teacher asks, “What makes the turtle a fitting animal for these stories?”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, students are asked, “How do you know that Mother Hare was right? Did you learn this from the text or the illustrations?” after reading Hungry Little Hare by Howard Goldsmith.

Indicator 1i

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process, grade-appropriate writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria of Indicator 1i.

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction. Students have opportunities throughout each unit to engage in on-demand writing. On-demand writing occurs after a second read of a shared text in all six units. There is also an on-demand assessment for every unit and on the Benchmark Assessment given three times a year. The process writing instruction includes opportunities for students to prewrite, brainstorm, draft, revise, edit, publish, and present. Materials include graphic organizers, editing and revising routines, rubrics, and model texts to help students with the writing process.

  • Materials include on-demand writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction. Examples include: 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, students learn about cause and effect. They read an effect and then write a sentence with a cause to complete each sentence. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, after reading Mattland by Hazel Hutchins and Gail Herber, students respond to the prompt, “Have you ever used your imagination to build something? Explain what you built and why you built it.” 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, after reading Our School is Like a City by Shameka Lee-Shirey, students respond to the prompt, “Describe some of the things you like best about your school.” 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, after reading Flower Power by Julia Wall, students respond to the prompt, “Describe the outcome of the plant experiment. Did all of the plants grow? Which plant grew the tallest?”

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, students describe a story that they enjoy telling others. 

  • Materials include process writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction.There is a predictable routine for students with graphic organizers and revising, editing, and publishing checklist. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, students learn the steps in the writing process and begin drafting an opinion piece. On Day 3, students choose an idea for an opinion piece, and on Day 5, students draft the opinion piece. In Lesson 5, students write another opinion piece. On Day 2, students finish drafting their opinion piece by using the TREE graphic organizer as a guide. 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, students learn about writing a narrative action tale. Students spend the entire week working on their story. On Day 1, the teacher models how to add dialogue to a story. In Lesson 4, students edit their narrative writing using a checklist. 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, students revise their informational piece. Students work in small groups to revise their draft using a series of questions such as, “Does the draft use facts and explanations to compare and contrast the two animals? Does the draft have a topic sentence?” 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, students begin summary writing with prewriting. They use a graphic organizer to write their ideas and the main parts of their summary. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, students choose a subject for a couplet and after drafting it, they revise and edit their couplet. 

  • Opportunities for students to revise and edit are provided. Examples include:

    • The teacher can present students with Instruction Routine 17, which is an editing and revising checklist.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, students revise their informational piece. Students revise for sentence variety and use a revising checklist.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, students revise their work using a revision checklist and feedback they received during a writing conference. In small groups, students read their writing aloud and peers give feedback. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, students edit their persuasive writing piece using a checklist. 

  • Materials include digital resources where appropriate. Examples include: 

    • In the digital materials, the ePresentation is a way for the teacher to electronically access and show students graphic organizers and editing and revising checklists. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, students are given the opportunity to publish their writing with digital tools. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, students use a word processing program to produce a final copy of their writing. They can add visual aids using digital tools as well.

Indicator 1j

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year-long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1j.

Grade 2 students participate in writing activities each day across the Language Arts block. Students write opinion, narrative, and informative genres and a variety of types within the genre. Informational writing makes up almost half of all writing assignments, with narrative and opinion writing accounting for less time. Opinion writing is taught in the beginning and end of the year and narrative writing happens in the middle and end of the year. Informative writing is distributed throughout the year. At times, writing assignments are connected to the texts. The teacher may remind students about a text they have read, but there are limited opportunities for the teacher to analyze a text as an exemplar to help students develop their craft. Students also respond to literature, but this occurs more in the second half of the year.

  • Materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing, but it does not reflect the distribution required by the standards.  Different genres/modes/types of writing are not evenly distributed throughout the school year. For example: 

  • Students have opportunities to engage in opinion writing roughly only 12% of all writing lessons, though roughly 28% of instructional time. Opinion writing takes place mostly at the beginning of the year and the end of the year. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, students write opinion pieces, for example, about money.

    • In Unit 6, students write a persuasive piece.

  • Students have opportunities to engage in informative/explanatory writing roughly 44% of the time. These pieces are written at the beginning, middle, and end of the year and include a variation in type including book reports and biographies. Examples include: 

    • In Unit 2, students write about a career, a book, an animal, and a relative.

    • In Unit 4, students write a compare and contrast about animals. 

    • In Unit 5, students write a response to literature and a summary.

    • In Unit 6, students write a response to literature. 

  • Students have opportunities to engage in narrative writing with six of the 25 process writing pieces being narrative. This accounts for roughly 24% of writing. Narrative writing is found in the middle and end of the year. Examples include: 

    • In Unit 3, students complete narrative writings, including an action tale, a realistic story, a personal narrative, and a fantasy.

    • In Unit 5, students write personal letters, a formal letter, and a narrative.

    • In Unit 6, students write a couplet and haiku and a personal narrative. 

  • Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets (either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports). Examples include:

    • In Unit 5, the theme is Citizenship. The big idea for the unit is “What makes a good citizen?” In Lesson 5, students draft a summary on the importance of being a good citizen. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, students choose a fiction reading selection from the Student Anthology 2 and use it to answer the question, “What is the plot of the story?”

Indicator 1k

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations of Indicator 1k.

Materials provide limited opportunities for students to practice evidence-based writing; however, many opportunities do not require students to write using a text. In the Look Closer activities students are asked to refer to information from the text, but the writing prompts still require them to share a personal opinion many times. In the process writing tasks, there are few opportunities to work with evidence from a text, and the few opportunities are writing summaries of a shared text. Additional opportunities are  part of the final inquiry presentation in each unit, but a writing prompt is one option students can choose to demonstrate their knowledge.

  • Materials provide some opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, after reading The Mice who Lived in a Shoe by Rodney Peppe, students describe a time when they demonstrated helpfulness at school, which is not an evidence-based writing prompt. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, after reading What Makes the Earth Shake? retold by Chandler Tyrrell, students create their own story about what causes an earthquake, which is similar to the story they read.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, after reading My Community and Me by Lisa Kurkov, students describe some special interests or talents that they have discovered in school, which is not an evidence-based writing prompt. 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, after reading Flower Power by Julia Wall, students are asked, “Describe the outcome of the plant experiment. Did all of the plants grow? Which plant grew the tallest?” 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, after reading A Brand-New American Family by Karen K. Martin, students imagine that they are a member of the Flores family. They then write what they would do to celebrate their new citizenship. Students do not need to comprehend or refer to the text in order to answer this writing prompt. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, after reading Cinderlad retold by Erika Alderfer, students imagine that they are Cinderlad in the meadow. They describe what they see, hear, and how they feel when the rumbling begins.

  • Some writing opportunities are focused around students’ recall of information to develop opinions from reading closely and working with evidence from texts and sources. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 1, students write a response after reading Little Red Riding Hood. The Teacher Guide states that students can write about “what they think of a character or characters and why” or “they might explain whether or not they thought the story was interesting or entertaining...” There is no specific prompt; therefore some students might write and refer to the text, while others might not. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, after reading In my Own Backyard by Judi Kurjian, students write about which story’s time they think would be the most fun to visit and why. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, after reading A Brand New American Family by Karen E. Martin, students respond to the text by answering the questions, “Who is one of the main characters in A Brand-New American Family? What words does the author use to describe the character?” 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, students write a persuasive piece. Teachers remind students that, “when writing a persuasive text, it is important to be sure they have solid reasons to support their opinions.” The reasons do not have to come from a text.

Indicator 1l

Materials include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards, with opportunities for application in context.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1l.

Materials provide explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards through the instruction and guided practice sections of the day’s activities that direct the teacher on wording and examples to teach the skill. Most grammar and convention standards are addressed in Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics. There is a missed opportunity for explicit instruction and repeated student practice for forming and using the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs. Opportunities are missed for students to learn how to consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. There are opportunities for students to apply grammar and conventions skills to in-context tasks.

  • Materials include explicit instruction of most grammar and conventions standards for the grade level. For example:

    • Use collective nouns (e.g., group).

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays the ePresentation to show collective nouns. The teacher explains that collective nouns describe a group of people, animals, or things. The teacher writes collective nouns on the board and students make sentences using one of the collective nouns.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 5, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher reviews collective nouns. The teacher lists animal-related collective nouns on the board. The students select two collective nouns and make a sentence with subject-verb agreement.

    • Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher presents the ePresentation to show sentences with singular and plural nouns. The teacher explains the rules for changing singular nouns ending in s, x, z, ss, ch, sh, y, f. The teacher displays singular nouns on the board for students to change to plural nouns. Nouns include girl, foot, box, child, baby, fox, wolf, tooth, man, mouse, sheep, fish.

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays a list of nouns (fox, baby, fish, child, hen). The students write the plural of each noun.

    • Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays a sentence with the reflexive pronoun, “Ari cleans the snake’s cages by himself.” The teacher explains the use of reflexive pronouns. 

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 4, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays sentences. Students identify the nouns that can be replaced with pronouns and reflexive pronouns.

    • Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher uses an ePresentation to explain verb tenses with irregular verbs. In Apply, students change sentences to show past tense, present tense, or future tense.

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays a friendly letter. Students identify three past-tense verbs (sent, got, yelled).

    • Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays an ePresentation with three sentences. The teacher points out the adjectives and the modified noun. Then students identify adjectives in three different sentences.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays an ePresentation with sentences and points out the adverbs. Then students identify adverbs in three different sentences. Students determine if the adverb tells how, when, or where.

    • Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy).

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher explains conjunctions. In small groups, students write sentences using an, or, or but.

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 3, Day 1, the teacher displays sentences. The students combine the sentences and then rearrange the sentences if needed.

    • Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher shows sentences and identifies the proper nouns. Students list product names on the board and capitalize the names.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher shows sentences with days, months, holidays, cities, states, and geographic names. The teacher explains that those proper nouns are capitalized. The teacher shows four other sentences with holidays, cities, and states that are not capitalized. Students edit the sentences and capitalize the proper nouns.

    • Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays a friendly letter. The teacher points to the commas in the greeting and closing. Students correctly write the greetings and closings on their paper.

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 5, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher reminds students about commas in greetings and closings. The students correct mistakes in greetings and closings.

    • Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher displays three sentences with contractions. The teacher explains contractions as two shortened words. The teacher shows three sentences with no contractions. The teacher shows the contraction to be made. Students identify which letter/letters the apostrophe replaced.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, the teacher shows three sentences and points out the possessive nouns and pronouns. The teacher explains a possessive noun and shows four sentences for students to identify possessive nouns and pronouns.

    • Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil).

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 1, Spelling, the teacher gives students a spelling pretest. Words on the test have /j/ spelled dge, /k/ spelled ck, and /ch/ spelled tch.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 3, Dictation and Spelling, the teacher uses Routine 7 and Routine 8 to spell words and sentences. Words include long e spelled with e, ee, ee, ea, ie, y, ey.

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 1, Spelling, the teacher gives students a spelling pretest. Words on the test have silent letters. Students spell words such as castle, answer, rhino.

    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, Day 1, Apply, students revise and edit their opinion writing. The teacher tells students that they should consult reference materials.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 2, Apply, students edit their informative/explanatory writing. Students are told to use “reference materials, including beginning dictionaries.”

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 6, Day 3, Apply, students edit their personal narratives. The directions to the teacher state, “Tell students that they should consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, to check and correct spellings.”

    • Compare formal and informal uses of English

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 2, Writing to Inform, the teacher reminds students to use formal language since the audience is the teacher. The teacher models revising a draft to eliminate informal language. Students complete Skills Practice I to identify the informal and formal language.

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 1, Narrative Writing, the teacher tells students that dialogue should sound realistic with informal language. Students make suggestions for other realistic dialogue to be added to the teacher’s narrative draft.

  • Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in- and out-of-context. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 1, Apply, the students add adjectives and adverbs to four sentences. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, students make sentences with product names and names with abbreviated titles.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 3, Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, the students write three sentences from the board. The teacher asks students to have two sentences with reflexive pronouns.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 3 Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics, Apply, students write two sentences with possessive nouns. 

Indicator 1m

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 1m.

Vocabulary activities occur daily in Grade 2. During each first read or close reading of an anchor text, students learn new words. They are then asked to apply their understanding of those words to familiar scenarios or to new contexts with different meanings. Students learn word-attack strategies, such as considering part of speech, using antonyms or synonyms, or looking up words in glossaries. Some vocabulary words are central to the meaning of an anchor text; however, vocabulary words are not repeated across multiple texts.

  • Materials provide teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year-long vocabulary development component. For example: 

    • Routine 11 is the Selection Vocabulary Routine which consists of five steps. Develop and Practice occur before, during, or after reading text. Apply and Extend have students read the same words in a new text created specifically for this program and complete practice activities to solidify their understanding of the meaning. The fifth step, Review, occurs throughout the program. 

    • Before reading the selection, the teacher orally introduces the definitions of vocabulary words essential to understanding the text. After reading, the teacher introduces additional vocabulary words. 

    • In Grade 2, students begin analyzing vocabulary words or study word relations to help understand the vocabulary word more quickly and efficiently.

  • Vocabulary is repeated in contexts, yet not often found across multiple texts. For example: 

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, the words approached and scrambling are introduced for the read-aloud, Little Red Riding Hood. These words are not referenced after reading or in other texts. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, before reading the text Mattland by Hazel Hutchins and Gail Hert, students learn the word modify. After reading the text, students review the word and are asked to discuss how the word relates to this selection. Students learn an additional 11 vocabulary words found in the text. On Day 3, the teacher reviews the vocabulary words and asks questions and students respond with a vocabulary word such as, “Which word names places where water drains? - culverts.” 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, students learn the words unfortunately and compelled in the text Cinderella Tales and apply their understanding of those words in examining the poem “The Big Bad Wolf Speaks” by Daniel R. Colwell.

  • Attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words. For example:

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, students learn the words tender and hind. Students go into the text Hungry Little Hare by Howard Goldsmith to define the words. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, students learn the words meanwhile, spark, bazaar, polished, fortune, sultan, procession, word, acquainted, extraordinary, spectacular, and lord. Students then use context clues to help determine the meaning of the words.

Criterion 1n - 1s

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

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Criterion Rating Details

Materials include a research-based synthetic approach to teaching foundational skills. Explicit instruction in most phonics standards is included in the materials; however, there is a lack of encoding practice for both newly taught phonics skills and high frequency words. Materials include decodables aligned to the scope and sequence of phonics and high frequency word instruction. Materials include instruction in 100 high-frequency words; however, less than half are irregularly spelled words. While materials include explicit instruction in fluency focused on accuracy, rate, and expression, there is a lack of teacher level modeling of fluent reading. Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills; however, teacher guidance for instructional strategies for assessment area deficits is lacking. Materials guide teachers in scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level. Additionally, English Language (EL) Tips are integrated throughout the lesson at the point of use.

Indicator 1n

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonics that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1n.i

Explicit instruction in phonological awareness (K-1) and phonics (K-2).

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1n.i.

Materials include explicit instructional routines for Sound-by-Sound Blending, Whole-Word Blending, Blending Sentences, Sounds-in-Sequence Dictation, Whole-Word Dictation, Sentence Dictation, Closed Syllables, Open Syllables, and Words with Prefixes and Suffixes. These consistent routines provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern. Sound/Spelling Cards are used for many activities. Routines are consistent for introducing each new sound pattern, and students can hear, say, encode, and read each pattern within the same lesson. While materials address the majority of grade-level standards, there are missed opportunities for students to learn to distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled words; particularly long and short e vowel sounds. 

  • Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. Examples include:

    • Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, the students practice contrasting long and short a. The teacher tells students that the final silent e signals the letter a to make /ā/. Students read tap, cane, tape, and cane.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 3, the students practice contrasting long and short i. The teacher tells students that the final silent e signals the letter a to make /ā/. Students identify the vowel sound in bit, strip, bite, and stripe. The teacher does not explicitly teach why the vowel sound changes.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 3, the students practice contrasting long and short o. Students identify the vowel sound in not, cop, note, and cope. The teacher does not explicitly teach why the vowel sound changes.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 3, the students practice contrasting long and short u. Students identify the vowel sound in cut, mutt, cute, and mute. The teacher does not explicitly teach why the vowel sound changes.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher is to review long a and long i using the Sound/Spelling Cards 27 and 29. Then students read the word lines and sentences.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 2, the teacher writes the sentences on the board. Students read the sentence aloud to distinguish the short and long vowel sounds. The teacher tells students to identify which word has short e and which has long e. The teacher does not explicitly teach short e and long e distinction. 

    • Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 1, the teacher introduces the vowel team oo. The teacher asks students to identify and read words spoon, spool, stool, stoop, mood, choose. 

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, the teacher introduces the vowel team ou_. The teacher asks students to identify and read words with that sound.

      • In Unit 6, Lesson1, Day 1, the teacher explains that ough has many different sounds. The teacher shows the word brought, says the word, and has students repeat the word several times.

    • Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding / ī/ spelled i, i_e Blending, the teacher introduces / ī/ spelled i and i_e using Sound/Spelling Card 29. The teacher uses Routine 5, the Open Syllables Routine, to discuss open syllables with students. The teacher reminds them that every syllable must have a vowel sound and a vowel spelling. The teacher points to the word final and has students identify the vowel spellings in the word (i, a). The teacher writes a V under each vowel spelling. Then students identify the consonant spelling between the vowels and write a C under the consonant spelling. The teacher tells students that when they see a vowel-consonant-vowel spelling pattern, they usually should divide the word before the consonant spelling. 

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Decoding, the teacher introduces the long /o/ using Sound/Spelling Card 30 and uses the decoding word list (e.g., rowboat, ozone, homegrown) to show identifying the vowel team.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 2, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Decoding, the teacher introduces the /ū/ spelled ew and ue using Sound/Spelling Card 31 and asks students what spellings for /ū/ they have already learned. u and u_e. The students read the words in the lines. (spew, hew, nephew, curfew, cue, cup, hue, hug, fuel, dispute, puny, accuse, continue, January, distribute, pewter. In About the Words, students identify the target sound/spelling in each word: continue, January, distribute, pewter.

    • Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 3, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 10 to introduce the prefixes dis- and un-. Students decode the words dislike, disagree, dishonest, disrespect, unkind, unwritten, unfair, unwise, and four additional words with each prefix. 

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 3, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 10 to introduce the prefixes non- and re-. Students decode nonfat, nonstick, nonprofit, nonsense, rebuild, rewind, recheck, reappear, and add four additional words with each prefix.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 3, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 10 to introduce the suffixes -er, -or, and -ness. Students decode the words runner, actor, kindness, softness, and twelve additional words. 

    • Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 5, Day 3, students identify the words meet, meat, and heal, heel. Students identify the spelling of each word. 

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 4, Day 3, Phonics and Decoding, Blending, the teacher introduces /j/ spelled ge and gi_ using Sound/Spelling Card 10. The teacher asks students what they think the letters e and i do to the consonant g. They signal g to make /j/. The teacher uses Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, to have students blend and read the words in the first line (gentle, magenta, strange, engage). Then the students read the rest of the words, stopping to blend only the words they cannot read fluently and automatically. 

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 3,  Phonics and Decoding, Decoding, About the Words, the directions tell the teacher to have students identify the /aw/ in each line with various spellings such as aw, au, augh, ough, all, and al.

  • Lessons provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern. Examples include:

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Days 3-4, Phonics and Decoding, Blending, the teacher reviews the long /a/ using Sound/Spelling Card 21. Then, the teacher guides students in decoding a wordlist with common spellings of long /a/ such as a_e, ai, and _ay. Next, the teacher engages students in dictation and spelling with Routine 7 and 8 with words with the long /a/.  

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, the teacher introduces the /ow/ spelled ow and ou_ asks students to identify the spelling in words, read words, and dictates words for students to spell. 

    • In Unit 5,  Lesson 4, Days 1-2, Phonics and Decoding, the teacher directs students to listen for the /aw/ with spellings such as aw, au, augh, and ough. Then, the teacher guides students in decoding a wordlist with common spellings of /aw/.  Next, the teacher engages students in dictation and spelling with Routine 7 and 8 with words with the /aw/. 

Indicator 1n.ii

Phonological awareness based on a research-based continuum (K-1).

Narrative Evidence Only

Indicator 1n.iii

Phonics demonstrated with a research-based progression of skills (K-2).

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for Indicator 1n.iii.

Materials include the research report, Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading, which provides a clear, evidence-based rationale for phonics instruction and the progression of skills. Also, the Unit Planner for each unit provides a cohesive scope and sequence for phonics instruction based on the evidence-based rationale in the research report. Patterns and generalizations are presented and then reviewed for students to have a manageable number of phonics patterns to learn deeply. Materials include lessons that provide students with frequent opportunities to decode phonetically spelled words, read complete words, and review previously taught grade-level phonics daily through blending sentences routines, whole-word blending routines, and word analysis. The students read complete words by saying the entire word as a unit using newly taught phonics skills through the use of the Whole-Word Blending Routine and Sentence-Blending routine when working with Sound/Spelling Cards, pages from the Student Edition, Decodable Readers, and word lists/sentences from the ePresentation Resources. The review activities found throughout the lessons provide students an opportunity to review previously learned grade-level phonics. Students have frequent opportunities to decode words in sentences through materials in the ePresentation resources, Core Decodables, and student Skills Practice Pages. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds through word-building in which students use letter cards to match the word the teacher wrote on the board. Students have frequent opportunities that apply phonics as they encode words into sentences or phrases through the dictation and spelling part of a day’s activities through Routines and words/sentences read aloud by the teacher.

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to decode (phonemes, onset, and rime, and/or syllables) phonetically spelled words. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 5, Phonics and Decoding /ch/ spelled ch, /th/ spelled th, /sh/ spelled sh, /w/ spelled wh_, and /ar/ spelled ar, the teacher reviews these sounds using Sound/Spelling Cards 23, 32, 33, 34, and 38. The teacher uses Instructional Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Instructional Routine 3, the Sentence Blending Routine, to have students blend and read the words and sentences from Days 1 and 3. For multisyllabic words, they use Routine 4, the Closed Syllables Routine, to have students blend and read the words syllable by syllable from the ePresentation Resources.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 6, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Blending, students decode words with long a such as snake, basic, able.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 4, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, the teacher introduces /aw/ spellings using the Sound/Spelling Card 43. Students decode /aw/ words such as hawk, sauce, caught, fall.

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to read complete words by saying the entire word as a unit using newly taught phonics skills. Examples include:

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Blending, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, to have students blend and read the words in the lines (Snake, plate, create, flame, top, tape, can, cane, basic, laser, April, bacon, able, cable, staple, maple).

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 3, Phonics and Decoding Review /ī/ spelled i, ie, igh, ie, and y, Blending, review /ī/ spelled i, ie, igh, ie, and y using Sound/Spelling Card 29, students read the words, stopping to blend only the words they cannot read fluently and automatically from word lists and sentences in the ePresentation Resources.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Decoding, the teacher reviews /oo/ and /ow/ using Sound/Spelling Cards 41 and 42 and then has students read the words in the lines. Words include wood, hoof, brook, overlook, spout, counter, flour, flower, aloud, allowed, brows, browse, bow, sow, ground, flounder. 

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to decode words in a sentence. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 2, students read a decodable text using the Reading a Decodable Routine. The routine includes referring to sound/spelling cards as necessary. Examples of words in the decodable text include sat, dad, help, sand, stand, hand, take, give, and additional decodable words.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding /ā/ spelled ai_ and _ay Blending, the teacher introduces /ā/ using Sound/Spelling Card 27. The teacher asks students what the blanks mean in each spelling. The blanks indicate that a consonant must come after ai and before ay. The teacher asks students which spellings for /ā/ they have already learned (a and a_e). In Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Routine 3, the Blending Sentences Routine, students blend and read the words and sentences from the ePresentation Resources.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 1, Phonics/Word Analysis, Compound Words, Synonyms, and Antonyms Decoding, students read the words and sentences from the ePresentation Resources. Then they discuss the structural feature or word relationship for each line.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 1, students read a decodable text with multiple sentences and paragraphs. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 3, students practice reading words in sentences focusing on the suffixes -ly and -y.

  • Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to build/manipulate/spell and encode words in isolation based in common and newly taught phonics patterns. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 1, Word Building, the teacher gives students letter cards a, c, h, i, m, o, p, s, and t. The teacher says a word, and the students build the word with their letter cards. Students build the words sip, ship, shop, cop, chop, chap, mat, math, and that.

    • In Unit 1, Getting Started, Day 2, the teacher uses the Sounds-in-Sequence Dictation Routine and asks students to say the word, identify the sound, and write the corresponding letter, checking the sound/spelling card for accuracy. The teacher repeats the routine for each sound in the word and writes the word for students to check their spelling.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 3, the teacher dictates, and the students spell and write the words muse, fuel, cube, human, confuse, and bugle

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 1, the teacher dictates, and the students spell and write the words droop, proof, pooch, tooth, shampoo, and broom. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Dictation and Spelling, students use Instructional Routine 7, the Whole-Word Dictation to spell/encode the words dough, doe, burrow, borough.

  • Materials contain a variety of methods to promote students’ practice of previously taught phonics. Examples include:

    • Student activity pages in review lessons practice previously taught phonics skills. 

    • Reading of decodable readers promotes students to practice previously taught phonics.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 5, Phonics and Decoding, Word Analysis, students point to words with the prefix dis- and un- as a review practice.

    • In the Student Edition, Resources, eGames, provides multiple opportunities for students to practice sound/spelling patterns. As an example, Lunch Rush, U6 eGame: Lesson 1, Foundational Skills, Level 1, students sort -ough words by their sound/spelling.

  • Materials clearly delineate a scope and sequence with a cohesive, intentional sequence of phonics instruction and practice to build toward application of skills. Examples include:

    • The Teacher Edition, Scope and Sequence for Sound and Spelling Introduction, indicates Getting Started begins with a review of consonant and short vowel sounds and spellings and then moves to digraphs, inflectional endings, schwa sounds, and r-controlled vowels in Unit 1. Unit 2 continues with comparative endings, homographs, and then instruction continues to vowel digraphs.

    • In Unit 3, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the following graphemes: ai, ay, ie, ey, mb, and ph. The unit culminates with a review of all the sounds of the unit.

    • In Unit 5, Unit Planner, there is a scope and sequence that highlights a progression of the following graphemes: oo, ow, and ou. The unit culminates with a review of all the sounds of the unit.

    • In Unit 6, Unit Planner, a scope and sequence highlights a progression of ough and a review of silent letters. The unit culminates with a review of all the sounds of the unit.

  • Materials have a clear research-based explanation for the order of the phonics sequence. Examples include:

    • In the Teacher Edition, “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading,” page 13, indicates that after simple consonants and short vowels, there should be instruction on long vowels, VCE generalization, and digraphs and then “long vowels, variant vowel spellings and diphthongs.”

    • In the “Foundational Skills: Five Ways to Build the Cornerstone of Proficient Reading” research report, the author Marsha Riot explains that the hierarchy of difficulty ranges from consonants whose sounds can be produced in isolation with the least distortion, high utility consonants, short vowels, digraphs, inflectional endings, and long vowels.

  • Materials provide sufficient opportunities for students to develop orthographic and phonological processing. Examples include:

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Dictation and Spelling, students write the following sentence from dictation, “Did Ray say he could sail in the rain?”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 5, Word Analysis, Writing, students create fill-in-the-blank sentences using ten different words from the word lines. The teacher tells students that except for the missing word, the sentences should be complete and make sense. The sixteen words on the Word List either have the prefix pre- or mis-.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher dictates the sentence, “Greg shook off the cookie crumb,” and students write it independently. The lesson focuses on the sound/spelling pattern /oo/ spelled oo

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, the teacher dictates the sentence, “Stan thought the test was tough,” and students write it independently. The lesson focuses on the sound/spelling pattern ough.

Indicator 1n.iv

Decode and encode common and additional vowel teams (Grade 2).

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for Indicator 1n.iv.

Materials include opportunities for the instruction of phonograms and spelling patterns concerning common vowel teams and additional vowel teams. Students have multiple opportunities for decoding practice, encoding practice, and review of common vowel teams and additional vowel teams. 

  • Materials include multiple opportunities over the course of the year for students to decode and encode common vowel teams. Examples include:

    • Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Blending, the teacher uses Instructional Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, to have students blend and read the words in the lines (snake, plate, create, flame, top, tape, can, cane, basic, laser, April, bacon, able, cable, staple, maple).

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding /ā/ spelled ai_ and _ay Blending, the teacher introduces /ā/ using Sound/Spelling Card 27. The teacher asks students what the blanks mean in each spelling. The blanks mean that a consonant must come after ai and before ay. The teacher asks students which spellings for /ā/ they have already learned (a and a_e). In Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Routine 3, the Blending Sentences Routine, students blend and read the words and sentences from the ePresentation Resources.

  • Materials include multiple opportunities over the course of the year for students to decode and encode additional vowel teams. Examples include:

    • Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.

      • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding /ow/ spelled ow and ou_ Decoding, the teacher introduces /ow/ spelled ow and ou_ using Sound/Spelling Card 42. Students read the words in the lines. Then they display the sentences and read each one. Students identify the number of syllables in each word (one syllable: mouth, bounce; two syllables: about, around).

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Blending, students identify words in Line 2 of the word list that have the /aw/ spelled ough. Then, they read the words on the line.

  • Materials include opportunities for students to review previously learned common and additional vowel teams. Examples include:

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 3, Phonics and Decoding Review /ī/ spelled i, i_e, _igh, _ie, and _y, Blending, review /ī/ spelled i, i_e, _igh, _ie, and _y using Sound/Spelling Card 29, students read the words, stopping to blend only the words they cannot read fluently and automatically from word lists and sentences in the ePresentation Resources.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Decoding, the teacher reviews /oo/ and /ow/ using Sound/Spelling Cards 41 and 42 and then has students read the words in the lines. Words include wood, hoof, brook, overlook, spout, counter, flour, flower, aloud, allowed, brows, browse, bow, sow, ground, flounder. 

    • In Unit 7, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher reviews the long /o/ spelled oa_ and _ow. The teacher uses the whole-word blending routine and asks the students to read words with the oa_ and _ow sounds.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for Indicator 1o.

Over the course of a year, the materials provide many learning opportunities about different text structures and text features. These opportunities are found in Access Complex Text, Writer’s Craft, and Social Studies Connection.

  • Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g., main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect).,Examples include:

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 3, Access Complex Text, the teacher reminds students that cause and effect is a type of relationship in which one event leads to another event. The teacher reads a paragraph aloud and the students identify the cause of the character’s feelings.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 6, Day 3, Access Complex Text, the teacher prompts students to remember that sequence tells the order of events. Students identify times and the timeframe in the text.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 2, Access Complex Text, the teacher has students consider the tree’s growth as a cause. Then students identify the effects.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 3, Access Complex Text, the teacher prompts students to recall what the main idea is. The teacher shows students how the main idea can be in the last sentence of a paragraph. Students identify details to support the main idea of “Broadway bustled with noise and life.”

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 4, Writer’s Craft, the teacher prompts students to recall what plot means. In the text, students identify the problem in the beginning of the Aladdin part of the story. Then students describe the climax of the story and explain how it solves the problem in the story.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 2, Access Complex Text, students compare how traditional stories are similar to objects in a museum. Then students contrast how traditional stories are different from objects in a museum. Later students compare and contrast praise poems and myths.

  • Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities about text features (e.g., title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Examples include:

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 4, Science Connection, the teacher reminds students that a photo or illustration adds information to an article or story. Students identify the caption in the text, “Holding Back Water.”

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, Day 4, Social Studies Connection, the teacher reminds students that bold text emphasizes certain words. Students identify bold text in “Many Kinds of Schools.”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, Day 4, Social Studies Connection, the teacher reminds students that a map is a diagram showing where things are located. Students identify how the map in “Kenya” helps them understand the text.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, Day 4, Social Studies Connection, the teacher reminds students that photos help bring meaning to the text. Students identify examples of pictures in the Student Anthology 2 and explain how the images enhance their understanding.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 4, Writer’s Craft, the teacher prompts students to recall different text features in informational text. Students identify italic text, and students explain why they think the author chose to use italic text.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 5, Day 4, Writer’s Craft, the students identify a heading in the text and explain how the heading helps them understand how the section is different from a previous section of text. Then students identify a caption and explain how the caption adds to their understanding of the text.

Indicator 1p

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1p.

There are multiple opportunities over the course of the year for students to read on-level texts for understanding. However, there is minimal evidence about reading for a purpose. Students read the various decodable stories and also passages on Skills Practice pages. The materials provide some opportunities for students to hear explicit, systematic instruction in reading elements such as accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. Fluency is modeled infrequently by the teacher. Routine 9 focuses on having students read the decodable text. Therefore teacher explicit instruction and modeling are limited. Materials include directions for teachers to direct students to use sentence features, such as punctuation, to guide reading fluently. The Core Decodables provide opportunities for students to hear fluent reading of grade-level text by a model reader or peer. The Skills Practice Pages and Routine 9 for Core Decodables provide various resources for explicit fluency instruction. The materials provide systematic instruction of high-frequency words with words introduced throughout the year. Although the teacher writes or displays the high-frequency words, there is an inconsistency of direction regarding the spelling of each word. There are references that a list of high-frequency words is on the inside back cover of each decodable, but this was not noted in the eBooks for teachers or students. Fewer than half the words are irregularly-spelled words.

  • Some opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. Examples include:

    • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.

      • In the Student Edition, Skills Practice pages, Lesson 6, Days 2, 3, and 4, of each unit, there is a passage 1-2 pages long for students to read. These do not include a purpose for reading.

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Day 2, Skills Practice pages 21 and 22, students have a passage to read, “A Trip,” and a Fluency Checklist that reminds them that as they read, to make sure they pause longer at a period or other ending punctuation, raise their voice at a question mark, use expression when coming to an exclamation point, pause at commas, think of the character and how they might say their words when there are quotation marks, read at a pace that makes sense to a listener, and to stop and reread something that does not make sense. The Fluency Checklist makes no linkage to the purpose of reading.

      • In Unit 9, Lesson 2, Day 4, Checking Comprehension, the teacher discusses the story with students and answers any questions students have after reading the story. Students identify any difficult words in the book. Students retell the story. The teacher asks students questions, and students answer in complete sentences and use the high-frequency words they have learned. 

  • Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade-level decodable words. Examples include:

    • Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, Day 4, Fluency: Reading a Decodable Story, the teacher reviews punctuation marks with students. The teacher models reading “A Lunch List” aloud to show reading at an appropriate rate.

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, Day 2, the materials provide a definition to teachers about automaticity. 

      • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 5, the teacher gives students a copy of Decodable Stories, Book 4, Story 29. The teacher tells students to read aloud within groups. The teacher circulates among the groups to monitor whether students are reading accurately.

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, Day 2, students read a decodable text, and the teacher tells students to attend to punctuation as it will assist with proper expression.

      • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 4, Fluency, students get into small groups to practice reading fluently using Decodable Stories, Book 7, Story 51. They read aloud within the groups. The teacher monitors whether students are reading fluently.

  • Materials provide some opportunities for students to hear fluent reading of grade-level text by a model reader. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, Day 5, Decodable Story 11, “The Red Star,” is available electronically for students to read independently or listen to the story being read to them. Students can also listen to individual words they may need support with when reading independently.

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 3, Phonics and Decoding, Reading a Decodable, the teacher models how to read with expression by reading pages 18 and 19 aloud to students.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 5, Day 4, students read a passage in a skills practice workbook. The teacher reads the first three paragraphs to model reading, emphasizing expression, dialogue, and using different voices for different characters.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 6, Day 4, the EL suggestion in the bottom margin proposes pairing English learners with fluent readers to practice their reading as a great way to help them become more fluent readers. 

  • Materials include systematic and explicit instruction of irregularly-spelled words. Examples include:

    • Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.

      • In Unit 1, Lesson 6, Day 1, the teacher introduces the high-frequency word live, pronounced with a short /i/ sound. The teacher displays the word, reads it, asks students to repeat the word orally, and explains the meaning. 

      • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 3, Blending, the teacher introduces the high-frequency words buy, goes, paste, and zero. The teacher displays the words, says the words, and asks students to repeat the words. The students practice reading the words in sentences. 

      • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 2, Phonics and Decoding, Fluency, assigns students Skills Practice pages 87-88. The two-page selection, “Ocean Life,” helps students build fluency and has at least 20 irregularly-spelled words in it. The teacher points out that some of the words in the selection might be unfamiliar and explains that when they encounter these words, they should sound out the pronunciation, reread the sentence, and then continue reading the passage.

  •  Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words in isolation. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, Day 4, Phonics and Decoding, Fluency: Reading a Decodable Story, the new High-Frequency words are never and under. The reviewed high-frequency words are how, like, over, walk, water, and would. The teacher reviews the high-frequency words in the story before using Routine 9, the Reading a Decodable Story Routine. The students read the high-frequency words in the text.

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 3, Blending, the teacher introduces the high-frequency words buy, goes, paste, and zero. The teacher displays the words, says the words, and asks students to repeat the words. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, Day 1, the teacher displays the words because and does, says the words, and asks students to repeat the words.

  • Materials include a sufficient quantity of new grade-appropriate irregularly-spelled words for students to make reading progress. Examples include:

    • The Teacher Edition, Appendix, Scope and Sequence, pages 6-9, indicates that 15 high-frequency words are introduced in the Getting Started Unit. The first new words, give, may, these, are introduced on Day 2. Unit 1 introduces 21 new words, Unit 2 introduces 24 new words, Unit 3 introduces 17 new words, Unit 4 introduces 11 new words, Unit 5 introduces 10 new words, and Unit 6 introduces two new words. 

    • In the Teacher Edition, Appendix, page 21, High-Frequency Word Lists, Section 4, lists 100 high-frequency words for Grade 2. Fewer than half the words are irregularly spelled words. 

    • In Unit 1, the teacher introduces the high-frequency words far, upon, much, start, which, never, under, eight, nine, bring, thank, think, seven, use, why, better, first, learn, animal, black, live.

    • In Unit 5, the teacher introduces the words warm, wash, full, picture, mouse, ought, small, always, laugh, once.

Indicator 1q

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1q.

The materials include the use of decodable texts aligned to the program’s scope and sequence. Students have multiple opportunities to reread decodable texts independently and in partnership with their peers to build fluency. The materials include decodable texts with high-frequency words aligned to the scope and sequence. Students use a consistent routine when reading the decodables and re-read the decodable during each routine. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds through word-building, in which students use letter cards to match the word the teacher wrote on the board. There are opportunities for students to encode sounds to letters and words. Students have frequent opportunities that apply phonics as they encode words into sentences or phrases through the dictation and spelling part of a day’s activities through Routines and words/sentences read aloud by the teacher. Students have limited practice, if any, for writing high-frequency words in context.

  • Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g., apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels, decode words with common prefixes and suffixes) in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 2, Day 1, Skills Practice pages 27-28, students apply /ō/ spelled o and o_e. After doing the first two items together, students complete the pages independently.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding /ā/ spelled ai_ and _ay Blending, the teacher introduces /ā/ using Sound/Spelling Card 27. The teacher asks students what the blanks mean in each spelling. The blanks indicate that a consonant must come after ai and before ay. The teacher asks students which spellings for /ā/ they have already learned (a and a_e). In Routine 2, the Whole-Word Blending Routine, and Routine 3, the Blending Sentences Routine, students blend and read the words and sentences from the ePresentation Resources.

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 1, the teacher reviews the long /o/ spelled o, oe, ow, and oa_. The decodable includes Sue, Joan, slowly, yellow, showed, hoses, and additional decodable words.

  • Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly-spelled words in connected text and tasks.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 4, Reading a Decodable, Fluency, the lesson builds students’ fluency by having them read “Granddaddy Spider” with a partner. The partners reread the story aloud several times. The decodable contains the high-frequency words believe and carry.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading a Decodable, Fluency, the lesson builds students’ fluency by having them read “Look How Pets Adapt” with a partner. The partners reread the story aloud several times. The decodable contains the high-frequency words warm and wash.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 2, Phonics and Decoding, Reading a Decodable Story, Building Fluency, students reread “Chinatown in San Francisco” with a partner. This text reviews the following high-frequency words: are, every, one, their, and very.

  • Lessons and activities provide students some opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. Examples include:

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, Day 1, Phonics and Decoding, Dictation and Spelling, students write the following sentence from dictation, “Did Ray say he could sail in the rain?”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 6, Day 5, Word Analysis, Writing, students create fill-in-the-blank sentences using ten different words from the word lines. The teacher tells students that the sentences should be complete and make sense except for the missing word. The sixteen words on the Word List either have the prefix pre- or mis-.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 3, Day 1, Guided Practice, students copy the sentence “Steve will be here.” and choose a sentence to copy that matches pictures. Similarly, in Unit 8, Lesson 3, Day 4, Guided Practice, students copy the sentence “Roy has a new toy train.” Students practice writing them correctly on the lines. These copying activities happen infrequently.

  •  Materials include decodable texts that contain grade-level phonics skills aligned to the program’s scope and sequence. Examples include:

    • The Core Decodables contain seven books with decodable texts for students to practice phonics skills. The Takehome Books have 55 books with decodable texts. The Practice Decodables include 55 books with decodable texts.

    • The Core Decodables Book 2 contains texts aligned to the graphemes: ch, edge, ing, er, and ore. The Core Decodables Book 4 has texts aligned to: ay, igh, ce, ie, and ge. The Core Decodables Book 6 contains texts aligned to graphemes: oo, ow, oy, oi, and au. These books are aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

  • Materials include decodable texts that contain grade-level high-frequency/irregularly spelled words aligned to the program’s scope and sequence. Examples include:

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 5, Day 2, new high-frequency words are knew, new, something, and sorry. The two corresponding decodable texts include each of the new high-frequency words. 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading a Decodable, Book 5, Story 38, “The Boat Show,” students learn the new high-frequency words: own, show, and review the high-frequency words: come, every, into, saw, want, water, your.

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 1, Day 2, Reading a Decodable, Book 6, Story 44, “Look How Pets Adapt,” the students learn the new high-frequency words warm, and wash, and review the high-frequency words: are, how, now, put, their, your.

Indicator 1r

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1r.

The materials include various assessment opportunities, such as diagnostic, benchmark, unit, and daily assessments in which students demonstrate their mastery of decoding skills. Materials do not include assessment results guidance in the following area: concrete instructional suggestions on supporting students’ progress toward mastery. Points of assessment are indicated in the Unit Planner and Teacher Edition. Assessments are in the Assessment Book, Diagnostic Assessment Book, and the Benchmark Assessment Book. The Assessment Blackline Masters provide student copies of each assessment. The materials provide teachers with both a Student Assessment Record and a Class Assessment Record. Students use eActivities and eGames for informal assessment. There is a Teacher Resource Book with interventions, but it is not cross-referenced with each assessment. The materials provide multiple assessment opportunities for fluency, as noted in the Unit Planner of each unit. In the Assessment Book, each of the six units includes an Oral Fluency Assessment. The assessments score reading rate and accuracy and also reading prosody. The Diagnostic Assessment can be used with an individual student or groups of students, and the Oral Reading Fluency strand measures reading rate, accuracy, and prosody. The Benchmark Assessment is administered three times per year and measures oral fluency with passage reading fluency. There are also differentiated teaching ideas in the teacher edition, but there is a lack of direct, explicit information on how to provide intervention based on each assessment. Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills.

  • Materials include assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonics and decoding. Examples include:

    • In the Assessment Book, the phonics assessments cover decoding and encoding. Decoding ability in context is measured under Reading Prosody in the Oral Fluency assessments.

    • The Diagnostic Assessment Book includes phonics and decoding. The Oral Reading Fluency assessments rate decoding ability under Reading Prosody.

    • In the Diagnostic Assessment, there are two Phonics and Decoding assessments. Students identify the given word in a word list and two Oral Reading Fluency assessments.

    • In the Benchmark Assessment, Test 1, Phonics, students select words with the same sound as the given word.

    • In the Benchmark Assessment, Test 2, Oral Fluency Passage Reading, students read a passage with 201 words.

  • Materials include assessment opportunities that measure student progress of word recognition and analysis. Examples include:

    • The Unit Planner per unit indicates when assessments are conducted. For example, Unit 2, Unit Planner, Lesson 5, Day 5 indicates when Assessment pages 26-27 will be given.

    • In the Foundational Skills Benchmark Assessment, each benchmark assessment has a word analysis assessment occurring three times throughout the year.

    • In the Assessment, Units 4-6 have a word analysis reading assessment.

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 2, Day 5, Monitor Progress, Formal Assessment, pages 87-88, assesses Phonics: Silent Letters (island, answer, shine, build, listen) and Word Analysis: Prefixes dis-, un-, and non-.

  • Materials include assessment opportunities that measure student progress of fluency. Examples include:

    • In the Assessment Book, each of the six units includes an Oral Fluency Assessment. The assessments score reading rate, accuracy, and prosody. 

    • In the Assessment Book, the Diagnostic Assessment has an Oral Reading Fluency component. The Diagnostic Assessment can be used as an initial screener with an individual student or groups of students. 

    • The Benchmark Assessment is administered three times per year and measures oral fluency through passage reading.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. Examples include:

  • In the Performance Expectations: Lesson and Unit Assessments, 80% mastery is considered an acceptable level of mastery (e.g., four out of five items correct).

  • In Performance Expectations: Oral Fluency Assessment, students must meet the following benchmarks to meet grade-level expectations: 84 (Unit 1), 92 (Unit 2), 100 (Unit 3), 109 (Unit 4), 116 (Unit 5), and 124 (Unit 6). 

  • The Diagnostic Assessment Book provides help to teachers to identify student strengths, weaknesses, and areas of concern in the following areas: Phonemic Awareness, Phonics and Decoding, Spelling, Oral Reading Fluency. The Diagnostic Assessment can be used as an initial screener with individual students or groups of students who might be lacking the prerequisite skills for the grade level. The information from the Diagnostic Assessment can then be used to inform instruction in those specific areas. 

  • The Benchmark Assessment Book, pages iii and v, notes that the Benchmark Assessment “...has two major components: 100-Point Skills Battery and Oral Fluency. The 100-Point Skills Battery component samples skills from three strands within the grade-level curriculum: Phonics, Word Analysis, and Spelling... Because each of the Benchmark Assessments is equivalent in difficulty and format, they provide a means for measuring the progress of all students in a classroom over the course of the academic year. Improving total scores on the Benchmark Assessments indicate a student’s increasing mastery of the foundational skills curriculum.”

  • The Foundational Skills Benchmark Assessment, Benchmark Assessment Record Sheet, provides the teacher with the goal for each benchmark assessment (i.e., 30).

  • The Assessment Book, page vi, notes expected fluency (words correct per minute) for each unit. The end-of-year expectation for students for prosody is four of five prosody elements in the average range.

  • The Benchmark Assessment, page iv, provides cutoff points for the three assessment periods for high-frequency word reading fluency and oral passage reading fluency. On page v, Diagnosis, it is noted that if a student falls below the cutoff score on the Oral Fluency assessments, they should be considered for intervention and should be closely monitored. Page iv notes, “The Oral Fluency portion of the Benchmark Assessment is a direct measure of students’ reading fluency. It also serves as a general, overall indicator of a student's reading competence. For example, students who score poorly when reading text aloud in a fixed time are the same students who have poor decoding skills, whose ability to recognize words automatically is adequate, who have limited vocabularies, and who have difficulty understanding what they read.”

Materials provide limited support to teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In the Benchmark Assessment, SRA Open Court Reading Foundational Skills Benchmark Assessment Overview, Diagnosis, the directives state that if students score below the cutoff for any Benchmark Assessment, the teacher should use one or more of the following general suggestions to help students get back on track: reteach students who need extra help, practice opportunities are available to students within the Skills Practice Workbooks, Decodable books, eGames, and Language Arts Handbook, differentiate Instruction during Workshop, and intervention should be assigned to students who need more intensive help.

  • In the Diagnostic Assessment, page iii, students who score below the expected level on any technical skill areas will need to remedy this through additional scaffolding and support provided in Intervention. These are only general suggestions.

  • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, Day 2, Phonics and Decoding, Fluency: Reading a Decodable Book, Differentiated Instruction, the directions tell the teacher if students need extra practice, have them read “A Fake Snake.”

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 2, Phonics and Decoding, Fluency: Reading a Decodable Book, Building Fluency, Teacher Tip, the directions tell the teacher if students are not ready to read the story without structure, revert to using Routine 9.

Indicator 1s

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1s.

The materials include suggestions for differentiating instruction to support English learners (ELs). Photocards have first language support by providing vocabulary in ten languages. A guide for teachers includes pictures of how the mouth forms each sound in English. Materials also include board games for students to play in competitive or cooperative groups. The materials guide teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or at the OCR “Approaching Level.” Each digital lesson has a toggle that can be switched on for differentiation support strategies and lesson extensions/adaptations. These activities are also in the Differentiated Instruction Guide in the Resource Library. The Program Overview refers to small groups as part of Workshop time, but there is no guidance in the Foundational Skills Kit explaining how or when to do Workshop small groups. Although the program overview indicates that  differentiated instruction occurs in small group settings, and differentiated instruction guides are provided in daily lessons, no mention of changing from the whole group to small group exists in the digital guide. The materials also provide a Supplemental Word List in the Appendix found in the Resource Library to extend learning in the lesson. The Program Overview references lessons containing detailed suggestions for differentiated instruction for those Beyond Level. Although there is a toggle switch for differentiated learning in the digital teacher edition, differentiation for Beyond Level was noted in the printed teacher edition at the bottom margin. The differentiated activities for Beyond Level are only evident in the print Teacher Edition, not the digital Teacher Edition. Many of the above-grade-level activities are not seen as doing more than their classmates rather different activities based on skill level.

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards. Examples include:

  • In the English Learner Teacher’s Guide, Contrastive Analysis Chart for Speakers of Other Languages: Phonemes, there is a correlation chart that compares English phonemes to those of other languages.

  • In the Resource Library, English Learner Photo Library provides cards to enhance the learning of English language learners. Cards include real photographs of items, definitions, and vocabulary words in ten languages. 

  • In the Resource Library, ELD board games introduction and table of contents explains eight board games designed for supporting ELs, Games include differentiated vocabulary to adjust to the language proficiency of the players. 

Materials provide some strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level foundational skills and to meet or exceed grade-level standards. Examples include:

  • The Resource Library, Program Overview, page 7, refers to Workshop time to allow for small groups, but there is no elaboration of this in the lessons.

  • The OCR Foundational Skills Kit, Grade 2, Teacher Edition, Resource Library, Program Overview, page 21, indicates that differentiated instruction tips in the teacher guide should be used in small groups. However, these do not show up in the lessons.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, Day 1, the teacher introduces decoding and the /ow/ spelled ow and ou_ in the whole group lesson. Materials include a differentiated instruction guide with explicit instructions for the teacher to give reminders, use whole-word blending and blending sentence routines, and provide syllabication for words. 

Materials provide extensions and/or advanced opportunities to engage with foundational skills at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level. Examples include:

  • The Resource Library, Appendix, Supplemental Word List can be used in several ways to extend the lessons. Words are listed by beginning sounds, ending sounds, and medial vowel sounds.

  • In the Resource Library, Program Overview, every lesson contains detailed suggestions for differentiating instruction for the following groups of students: Approaching Level, On Level, and Beyond Level (this is seen in the print materials, but not the online materials).

  • In Unit 3, Lesson 2, Day 1, printed version, Beyond Level students list other words with long /e/ spelled -i.e., _y, and _ey.

  • In Unit 5, Lesson 5, Day 1, printed version, students Beyond Level extend sentences with /oi/ words, while On Level students rewrite sentences with words from the lesson.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Not all units in the program effectively build students’ knowledge on a topic. While text analysis is well-covered, including some analysis of knowledge and ideas within and across texts, not all questions and tasks compel students to return to the text to support their contentions and conclusions.

Students engage in frequent writing tasks across the year; however, since informational writing encompasses nearly half of writing instruction, students may not achieve the full balance of writing genres outlined in the standards. 

The Inquiry projects that conclude each unit teach some research skills but due to student choice, do not provide adequate growth in those skills. These projects also fall short of demonstrating the growth of students’ knowledge, standards, and skills from the unit.  

The materials provide coverage of the standards throughout all units and over the course of the year; however, the preponderance of repetitive, unaligned reading strategies throughout the program moves the focus of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessments away from a tight focus on grade level standards alignment. The program also contains a large volume of material without a suggested daily schedule; therefore, a full and standards-aligned implementation could be challenging.

Criterion 2a - 2f

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

12/24
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Criterion Rating Details

The Open Court Grade 2 materials include six units that are formed around a topic or theme related to the program theme. Each unit includes a big idea and question that is aligned to a vertical thread that runs across each grade level in the program. However, not all units work toward building knowledge on a topic as some work toward a unifying theme. 

Within each unit, the questions and tasks lead students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft and structure of the texts they are studying. Students also engage in some analysis of knowledge and ideas within and across texts, however not all questions and tasks compel students to return to the text to support their contentions and conclusions.

Students engage in frequent writing tasks across the year; however, since informational writing encompasses nearly half of writing instruction, students may not achieve the full balance of writing genres outlined in the standards. 

While the Inquiry projects provide an opportunity for students to extend their learning about the topic or theme of each unit, these projects fail to consistently incorporate the knowledge and skills students gain throughout the unit nor do they require the students to incorporate and demonstrate the integration of the knowledge and skills that align to the standards. Since the projects may be done in a group for every unit, they may fail to build each individual student’s research skills as required by the standards.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a cohesive topic(s) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 2a.

The texts in some units focus on a Big Idea that identifies a specific topic. Other units are tied together by a broad theme. The topics include Earth in Action, My Community at Work, Plants and Animals, and Citizenship. Some units are focused on a theme such as Teamwork and Story Time. Each lesson in a unit also includes an essential question that is the focus for the text(s) included during that week; however, at times, these essential questions do not consistently connect to the Big Idea in a way that helps build knowledge on a specific topic. Within a given week, the majority of anchor texts are paired with a poem, as opposed to an informational text on the same topic that builds knowledge. According to the program Guide, “Through the engaging themes that stretch across grade levels in SRA Open Court Reading, students learn about universal truths, such as kindness and friendship, as well as about cross-curricular subject areas, such as life science and government.” The topics/themes across all grades are character, changes, communities, life science, government, and creativity. 

  • Some texts are connected by a grade-level appropriate topic. Some texts build knowledge and the ability to read/listen and comprehend complex texts across a school year. Examples include: 

    • In Unit 2, Earth in Action, the Big Idea is, “In what ways can Earth’s surface change?” The eight texts are organized in a way to help students progress through the concept. For example, students read the informational text, A River of Ice (Lesson 2) with the essential question, “In what ways can frozen water change the shape of the land?”, which introduces the concept of glaciers and slow changes to the Earth’s surface. Then they read an informational text about earthquakes called, All About Earthquakes!  (Lesson 4) with the essential question, “How do earthquakes change Earth’s surface?”

    • In Unit 4, Plants and Animals, the Big Idea is, “How do plants and animals help each other?” Students read texts that help build their knowledge of how plants and animals help each other. For example, students read the fantasy, Hungry Little Hare with the essential question, “Why do some animals need to blend into their environment?” (Lesson 2) and the informational text, Busy Bees with the essential question, “In what ways do honeybees and plants help each other?” (Lesson 4).

  • Some texts in a unit are connected by a theme, as opposed to building knowledge on a topic. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Teamwork, the Big Idea is, “How can you work better with others?” Some texts in this unit include a fantasy text, The Mice Who Lived in a Shoe (Lesson 1) with the essential question, “ How can families work together as a team?” and a fable, The Bat, Birds, and Beasts (Lesson 3) with the essential question, “How can you show loyalty to your teammates?” This broad theme does not provide students with the opportunity to build knowledge on a topic over the length of the unit. 

    • In Unit 6, Story Time, the Big Idea is, “Why do you enjoy stories?” Students listen to texts that address the elements of quality stories and learn how people use storytelling in their lives. The stories in this unit expose students to different types of stories, but opportunities to build knowledge in a sequential manner is limited. Examples of texts include the folktale, One Thousand and One Arabian Nights, Part Two (Lesson 1) with the essential question, “What are some qualities that make a story exciting?” and the informational text, Storytelling: A Zulu Tradition (Lesson 5) with the essential question, “What are some of the reasons why people tell stories to one another?”

Indicator 2b

Materials require students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft, and structure within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high-quality questions and tasks.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria of Indicator 2b.

Materials include multiple opportunities for students to  interact with anchor texts within a week. During a Shared Reading session, questions on key ideas, details, craft, and structure are modeled and/or prompted by the teacher. Shared reading prompts transition from teacher modeling in the early units to modeling and prompting in the middle of the year, to just prompts by the end of the year. Following a reading, Discussion Starter questions ask students to recall ideas from the text. On a subsequent day, students read or listen to the text again in order to analyze Writer’s Craft or to use an Access Complex Text strategy. The Look Closer section at the end of each selection specifically asks students to analyze the key ideas and details, the writer’s craft, and the text structure of the selection. The type of questions asked in this section require students to delve deeper into the text to help them access the complex text and to make sense of the text.

While most questions and tasks are high-quality, provide a logical sequence, and build in rigor throughout the year, some questions engage students in practices that do not align to the grade-level standards. The teacher models tasks at the beginning of the year and gradually releases more of the task to the students.

For some texts (read-aloud texts K-1 and anchor texts Grade 2), students analyze key ideas and details and craft and structure (according to grade-level standards).

  • The materials contain coherently sequenced questions and tasks that address key ideas and details; however, the bulk of the questions and tasks address reading strategies that steer students' focus away from the text. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, after reading The Mice who Lived in a Shoe by Rodney Peppe, students answer questions such as, “How can family members of all ages make meaningful contributions to a ‘team project’? What are some special qualities of families that make them good teams?”

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, while reading the text How Athens Got Its Name, students respond to questions such as, “How did Poseidon’s gift change the land in Athens? Why was Athena’s gift successful even though the land in Athens was not suitable for growing crops? Why was Athena’s gift more valuable to the people of Athens than Poseidon’s gift?” 

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 1, students listen to the text The Little Red Hen by Maria Minnick, and are asked, “What is the lesson of this story? How does this story’s lesson connect to the idea of community?”

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 3, after the second read of Where’s the Honey, Honey? by Tania Therien, students identify the main idea on page 66 and the details to support it. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, students listen to One Thousand and One Arabian Nights and Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, Part One retold by Rania Atkinson, and are asked, “What is the relationship between the story One Thousand and One Arabian Nights and Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, Part One?” 

  • The materials contain some coherently sequenced questions and tasks that address craft and structure. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 2, after reading the poem “Teamwork” by Tanya Anderson, students say what effect they think the rhyming words have in the poem and to identify ways the regular beats supply rhythm and meaning to the poem. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, students complete a close read of the text Mattland by Hazel Hutchins and Gail Herbert, and are asked what “descriptive words the author uses to describe the road Matt made.” Students identify the descriptive words that Matt used to make the sheep. Students then answer how these descriptions add to their understanding of the story.

    • In Unit 3, Lesson 3, after reading Victor’s Journal by Wendy Reyes, students are asked, “What is the event that begins the story? What is the final event in the story? Based on what you know about the beginning and the ending of this story, how would you describe its structure?” 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, during the second read of the text Cinderella Tales by Eduardo M. Davalos,teachers pose several questions, none of which address craft and structure, such as, “Pause after reading age 421 and ask students what this story has in common with the first story they read”. 

Indicator 2c

Materials require students to analyze the integration of knowledge within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high-quality text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 2c.

Throughout the Grade 2 materials, students have opportunities to analyze the integration of knowledge within a single text; however, materials provide limited opportunities for students to analyze the integration of knowledge across multiple texts on a topic. Questions that provide students opportunities to analyze the integration of knowledge mostly occur during the Access Complex Text portion of the lesson plan.  Naterials also include questions within a given week that focus on comprehension strategies such as making connections, predicting, and visualizing, as opposed to questions that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge. Some sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze across multiple texts as well as within single texts.

  • Sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze within single texts. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 4, after looking at and reading the map of The Appalachian Trail (no author), students work with a partner to answer questions such as, “How many states does the Appalachian Trail cross? How can you tell what the total distance is of the Appalachian Trail? How can you determine the geography of the Appalachian Trail?” 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 1, students read Mattland by Hazel Hutchins and Gail Herbert, and are asked, “What are some of the ways, big and small, that people can change the surface of the Earth?” 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, after reading Busy Bees by Brighid Lowe, students tell what they learned on page 86 about how bees help plants and then on page 87 students tell how bees help people. 

    • In Unit 5, Lesson 2, students read the poem “Statue of Liberty,” and are asked questions such as “What is the difference between a natural-born citizen and a naturalized citizen of the United States? How can people become naturalized citizens?” 

  • Some sets of questions and tasks provide opportunities to analyze across multiple texts. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, after reading The Bat, Birds, and Beasts retold by Chad Clark, students compare that story to other versions of the same story by different authors, such as the traditional Aesop’s Fables. The students discuss why each author might have written it differently. 

    • In Unit 4, Lesson 4, students recall what they learned about pollination from Flower Power and then compare and contrast it to Busy Bees by Brighid Lowe.

Indicator 2d

Culminating tasks require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a unit's topic(s) through integrated literacy skills (e.g., a combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet the criteria of Indicator 2d.

Materials do not include culminating tasks that demonstrate students’ knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. At the end of each unit, students complete an Inquiry Project, but these are not evaluated on any specific reading or writing standards and do not require demonstration of knowledge accumulated through the unit. The Inquiry Projects do relate to the theme or topic of the unit, but text-dependent questions and tasks prior to the Inquiry Projects do not necessarily help students complete the project. Some tasks may be considered culminating in units, however; they are not found consistently throughout the year.

  • Culminating tasks are not found across a year’s worth of material nor are they multifaceted, requiring students to demonstrate mastery of several different standards (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) at the appropriate grade level. Examples include:

    • Inquiry Projects at the end of each unit are related to the theme of the unit, but do not require students to demonstrate mastery of several standards. According to the Program Guide, the Inquiry Projects require students to “conduct an investigation into something related to the theme that interests them”.

    • In each unit’s Lesson 6, Day 5, students meet in small groups to discuss their favorite text and retell the story, explain what they learned from the story, and to make connections. This task is found at the end of each unit, however, it is not multifaceted and does not have a writing component. Also, students are not evaluated on this discussion. 

  • Culminating tasks are not varied across the year and do not provide students the opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge of a topic or topics through integrated skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening). For example: 

    • The end-of-unit Inquiry Projects allow students to choose the modality in which they present. There is no integration of skills required. 

    • Inquiry Projects do not ask for any demonstration of comprehension or knowledge of the topic.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 2e.

Grade 2 students participate in writing tasks across the entire year. The majority of student writing is process writing, which occurs daily and includes a variety of genres, though it focuses more on informational writing. On-demand writing occurs after each close reading of a text. However, a minority of tasks throughout the entire year rely on information students have read, making it difficult for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year. The program provides graphic organizers, including a range of rubrics, and sample responses.

  • Materials include some writing instruction aligned to the standards for the grade level, and writing instruction spans the whole school year. Examples include:

    • Writing to inform process writing tasks are present in the beginning, middle, and end of the year. In Unit 2, students write four short informational writing pieces. The first one is a class shared-writing piece and the second one is planned in pairs. The third and fourth writing opportunities are done independently. In Unit 4, students write to inform again, but this time they use a compare and contrast structure. 

    • Students write a narrative in the middle and end of the year. In Unit 3, students write four short narratives. The first one is a shared writing piece and the second piece is planned in pairs. The third and fourth ones are done independently. In Unit 5, students write a narrative again, but this time they choose what narrative genre they would like to use to write.

    • Throughout the year, students learn prewriting strategies. There is no real progression of skills for this step of process writing. In Units 1, 3, and 6, the teacher models how to use the graphic organizer for prewriting before students complete it independently. 

  • Instructional materials include a variety of well-designed lesson plans, models, and protocols for teachers to implement and monitor students’ writing development. Examples include:

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 4, students review the purpose and benefits of using a TREE graphic organizer to plan the writing. The TREE graphic organizer has students write a Topic sentence, Reasons with an Explanation, and an Ending to wrap it up. This same graphic organizer is used throughout the entire year. 

    • The Program Overview explains how to conference with students to provide feedback. There is a basic procedure for conferencing which has the student read aloud his or her work, using one or more of the strategies to help the student improve his/her work, and having the student add, delete, or rearrange something in the work. This process is the same throughout the entire year. 

    • Rubrics are provided for different genres. There is a four-point rubric for the writing process and a four-point rubric for writing traits. 

    • The materials include Instructional Routine 17, which is a checklist to help students edit and revise their writing. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 1, the teacher uses the writing rubrics to evaluate students’ poems.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a progression of research skills that guide shared research and writing projects to develop students' knowledge using multiple texts and source materials.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 2f.

Within each unit of the Grade 2 materials, students engage in research through the Inquiry Project. Students learn and apply the same six research steps across the year, with some shifting from teacher-led to student-led tasks. Materials include the same six steps from Grade 1. However, in each unit, students have the opportunity to choose the research question and mode for presentation, making it difficult for the teacher to provide explicit instruction in research. As a result, research projects are not sequenced across the school year to include a progression of research skills according to the grade-level standards. Directions are vague and explicit instruction for research skills is not found throughout the program.

  • Research projects are not sequenced across a school year to include a progression of research skills that build to mastery of the grade-level standards. Examples include:

    • In each unit there is an Inquiry Project and according to the Program Overview, “a gradual release from whole-class to small-group or individual Inquiry structures” will happen. For example, in Unit 1, the teacher chooses the class investigation question, and then in Unit 3, students lead the class discussion. By Unit 6, students choose their preferred question and form like-minded groups to conduct research. 

    • The same steps for research and inquiry are taught throughout the year without a progression of skills. Instruction for these skills is very similar to the instruction provided for Grade 1 students. The steps are: (1) Develop Questions (2) Create Conjectures (3) Collect Information (4) Revise Conjectures (5) Develop Presentations and (6) Deliver Presentations. 

    • Throughout the year, the teacher models note-taking strategies so that by the end of the year students have learned six different note-taking strategies and can choose which one to use for their research project. 

    • In Unit 2, Lesson 3, the teacher models how to use a Venn Diagram. The materials state, “Use Venn diagrams to compare and contrast, where useful.” Not all students are given this instruction since the teacher has discretion to provide instruction or not based on each students’ project.

  • Materials support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge on a topic. For example: 

    • Unit texts used in Unit 1 help students with the Inquiry Project about why humans and animals work together as a team including, The Mice Who Lived in a Shoe by Rodney Peppe and Ant and Aphids Work Together by Martha E.H. Rustard.

    • In Unit 5, students are given unit texts to support their Inquiry Project about citizenship such as A New Life in America by Elsa Hale and A Brand-New American Family by Karen E. Martin.

  • Materials include minimal shared research projects to help develop students’ research skills. Whole-class experiences guide students through research. For example: 

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 3, students review the question and conjectures they are researching as a class and share information The teacher makes a list of students’ findings and models using a graphic organizer to organize the information. The class completes the organizer together as a group. 

    • In Unit 5, the teacher models how to collect information but students do not engage in a shared research project. The teacher states, “I need to learn more about democracies and why the Founding Fathers made America a democracy. I will look in books and online.”

Criterion 2g - 2h

Materials promote mastery of grade-level standards by the end of the year.

4/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials provide coverage of the standards throughout all units and over the course of the year, however, the preponderance of repetitive, unaligned reading strategies throughout the program moves the focus of the instruction, questions, tasks, and assessments away from a tight focus on grade level standards alignment. The program also contains a large volume of material without a suggested daily schedule; therefore, a full and standards-aligned implementation could be challenging.

Indicator 2g

Materials spend the majority of instructional time on content that falls within grade-level aligned instruction, practice, and assessments.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 2g.

The materials include instruction that is aligned to the grade-level standards, as well as instruction that is not aligned to the grade-level standards, and instead focuses on reading comprehension strategies such as predicting and making connections. During the first read of a text, the teacher models comprehension strategies, and this instruction and corresponding questions are mostly not aligned to standards. During a second read of the text, with Access Complex Text topics and Writer’s Craft, instruction and tasks tend to be standards-aligned. Because of this both questions and tasks and assessment questions are not always aligned to the standards. 

  • Over the course of each unit, some instruction is aligned to grade-level standards. For example:

    • In Unit 1, students focus on reading comprehension strategies including asking and answering questions (RL/I.2.1) as well as making connections, clarifying, visualizing, summarizing, and making predictions, which are not aligned to the standards.

    • In Unit 3, when focusing on writer’s craft, students learn about the use of declarative sentences, descriptive words, and alliteration (RL.2.4) and story elements (RL.2.7). 

    • In Unit 5, when focusing on accessing complex text, instruction is focused on comparing and contrasting (RL.2.9) and main idea and detail (RL/I/2.1) as well as classify and categorize and cause and effect, which are not aligned to the standards.

    • In Grade 2, students read a variety of text types including fables and folktales, which supports the standard RL.2.2: Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson or moral. 

    • Standard SL.2.1 includes participating in collaborative conversations, which is taught in the Management Routine A: Handing-off. This is found throughout the program including in Units 2, 4, and 6, during Lesson 1, Day 2, and Lesson 6, Day 2. 

  • Over the course of each unit, most questions and tasks are aligned to grade-level standards. For example:

    • Students write narrative, opinion, and informative pieces, which is part of the standards; however, there is not an equal amount of time spent on each type of writing. 

    • Throughout the materials, students spend a lot of time on standard R.L. 2.1 (ask and answer questions) such as in Unit 4, Lesson 4, where students are asked, “Why do honey bees store honey? What are two different ways that honeybees can communicate with one another? What are the differences between the three types of honeybees in a hive? How does an earthworm using soil help the roots of a plant grow?” 

    • Students answer Discussion Starter questions after the first read of a text. In Unit 6, Lesson 3, students are asked, “How does Aesop make learning fun for the children who come to hear him? Why do you think Aesop made up stories with animal main characters rather than human ones?” These questions are tagged to RL.2.1, SL.2.1b., SL.2.1.c, and SL.2.6. 

  • Over the course of each unit, some assessment questions are aligned to grade-level standards. For example:

    • In Unit 1, Lesson 1, students respond to reading comprehension questions such as, “Which of these predictions can you make from reading the beginning of the story? What was the effect of the merchant’s visit?” Neither of the questions are aligned to grade-level standards. 

    • In Unit 2, many comprehension questions align to the standards R.L.2,1 R.L.2.3, and RL.2.5; however, students are also assessed on synonyms, which is not part of the standards. 

    • In Unit 6, Lesson 4, students are asked to compare and contrast two characters and select the reason Zanyaya is different from Cinderella and Yeh-Shen, which is part of the standards. 

  • By the end of the academic year, standards are addressed within and across units, however the focus on unaligned strategies throughout may not allow students to fully master the depth and breadth of the standards. For example: 

    • RL.2.2 is only found in Unit 6 .

    • R.I.2,3 is found in Units 2, 4, and 5.

    • RL.2.5 is only found in Units 4 and 6.

    • RL.2.6 is only found in Unit 6.

    • RL.2.7 is found within all six units.

    • RL.2.10 is found within all six units. 

    • W.2.1 is only found in Units 1 and 6.

    • All speaking and listening standard are covered in every unit.

Indicator 2h

Materials regularly and systematically balance time and resources required for following the suggested implementation, as well as information for alternative implementations that maintain alignment and intent of the standards.

2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria of Indicator 2h.

Materials include implementation schedules that align to core learning and objectives. However, there are 190 full lessons in the Grade 2 materials and no guidance is provided on how to implement the program when there are not 190 days of instruction available. In addition, individual lessons do not indicate how much time is spent on a topic in a day. Lessons are written in a linear way with suggested activities in the core lesson and alternative options below as teacher tips. Optional tasks support core learning and are flexible in order to meet the needs of all students.

  • There are no suggested implementation schedules and alternative implementation schedules found in the program. For example:

    • The Scope and Sequence outlines units, lessons, and instruction. Lessons are broken down by days; however, within the day, there is no approximate teaching time for each area of study or information on how to complete the topics in one day. 

    • The program guide gives suggestions on when small group instruction can be offered. The Teacher Edition states, “Whatever the case may be, workshop should be flexible and work well for both you and your students.”  

    • In Unit 1, there is a Getting Started Section which is included in order to provide teachers with an opportunity to observe students and evaluate their levels prior to the start of instruction. This is a ten-day lesson plan, and gives teachers the ability “to spend more or less time on a specific lesson, depending on the needs” of the students.

  • Suggested implementation schedules cannot be reasonably completed in the time allotted. For instance:

    • There are 190 days of planned instruction for Grade 2. This includes two weeks of Getting Started at the beginning of the year and six Units with six weeks of lessons with five days of instruction each for each unit. 

    • There are no recommendations provided to accommodate school schedules that have fewer than 190 days of instructional time.   

    • Daily lessons do not include time frames for individual activities, nor do the program materials indicate a total literacy block time frame. In a typical lesson, there are 18 distinct activities in one day (six in Foundational Skills, six in Reading and Responding, and three in Language Arts). This does not include the additional 15-30 minutes for Workshop time.

  • Optional materials and tasks do not distract from core learning. For example:

    • Workshop is part of core learning, but the activities and resources in each area (reading, writing, listening, phonics, and fluency) are up to the teacher. This time is meant for extra practice with core content, individualized learning, or small-group time. 

    • There is a suggested timeline for what Workshop will look like in each unit based on the grade level. 

    • There are additional lessons for intervention that can be used flexibly and taught to individual students or used during small group instruction during Workshop. The materials review and reinforce skills being taught to the whole group.

  • Optional materials and tasks are meaningful and enhance core instruction. For example:

    • Workshop time is when teachers can work with small groups or individual students. All students are either working on independent material or working with the teacher, which can focus on preteaching, retreating, or engaging in enrichment activities. Students not working with the teacher have options such as reading a decodable, completing writing assignments, or practicing skills with eGames. 

    • Teacher tips and notes on differentiation are used liberally throughout the Teacher Edition and are always options. Sometimes they are reminders or activities to include in the moment to enhance core instruction and other times they are suggestions for Workshop time.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials to support students' literacy development.

N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

N/A

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

N/A

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

N/A

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

N/A

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

N/A

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

N/A

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level content and to meet or exceed grade-level standards that will support their regular and active participation in learning English language arts and literacy.

N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials regularly provide extensions to engage with literacy content and concepts at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level.

N/A

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards to regularly participate in learning English language arts and literacy.

N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

N/A

Indicator 3u

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Indicator 3v

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology (when applicable) with guidance for teachers.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

N/A

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

N/A

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

N/A

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/10/07

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Teacher's Edition Vol 4 978‑0‑0214‑2396‑5 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Teacher's Edition Vol 5 978‑0‑0214‑2397‑2 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Teacher's Edition Vol 6 978‑0‑0214‑2398‑9 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Program Overview Grade K-3 978‑0‑0214‑5682‑6 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Teacher's Edition Vol 1 978‑0‑0766‑2132‑7 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Open Court Reading CORE ELA Teacher's Editions Package 978‑0‑0766‑6664‑5 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Teacher's Edition Vol 3 978‑0‑0766‑6703‑1 McGraw-Hill Education 2016
Teacher's Edition Vol 2 978‑0‑0766‑8194‑5 McGraw-Hill Education 2016

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA K-2 Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations