Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials meet the expectations of alignment to career and college readiness standards. Students are presented with texts and tasks that engage them in appropriately rich and rigorous ways as they grow over the course of the school year.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality and Complexity

0
18
32
36
35
32-36
Meets Expectations
19-31
Partially Meets Expectations
0-18
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
15
23
25
23
23-25
Meets Expectations
16-22
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality and Complexity and Alignment to the Standards with Tasks and Questions Grounded in Evidence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

LearnZillion EL Education 6-8 Language Arts Grade 6 meets the expectations of Gateway 1. The core texts are engaging, rigorous, and relevant to students. Most tasks, from writing and reading to speaking and listening, are anchored authentically in the associated texts, providing true close reading practice and supporting students’ inquiry and analysis. Support for vocabulary development underscores what students are reading and learning.

Criterion 1a - 1e

Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade.

Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.

18/18
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Criterion Rating Details

Texts included in the program are high-quality and engaging, as well as encompassing many student interests. They provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to become independent readers at the grade level, including text complexities that increase over the course of the year. Core texts are appropriately rigorous and provide an opportunity for students to read about different cultures and experiences.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of high quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1a.

The Grade 6 materials include anchor texts that are of publishable quality, consider a range of student interests, and are engaging to students because they are well-crafted and rich in content. At the heart of the program is the use of the anchor texts to engage and motivate students to increase time in text and enhance literacy skills. The required anchor texts and accompanying additional texts for all four modules provide students with a variety of topics and challenging content throughout the school year. Furthermore, texts include multiple cultural perspectives from within the United States as well as globally. Texts are of high quality, are worthy of careful reading and include popular middle-grade authors.  Anchor texts include stories of scientists and inventors, mythology, and coming-of-age historical fiction.

Examples of anchor texts include:

  • In Module 1, students read The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan. The modern and engaging text highlights the struggles many early teens face. The characters are relatable and the text is rich in language concerning Greek mythology.

  • In Module 2, students read The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer. The complex text has received many honors and tells the true story of how a thirteen-year-old boy in Malawi invents an unconventional way to save his family and village from famine. The text encourages students to connect science content with a cultural perspective that may differ from their own. Chapters combine both a narrative and expository style and include academic and domain-specific vocabulary used to describe a scientific invention. The text demonstrates good character qualities such as perseverance and the benefits of thoughtful decision-making. 

  • In Module 3, students read Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac. The award-winning title presents an engaging and sympathetic view of early twentieth-century Native Americans. The novel acknowledges the acculturation of Native American students through boarding school. The complexity of text and focus on race and identity make it a challenging historical read. The additional required texts provide students with the historical background and knowledge needed to understand the anchor text.

  • In Module 4, students read the Young Reader’s Edition of Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. The text tells the story of the role of four African-American women who lived through the Civil Rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the movement for gender equality. The anchor text and accompanying additional texts provide students with a thought-provoking story that is language rich and challenging in text structure. The complexities of this text are revealed through the discipline-specific knowledge in science and mathematics as well as the need for an understanding of the political and social context of the United States in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1b. 

The Grade 6 materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. The texts reflect a variety of different genres including literary texts, mythology, speeches, informational articles, primary source accounts of historical events, and other historical documents. Over the course of the year, the materials reflect approximately 70/30 balance of informational to literary text with an emphasis on literary nonfiction. There is consideration for student interest in the range of genres.

Examples of text types and genres include:

  • In Module 1, students read the novel, The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan. Additional supporting texts include the informational texts, “Why Ancient Greek Mythology is Still Relevant Today,” and myths, such as “Hestia,” “Theseus and the Minotaur,” “Cronos,” and “Medusa.”   

  • In Module 2, students read the literary non-fiction text, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba. Additional supporting texts include watching a TED Talk by the author, “How I Built a Windmill,” and reading an informational article, “William Kamkwamba’s Electric Wind.” 

  • In Module 3, students read the historical fiction novel, Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac. Additional supporting texts include “The Land of Red Apples,” a personal narrative about Indian Boarding Schools by Zitkala-Sa and “The Advantage of Mingling Indians and Whites,” a speech by Richard H. Pratt, and excerpts from “The Problem of Indian Administration: Report of a Survey Made at the Request of Honorable Hubert Work, Secretary of the Interior and Submitted to Him, February 21, 1928.”

  • In Module 4, students read the literary non-fiction text, Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly and Laura Freeman. Additional supporting texts include “Special Message to the Congress on Urgent National Needs,” a speech by President John F. Kennedy, “This is How the Space Race Changed the Great Power Rivalry Forever” an informational article by Martand Jha, and “Moon Dust and Black Disgust” an informational article by Booker Griffin.

Indicator 1c

Core/Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Documentation should also include rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1c.

The Grade 6 materials include texts that have the appropriate level of complexity according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Each text is accompanied by thorough documentation and rationale for its inclusion. The analysis and rationale contain accurate information. While some of the anchor texts fall below the recommended range for Grade 6, qualitative measures such as meaning, text structure, language features, knowledge demands, and the associated tasks provide for a purposeful placement in the grade level.

Examples of text complexity and rationale include:

  • In Module 1, students read the anchor text, The Lightning Thief by Rick Riodan. The text falls below grade level according to quantitative measures (680L), but qualitative measures of meaning, structure, language, and knowledge demands increase the complexity. The text is placed at the beginning of the school year and strong systems of support are in place to encourage student success while reading the text and completing associated tasks.  In addition, many of the accompanying supplemental texts are Greek myths which have high qualitative and quantitative demands, ranging from 870L to 1170L.

  • In Module 2, students read the anchor text, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkawamba and Bryan Mealer. The text falls below grade level according to quantitative measures (850L), but qualitative measures of meaning, structure, language, and knowledge demands increase the complexity. The text requires students to attend to scientific explanations and cultural milieu, making it qualitatively complex.  

  • In Module 3, students read the anchor text, Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac. The text falls below grade level according to quantitative measures (740L), but qualitative measures of meaning, structure, language, and knowledge demands increase the complexity. Students must navigate multiple perspectives, settings, complex structure, and high knowledge demands. “This module aims to support and challenge students as they grapple with the complex questions of race posed by the text.” 

  • In Module 4, students read the anchor text, Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterfly. The text falls within Grade 6-8 grade band according to quantitative measures (1120L), and the qualitative features of meaning, structure, language, and knowledge demands also contribute to the complexity.

Indicator 1d

Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1d.

The anchor and supplemental texts in the Grade 6 materials are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth. Quantitative measures range from 680L to 1370L. While some of the quantitative measures for the anchor texts are low for the grade level, the supplemental texts and qualitative measures make up for the lower level in the way of text complexity, knowledge demands, language features, meaning, and purpose. Many scaffolds and instructional techniques support literacy growth over the course of the school year. Texts generally build in complexity over the course of the year, with the most complex texts appearing in Module 4.

Examples of the variety of text complexity and scaffolds include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, students read The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan. Although the text has a 680L, students complete tasks that require high levels of thinking and rigor. For example, in Unit 2, Lesson 4, students compare and contrast themes in The Lightning Thief to other Greek myths discussed in the novel. Supporting texts in Units 2 and 3 include several Greek myths with higher Lexile levels such as, “Theseus and Minotaur” (870L) and “Cronus” (990L). 

  • In Module 2, students read The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer. The text has a Lexile level that is slightly low for the grade band (850L); however, students read supplemental texts that are within grade bands and support the comprehension of the anchor text, including “William Kamkwamba’s Electric Wind” (940L) and “The Hippo Roller” (1100L). In addition, students complete tasks that require higher levels of thinking and rigor. For example, in Unit 1, Lesson 12, students interpret the meaning of figurative language, identify the central idea and how it is conveyed through details, and determine the text structure of the chapter. 

  • In Module 3, students read Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac. Although the text has a 740L, the supplemental texts and qualitative measures make up for the lower level in the way of meaning, purpose, text structure, and knowledge demands. In addition, the curriculum tasks require students to use critical thinking skills to write an argumentative essay. Supplemental texts include  “The Cutting of My Long Hair” (900L) and “Land of the Red Apples” (1040L). In Unit 3, Lesson 2, students begin the process of writing an argumentative essay based on a character’s decision. Students gather evidence in preparation for the essay. Scaffolds are provided to support students as they read the complex text, such as engaging in time to think and using discussion protocols like Think-Pair-Share.

  • In Module 4, students read Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. The text is above the grade band (1120L), and supplemental texts are also above the grade band: “Special Message to Congress on Urgent National Needs” (1370L) and “How the Space Race Changed the Great Power Rivalry Forever” (1310L). The tasks that accompany the texts provide structure and analysis which scaffold the reading for students. For example, in Unit 2, Lesson 9, students write an argumentative essay detailing the accomplishments of one of the main characters in the anchor text. Scaffolds are provided to support students as they read complex texts, including completing short writing tasks that encourage them to revisit the texts multiple times.

Indicator 1e

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year, including accountability structures for independent reading.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1e.

The Grade 6 materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to become independent readers at the grade level, including text complexities that increase over the course of the year. Students engage in a volume of reading through robust anchor text sets and texts on suggested reading lists that are largely read independently. Independent reading is completed both in class and as homework. A variety of instructional techniques are used to move students progressively toward understanding and independence. Most texts are organized with built in supports and/or scaffolds to foster independence. In the Teacher Edition, descriptions and explanations are included for ways teachers can provide successive levels of temporary support. In the Student Edition, anchor texts that are read independently have an accompanying list of key points for each chapter.

Students are provided with two types of reading time to build independence at grade level reading. Work Time is used to read anchor and supplementary texts in class, while Independent Research Reading time is used to read related texts at home. This time allows students to pick from a list of supplemental texts identified for each module that build background knowledge and provide additional information on the topic of the module. The materials include student routines and a tracking system for assigned Independent Research Reading. While the materials provide a variety of texts and complexities to build independence, there is little evidence to support building reading stamina as the amount of time to read anchor and supplementary texts is limiting and does not change for the duration of the school year.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities for students to engage in reading a variety of texts to become independent readers at the grade level.

    • Materials include a suggested reading list at a variety of Lexiles beyond the anchor and core texts for students to engage in independent reading. The list includes topically-relevant books. For example, for Module 1, which centers on the topic Greek Mythology, suggested independent reading includes Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods by Rick Riordan and Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton.

  • Instructional materials provide sufficient teacher guidance and support to foster independence.

    • Independent Reading Plans provide teacher guidance for launching and maintaining independent reading, communicating with parents, goal-setting and accountability, conferring, and publishing authentic reviews.  

    • In Module 2, Lesson 10, the Teacher Guide states, “Like Chapter 2, Chapter 6 may be read with slightly less attention to detail without disrupting students’ understanding of the story,” and provides tips teachers can use to keep struggling readers motivated.

  • Instructional materials provide procedures for teachers, proposed schedule for students, and a tracking system for independent reading.

    • The Independent Reading Sample Plans include lessons for launching independent reading, writing a reading journal entry, conducting a book talk, encountering new vocabulary, identifying interesting points, and connecting independent reading books to the module under study.

    • For anchor texts, students engage in the routine of pre-reading a selection of the text as homework and discuss a passage from it in class the next day.  For example, in Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 9, students pre-read Chapter 12 of Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac.  In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 10, students reread several key passages of the chapter and analyze the text structure. 

    • Materials recommend that “students should complete 20 minutes of Independent Research Reading for homework when they are not reading a chapter from the anchor text. Students should also continue Independent Research Reading over weekends.” 

    • The Independent Reading Journal is used throughout each module as a tracking system. Students keep an Independent Reading Journal in which they record their goals and their thoughts about the book. The Independent Reading Plans encourage teachers to “check in with students about their reading” and a conference protocol.

Criterion 1f - 1m

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

17/18
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials meet the expectations of high quality questions, tasks, and practice that is text specific and attends to the demands of the standards. Students have practice with speaking and listening, writing, and reading that is rich and rigorous and consistently encourages attention to the text itself. Tasks and questions allow readers to uncover details and meaning that they could miss in cursory reading. Academic vocabulary development is supported over the course of the school year.

Indicator 1f

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and/or text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria criteria for Indicator 1f.

The Grade 6 materials include questions, tasks, and assignments that are text-specific and text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly.  Explicit and inferential questions are included, with prompting that students should use textual evidence to support their inferences. Materials encourage students to gather insight, knowledge, and evidence from the texts rather than relying on personal experience and prior knowledge. Tasks and questions allow readers to uncover details and meaning that they could miss in cursory reading. Teacher materials, particularly the student workbook and supplemental resources, provide for the planning and implementation of the text-based questions and tasks, and include examples of valid student responses and additional prompts to aid students who may need support. Additionally, in the student materials, students monitor their independent reading progress with a rubric that includes the expectation to use text evidence.

Examples of text-specific and text-dependent questions include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 4, students complete the task: Compare and Contrast Themes: Greek Myths and The Lightning Thief. Students complete a graphic organizer, choose two themes from a list, and then compare how each text conveys the theme using text evidence.  In the Teacher Guide, the “Support for All Students” section includes suggestions for planning and implementation for English Language Learners, such as “pre-annotate myths to draw students’ attention to the areas that hint at a theme,” and notes about thoughtful, strategic grouping of students.

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 2, students analyze figurative language through text-dependent questions such as: “What were some of the key ideas of this excerpt? How do we know that William is learning as he goes? Why might comparisons to familiar things-like bones, hoses, or giraffes - help William learn? How, then, does the authors’ use of similes help to develop the key idea that William is teaching himself how to build a windmill as he builds it?”

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 8, students complete a graphic organizer with three characters listed and “gather and record evidence of the character’s point of view. Name how the author developed the character’s point of view (thoughts, dialogue, actions, facial expressions, figurative language, description, etc.).” After completing the graphic organizer, they answer the following question: “How does Cal’s point of view about the Indian schools compare and contrast with the perspectives of the other supplemental texts?” The Teacher Guide provides detailed instructions for the teacher to model how students work together as a group to gather evidence to answer a question, place them on a board with sticky notes, and then read them silently to search for the strongest evidence.

Indicator 1g

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1g.

The Grade 6 materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that are varied throughout the year. Students participate in daily informal structured discussions, such as small group discussions, Turn and Talk, and Think-Pair-Share. More formal opportunities are also provided, such as Socratic Seminars, Chalk Talks, Fishbowl Discussions, and other collaborative discussions. The Teacher Guide and Curriculum Companion provide protocols for speaking and listening and encourage full engagement activities including “drama or role play,” “sketching,” and “Equity Sticks,” which also includes communicating ideas. While instruction for teacher modeling of academic vocabulary and syntax is not always explicit, support for teaching norms and reminders for incorporating academic discussions, including support for teaching students to use text-based evidence in their discussions, is provided.

Examples of opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 15, students participate in a Fishbowl Discussion to answer the unit focus question: “How do habits of character help people solve critical problems?”  The materials provide a protocol for discussion: students “interpret information presented in diverse formats, extraction details and examples from their QuickWrites...their own research, and their Solution Symposium note-catchers to support their answers.”  The materials provide questions for teachers to encourage the continuation of discussion such as: “How are the innovators similar? How are they different?” 

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students use the Infer the Topic Protocol to examine materials: “This protocol offers students a chance to work together to uncover the heart of a larger concept before they begin to study a new topic. Students also have a chance to experience the ways an inference can change as they learn new information. It allows students to draw on their own background knowledge and work in a fun, collaborative environment with new information from a variety of peers to uncover meaning.” In Lesson 5, students engage in a jigsaw protocol. Students read one of several texts with an expert group using a protocol and then return to their home group to share the information from the text. Students guide discussion using task cards and keep conversation text-based with a chart.

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 17, students participate in a Collaborative Discussion in which they present their End of Unit 3 Assessment (a collaborative nonfiction picture book) to a group.  Earlier in the module, they practice Collaborative Discussions (Unit 2, Lesson 6) and reflect on performance. A Peer Assessment: Picture Book Presentation handout is provided to help listeners track the argument of each group.  Support for teachers and students include a Presentation Checklist, suggestions on how to help students reflect,and how to provide feedback, such as “I heard a lot of you speaking at an appropriate pace and volume to be clearly understood.”

Indicator 1h

Materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1h.

The Grade 6 materials provide opportunities for students to regularly speak and listen about topics they are reading for a variety of different purposes. End-of-Unit Assessments often include a presentation that requires students to use evidence from texts. In addition,  instructional opportunities are provided that monitor and extend students’ growth in learning through direct instruction of the speaking and listening and research standards and presentation opportunities.

Examples of opportunities for students to speak and listen about what they are reading and researching include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 13, students create norms for a productive Socratic Seminar discussion. Students practice Socratic Seminar, reflect on their performance, and prepare for text-based discussion. In Lessons 15-16, students participate in the Socratic Seminar. Teacher instructions are included to facilitate the Socratic Seminar which include protocols for discussion, such as reminding students that “effective participation is about listening to others and asking and answering questions...build[ing] off each other’s ideas.” The teacher instructions also include a Collaborative Discussion checklist, a Discussion Norms Anchor Chart, and possible follow-up questions, such as “Can you say more about that? Can you give an example?”

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 5, students jigsaw read the supplemental text, “The Problem of Indian Administration: Report of a Survey Made at the Request of Honorable Hubert Work, and Submitted to Him.” 

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lessons 11-13, students listen to classmates’ audio recordings of their learning across the whole module. Students create a listening station in which they select a text from the module and write a preface explaining the context and significance. The lesson focuses on speaking and listening skills and deep understanding of the selected text. 

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 6, students participate in a Chalk Talk written discussion protocol in which they analyze a chunk of text from Hidden Figures. Then, the teacher leads a whole class discussion, using cold-calls for students to share responses. Finally, a Think-Pair-Share is used with the following questions: “How does the author implicitly call the reader’s attention to the habits of character? Why is the author’s point of view toward Dorothy Vaughan based on the text chunks we analyzed?” 

Indicator 1i

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1i.

The Grade 6 materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing that covers a year’s worth of instruction The materials include Quick Writes and Entrance Tickets for informal, on-demand writing that provide opportunities for students to express thoughts and ideas in response to texts on a daily basis. Each module contains one or two process writing tasks in which students plan, draft, and revise their work. After some process writing tasks, students complete an on-demand version of a similar task to demonstrate understanding. Process writing using digital resources and multiple opportunities to revise and edit are offered in each of the four module units across the grade levels. The tasks at the end of the year are multi-faceted writing and presenting opportunities.

Examples of  on-demand writing opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students complete a QuickWrite in which they analyze point of view in an excerpt of Chapter 2 of The Lightning Thief.  

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students complete a QuickWrite in which they use figurative language to explain a subject in which students are experts.

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 12-13, students write a narrative letter based on Two Roads “from Cal to Possum about his decision to return to Challagi.”  After students write the letter, they record it using audio recording technology. In Lesson 13, students revise the letter for pronoun use and sentence variety.

Examples of process writing opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lessons 6-11, students write a compare and contrast informative essay that compares and contrasts a scene from The Lightning Thief with the film version. Students analyze a model and rubric then use a graphic organizer to plan the draft over the course of several lessons. In Lessons 12-13, students write the essay as an on-demand prompt. During Lesson 14, students revise the essay using a Peer Critique Protocol to determine possible revisions.

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lessons 1-6, students write a collaborative literary argument essay.  Students analyze a model, gather evidence, and use a graphic organizer to plan the essay. Students write an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion in pairs.  

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lessons 11-13, students write a nonfiction narrative children’s book.  Students use Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race as a model. Students use information about their chosen “hidden figure” and collaborate on planning, writing, typing, editing, drawing illustrations, and publishing the book online or on paper.  During the process, groups pair up to give feedback using sentence starters, then groups use the feedback to revise. 

Indicator 1j

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1j.

The Grade 6 materials provide different modes of writing that are distributed across the school year and are connected to the anchor and/or supplemental texts. Lessons are sequenced so students understand the reading content prior to formally writing. In each module, Unit 3 offers a scaffolded writing task and a critique process to strengthen writing. Writing tasks guide students through a formal process that results in a culminating presentation.

Examples of argumentative writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, students write a literary argument essay where they make a claim about whether or not Cal, the main character of Two Roads, should return to Challagi Indian Industrial School, using reasons and evidence to defend the claim.

  • In Module 4, Units 1-2, students read Hidden Figures and choose an important person in space science whose contributions have gone unrecognized. In Unit 3, students write an argument essay about how that person’s accomplishments are remarkable, using evidence and reasoning to defend the claim.

Examples of informative/explanatory writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, students write an informative compare and contrast essay to compare a scene in the film version of The Lightning Thief to the same scene in the novel.

  • In Module 2, Unit 3, students write a problem-solution essay about an innovator they researched in the previous unit. They show how that person applied the design thinking process and habits of character to develop a solution to a critical problem.

Example of narrative writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, students write a narrative inserting a newly created demigod character tinto a scene from The Lightning Thief. Throughout Unit 3, students revise their narratives for sentence patterns and consistency in style and tone.

Indicator 1k

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1k.

The Grade 6 materials provide opportunities for evidence-based writing. Students frequently work closely with the anchor and supporting texts to make claims and support them with specific evidence from the texts. Materials require students to develop text-based claims, using evidence to support them. Frequent opportunities are available across the school year for students to acquire and practice skills in daily assignments, Performance Tasks, and assessments. Over the course of the units, students complete informal and formal writing tasks that require evidence to support claims, such as using QuickWrites, Entrance Tickets, Close Read exercises, argumentative essays, and informational essays.

Examples of evidence-based writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 8, students read an excerpt from The Lightning Thief and complete an Entrance Ticket prompt: “What does Percy think of Mr. Burner in this excerpt from Chapter 5? How has the author developed Percy’s point of view toward Mr. Brunner from the previous chapter?” Students make a claim and support it with evidence from the text.

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 2, in a Close Read exercise, students analyze specific passages from The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind to determine its central idea and how that central idea is conveyed through particular key details. Students make and support claims in response to questions: “Why do you think this sentence is included? What is actually happening in this section of text? What are the last two sentences telling us? Why are they important?”

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 11, students complete an Independent Argument Evidence Note-Catcher as they gather evidence to answer the focus question: “Should Cal return to Challagi Indian Industrial School?” The Note-Catcher includes columns for both sides of the issue with evidence from the text and reasoning (explanation for how the evidence supports the reason) for each position. After examining evidence for both positions, students choose one of the two and make their own claim.

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lessons 1-7, students write an argumentative essay in which they answer the question, “Why are Mary Jackson’s/Kathrine Johnson’s accomplishments remarkable?” and use evidence from Hidden Figures: Young Reader’s Edition to defend their claim. Students are required to identify text-based reasoning and evidence.

Indicator 1l

Materials include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards, with opportunities for application in context.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1l.

The Grade 6 materials include practice of the grade-level grammar and usage standards; however, explicit instruction is rare. Attention to general usage is seen throughout all modules. Most explicit instruction for grammar and conventions occurs in mini lessons, but only for some standards. Opportunities for application in context are available; however, some application is out of context. Language Dives provide a routine for students to analyze grammar in focus sentences from the anchor texts and then mirror the structure in their own writing. While increased emphasis and some direct instruction of grammar and conventions standards is found primarily in Module 3, practice writing opportunities for grammar and conventions standards are found throughout the four modules. Practice writing opportunities use the anchor text as either a model or the content for the sentences.

Examples of explicit instruction of some grammar and usage standards include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 12, students complete a mini lesson on intensive pronouns. Teacher scripting is provided to lead students is a discussion of what a pronoun is and direct instruction on intensive pronouns. Students compare two sentences: ”The dog opened the bag of dog food. The dog itself opened the bag of dog food.” Students then discuss how the intensive pronoun changes the sentences. In the Student Workbook, pairs of students complete a worksheet for additional practice. In Lesson 13, students complete an Entrance Ticket where they rewrite sentences from Two Roads adding an intensive pronoun.

  •  In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 12, students have opportunities to recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents). For the Entrance Ticket, students revise sentences to correct vague or ambiguous pronouns, such as “When Cal hit his arm on the boxcar door frame, it broke.” There is no explicit instruction on vague pronouns in the materials.

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 11, students have opportunities to use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements. Students use a Language Dive to examine how commas communicate where chunks of information belong in a sentence. Using the pattern established in the Language Dive, students practice using nonrestrictive clauses in their own sentences.

Examples of opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context including applying grammar and convention skills to writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 5, students review and use a Narrative Writing Checklist to identify the elements found in a model narrative, including spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lessons 10-11, students use a checklist to track a partner’s presentation skills.  As part of the checklist, they evaluate whether their partner “adapts speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.”

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, students read a sample student introduction and use the Argument Writing Checklist to provide “kind, specific, helpful feedback to help the authors improve their introductions.” 

Examples of opportunities to spell correctly and maintain consistency in style and tone include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 14, students provide peer feedback on areas in the informative essays they are writing on what can be improved, “such as spelling.” There is no explicit instruction on spelling.

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 8-9, students evaluate their argument essays with a checklist that includes “the spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are correct” and “I use a formal style.”

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, students use an Argument Writing Checklist to review their work that includes checking work for correct spelling.

Indicator 1m

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 1m.

The Grade 6 materials include a cohesive year-long plan for vocabulary development. Teacher materials, including the Curriculum Companion, outline the importance of teaching academic vocabulary and provide guidance on protocols for building vocabulary through domain-specific and academic vocabulary. Key topic-based words are introduced at the beginning of each module through the “Infer The Topic” routine, and students encounter these ideas frequently throughout the module. Vocabulary instruction is provided through meaningful context within the anchor and supplemental texts. Students connect new words to previous schema and practice these words by repeated shared use of the words throughout the year. Vocabulary is taught either indirectly or directly on a daily basis by using Vocabulary Logs, academic word walls, Entrance Tickets, Language Dives, Note-Catchers, and text-dependent questions. Language Dives are teacher-guided conversations with questions about specific meaning and language structures that provide a routine where students analyze vocabulary in context. Students frequently use different types of vocabulary in multiple ways, including to determine the meaning of new words with affix lists; practice inferring the meaning of new vocabulary; and incorporate domain-specific and academic vocabulary in their speaking, reading, and writing in the culminating tasks. 

Examples of vocabulary instruction and activities include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 10, students participate in a Language Dive and determine the meaning of unknown words found in the anchor text, The Lightning Thief. The Language Dive focuses on how the differences among word connotations help determine meaning. For example, students sketch or write the differences between sullen and depressed.

  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students learn the meaning of infer before using the Infer The Topic protocol to learn about “Critical Design Problems and Solutions.” They use an online dictionary to determine which meaning of critical the module is using which is repeated throughout the module materials and texts. Infer is also added to the academic word wall.

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 6, students examine the connotation of the phrase, stripped of; determine if the phrase is negative, positive, or neutral; and explain how it helps convey the author’s point of view.

  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 5, students read “This is How the Space Race Changed the Great Power Rivalry Forever” and examine the key ideas, tipping point and Cold War. Then based on the reading, students write about the Cold War.  Next, students examine intercontinental and national security and answer the question: “What connection do these paragraphs make between the Space Race, technology, and national security?”  They use this examine-define-read-write structure throughout the close reading activity.

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 2, students complete the activity, Analyze Word Definitions, where they determine the meaning of multiple-meaning words as used in Chapters 2-3 of the anchor text, Hidden Figures.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials meet the expectations of Gateway 2. Carefully organized text sets and associated tasks support students’ knowledge building as they build their skills in research, writing, speaking and listening, and analysis. The program’s attention to building students’ literacy development with appropriately rigorous and integrated skills practice sets them up for successfully engaging in grade level work for the next year. Overall, the materials do provide enough material for teachers to build students’ learning, although the teacher may need to revise some work since extra included components may be a distraction.

Criterion 2a - 2f

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

24/24
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials are organized to support students’ knowledge building in multiple topics. Texts are organized and linked together to amplify how students explore topics and grow their understanding of not just the content of the texts, but the construction of texts per the authors’ choices of syntax and text components. Culminating tasks and research supports require students to integrate literacy skills while staying close to the text and demonstrate knowledge.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a cohesive topic(s)/theme(s) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 texts are connected by and organized into modules with grade-level appropriate topics. To assure that the texts work together to support student learning, they are supported with lessons and guidance.  At the beginning of each module, guiding questions and big ideas are presented to thematically tie anchor and at maximum, six supporting texts together. The texts build knowledge and vocabulary; they provide opportunities to comprehend complex texts across a school year. Academic and domain-specific vocabulary are introduced at the beginning of some lessons. Related narrative and expository texts are placed together to encourage students to make meaning of the texts; a variety of text types related to the topic are presented to build knowledge. Several nonfiction and fiction texts are used in reading, writing, speaking, and listening learning experiences.

Examples of how modules are organized around a topic include:

  • In Module 1, students read texts about Greek mythology. Students read the anchor text, The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan, and supplemental texts and apply knowledge in various ways including answering Guiding Questions, identifying big ideas, and preparing for a Socratic Seminar. In Unit 1, Lesson 9, students work with academic vocabulary terms: depressed, millenia, sullen, and skeptical.

  • In Module 2, students read texts about design thinking. The anchor text, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer, and supporting texts help students answer Guiding Questions: “How can design thinking help solve a critical problem? What habits of character can help solve a critical problem to contribute to a better community?” In Unit 2, Lesson 1, students work with domain-specific vocabulary terms: figurative language and simile.

  • In Module 3, students read texts about American Indian boarding schools.The anchor text, Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac, and supporting texts encourage deeper understanding of the topic. By the end of the module, students demonstrate their knowledge by creating an audio museum where students “use an audio recording application program to produce a product that will be featured at a listening station as part of the audio museum and can be widely shared to uplift the voices of American Indian boarding schools.” In Unit 3, Lesson 3, students work with domain-specific vocabulary terms: background information, main claim, and point.

  • In Module 4, students read texts about the Space Race. The anchor text, Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly, and supplemental texts encourage students to look at the way facts and ideas connect with one another across texts to gain an understanding of the topic. Guiding Questions include: “What were the main events of the Space Race, and in what scientific, political, and social context did it take place? What were the accomplishments of the ‘hidden figures’ at NASA, and why were they remarkable?” In Unit 2, Lesson 2, students work with the academic vocabulary term, segregation.

Indicator 2b

Materials require students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft, and structure within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high quality questions and tasks.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 2b.

Throughout the year, students analyze the structure, language, point of view, and characters of anchor texts in order to determine theme and central idea. The skills are practiced in various activities that include reading, writing, speaking, and listening and are embedded in students’ work through discussions, activities such as Language Dives, and collaborative anchor charts in the student workbook. Tasks are logically organized and increase in complexity over the course of a module and year. The materials place emphasis on comparison and synthesis of ideas, particularly providing opportunities to compare and contrast the ideas and concepts in the supplemental materials to the anchor texts.

Examples of questions and tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, students read “Why Ancient Greek Mythology Is Still Relevant today” and complete a chart with a series of questions that address key ideas and details such as: “What is the central idea of this text? How does the author develop this idea?” The chart offers scaffolding by providing two main ideas and requiring students to find supporting details. A third box is left blank where students write their own main idea and add supporting details. 

  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 8, students answer a series of questions about text structure as it relates to the central idea in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind such as: “What is a central idea from Chapter 4?  Given the central idea we came up with, what structure might likely be used by this chapter? How do you know? Take a look at the sentence after the break on page 67: ‘But that was in a normal year.’ How would you describe what the paragraphs leading up to that sentence describe or do?  How would you describe what the paragraphs that come after that sentence on page 67 describe or do? Take another look at that sentence on page 67: Given what you noticed about what comes after this sentence, how does this sentence seem to be functioning in the overall structure of this chapter?  What is the purpose of this sentence?  How does this sentence help to convey the central idea that we identified?”

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students read Two Roads and complete an exit ticket about the theme. Students complete the following:  “Help others whenever needed; you may need their help one day.” They find one piece of text evidence that supports the theme and explain their choice by connecting it to the theme statement. They are directed to “remember that the theme can be revealed by any character’s actions or words, not just those of the protagonist.”

Indicator 2c

Materials require students to analyze the integration of knowledge within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high quality text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 2c.

Texts and instructional activities are included to develop student knowledge about topics in science, social studies, arts, and technology. They read, discuss, and write about a topic across a module to integrate knowledge across multiple texts. The materials encourage students to provide evidence from text, show thorough understanding of concepts, and think creatively about applying the concepts. Reading tasks, question series, and culminating tasks provide coherent opportunities for analysis. The materials also provide guidance for teachers in supporting students’ integration of knowledge and ideas through Teacher Supporting Materials, ELL supports, and Additional Resources guides.

Examples of ways students integrate knowledge include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 4, students compare how a particular theme from The Lightning Thief compares to how the same theme is conveyed in a myth that the students select (from “Theseus and the Minoraur,” “Cronus,” or “Medusa”). A list of six themes is provided, such as “A mother will put her love for her children above every other relationship. Excessive pride can make a person act recklessly.” Students compare how each text conveyed the theme they chose. In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 13, students read The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind and other texts and complete a chart as they research the stages of the design process from problem to solution that the main character used. They answer questions such as, “Who is working on this problem and solution? Explain the critical problems in a few words. Explain the solution in a few words. How did this problem become known?” ELL support for the teacher includes strategies for different levels of support for students who may find it challenging to compare and contrast themes from Greek myths.

  • In Module 3, students read texts and complete activities to gain knowledge of the “forced acculturation” of Native Americans through boarding schools. Guiding Questions include: “Why were American Indian boarding schools first established? What kinds of experiences did students have at American Indian boarding schools?” Students read the anchor text, Two Roads, along with several supplemental texts including “The Cutting of My Long Hair” and “The Advantage of Mingling Indians with Whites.”  In Unit 1, a Mid-Unit Assessment includes students integrating their interpretations of two photos related to the ideas found in the text, “The Cutting of My Long Hair.” The module ends with multiple displays of student learning such as: Students “select a text written by a survivor of the boarding schools and respond to this reading by writing a preface and reflection based on their chosen text. Students record themselves sharing their reading, acting as witnesses to this unrecognized time period in U.S.history.”

  • In Module 4, students read texts and complete activities to increase their knowledge of remarkable accomplishments in the Space Race. Guiding Questions include: “What were the main events of the Space Race, and in what scientific, political, and social context did it take place? What were the accomplishments of the hidden figures at NASA, and why were they remarkable?” Students read the anchor text, Hidden Figures, along with several supplemental texts, including “The Space Race” and “An Account of the Moon Landing.”  An end of unit assessment  includes reading an article and tracing the author’s argument, identifying a claim, reasons, evidence, and reasoning. The module ends with multiple displays of student learning, such as students creating a picture book for a younger audience, devoted to the stories of these hidden figures.

Indicator 2d

Culminating tasks require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a unit's topic(s)/theme(s) through integrated literacy skills (e.g., a combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 2d.

The Grade 6 materials include culminating tasks that require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated literacy skills. The culminating tasks, identified in the program as Performance Tasks, occur at the end of each of the four modules and allow students to apply their learning in experiential ways. Performance Tasks have authentic audiences, including classmates, school peers, and the wider community. They require students to demonstrate comprehension and application of the module’s topic through mastery of several different standards including reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language skills. Throughout the course of each module, students complete coherently sequenced text-dependent questions to build knowledge and prepare them for the complexity of the Performance Task.

Examples of how culminating tasks build knowledge and integrate skills include:

  • In Module 2, the Performance Task is a presentation during a student-hosted Solution Symposium. Students complete tasks leading to the culminating task including conducting research on a “Design Thinking” framework to analyze problems and solutions in Unit 2.The framework is the topic of the module as supported by The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. In Unit 3, students write a problem/solution essay. During the Solution Symposium, students present the problem and design-solution in which they researched and wrote. To prepare for the presentation, students create flip-down visual representations of their essay content and post these visuals. During the symposium, guests (i.e., other students, parents, members of the local community) will circulate around with a presentation prompts card: an index card with two questions to ask the presenters. The Presentation Prompts ask, “How was design thinking used to solve this problem? How were habits of character used to solve this problem?” Presenters answer questions and guests record a new insight on a sticky note next to the presenters’ work.

  • In Module 3, the Performance Task is an Audio Museum: Voices of American Indian Boarding Schools. Students design and create short audio presentations, recorded individually and shared via listening stations at a public audio museum event at which visitors listen to the stories of American Indian Boarding School students. Throughout the module, students learn about the Native American boarding school experience through reading Two Roads and other accounts. In Unit 3, they study point of view where they choose from a curated list of primary source texts written by students of American Indian boarding schools. Students write two accompanying pieces: a preface introducing their selected pieces and a brief reflection which explains why they selected this piece to share at the community museum event. They rehearse reading aloud with appropriate pacing volume and intonation then record the audio text of the preface and reflection.  

  • In Module 4, the Performance Task is to create one page of a children’s picture book called Hidden Figures in Space Science Picture Book. Students read Hidden Figures and additional texts on important women in the space race. In Unit 3, students research a person’s accomplishment and write an argument essay about why that person’s accomplishments are remarkable. In the Performance Task, students work in triads to create and contribute three pages of a class picture book devoted to the stories of hidden figures. Each triad is responsible for three pages of content on the person they researched. The individual stories are compiled into an anthology-style picture book geared toward an elementary audience.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials align to the standards for the grade level and support writing growth over the course of the school year. Across the grade levels, the program uses the read-think-talk-write cycle. First, students analyze a model to help them understand how to effectively communicate their thinking about the content. Next, students write a practice piece that is similar to the model with direct instruction and support. Finally, using what they’ve learned, students write an independent piece. During this three-step process, students meet with their peers and teacher for further guided instruction and support. Process pieces are heavily scaffolded with lesson plans, models, exemplars, and protocols that support student writing. After each process piece, students complete an on-demand parallel writing piece with fewer scaffolds to assess understanding. Student materials include scaffolds such as Note-Catchers, checklists, and Reflection Guides to help them monitor their progress toward grade-level standards. Materials include suggestions for keeping “Track Progress” folders for students and teachers to monitor writing progress. Despite the extensive scaffolds, students make few choices about the organizational tools that work for them, and the writing tasks at the end of the year are similarly scaffolded as those at the beginning.

Examples of a year-long plan for writing to meet standards include:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, students write a narrative “inserting a newly created demigod character into a scene from The Lightning Thief.”  Throughout the unit students engage in lessons that support them to write the narrative. In Lesson 5, students read a model narrative, “Greek God: Hypnos” to find the gist and identify elements of an effective narrative. In Lesson 6, students use the model as a guide and attend to task, purpose, and audience as they plan their narratives. In Lesson 8, students examine effective writing techniques for narrative writing. Scaffolds include a Narrative Writing Planning Graphic Organizer, a narrative writing checklist, and the model narrative.

  • In Module 2, Unit 3, Lessons 1-10, students write a problem-solution essay about how “design thinking [was] used to solve a critical problem.”  Students use The Painted Essay® template to examine a model problem-solution essay. The template requires students to color-code parts of the essay depending on purpose. Materials include an informative writing checklist and an anchor chart. Lessons include instruction on organizing an introduction with adequate context, composing proof paragraphs with facts, quotations, transitions, and accurate sourcing, and writing a conclusion that relates clearly to the facts presented. Note-Catchers are provided to support students’ writing development. Students track their progress in informative writing by frequently referring to the Informative Writing Checklist in the Student Materials. After students plan their essay with scaffolding, they write a problem-solution essay in an on-demand task.  

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, students write a narrative letter from the perspective of the character, Cal, in the anchor text, Two Roads, and complete lessons to strengthen writing. In Lesson 6, language standards are included as students examine pronoun usage in Chapter 25 of the anchor text. In Lesson 8, students analyze ways that writers add variety into their sentence patterns and watch a video about the effectiveness of sentence variety. In Lesson 9, students complete an exit ticket where they revise a sentence for variety and meaning.

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lessons 11-16, students collaboratively compose a narrative nonfiction picture book about one of the “hidden figures” of the Space Race. Students analyze models, identify the characteristics of narrative nonfiction, conduct research, use graphic organizers and checklists, and draw or download illustrations for the book.  Students choose what types of writing planners will work for their team instead of the teacher prescribing them. Lessons include instruction on the purpose of illustrations, narrative writing techniques, and effective visuals.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 2f.

The Grade 6 materials provide multiple opportunities across the school year to develop research skills based on grade-level standards. Students engage in activities requiring them to research both primary and secondary sources for the purpose of further understanding the anchor text or topic of the module. Materials support teachers in employing projects that develop students’ knowledge on a topic via provided resources such as anchor texts within the unit and book lists for independent student research. Shorter and longer research projects are included as well as assessments to check development of research skills. Many useful supports for the student and teachers are included as guides through the research process, research mini lessons for teachers, and peer support for students.

Examples of short and long research projects and activities include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 3, students choose a god to research and use the Greek God Research Note-Catcher to record details for the purpose of increasing their knowledge about Greek myths and legends. Students must list the sources they used on the Note-Catcher.

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lessons 5-12, students complete a long research project. Throughout the process, students learn how to take notes, assess credibility, skim and scan to collect relevant information, search for sources, record bibliographic information, determine relevance and credibility of sources, paraphrase and quote. Students complete an assessment in which they demonstrate understanding of research techniques as they develop them. 

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 14, students begin an independent argument essay with the prompt, “Why are my focus figure’s accomplishments remarkable?” They complete an Independent Argument Evidence Note-Catcher where they organize information collected during the research of their focus figure. One requirement of the Note-Catcher is to include bibliographic information and explain what makes the source credible.

Criterion 2g - 2h

Materials promote mastery of grade-level standards by the end of the year.

6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials partially meet the expectations of criterion 2.2 While the materials consistently provide students practice with grade level material, the directions and extra supports may complicate integrity of implementation. The teacher may have to re-design to assure that the student truly does access the high quality grade level material provided by the program in the amount of time provided by a typical school year.

Indicator 2g

Materials spend the majority of instructional time on content that falls within grade-level aligned instruction, practice, and assessments.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 2g.

The Grade 6 materials are designed to ensure that nearly all instructional time is focused on content that is aligned to standards. The standards alignment is clearly documented in teacher planning materials. Each lesson segment is aligned to grade-level standards with grade-level appropriate questions and tasks; assessments cover the key standards taught in each module. The program is organized so students encounter skills and topics with increased complexity that reinforce previous learning. The materials also are presented in a logical sequence and repeated in a way to address the full extent of the standard. While a few standards, such as RI.6.9 and RL.6.7, are taught only once, most standards are taught and assessed at least twice throughout the school year with a few key standards receiving instruction and assessment in every module. Optional materials are rare, though there are opportunities for diverse learners to meet the standards through scaffolded questions, activities, and assessments rather than providing less rigorous instruction. A few questions and tasks per module focus on the curriculum’s habits of character teachings and learner-based reflections; however, most are directly standards-based. Consideration is given in the program to ensure students understand the quality of the standards, how they are addressed, and how individual students feel about their progress toward meeting standards.

Examples of how the curriculum is arranged include:

  • Key standards (RI.6.1, RI.6.4, L.6.5c, L.6.6, W.6.4, W.6.6, and W.6.10) are taught and assessed in all modules.  

  • In each module, students track their progress several times on standards. For example, in Module 1, Unit 1, Lessons 15-16, students use a chart to rate how they feel they are performing on the standards. Both teacher and student provide a written reflection concerning progress toward the standards. 

  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students answer standards-aligned comprehension questions, such as “What do we learn from William from these examples?” (R.I.6.3).  They then use repeated ideas in the text to “determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details” (R.I.6.2).

  • In the Module 3, Unit 1, Mid-Unit Assessment, students read an excerpt from “The Cutting of My Long Hair” by Zitkala-Sa and answer multi-part standards-aligned questions: “What best describes Zitkala-Sa’s point of view toward the other girls she encountered on her first day?” (RI.6.6) “Which piece of evidence from the text best helps to convey the point of view from Part A?” (RI.6.1, RI.6.6)

  • Materials for English Language Learners provide suggestions for teachers to help students reach the standards.  In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 8, ELL students use sentence stems to complete the same Entrance Ticket as the rest of the class. In the same lesson, materials provide some illustrations of both literal and nonliteral language in The Lightning Thief to accompany the text-dependent questions.

  • In Modules 1 and 2, students have multiple opportunities for instruction in and practice of writing informational texts.

  • In Modules 3 and 4, students have multiple opportunities for instruction in and practice of writing arguments.

Indicator 2h

Materials regularly and systematically balance time and resources required for following the suggested implementation, as well as information for alternative implementations that maintain alignment and intent of the standards.

2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 2h.

The Grade 6 materials are organized to balance time and resources throughout the course of a year; however, because individual lessons and tasks may take longer than the curriculum estimates, completing all modules may not be possible in a school year. The materials provide 36 weeks of instruction, which does not allow for any variation in the schedule including state testing, assemblies, etc.  There are four modules that are each designed to last eight to nine weeks and include two assessments. Each module consists of three units. At the beginning of each unit, a time frame is given in weeks and daily sessions. Each lesson is designed for a 45-minute instructional day. Each lesson includes a time allotment for each of the four to six daily activities, aligned to core learning and standards-based objectives. At the lesson level, the requirements of the tasks would likely take longer than the allotted time. Most suggested times do not seem possible for students achieving below honors level. Standards are scaffolded to increase rigor and relevance over the course of a given year. While no optional activities are listed, diverse learners have scaffolds embedded in the lessons to assist with understanding which likely would take longer than the allotted time. The Curriculum Companion offers a section called “How Can I Stay on Track and on Target With My Pacing” to assist teachers in the pacing of the day, the unit, and the module.

Examples of implementation guidance and ways the program timelines may not allow for full implementation include, but are not limited to:

  • In all modules, a suggested timeline for the length of each unit is provided. For example, in Module 2, Unit 2, the Teacher Edition suggests a pacing of three weeks or 12 days to complete the unit. 

  • In all modules, most lessons are divided into the following segments: Opening, Work Time, Closing Assessment, and Homework. The allotted time for each segment would be challenging, especially for novice teachers. For example, in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 9, the plan suggests that Work Time take 25 minutes. This includes students completing a teacher-guided Language Dive for ten minutes, reading an excerpt of Chapter 7 for 15 minutes, and responding to text-specific questions that relate to the anchor text for ten minutes. In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 3, students are given ten minutes to determine the central idea of the anchor text. 

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3, suggested time frames are given in an agenda format for the six activities listed for the day: Opening - Engage the Learner (5 minutes), Opening - Strategies to Answer Selected Response Answers (5 minutes), Work Time - Read The Lightning Thief Chapter 2 excerpt (15 minutes), Work Time - Analyze Point of View The Lightning Thief Chapter 1 (15 minutes), Closing and Assessment - Reflect on Learning Targets (5 minutes).

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 8, materials suggest 15 minutes to compare and contrast the author’s methods of conveying information in a text (RI.6.3, RI.6.9).  In that amount of time, teachers and students collaborate on updating their Author’s Method Anchor Chart from Module 2. In order to do this, materials suggest that students Turn and Talk three times about the difference between quotations and dialogue. The teacher adds “dialogue/quotations” and exposition to the anchor chart, giving a brief explanation of exposition and asking students to discuss five questions about exposition.  Then, students skim two texts, comparing the authors’ methods for conveying information.  This will likely take longer than 15 minutes.

Examples of information for alternate implementation to maintain alignment to the standards include, but are not limited to:

  • Materials provide suggestions for extending lessons: “During lessons, students read excerpts from the anchor text rather than complete chapters to ensure sufficient time for students to think and respond to the text...if there is extended time for language arts, reading the entire chapter might be an option.”

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, standards are organized and scaffolded across the unit to increase rigor and relevance toward the Performance Task. For example, some activities are as follows:  Lesson 1 (W6.1) Analyze the structure of a model essay, Lesson 2 (W6.1) Plan a literary argument essay, Lesson 3 - Collaboratively write the introduction for an argument essay, Lesson 7 (W6.1) Gather and evaluate evidence for an argument essay, Lessons 8-9 (W6.1) Write a literary argument essay.

  • In Module 3, optional tasks to enhance the unit on American Indian Boarding Schools include “Invite a representation from a nearby historical society or Indian reservation to further educate students on Native American history in the area,” broadening the audience for students’ audio museum by housing it in a public place, and using websites such as Native Knowledge 360 to enhance students’ cultural competence.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials meet the expectations of Gateway 3, providing teachers ample supports to implement the materials with fidelity while they support students’ learning and grow their own professional expertise. Resources include an assessment suite to measure short- and long-term development, as well as differentiation scaffolds for students who demonstrate above- or below-grade level proficiency. The materials support engaging English learners in core curricular activities, emphasizing home language and background as an asset that enriches and improves students’ education.

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

9/9
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Criterion Rating Details

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content. Guidance and support for teachers include useful annotations and suggestions not only for basic implementation, but also for implementation in local settings. The materials include examples explanations for teachers to grow their own knowledge as they assure students have access to grade level practice. Alignment to the standards is clearly designated throughout the program, not just for the teacher but also in materials for community and families.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their literacy development.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3a.

The Grade 6 materials include useful annotations in the Teacher Edition, guide for English Language Learners, and supporting materials. The introduction in the Teacher Edition explains the design and principles of the curriculum. Each daily esson is divided into Opening, Work Time, Closing and Assessment, and Homework. Lesson annotations include clear directions, scripting in red and italics when appropriate, time stamps, and bolded references to any student materials. Suggestions are included for varying levels of scaffolds for each lesson. Answer keys are provided for all activities, including homework. Text guides address sensitive issues in the anchor texts with suggestions of how to handle them.

Examples of lesson annotations and suggestions include:

  • Each teacher-facing lesson begins by highlighting CCSS, daily learning targets, and on-going assessment. 

  • An agenda for the day is presented with time stamps for opening, work time, closing and assessment, and homework. 

  • Teaching Notes provide helpful information on ways to adapt the lessons.

  • Teachers are provided with ways technology and multimedia may be used in the lesson.

  • Academic or domain-specific vocabulary is listed.

  • A list of materials needed to complete each lesson is listed.

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3b.

The Grade 6 materials include explanations and examples so that teachers can improve their knowledge. Teaching Notes are included in each lesson and provide adult-level explanations on numerous topics: purpose of the lesson, information on alignment to the standards for assessments, ways to monitor instruction, support to make informed decisions on adapting the curriculum, suggestions for accommodations and differentiation, links to professional articles explaining the purpose of a protocol, opportunities and guidance to extend student learning and assessments, and a preview of upcoming lessons.

Examples of explanations include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, the Teacher Edition includes examples of teacher instruction for the use of Conversation Cues such as: “This lesson is the first that includes built-out instruction for the use of Goal 1 Conversation Cues. Conversation Cues are questions that promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O’Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer.  TERC, 2012. http://inquiryproject.terc.edu/shared/pd/TalkScience_Primer.pdf. Based on Chapin, Suzanne, O’Connor, Cathy, and Anderson, Nancy. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K–6. Second Edition. Math Solutions Publications, 2009). Goal 1 Conversation Cues encourage all students to talk and be understood. As the modules progress, Goals 2, 3, and 4 Conversation Cues are gradually introduced. To review the complete set of cues, refer to Overview–Conversation Cues on the Tools Page (http://eled.org/tools).”

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 10, the Teacher Guide includes examples of Teaching Notes for supporting all students such as: “In Chapter 12, Cal and Pop reach Challagi. They discuss some of the American Indian students they see there, speculating on whether they are ‘full-bloods’ (141). Meanwhile, Cal continues to grapple with some complicated elements of his own racial identity: ‘I don't have a white face. But until two days ago, I thought I was white or stahitkey as Pop called them’ (141). Depending on how they understand their own identities, some students may feel especially connected to these passages. A QuickWrite during Closing and Assessment A in this lesson offers students the opportunity to explore some of these ideas in a safe way. Give students the opportunity to share their thoughts with small groups, but do not require them to do so.”

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 14, the Teacher Edition includes a Teaching Notes with opportunities to extend learning such as: “Invite students to create a collage incorporating words and images that represent the scientific, political, and social context around the Apollo 11 mission. This hands-on activity provides an opportunity for students who thrive through visual learning and creative representation.”

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3c.

The Grade 6 materials include a Teacher Edition that provides an overview of the standards that are addressed in each module. In each lesson, an agenda describes the lesson sections, including the Opening, Work Time, and Closing and Assessment, and identifies the standards that are addressed.  Supporting standards are also identified in each lesson. For supporting standards, the Teacher Edition states, “These are the standards that are incidental - no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.” In the Your Curriculum Companion, the key shifts of the CCSS are explained in the context of the curriculum. It explains previous practice, the instructional shift, and how the curriculum supports the shift. This section also includes a table that correlates the College and Career Ready ELA/Literacy Standards to the curriculum. A case study in this section illustrates in-depth how the Topic, Tasks, Targets, and Texts are used to achieve daily, unit, and module-length goals. The section gives teachers advice on making instructional decisions that keep the integrity of the standards intact.

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3d.

The Grade 6 materials include an introductory welcome letter in the Additional Resources tab that teachers send at the beginning of the year to give families an overview of the year’s modules, units, and goals. The letter includes an overview of the program and anchor texts students will read throughout the year. A rationale is given for including each text along with the main tasks for each module and how those tasks fit into a full year’s learning. In the Teacher Supporting Materials for each unit, homework resources are included for families. These detailed documents include, Guiding Questions and Big Ideas, homework per lesson, and information on independent reading and vocabulary.

Examples of resources include:

  • In Module 1, the homework resource for families includes Guiding Questions and Big Ideas such as: ”What is mythology and what is the value of studying  mythology from other cultures? Why have stories from Greek mythology remained popular? How does point of view change with experience? What will your student be doing at school? And How can you support your student at home?” Key vocabulary is defined for families to help students at home. Then the unit’s homework is presented including information on research, choice reading, and vocabulary logs. A chart of each lesson’s homework is presented. Next, instruction on how to keep an independent reading log is presented along with a list of example prompts for the student to choose from to respond to their reading.

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3e. The Grade 6 materials include a section in the Your Curriculum Companion that explains how research impacts the design of the curriculum and how the curriculum addresses College and Career Ready standards. Chapter 1 describes how research impacts the vocabulary, knowledge-building, syntax, and fluency components of the curriculum to close the opportunity gap. It also includes chapters that explain the instructional approaches of the curriculum, including preparing to teach, supporting students to read complex texts, writing with evidence, supporting students to meet grade-level expectations, and helping students grow as learners and people. 

Examples of explanations of instructional approaches include:

  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, the section, “How Did Research Impact the Design of the Curriculum, and What Difference Will It Make to My Students?” addresses student gaps due to varying levels of readiness. Research citing systemic inequities and the Matthew Effect, “The rich get richer and the poor get poorer,” are included along with a mission from the publisher. This mission is to “give all students access to a challenging, engaging, and empowering curriculum built on best practices in literacy instruction in order to accelerate their achievement.” Included in this section is research for the following four elements of literacy instruction: vocabulary, knowledge-building, syntax and fluency.

  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, chapters explain the instructional approaches, including preparing to teach, supporting students to read complex texts, writing with evidence, supporting students to meet grade-level expectations, and helping students grow as learners and people. The chapters include QR codes for videos showcasing the pedagogy within the curriculum, including the routines such as Language Dives, Peer Critique, Jigsaw, Unpacking a Learning Target, and Close Reading.  

  • In the Your Curriculum Companion, the section, “How Will the Curriculum Help Me Address College-and Career-Ready Standards?” explains the three main shifts in the creation of the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts/Literacy. Details concerning how the shifts are more aligned with research on best practice is included along with an explanation of how the new shifts are more beneficial to student learning and closing the gap among all learners. In addition, a table is provided that describes how the curriculum materials address the specific aspects of the standards in the areas of Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening.

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3f.

The Grade 6materials include a 6-8 Required Trade Books and Resources Procurement List, including titles, authors, publishers, quantities, ISBN or UPC codes, Text Types, Lexiles, and Publication Dates. These details are provided for all texts and videos used in the program. Each lesson includes a list of required materials, including “Materials from Previous Lessons” and “New Materials.”  Material lists are also categorized by items used by students and teachers. In each Module Overview,  the Texts and Resources section includes a list of required textbooks and resources and the number of each resource needed. The Preparations and Materials sections explain what the teacher needs to prepare in advance and the location of  those materials. In addition, any new materials needed for both teacher and student are listed.

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

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Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

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Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

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Criterion Rating Details

The materials include clear and comprehensive information on which standards are assessed at which point in time, with accompanying assessment system supports. The materials provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their proficiency in formal and informal ways. The materials also include guidance for the teacher to provide differentiated assessment where necessary.

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3i.

The Grade 6 materials include information on which standards are assessed. The Teacher Edition and the Teacher’s Guide for English Language Learners for each module provides an overview of the standards being taught and assessed in each series of lessons. Each module’s Teacher Supporting Materials includes an Assessment Overview and Resources section. This section details the standards assessed in each Mid-Unit and End-of-Unit Assessment. Each question in the assessments includes an annotation of what standard the question is intended to evaluate. For assessments that include a discussion, materials provide a checklist with the standards and performance criteria for teachers to aid in assessment.  For assessments that involve writing, materials provide an annotated exemplar showing where the exemplar achieves the standards being assessed. Assessment Design in Expeditionary Learning in Grades 3-8 is another document that provides details about the assessment design process and explains how modules assess student achievement of the Common Core Standards, the groupings of standards in each assessment, and how the learning of each module scaffolds students toward meeting the standards in the assessments.

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 3j.

The Grade 6 materials include assessments with scoring guidelines to interpret student performance; however, specific suggestions for follow-up or interventions are not provided. The discussion or performance assessments include a checklist with the standards and performance criteria for teachers to aid in assessment.  The speaking assessments include forms for running records of student performance with standards references. The writing assessments include rubrics and annotated exemplars showing where the exemplar achieves the standards being assessed. Assessments that include revising are accompanied by a Teacher Reference with the revisions made and an explanation of why each revision is necessary. Accommodations and extensions are suggested for the assessments, and opportunities for students to reflect on their own performance are included. Materials prompt teachers to provide students with specific feedback and allocate time to conference with students about performance. Because ELA standards are cyclical and often revisited, follow-up can be provided in that way, but the curriculum does not specifically provide suggestions.

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials include assessments that measure the expectations of the standards regarding rigor and depth. There are six unit assessments per module at mid-unit and the end of the unit. A variety of item types are presented including, selected response, short and long constructed response, text-based discussion, written reflection, and essays. Standards-based formative and summative assessments are included in each unit in all modules. Also, each lesson includes a section titled Ongoing Assessment at the beginning of the lesson, and an Assessment Guidance section within the Teaching Notes that detail the kinds of data the teacher can collect on student progress toward the standard.

Daily formative assessments include writing and reflection, strategic observation and listening, and debriefs. Writing and reflection assessments include summary writing, Note-Catchers and Entrance Tickets, and Exit Tickets. Strategic observation and listening are assessments made by the teacher while students are engaged in conversation during a Turn-and-Talk or other conversation-based protocol. Debriefs occur at the end of each lesson when students reflect on their progress toward the learning targets and standards.

Summative assessments are standards-based constructed responses to culminating discussions, presentations, or on-demand writing. Anchor writing standards are taught and assessed in every module. Students write essays to inform or to express a claim, or they write narratives. As a summative assessment, these writing tasks are independent and on-demand.

Examples of formative assessment types include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 3, students complete a Quick Write to answer the prompt: ““From reading this excerpt, what is Percy’s point of view toward Mr. Brunner?” Teacher directions state, “Circulate to monitor and guide students. Pay attention to common misconceptions, and take note of a student who has composed an exemplary reponse.”

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 2, students complete an Entrance Ticket (RI6.8 and W6.1) explaining why they think an author made a particular claim in an argument essay.

  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students complete the activity, Analyze Point of View: President Kennedy’s Speech Note-Catcher (RI6.1, RI6.2, RI6.4, RI6.6, RI6.10, W6.10, L6.5c).

Examples of summative assessment types include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, students complete an End-of-Unit Compare and Contrast Summative Assessment Essay (RL6.1, RL6.7, W6.2, W6.4, W6.5, W6.6, W6.9a, W6.10, L6.6).

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 4, the Mid-Unit Summative Assessment has students “analyze figurative language and central idea.” (RI6.1, RI6.2, RI6.3, RI6.4, RI6.5, RI6.10,L6.4a, L6.5a, L6.5c.)

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, the End-of-Unit Assessment is a reading assessment (RL.6.10) where students read an excerpt from the beginning of Chapter 18 of Two Roads and answer selected-response and short constructed response questions about how Cal’s point of view is developed (RL.6.1, RL.6.6), the structure of the text (RL.6.1, RL.6.3, RL.6.5, W.6.10), the use of intensive pronouns (W.6.10, L.6.1b), and the impact the use of language varieties has on character development (RL.6.1, RL.6.3, W.6.10, L.6.1e).

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, the End-of-Unit Assessment is an argument essay (W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.6, W.6.9b, W.6.10, L.6.2, L.6.3, .6.6) based on research that argues why a hidden figure’s accomplishments are remarkable (RI.6.1, RI.6.3, RI.6.10, W.6.7, W.6.8). Students use reasons and evidence from their research texts and reasoning to defend their stance. Although Grade 6 is not required to address counterclaim, students acknowledge the existence of the opposing stance as part of their introduction and/or conclusion.

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials include accommodations for students while taking assessments so they are able to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment. Teaching Notes for each lesson include a section titled “Support for All Students” and “Assessment Guidance” with suggestions for how to support students in completing the assessment. The Teacher Guide for English Language Learners (ELLs) offers additional teacher assistance to guide teachers in providing the appropriate amount of support for ELLs. The Teacher Guide for English Language Learners includes guidance for each lesson and a section titled, “Levels of Support” to document “lighter support” and “heavier support” for each assessment. Both types of supports are scaffolds only and do not change the content of the assessment.

Examples of accommodations provided include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 15, Teaching Notes in the “Support for All Students” section for the assessment state, “If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment. Some students may require more than the time allotted to complete the assessment.”

  • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 15, the Teacher Guide for ELLs suggests lighter support for the assessment: “Before the assessment of Work Time A, underline key vocabulary in the assessment directions and prompt and read aloud together as a class to ensure that students understand each task included in the assessment. Invite students who need lighter support to restate or clarify information for students who need heavier support.” The same guide suggests heavier support: ”After students who need lighter support generate a more sparse sentence frame (see the accompanying suggestion in For Lighter Support), invite students who need heavier support to practice filling in the frames with simple statements about Cal and Possum. Provide examples as needed (e.g., Cal speaks softly, using few words and listening to others). This will refresh students’ memories about the function and use of the sentence frame and prepare them to adapt it for their own writing, if they choose, during the end of unit assessment.”

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

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Criterion Rating Details

The materials provide clear supports for teachers to assure all students have access to the full demands of the standards, not just in isolation but also in application. Students have many opportunities for collaboration through various protocols and debriefs that encourage literacy development, skill improvement, and knowledge enhancement. Students have many opportunities to demonstrate knowledge in different ways and in different engagements with their peers as well as in independent work. Supports and guidance for students who demonstrate proficiency above grade level are authentic, useful, and engaging. 

Students who are acquiring English are supported in these materials in specific guidance for the teacher throughout the core material, with varying degrees of support dependent on what each student needs. 

The materials highlight that all students must in that students work with rich, rigorous grade level work. Emphasis is placed on valuing students’ home language and cultural/social backgrounds, highlighting that what each child brings to the classroom is an asset to bolster knowledge and overall literacy development.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level content and to meet or exceed grade-level standards that will support their regular and active participation in learning English language arts and literacy.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3m.

The Grade 6 materials include a Teacher Edition with a section called Support All Students that provides strategies and supports for students in special populations. Lessons provide opportunities and suggestions for differentiation and modifications as needed. In the Teacher Guide for English Language Learners, a black triangle signifies a differentiated version of student-facing materials to support all learners as needed. Lessons are designed to support small groups and individual students. Students also have many opportunities for collaboration through various protocols and debriefs that encourage literacy development, skill improvement, and knowledge enhancement.

Examples of strategies and supports include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, in the Support All Students section, examples of guidance for students who read below grade level are as follows: “Students may find it challenging to complete the complex close read in the amount of time allotted. Focus on fewer sections. Gather students who might need additional support during the close read in one place in the room to support them quickly and quietly as they closely read the text.”

  • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 3, in the Support All Students section, students “with lower decoding abilities may struggle to read at the same pace as their classmates. Support developing readers with as many options as possible, including having them following along, reading silently, during read-alouds or reading in a pair or small group of classmates. Make sure that quicker readers are aware of what to do if they finish reading early (e.g., add to their Analyze Key Individual: William Note-Catchers; return to the text and highlight what they consider to be the most important ideas), so that ELL students do not feel pressured to read more quickly than they are able to.”

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 2, in the Support All Students section instructions state: “After the close read, a Language Dive facilitates a critical ‘pause’ and a closer look at a key sentence in the chapter, helping students tackle the theme of identity in a more scaffolded way.” In the Language Dive, students work in groups to discuss ways to rearrange chunks of sentences to make a meaningful sentence. They take turns paraphrasing and discussing, sketching, or acting out the sentence.

Indicator 3n

Materials regularly provide extensions to engage with literacy content and concepts at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 6 meet the criteria for Indicator 3p.

The Grade 6 materials include extension activities that are authentic applications of higher learning, not just additional work given to students who finish early and accurately. The Teacher Notes include an Opportunities to Extend Learning section that provides extensions for every lesson. Extensions are included in daily lessons, Performance Tasks, and other activities that can be applied across an entire module. Extensions can be applied to daily lessons by assigning different or additional research on the module topic, practicing or deepening skills tied directly to a lesson’s standards, removing scaffolds so students complete tasks independently, and encouraging creative expression and leadership skills. Extensions can be applied to the Performance Tasks by increasing the complexity of the work through higher-order thinking skills; expanding the craftsmanship through increased demands of accuracy, detail, and aesthetic quality of the task; and requiring a higher demand of original thinking or authentic personal voice and ideas to the task. Extensions can be applied across the entire module by providing students with opportunities to listen to experts, conduct fieldwork, and engage in service learning projects. Your Curriculum Companion also provides guidance for which extensions should be considered for the whole class and which should be considered for small groups or individuals. Some extensions are geared to students who show more interest in the topic rather than above grade-level skill. While extensions occasionally amount to more work, on the whole, they provide opportunities for deeper learning.

Examples of extensions for students above grade level include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, in addition to reading the excerpts of The Lightning Thief that are read closely in class, students may read the whole book.

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 9, the Opportunities to Extend Learning section states that some students may not require the level of scaffolding provided. Teachers are encouraged to prompt students toward deeper levels of understanding and increased rigor by referencing Levels 3 and 4 of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge.

  • In Module 2, the optional module-length, whole-class extension includes having students “listen to the Ted Radio Hour podcast episode entitled ‘The Power of Design’.”  Your Curriculum Companion lists another podcast for students who are interested in learning more.

  • In Module 3, students look for local museums or reservations that provide education on Native American culture and contact them to arrange a visit or sign up for an education program.

  • In Module 3, the Performance Task includes extensions for students to work with a teammate to produce their recording together and consider ways to use music and/or other media to make their recording more engaging.

  • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 15, an extension recommends students use the NASA webpage to view photographs, audio, and video clips from Apollo 11 and discuss “how the images inform their understanding of the text.”

  • In Module 4, the Performance Task requires students to create a picture book about hidden figures in space science. An extension activity suggests students look for hidden figures within their school community and honor them in a public way that highlights their contributions.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for for students to monitor their learning.

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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials provide various ways for students to demonstrate their knowledge of content and apply specific ELA standards. Anchor writing standards are taught and assessed in each module in on-demand and independent writing tasks. On-demand and culminating tasks encourage students to demonstrate understanding of learning targets and encourage deep analysis of texts. Entrance and Exit Tickets, Note-Catchers, and summary writings are examples of formative tasks in lessons. Research skills are part of lessons and Performance Tasks to build information-literacy and multimedia presentation skills. Opportunities for pairs, trios, and group work are provided throughout the modules and across each grade level, allowing students to develop interpersonal relationships and collaboration skills. Students often consult with peers in pairs and small groups to receive feedback about their work. These collaborative opportunities take place at the lesson level and the end-of-module Performance Tasks. Students use creativity and higher-level thinking skills to complete summative assessments and Performance Tasks. Summative assessments vary in format and include constructed or selected response questions and discussions or presentations. Performance tasks are designed to encourage student authenticity, complexity, and craftsmanship. They vary in design from creation of an audio museum to a solution symposium. Students complete self-assessments after each summative assessment using the Tracking Progress Form. A “debrief” at the end of one lesson during the closing and assessment phase is another opportunity for students to demonstrate their learning and inform next steps. At the end of the year, students review these forms to review their progress.

Examples of the variety of learning tasks include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 3, students plan, write, and revise a scene from The Lightning Thief written from the perspective of a new character. Students create a multimedia presentation for a live audience. Students often work in pairs and small groups to receive feedback concerning their essay and presentation. 

  • In Module 2, Unit 3, students participate in a Solution Symposium where they present the problem-and-design solution they previously researched for an informational essay. For the Solution Symposium presentation, students will create a flip-down visual representation of their essay. 

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, students produce a recording to be included in the Voices of the American Indian Boarding School Audio Museum. Students select a primary source text written by students in American Indian Boarding school and write two accompanying pieces: one explains the content and the other explains why they included this particular piece in the museum. After several opportunities to receive peer feedback on their project, students record the audio for the museum.

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, students work in triads to create and contribute three pages, including illustrations, to a class created picture book anthology about a famous hidden figure. Students conduct individual research but come together to write and illustrate their three-page contribution.

The Grade 6 materials provide a systematic approach for students to monitor their own learning. Each lesson begins with learning targets derived from the standards and written in student-friendly language. Students regularly break apart learning targets, determining what parts of the targets are most important. Throughout the module, students complete self-evaluation documents where they track their progress on each learning target. Students participate in debriefs at the end of lessons to reflect on their learning and complete self-evaluation. Students complete checklists to self-evaluate their progress and a protocol for students and teachers to share and accept feedback collaboratively. After each Mid-Unit and End-of-Unit assessment, students reflect on their performance and set goals for the future. Before the subsequent assessments, students reflect on past successes and set a goal for the assessment at hand.

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials provide a variety of grouping strategies and protocols to encourage flexible groupings, higher levels of thinking, and knowledge retention. Partners, triads, and groups of four and five engage in learning experiences using various protocols like Face to Face, Back to Back, Chalk Talk, Collaborative Conversations, Fishbowl Discussions, and Socratic Seminar. Additionally, there are partner and small group options and support for text reading including, partner reading, Poetry for Multiple Voices, and Reader Theater Scripts. The protocols encourage students to learn to speak in front of their peers, listen actively, challenge ideas, and collaborate.

Examples of grouping strategies include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 13, students use a Think-Pair-Share to answer a question about Chapter 11 of The Lightning Thief. Once students have had a chance to discuss the answer to the question with their partner, they move to an abbreviated Socratic Seminar where the teacher invites pre-selected small groups to further discuss the prompt in front of the class. 

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students work collaboratively in pairs or triads to compare the similes they have identified while analyzing figurative language from The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 2, students work in writing partnerships to complete the Collaborative Literary Argument Writing Plan Graphic Organizer. Once they have completed this activity, they work collaboratively with another writing pair and share their in-progress argument writing planners for feedback.

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 2, students work in pairs on the Collaborative Argument Evidence Note-Catcher to prepare to write a group hidden figures essay. 

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards to regularly participate in learning English language arts and literacy.

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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials provide strategies and supports for ELL students as they work with grade-level content. All students engage in the same anchor and supplemental texts. English Language Learner instruction and strategies are integrated into each lesson of the curriculum. The Teacher Guide for English Language Learners provides support for each lesson to ensure that ELL students of differing abilities receive appropriate scaffolding for language proficiency standards. It includes unit and lesson highlights and Differing Levels of Language Support for the various items in each lesson to support learners in accessing content at the differing levels of language proficiency.

In the standard Teacher Guide, a black triangle indicates instruction that is particularly supportive of intermediate ELL students. The curriculum includes specific approaches and strategies at the unit and lesson level, highlighting Language Dives as a high-yield strategy. Language Dives are provided throughout the modules and across all grade levels and provide the opportunity to “notice and wonder” about the ways in which language is used to convey meaning. Each Language Dive consists of a “Deconstruct, Reconstruct and Practice” routine which promotes building language, literacy and habits of mind. Conversation Cues are utilized at all grade levels and are designed to build the capacity for all students to engage in rich, collaborative discussions targeted at the ELA standards. Writing Scaffolds are provided throughout the modules and across grade levels. These scaffolds include teacher modeling and sentence and paragraph frames to assist students who need additional language support.

Examples of ELL supports include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 5, materials provide an affix list for students to use to help them determine the meaning of new vocabulary words.

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lessons 3, 9, and 10 provide three additional mini Langage Dives to assist ELLs in making meaning of the text.  For example, in Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 3, the Language Dive focuses on a sentence from The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind that uses chronological words and multiple-meaning words, such as reach.

  • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 5, teachers use combinations of Conversation Cues for students who need support in discussions. Cues are differentiated for “Lighter” and “Heavier” support, including “Can you say more about that? Who can repeat what your classmate said?”

  • In Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 1, materials provide a differentiated graphic organizer for analyzing a model argument essay versus completing a Note-Catcher. The graphic organizer contains examples of what a student might write for the similarities and differences between the model essay and the Note-Catcher. Then, the graphic organizer provides things to think about, such as “the way the documents and their information are organized” and “the tone and formality of the documents.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials include two platforms for accessing the materials and both include images and information with people of various demographic and physical characteristics. One platform is the EL Education Open Up Resources; there are no images in the curriculum. The resources consist of PDF documents for the Teacher Guide and the student workbooks, and worksheets do not include illustrations.

Examples of diverse perspectives in the texts include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 2, students read about William Kamkwama, a boy from Malawi, who created a windmill to provide electricity for his village.

  • In Module 4, students read about the contributions of African-American women to NASA through the reading of Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race.

  • In Module 3, students read about Native American Boarding Schools and how they shaped the Native American experience.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

0/0
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials include The Teacher Guide for English Language Learners that provides guidance and strategies for teachers to encourage students to use their home language to facilitate learning. For each module and lesson, there are suggested levels of support from lighter to heavier based on the needs of the student. Heavier support usually includes suggestions for using the student’s home language. In addition, transcripts for some videos are provided to the student in their home language to facilitate comprehension. 

Examples of guidance and support include, but are not limited to:

  • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, heavier support for learning vocabulary includes, “Translation and cognate: What is the translation in your home language? Does the word look like a similar word in your home language?” 

  • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 6, heavier support for discussions includes, “During the small group discussion of Closing and Assessment A, encourage ELLs who need heavier support to discuss their research findings with peers who share the same home language. This may help students better process the information they have gathered so far and more easily clarify misunderstandings.”

  • In Module 3, Unit 3, Lesson 1, heavier support includes, “if it is feasible to do so, pair students into homogeneous language groups. As needed, allow students to use their home languages as a resource to help them interpret the essay and paint it appropriately.”

  • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 2, heavier support for language development includes, “Consider providing ELLs with the Language Dive sentence ahead of time. Invite students who need heavier support to annotate the sentence with home-language translations of unfamiliar words (e.g., compact, capsule, searing).”

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

0/0
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The Grade 6 materials provide guidance in the Support All Students Materials. In daily lesson plans, the resource informs teachers about cultural or social issues that may be incorporated within students’ reading and gives suggestions on how to support students. The Opportunities to Extend Learning notes frequently provide suggestions about connecting learning to student interests. The Teacher Guide for English Language Learners (Unit Teacher Notes) encourages teachers to use cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning: “Investigate the routines, practices, rituals, beliefs, norms, and experiences that are important to ELLs and their families. Integrate this background into the classroom as students engage with texts. Consider the values and narratives embedded in class texts, and try to anticipate their relevance to ELLs.” Additionally, diversity, inclusion, and cultural relevance considerations are provided in the Teaching Notes section of the Teacher Edition for each lesson.

Indicator 3u

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

0/0

Indicator 3v

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

0/0

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology (when applicable) with guidance for teachers.

0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials do not include interactive tools, virtual manipulatives, or dynamic software. Materials do not include digital nor embedded technology. Materials come in two formats which both have a visual design that supports learning. The design is not distracting or chaotic, and it neither adds to nor distracts from the subject matter.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

0/0
+
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Indicator Rating Details

N/A 

Materials include no interactive tools, virtual manipulatives, or dynamic software. The materials are available in a digital format; however, it consists of materials that are not interactive.

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

N/A

Materials do not include digital technology.

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

Materials are provided in two formats which both have a visual design that support learning. The design is not distracting or chaotic, and it neither adds to nor distracts from the subject matter. One format includes PDF documents and workbook pages that are organized in an accessible way. Graphic organizers are provided when needed to help with student organization. The use of typography, layout, and space are visually appealing, though there is little variance in color and no engaging images. The other format is the Learnzillion platform that presents lesson information in slideshows and is accompanied by illustrated characters who appear as presenters of the information on the page.

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

N/A

Materials do not include embedded technology.

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Report Published Date: 2021/02/11

Report Edition: 2020

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA 3-8 Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations