Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations of alignment. Rigorous, engaging texts are high quality and are organized to be the central focus of lessons while supporting students’ knowledge building. The materials support student growth in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and developing language skills over the course of the school year, with attention to close reading and analysis of texts, topics, and themes. The materials also meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability, with guidance for differentiation and program design for implementation.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
32
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
33
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations for high-quality texts are the central focus of lessons, are at the appropriate grade-level text complexity, and are accompanied by quality tasks aligned to the standards of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in service to grow literacy skills. Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade, although there are missed opportunities to address instructional goals in below level and stretch texts. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading and provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
12/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criterion for texts are worthy of students’ time and attention, are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.  Anchor texts are of publishable quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests, and the materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. While text sets represent a broad range of complexities, from well below the band and into the stretch level, there is a variance in the opportunities to address instructional goals in texts that fall below grade level in comparison to stretch texts. Although the materials represent a variety of modes, genres, and complexities to support students’ literacy skill development, there is no staircase of complexity.  Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level and students have the opportunity to read a diverse range of texts and genres throughout the school year.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading. Included texts are engaging and attend to student interests.

Examples demonstrating the quality of texts include (but are not limited to):

  • “Coming of Age in the Dawnland” by Charles C. Mann. This is the second of two texts that students compare and contrast for this unit. In this historical writing, Mann looks at the culture shock between Europeans and Native Americans using modern research on this period of history. It provides a more contemporary and engaging perspective on the historical topic which students will find interesting and thought-provoking. 
  • "Letter to John Adams" by Abigail Adams. This is a letter written by John Adams’s wife who asks him to “remember the ladies.” It’s the first real feminist piece linked to the formation of the United States, as his own wife urges him to remember the women who are also fighting for liberation from Britain.
  • "From Song of Myself "by Walt Whitman. Walt Whitman was an American writer during a time of great expansion. Whitman wrote about the American ideal and his own distress about current events such as the Civil War. The four poems selected for inclusion in this text reflect the essential question “In what ways do we seek to remain true to ourselves?”
  • “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Nathaniel Hawthorne is a canonical American author, grandson of a judge involved in the Salem witch trials. An essential question for the unit is “What do we secretly fear?” and this short story cleverly reveals community fears and suspicions when a minister chooses to hide his face behind a veil. 

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The instructional materials include an appropriate balance of text genres and types for Grade 11. The textbook is ordered chronologically and based on historical time periods. 

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1--“Here Follow Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666” by Anne Bradstreet
  • Unit 2--“A Soldier for the Crown” by Charles Johnson
  • Unit 4--“Runagate Runagate” by Robert Hayden
  • Unit 5--“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin
  • Unit 6--“Mending Wall” by Robert Frost

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Unit 1--“A Desperate Trek Across America” by Andrés Reséndez
  • Unit 2--"The Declaration of Independence" by Thomas Jefferson
  • Unit 4--Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs
  • Unit 5--“The Lowest Animal” by Mark Twain
  • Unit 6--“Speech on the Vietnam War, 1967” by Martin Luther King Jr.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis.  

The entire text set for the unit, including those in the independent reading section, represent a broad range of complexities from well below the band to reach into the stretch level. All texts address the topic and essential question, but the texts that fall below grade level provide only superficial opportunities to address the instructional goals while the stretch texts are well supported with appropriate strategies for whole class and small group study. In each unit, independent reading selections are often more complex, even far more complex, than instructional texts. 

Examples of texts and associated tasks that support grade-level expectations include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, students read “On Being Brought from Africa to America” by Phillis Wheatley. Within this poem, while there isn’t a Lexile present, there are multiple levels of meaning, the text is abstract, and difficult and emotional ideas are represented--not to mention the use of symbolism and irony. This text fits well within the constructs of the Essential Questions, and represents the lens of the African American experience. 
  • In Unit 3, students read “My Friend Walt Whitman” by Mary Oliver, 1030L. The text complexity is just below the grade band, however students will still be appropriately challenged by the message and informal style the text is written in. Also, many students struggle with understanding the point and purpose of Walt Whitman so this text serves as a good bridge to that understanding .
  • In Unit 5, students read “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin, 970L. The story is very brief and provides little opportunity for grade level instruction. The story structure is chronological and the language, while peppered with emotion-based imagery, is clear. The story’s theme may be complex but can be determined by students independently.
  • In Unit 6, students read “Ambush” by Tim O'Brien, 950L. The story relates to the essential question of "How do we deal with rejection and isolation?" in a sophisticated manner. The story is slightly more complex than the quantitative measure indicates as it is a story within a story story, providing a frame with a narrative embedded to reflect the author’s experience and the lasting effect of that traumatic experience.

Examples of texts and associated tasks that do not fully support grade-level expectations include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, students read "Balboa” by Sabina Murray, 920L. The quantitative complexity measure is significantly below grade level. The qualitative measures include mostly explicit structures and language. Challenging vocabulary is defined in the margins. This text could be read independently rather than examined as a mentor text for grade level writing.
  • In Unit 1, students read “The World on the Turtle’s Back” a myth by the Iroquois storytellers, 850L. The quantitative complexity measure is significantly below grade level. The qualitative measures include mostly explicit structures and language. Challenging vocabulary is defined in the margins. This text could be read independently rather than examined as a mentor text for grade level writing.
  • In Unit 3, students read “The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe, 1020L. Although the complexity of the text is a little bit below the grade band, the plot structure and mood make it more complex.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

Overall, Grade 11 presents complex texts that reinforce literacy skills. Accompanied with every text are the following sections: “Get Ready,” “Check Your Understanding,” and “Respond.” Within these sections, there are tasks such as but not limited to “Analyze the Text,” “Research,” “Create and Discuss,” and “Respond to the Essential Question.” Students practice analysis and deconstruction with every single text encountered; however, the six units do not present a continuous progression of text complexities, but each unit does represent development of grade level literacy skills with texts that represent a variety of complexities, from below to above the recommended grade band. Students are following the same pattern and tasks with every text, ranging in complexity, but never working up to more complex reading in progression. Students, however, complete a culminating writing and speaking and listening task at the close of every unit; but, similarly, there is no increasingly complex task that students must complete compared from Unit 1 to Unit 6.

In the beginning of the year, the students are asked to read texts that follow along the American literature timeline. In Unit 1, they read an Iroquois myth “The World on the Turtle’s Back” followed by a short story “Balboa” by Sabina Murray and also a poem “Here Follow Some Verses Upon the Burning of our House, July 10th, 1666” by Anne Bradstreet. All three of these texts are appropriate for the unit’s chronology, however they are mostly below grade level. On the other hand, the mentor text for this unit “A Desperate Trek Across America” by Andres Resendez is above grade level and well-supported. In addition, students are asked to compare a text from Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford and from Coming of Age in the Dawnland from 1491 by Charles C. Mann. All of those texts are on or above grade level. Finally, the independent reading texts include a memoir, poem, two historical narratives and a poem which are all appropriate for the grade level along with the suggested novel connection The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri. 

In the middle of the year in Unit 3 students are asked to read poems from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson along with the essay “My Friend Walt Whitman” by Mary Oliver and the poem “In Season of Change” by Teresa Palomo Acosta. All of these texts are appropriate for the grade level and the point students are studying in American literature. The comparison texts for this unit include a selection from Walden by Henry David Thoreau and from Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv as well as “The Minister’s Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne and “The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe. All of  these texts are at or above grade level and appropriately challenging for students at this point in the year. Finally, the independent reading selections include two pieces from Ralph Waldo Emerson along with an article and two poems. The suggested novel connection is Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury which is also an appropriate selection at this point in the year. 

By end of year, Unit 6, students read a wide range of texts with varying Lexile levels: “A Rose for Emily” a short story by William Faulkner (1120L); the Mentor Text, “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” an essay by Zora Neale Hurston (950L); “Mending Wall” a poem by Robert Frost (n/a); The Crucible by Arthur Miller (n/a); an open letter “My Dungeon Shook: Letter to My Nephew” by James Baldwin (1040L); among others. For the culminating activity at the close of the unit, students must compose a personal essay, and they utilize the Mentor Text, “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” as an exemplar example.

Throughout Unit 6, each text selection offers the following sections: “Get Ready,” “Check Your Understanding,” and “Respond.” Within these sections, there are tasks such as but not limited to “Analyze the Text,” “Research,” “Create and Discuss,” and “Respond to the Essential Question.” And, the independent reading selections, some of which are an essay “Martin Luther King Jr.: He Showed Us the Way” by César Chávez and a short story “Reality Check,” by David Brin, are within the same Lexile range of “not available” to 920L to 1160L.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. 

The publisher provides the quantitative measure of each print text except poems as a Lexile measure. The Lexile Text Measure is listed in the teacher's edition as part of the instructional overview that prefaces each unit. The publisher explicitly describes the qualitative measures of the text in the “Plan” section before each text. Reader and task considerations for each text are explicitly described and include English learner support and suggestions for differentiation when students struggle. These supports are directly related to the content of the text, the qualitative elements.  Each text set is crafted to address an essential question, includes a mentor text for the end of unit writing task, and provides students an opportunity to engage in close reading and analysis of content building toward the final performance task. These elements of the Teacher's Edition illustrate attention to reader and task. 

Examples demonstrating this information:

In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2: Building a Democracy

  • The text set for the unit includes a public document, history writing, video, a short story, poems, an excerpt from an autobiography, an essay, and a historical letter.  Lexile measures range from 1000L to 1390L, representing the breadth of the grade band. 
  • The mentor text is history writing, “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies" by Ron Chernow. The text measures 1340L and includes the following qualitative elements:
    • "Ideas presented: requires weighing multiple perspectives; some analysis of bias and author’s motivations."
    • "Structures used:  more complex, multiple perspectives may be presented; more deviation from chronology."
    • "Language used: vocabulary not defined at point of use; mostly Tier II and II words; metaphor (rather than smilies) used more; multiple technical words may be used in one sentence."
    • "Knowledge required:more complex problems; experiences may be less familiar to many; cultural or historical references."
    • "English learner support includes use of cognates, identifying verb tenses, use of hyphens, and language conventions." 
    • The end of unit writing task is to write a research report. 
  • “Letter to John Adams” by Abigail Adams, 1180L, is paired with an excerpt from “Lean In”, an essay by Sheryl Sandberg, 1000L. 
  • Abigail Adams:
    • "Ideas presented: requires weighing multiple perspectives. Some analysis of bias and the author’s motivations. Some ambiguity." 
    • "Structures used:  more complex, multiple perspectives may be presented; more deviation from chronology. Tables and figures support understanding.[sic, pg 168A]"
    • "Language used: vocabulary not defined at point of use. Mostly Tier II and III words. Metaphor (rather than similes) used more. Multiple technical words may be used in one sentence."
    • "Knowledge required: More complex problems. Experiences may be less familiar to many. Cultural or historical references."
    • "English learner support includes learning new expressions, using cognates, making verbs and nouns from adjectives, language conventions, and understanding idioms." 
    • Support for differentiation includes teaching voice and tone as well as reteaching an understanding of purpose.
  • Sheryl Sandberg
    • "Ideas presented: requires weighing of multiple perspectives. Some analysis of bias and author’s motivations. Some ambiguity."
    • "Structures used:  more complex, multiple perspectives may be presented; more deviation from chronology. Tables and figures support understanding.[sic, pg 178A]"
    • "Language used: vocabulary not defined at point of use. Mostly Tier II and III words. Metaphor (rather than similes) used more. Multiple technical words may be used in one sentence."
    • "Knowledge required: More complex problems. Experiences may be less familiar to many. Cultural or historical references." 
  • Both texts:
    • English learner support includes learning new expressions, using cognates, making verbs and nouns from adjectives, language conventions, and understanding idioms. 
    • Support for differentiation includes teaching voice and tone as well as reteaching an understanding of purpose.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 include mentor and supporting texts that allow for students to engage in a range and volume of texts in order to achieve grade level reading. There are six units that revolve around an essential question for students and provide multiple texts.

Throughout the year, students are exposed to a wide variety of texts in both print and multimedia formats which are identified in the table of contents for each unit. Each unit begins with an Analyze and Apply section that uses one text as a “Notice and Note reading model” along with another text which serves as a mentor text followed by other supporting texts. The next group of texts, Collaborate and Compare, provide a comparative analysis of two different selections, both of which connect to the essential question but which may be different in “genre, craft, or focus”. In addition, there are independent reading selections which can be accessed with the digital edition. Finally, there are suggested texts provided which can give educators even more options for text selection.

  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 2: Building a Democracy, the following texts are provided: 
  • Mentor Text: “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies” by Ron Chernow (history writing)
  • Supporting texts:
    • Public document: “The Declaration of Independence” by Thomas Jefferson
    • Video: American Experience: Alexander Hamilton by PBS
    • Short story: “A Soldier for the Crown” by Charles Johnson  
    • Autobiography: from The Autobiography by Ben Franklin
  • Collaborate and Compare Texts:
    • Poem: “On Being Brought from Africa to America” by Phillis Wheatley
    • Poem: “Sympathy” by Paul Laurence Dunbar
    • Letter: “Letter to John Adams” by Abigail Adams 
    • Essay: From Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
  • Independent Reading Texts:
    • Speech: “Speech to the Virginia Convention” by Patrick Henry  
    • Public document: from The United States Constitution: “The Bill of Rights”
    • Aphorism: from Poor Richard’s Almanack by Benjamin Franklin 
    • Informational text: “Abigail Adams’ Last Act of Defiance” by Woody Holton
    • Poem: “Democracy” by Langston Hughes  
    • Suggested Nonfiction Connection: 1776 by David McCullough
  • In Student Edition Unit 4, The Quest for Freedom, whole class reading
    • Speech: “Second Inaugural Address” by Abraham Lincoln
    • Letter: “To My Old Master” by Jourdon Anderson
    • Image collection: Civil War Photographs
    • Short story: “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce
    • History writing: “Building the Transcontinental Railroad” by Iris Chang
    • Argument: “Declaration of Sentiments” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton (mentor text)
    • Argument: Speech to the American Equal Rights Association by Sojourner Truth
    • Poem: “Runagate Runagate” by Robert Hayden
    • Autobiography: from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs
  • Independent reading
    • Letter: “Letter to Sarah Ballou” by Sullivan Ballou
    • Diary: from A Diary from Dixie by Mary Chesnut
    • Speech: from "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July" by Frederick Douglass
    • Spirituals: Go Down, Moses; Follow the Drinking Gourd; Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
    • Poem: “Imagine the Angels of Bread” by Martin Espada
    • Novel suggestion: Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 5: America Transformed, the following texts are provided 
    • Mentor Text: “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin (short story)
    • Supporting Texts:
      • Short story: “To Build A Fire” by Jack London
      • Essay: “The Lowest Animal” by Mark Twain ) 
      • Article: “Why Everyone Must Get Ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution” by Bernard Marr  
      • Poem: “Chicago” by Carl Sandburg 
    • Collaborate and Compare texts: 
      • Novel: from The Jungle by Upton Sinclair 
      • Investigative journalism: “Food Product Design” from Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser  
    • Independent Reading Texts:
      • Short story: “The Men in the Storm” by Stephen Crane 
      • Short story: “A Journey” by Edith Wharton
      • Short story: “A Wagner Matinee” by Willa Cather  
      • Article: “Evidence that Robots Are Winning the Race for American Jobs” by Claire Cain Miller 
      • Article: “Healthy Eaters, Strong Minds: What School Gardens Teach Kids” by Paige Pfleger 
    • Suggested Nonfiction Connection: Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer 

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criterion for materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly, while sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills. The materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax, while also supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. The materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. The materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards and include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. The materials also include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text). 

The instructional materials include questions and tasks that require careful reading over the course of a school year. The majority of questions are text dependent and require students read closely for content and author’s craft, such as word choice. Students are required to reinforce their responses and answers to questions using evidence from specific texts that students are required to read. Questions are structured to support students learning to recognize signposts from Notice and Note strategies such as the significance of contrasts and contradictions. Each unit includes a mentor text with annotation and reflection tasks focused on the primary learning goal of the unit writing task.  Within each of the six units, students experience recurring sections, such as Analyze & Apply and Collaborate & Compare; these sections reinforce concepts, theories, ideas, and critical thinking directly related to each text read. Also, throughout each text, students experience a sidebar on the page that support student annotations to assist in going back to the text for future tasks that require students to re-engage with said text, and also within the sidebars, students are presented with questions that push them to infer, analyze, predict, summarize, among other skills, which directly relate to the passage(s) the sidebar note is next to.

Examples of how the materials approach text dependent questions include, but are not limited to:

  • In Volume 1, Unit 1, students read the mentor text, an article, “A Desperate Trek Across America,” by Andrés Reséndez. At the close of the text, students must complete the Check Your Understanding section; there are three questions located within this section. Students must “Answer these questions before moving on to the Analyze the Text section on the following page:”
    • "1. Why do the Spanish adventurers call the estuary near their campsite the 'Bay of Horses?'"
    • "2. Why is the trip by raft so difficult for the Spaniards?"
    • "3. What does Cabeza de Vaca do after returning to Spain the first time?"
  • In Volume 1, Unit 3, students read an excerpt from “Song of Myself,” a poem, by Walt Whitman. Within the sidebar of the poem read, students are asked to annotate: “In lines 27 - 32, mark places where the poet expresses his thoughts directly.” Then, students must “Cite Evidence: How do these ideas relate to each other and to Whitman’s theme(s)?”
  • In Volume 2, Unit 5, students read Carl Sandburg’s poem, “Chicago.” Within the Research section directly after the Analyze the Text section, students are asked to “Extend: What did Sandburg have to say in defense of his technique to the critics of his poetry and its ‘formlessness?’ Find a quotation that gives his perspective on poetic form and diction.”

Examples of how students are asked to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text include:

  • In Student Edition, Unit 1, students are asked to read the historical narrative “Of Plymouth Plantation” by William Bradford. In the sidebar Analyze Author’s Purpose, students are asked to mark three phrases in paragraph 4 that suggest a formal tone. Then, they are asked: “What can you infer about the author’s purpose based on his tone thus far? Cite text evidence in your response.”  
  • In Student Edition, Unit 5, students are asked to read an article titled “Food Product Design” from the book Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser. After students read the passage, they are asked to Analyze the Text in a series of five questions. The directions for this section ask students to “support their responses with evidence from the text.” The questions are:
    • "What do the first two paragraphs suggest about author’s purpose?" 
    • "Why does Schlosser include so much detail about his visit to the IFF plant in New Jersey?"
    • "What are the similarities and differences between “artificial flavors” and “natural flavors?” Why does Schlosser explain the terms in such detail?"
    • 'What might Schlosser want his audience to do after reading this selection?"
    • "What is Schlosser’s purpose in listing all the chemical ingredients in a typical artificial strawberry flavor, like the kind found in a Burger King strawberry milkshake?" *For this final question, students are asked to look specifically at paragraph 17 for their response. 

Examples of tasks that support students in engaging with the text directly, drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text include:

In Student Edition, Unit 1

  • A Desperate Trek Across America
    • "Mark the words and phrases in paragraph 6 that come from a primary source. What does the information that is included add to your understanding of the explorers’ situation?"
    • "Mark details in paragraph 11 that tell what Cabeza de Vaca does to survive the cold night. What does the quotation tell you about Cabeza de Vaca?"
    • "Write an analytic response to the text that explains whether the writer finds Cabeza de Vaca admirable." 

In Student Edition, Unit 3

  • Last Child in the Woods
    • "Mark an example of irony in paragraph 6. What point does Louv make through the use of irony?"
    • "Mark two significant details about the research that the author cites in paragraph 9. How do these details support the author’s key idea that children ought to reconnect with nature?"
    • "How does Louv use contrasts - such as death and rebirth, broken and healing - to develop his essay’s main ideas in the excerpt from Last Child in the Woods?"

In Student Edition, Unit 5

  • The Story of an Hour
    • "Mark the clues in paragraphs 1-3 that indicate the point of view. Which type of third-person narrator is Chopin using? What is the effect of this point of view?"
    • "Mark clues in paragraph 7 that describe the impact her husband’s death has had on Mrs. Mallard. How do you think Mrs. Mallard will cope after learning about the death of her husband?"
    • "What is surprising about how the narrator describes Mrs. Mallard in paragraph 11 compared to the earlier description of her 'heart trouble?'"

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials containing sets of sequences of text-dependent/text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

Each unit is organized around an essential question and a mentor text to guide students’ thinking around a topic. Close reading of the mentor text focuses on topic development and writer’s craft. Within each individual lesson, after every reading assignment, students are presented with various sections to complete to represent their understanding of the text and how their understandings and empathizing connects to the outside, “real” world; these tasks that build up to the cumulative tasks at the end of the unit consist of, but are not limited to, the following: Analyze the Text, Create and Discuss, Analyze Podcasts, Research, Create and Present, and Collaborate & Compare. The lessons include sequences of text-dependent questions that guide their understanding of the selections in the unit and build to the culminating writing task. Lessons leading up to culminating tasks require the demonstration of various skills, including reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, students compose a literary analysis: “In this unit, you have read works about early explorations in America. Andrés Reséndez based his article ‘A Desperate Trek Across America’ on Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca’s La relación, a first-hand account of the ill-fated Spanish expedition to Florida beginning in 1528. Although Reséndez’s narrative article on Cabeza de Vaca’s account is not a formal analysis, he uses several techniques which you can apply to the literary analysis you are going to create for your next writing task. As you write your literary analysis, you can use the notes from your Response Log, which you filled out after reading the texts in this unit.” The writing prompt is: “Write a literary analysis explaining how your chosen selection connects with the idea of being a stranger in a strange land or unfamiliar surroundings.” Students will complete the following sections: Plan, Develop a Draft, Revise, Edit, and Publish. And, students are required to include evidence and details from the text within their paper. Once students complete the cumulative writing task, they must participate in a panel discussion: “You will now adapt your literary analysis for presentation to your classmates. You will also listen to their presentations, ask questions to better understand their ideas, and help them improve their work.” 
    • Students read “Balboa,” a short story by Sabina Murray. Students complete the Research section: “Balboa, from Spain, was just one of many European explorers who sailed during the late 1400’s and early 1500’s. With a partner, research other explorers of this time from the countries listed in the chart. Summarize why they are remembered.” After students complete the chart, there is an extension activity: “Find another source that mentions Vasco de Balboa. Find three facts about this explorer that were not reflected in the short story. Discuss with your partner whether the facts align with the depiction of Balboa in the story.” 
    • Students read “A Desperate Trek Across America,” an article by Andrés Reséndez. Once students read the text, they complete the Create and Present section. Students must compose an analytic response: “Write a response in which you analyze the author’s view of Cabeza de Vaca.” Then students must present a response: “Prepare to present your response to a small group of classmates.” There are scaffolds located within the Create and Present section. 
    • Within Unit 1, students read an excerpt from Of Plymouth Plantation, a historical narrative by William Bradford. Within the Create and Discuss section, students must compose an informational text: “Bradford’s account describes how the Native Americans helped the colonists adapt to life in New England. Write a three- or four-paragraph informational text that explains how the colonists and Native Americans confronted challenges together.” Students must then hold a group discussion: “With a small group, discuss how the relationship between Native Americans and colonists developed over time and what factors caused changes to occur.”
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, The culminating task for the unit is to write a research report about how the founding documents, systems, or fundamental principles facilitate shared power and constructive alliances in our democracy and present an adaptation of the  research report. The mentor text is an article by Ron Chernow entitled “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies.”
      • Students analyze the text and its structure then write an essay and present it. 
      • Analysis includes syntax, diction, and irony.
      • Research following the text directs students to learn about the Federalist Papers.
    • Other research tasks students do during the unit prior to the culminating task include:
      • Research laws passed in Britain in the years before the Declaration of Independence and the colonists’ responses.
      • Research the Constitutional Convention.
      • Research what happened to loyalists after the American Revolution. 
      • Research Ben Franklin and identify some of his accomplishments.
      • Identify at least one interesting fact or quote from several members of the Adams family, including John, John Quincy, Abigail, and Samuel. 
    • These research tasks, related discussions, and writing build to the culminating task for the unit.
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 4, the culminating task for the unit is to write an argument about a current barrier to self-determination and specify what should be done to remedy it so that self-determination is possible for more members of our society. Students then use the argument to debate the issue.
    • The Mentor text is Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s “Declaration of Sentiments.” Students analyze and evaluate the claim, supports, reasons, and evidence.
    • Students compare the Stanton argument to Sojourner Truth’s “Speech to the American Equal Rights Association.” 
      • Students analyze rhetorical devices including repetition, parallelism, and allusion.
      • Students write a compare and contrast essay of these two texts. 
    • Other activities that build toward the culminating task include:
      • Analyze Lincoln’s “Second Inaugural Address” and write a letter in response. 
      • Analyze archival Civil War photographs for their effectiveness in conveying the photographer’s purpose and sentiment. 
      • Find another photograph and write a didactic placard.
      • Research the use of spies during the Civil War.
      • Research events in China which may explain why Chinese immigrants were leaving China and working to expand the United States by helping to build the railroad. Write a historical report.
    • Students have opportunity with each text to explore the central theme of self-determination and develop content knowledge prior to beginning the culminating task. 
  • In Student Edition, Unit 5, the culminating task is to write a short story that explores the questions of "To what degree do we control our lives?" and "What are the consequences of change?" These questions have been alluded to in prior units. 
    • The mentor text for the unit is Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour.” 
      • Students research a classic American novel that was met with negative criticism then write a short story that takes place in an hour. 
    • Other texts in the unit explore control such as Jack London’s “To Build a Fire.” 
      • Students read other London stories and explain how nature and fate play critical roles in the stories.
      • Students write a how-to guide about something they do well. 
    • Change is also central to the text set including the Bernard Marr article “Why Everyone Must Get Ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution” and an excerpt from The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. 

In the Student Edition, Unit 6, students are asked to write a personal essay that synthesizes information from the texts and is connected to one of the essential questions of the unit. The context for the essay is that “Telling your story is a way to make new connections, bridge spaces, and break down walls.”

There are several tasks and questions throughout the unit that support this culminating writing task: 

  • After reading the historical writing “The Warmth of Other Suns” by Isabel Wilkerson, students are asked to analyze the text in several ways. Two of the questions on page 800 ask students to explain: 
    • "What is the author’s message? What details support this message?"
    • "How does Wilkerson’s use of language impact the way you perceive the treatment of African Americans? Cite text evidence in your response" 

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

There are frequent opportunities where students are expected to participate in evidence-based discussions. After reading assignments, there are small group or one on one interactions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. Specifically, within the online materials, students and instructors are presented with the Speaking & Listening Studio, where additional discussion supports are in place. Also, within the Teacher's Edition, at the beginning of most texts, when instructors are setting up the lesson, instructors are presented with two grouping strategies to support discussion titled Small-Group Options.  These opportunities can also be found in Respond sections after texts, where students are encouraged to work with a panel to discuss what they have learned from the text, as well as modeling the style of the reading assigned. This can also be seen in Critical Vocabulary sections in Respond at the end of a text, allowing students to model the language and syntax, as well as work with a peer. Speaking and listening instruction occurs frequently throughout the year and is supported through teacher resources and materials.

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, instructors are presented with the section Make Inferences: “Remind students that the way characters act and respond to each other reveals important information about them. In creation myths, the way characters behave can also reveal important social values. Discuss how the creatures’ actions and reactions reveal the Iroquois’ positive feelings toward animals.” Instructors are given a possible student response. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3, students read the poem “In the Season of Change,” by Teresa Palomo Acosta. Instructors are presented with the section Small-Group Options before the initial lessons, and instructors are presented with two options; one is as follows: “Reciprocal Teaching: Provide students with a list of comprehension question stems before they begin reading the poem. For example: ‘State ___ in your own words. What might happen if ___?’ As students read, have them write questions about the poem using the stems. Organize students into groups of three and have each student offer two questions to the group for discussion without duplicating each other. Have students discuss the questions and find evidence from the selection to support their responses.”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3, students are asked to read “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne.  In the sidebar below the page titled Improve Reading Fluency, the teacher is directed to “have students work with partners to read paragraphs 45-47. First, use paragraph 45 to model how to read fictional text. Have students follow along in their books as you read the text with appropriate phrasing and emphasis. Then, have partners take turns reading the next two paragraphs aloud. Encourage students to provide feedback and support for pronouncing unusual or unknown words. Remind students that, when they are reading a story aloud for an audience, they should pace their reading so the audience has time to absorb and comprehend what is happening.” 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students read the poem “Runagate Runagate” by Robert Hayden. Following the reading there is a sidebar at the bottom of the page titled “When Students Struggle….” The instructions instruct the teacher to “review the term allusion. Then, have students reread the poem. Focus on the allusion to Frederick Douglass in line 56. Ask: why might Hayden have alluded to Douglass in this poem? How is the subject of the allusion related to the topic of the poem? Does the allusion create positive or negative associations and feelings? Does the allusion help convey the theme of the poem. Have students work in small groups to analyze the allusion and write sentences that answer the questions." 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 5, students read Bernard Marr’s article, “Why Everyone Must Get Ready For the Fourth Industrial Revolution.” Within the sidebar of the teacher’s edition, instructors are presented with two opportunities for whole class discussion:
    • Language Conventions: “Have students annotate individually. Call on different students to explain the reasons for each instance of capitalization.” Instructors are presented with possible student responses.
    • Critical Vocabulary: “Augment: The text notes that the capabilities of machines can be augmented, or increased, by connecting them to the Internet or to other systems. Ask students how augmented machines can lead to the creation of ‘smart’ factories.” Instructors are presented with possible student responses. 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 6, students are asked to read the short story “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner. After they read, under the heading Create and Discuss it asks students to “discuss in a small group.” Specifically, it asks students to “discuss whether the townspeople bear any responsibility for what becomes of Emily.” In the Teacher's Edition on the same page in the sidebar to the right it reminds teachers that “as students discuss the topic of the townspeople’s responsibility, they should reference the story as much as possible." Also, it adds later that “during the discussion students should listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules.”
  • Within the online materials, teachers and students are presented with the Speaking & Listening Studio. In this section, students are presented with interactive lessons regarding discussions:
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Overview
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Introduction
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Preparing for Discussion
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Establishing and Following Procedure
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Speaking Constructively
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Listening and Responding
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Wrapping Up Your Discussion
    • Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Credits

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Grade 11 speaking and listening tasks follow reading and viewing with a primary purpose of preparing and presenting reflections about the topic studied. Discussions serve mostly to provide feedback about a planned presentation or reflection to that presentation. Instead of in-test follow up questions, students are directed to the Speaking and Listening Studio for methods of evaluating tasks. Discussions encountered require students to go directly back to the text or reference evidence. In many cases, instructors are presented possible student responses for additional support. Sections where questions and supports are seen within the Student and Teacher's Editions are: Reflect on the Unit, Introduce the Selection and Quick Start, the Revise section within all major cumulative writing tasks, Create & Discuss, Applying Academic Vocabulary, Create and Discuss, and Collaborate and Present.  The Speaking and Listening Studio is a digital resource that provides a quick reference for students to address specific speaking and listening actions. The margin notes remind students to use the Speaking and Listening Studio for more information about the task. The Speaking and Listening Studio also provides an opportunity for targeted instruction and supports teachers to help guide students in speaking and listening areas.

Evidence that supports the rationale includes:

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, students are asked to read the short story, “A Soldier for the Crown.” After they have read the text, students are asked under the heading Create and Debate to have a debate about Freeman’s “gamble” and if you think that gamble paid off. In the instructions it ask students to divide into two groups, find details from the text and listen closely to the opposing group’s ideas and present counter-arguments. In the Teacher's Edition on the same page, it also adds that educators can, as a prewriting activity, “instruct students to make a pro-con list for making a decision about which group they will join.”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students are asked to write a well-structured argument. After they have written an argument they are tasked with adapting their argument into a debate. The sidebar on the right side of the page explains that “as students adapt their arguments, suggest that they consider adding rhetorical techniques such as those that Stanton uses in ‘Declaration of Sentiments’”. It also tells teachers to remind students about adding vivid language, make sure they clearly link their debate points to their claims and reasons, use transition words and varied syntax and review gestures and vocal expression categories. Finally, it reminds teachers to “tell students they should practice making their points before the live debate.”
  • In Student Edition, Unit 6, students are asked to read “Speech on the Vietnam War, 1967”. Following their reading under the heading Create and Discuss, students are asked to have a group discussion. The directions tell students to:
    • "discuss King’s main points and how the evidence supports his points"
    • "present examples of King’s rhetorical devices and how they enhance his argument"
    • "listen carefully to the contributions of your classmates and adjust your view of King’s speech as needed"
    • "evaluate King’s conclusions on the Vietnam War"

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. 

For every text that students read or view, there is a writing task that either clarifies and deepens understanding of the text, explores the essential question, or helps prepare the student for the end of unit writing task. These are both long assignments with multiple drafts, short assignments for in class responses, focused projects, and other short answer responses. These can be found both before and after a reading assignment within each unit.  At the end of every unit, students must complete a cumulative writing task that emulates one of the following: short story, personal narrative, explanatory essay, literary analysis, argumentative essay, and research essay. These process writing tasks have multiple layers for support. On-demand writing assignments, including shorter, more focused writing projects, are found throughout all six units.  

Evidence of on-demand writing includes, but is not limited to:

  • In Student Edition, Unit 2, students read the “Declaration of Independence,” a public document, by Thomas Jefferson. Within the Analyze the Text section, students must “Support [their] responses with evidence from the text.” Students are presented five questions that address different aspects of Bloom’s Taxonomy, where they must compose short responses. Examples of some of the questions are as follows:
    • “2. Analyze: A logical appeal is a methods of argument based on evidence and reasons. Choose an example of a logical appeal in the Declaration and explain how it supports the thesis.”
    • “5. Draw Conclusions: How does the structure of Jefferson’s argument support his purpose? Consider elements such as evidence and a call to action in your response.” 
  • In Student Edition, Unit 5, students are asked to read the article, “Why Everyone Must Get Ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” by Bernard Marr. Before they begin reading they are asked in a Quick Start activity to “Think about a time when you went through a big change in your life. Did you have a sense that the change was going to happen? Take notes about what happened leading up to the change and how the change affected your life.”

Examples of process writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Student Edition, Unit 2, students must compose a literary analysis. The process writing directions are as follows: “In this unit, you have read just a few great works from the English Renaissance, with a focus on Shakespeare, the dominant literary figure of the period. Your next writing task will focus on what you have learned about the theme of revenge in Hamlet. Write a literary analysis of a scene in Hamlet that shows the hero struggling to overcome an internal or external conflict. You can use ‘Hamlet’s Dull Revenge’ by René Girard as a mentor text. As you write your literary analysis, you can use the notes from your Response Log to answer the question, ‘What can drive someone to seek revenge?’ which you filled out after reading the texts in this unit.” The prompt is as follows for the literary analysis: “Write a literary analysis of a scene in Hamlet that shows the hero struggling to overcome an internal or external conflict. The following support directions are put into place:
    • “Make a clear thesis statement, or claim.”
    • “Present key ideas, or reasons, in a logical order.”
    • “Support key ideas with details and evidence from the text.”
    • “Quote passages from the text.”
    • “End your analysis with a strong conclusion.”

There are multiple steps in this process writing assignment:

    • 1. Plan
    • 2. Develop a Draft
    • 3. Revise
    • 4. Edit
    • 5. Publish
  • In Student Edition, Unit 3, students read an excerpt from Alexander Pope’s poem, “The Rape of the Lock.” Once students complete the reading of this text, they then must complete the Create and Discuss section, where they compose a rhymed satirical poem: “Think of a behavior common in our culture that you disapprove of. Write a short rhymed poem satirizing that behavior.” The following directional supports have been put in place:
    • “Before you start composing, generate ideas through a short free write.”
    • “Invent an imaginary incident as an example.”
    • “Create humor through the use of elevated language, rhyme, and juxtaposition.”
    • And, within the sidebar, the following support is listed: “Go to Writing as a Process in the Writing Studio for more help.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the the criteria for materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. (Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.)

The text types students must compose that reflect the standards are short story, personal narrative, explanatory essay, literary analysis, argumentative essay, and research essay.  Students write after each reading or viewing experience. Most writing experiences are elements of the writing process and may be completed as a stand-alone product or part of a larger task or learning experience. Digital application is expected and some writing tasks are specifically designed for digital media. A few of the writing tasks are primarily visual, supporting learning about an element of written and spoken presentation: the graphic representation of an idea. Across the entire school year, students write six process essays that reflect deep understanding of the unit’s essential question and of the genre study within each unit.

End of unit writing tasks include: 

  • Unit 1: Write an literary analysis (W1, W2).
  • Unit 2: Write a research report (W2).
  • Unit 3: Write an explanatory essay (W2).
  • Unit 4: Write an argument (W1).
  • Unit 5: Write a short story (W3).
  • Unit 6: Write a personal essay (W2).

A representative example of how students engage with writing modes can be found in Unit 2:

  • The Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson: write an argument.
  • “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies” by Ron Chernow: write an essay.
  • American Experience: “Alexander Hamilton” (video) by PBS: write an essay.
  • “A Soldier for the Crown” by Charles Johnson: write an argumentative essay.
  • From The Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin: write an essay.
  • “On Being Brought from Africa to America” by Phillis Wheatley and “Sympathy” by Paul Laurence Dunbar: write a prose adaptation.
  • “Letter to John Adams” by Abigail Adams and from Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg: write an essay.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.

Each unit contains multiple opportunities for students to compose and refine research-based and evidence-based writing. Students are offered opportunities to evaluate and support claims both in formal assignments and informal in-class assignments. This can be seen in the Respond section of readings, where students have opportunities in both Research and Create and Present. In some texts, there are also opportunities to research and analyze in Respond to the Essential Question. This asks students to review annotations and notes to develop support for specific questions. The Teacher's Edition provides a road map of the year which is presented in six units. Each text - or sometimes pair of texts - in the unit is followed by both a brief research prompt and a writing assignment informed by the research. The on-demand writing tasks reflect development of skills necessary to complete the end of unit writing task.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, students read the short story “Balboa” by Sabina Murray. After students read the text, they join with a partner and research other explorers of this time from the countries of France, Spain, and Portugal. Then, they summarize why they are remembered. After that task, they find another source that mentions Balboa and find three facts about this explorer that were not written about in the short story. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3: The Natural World. The essential question: What effect do we have on nature, and how does nature affect us?  The end of unit writing assignment, "students will write an explanatory essay about a specific aspect of nature and our relationship to it." Students use notes from the response logs to give clear examples and an explanation of human nature and nature.
  • Students read a public service advertisement from The National Park Service called “Find Your Park.” This resource is a video, providing students the opportunity to analyze media. Students who struggle are encouraged to replay the video, starting and stopping as needed, to clarify understanding. 

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet  the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

Each (written) text includes a Language Conventions section at the beginning of the reading that provides information about a convention relative to the text, and directions for what to look for while reading. Texts often include prompts in the margin notes to annotate and respond to the convention identified. After reading, students extend the learning with direct instruction of the language convention and practice by applying what they have learned. In the Create and Apply section, there is another heading labeled Language Conventions which provides additional instruction to students in that grammatical category as well as a “practice and apply” formative assessment in which students can demonstrate their understanding in that particular category. The Grammar Studio is a digital resources that provides students with additional information and practice about specific components of the grammar standards. Students explore spelling, punctuation, parts of speech, clauses, and more throughout the Studio. Teachers can assign specific lessons for students to study independently or in small groups. Teachers can also assign module assessments to track student progress with the topic/standard.

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, students read the public document, “The Declaration of Independence,” by Thomas Jefferson. Students are presented with the Analyze the Text Structure section where they review structure in general, counterarguments, and syntax to emphasis ideas. Students must complete a chart to “record key ideas in each section of the text” in relation to structure and syntax. 
    • Within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, instructors are presented with the following support: “...text structure is a main way writers of argumentative texts can create tone for their readers and reflect the author’s purpose…. Encourage students to look for places where the text structure intensifies the text or makes it more persuasive.” 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3, students must complete a culminating writing task: Explanatory Essay. The focus of this conventions and grammar exercise is to edit their work within the fourth task of the culminating writing task, Edit, that focuses on semicolon usage: “...He often uses semicolons rather than a comma and conjunction to mimic the way people think or speak and to create a rhythm in his writing. Semicolons also add clarity to writing and can draw attention to specific ideas or closely connect two ideas.” Within this section, students are presented with a chart to “Notice how Louv uses semicolons to connect ideas in Last Child in the Woods.” In the Teacher's Edition, in the sidebar, there are further supports and reminders for students.  Also, there are digital resources for students practicing semicolons in the editing phase of their explanatory essays: “Go to Semicolons and Colons in the Grammar Studio to learn more.” 
  • In Student Edition, Unit 6, students read several selections including: “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner. In the Before reading section students are told,  "A key decision in narrative writing is choosing an effective point of view, the narrative perspective from which events in a story are told. In 'A Rose for Emily,' Faulkner has selected the unusual first-person plural point of view, telling the tale from the townspeople’s perspective , which is reflected by his use of the pronouns we, us, and our. It offers the intimacy of a first-person narrative, but adds a sense of uncertainty because the narrator isn’t one person but a group of people." 
    • "While reading: Annotate: Mark the pronoun that identifies the narrator in paragraph 43. Evaluate: What effect does the point of view chosen by the author have on the telling of the story?"
    • "Apply: Try using first-person plural point of view to create a narrative of your own. Choose a group - a family for example, or a sports team - and describe, in a paragraph, an event or experience from their point of view. Be sure to use the correct pronouns - we, us, our, ours - in your narrative." 

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations for materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. The materials build students’ knowledge across topics and content areas; however, academic vocabulary instruction is not intentionally and coherently sequenced to consistently build students’ vocabulary. Questions and tasks build in rigor and complexity to culminating tasks that demonstrate students’ ability to analyze components of text and topics. Reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills are taught and practiced in an integrated manner.

Criterion 2a - 2h

32/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.

The materials for Grade 11 are organized around topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend texts proficiently. Each of the six units has four Essential Questions that provide a theme for the unit with strands for deeper exploration. All of the text sets in a unit explore the Essential Question for the unit. Within the Analyze and Apply instruction, the mentor texts provide students the opportunity to read closely and examine the genre of writing which is also the end of unit writing task.  Supporting texts in each of the text sets including the Independent Learning sections provide information relative to the essential topic and culminating task. Many of the texts represent multiple and sometimes conflicting perspectives about the essential topic, and include a variety of styles, genres, and media. The lessons in each of these learning modalities include activities that further student comprehension of progressively difficult text. Students’ knowledge based on the specific topic/lens is deepened after every text is analyzed, based on supporting questions. Additionally, students display their knowledge in the completion of end of unit tasks that always include writing and often presenting in mixed media. 

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, the title of the unit is Building a Democracy, which focuses on the revolutionary time period, and there are multiple Essential Questions presented: “What does oppression look like?” “How do we gain our freedom?” “How can we share power and build alliances?” and, “How do we transform our lives?” By the end of Unit 2, students must be able to compose a research report. The mentor text for this unit is Ron Chernow’s history writing “Thomas Jefferson: the Best of Enemies.” Within the Grade 11 textbook, students have been scaffolded from Grades 9 and 10 from one EQ per unit to four EQ’s per unit. Within the Teacher's Edition, there is a break down of each essential question that is referenced throughout the chronologically ordered Grade 11 textbook. For example, within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, under the EQ “How do we gain our freedom?” instructors are offered the following support for students: “Explain the meaning of freedom with students. What freedoms do they have that people in other countries may not? Are there any freedoms they don’t have that they wish they did? What would they be willing to sacrifice to keep the freedoms they have or to gain others?”  Throughout the unit, students read fiction and nonfiction texts that relate to the essential questions and overall topic of the unit--as is referenced by the unit title--Building a Democracy. The culminating writing and speaking/listening task directly relates back to the essential question and mentor text: “This unit focuses on what it takes to build and maintain a democracy, and how this relates to sharing power and building alliances among people and groups. For this writing task, you will write a research report--a type of informational writing grounded securely in careful research of a topic. Reports synthesize information from multiple relevant and credible primary and secondary sources. For an example of a well-written informational text you can use as a mentor text, review the article ‘Thomas Jefferson: the Best of Enemies.’” Students also end Unit 2 with a reflection task that directly requires them to revisit the EQ’s, reflect on their reading throughout the whole unit, and their cumulative writing task. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3, the title of the unit is The Individual and Society, which focuses on literature of the American Renaissance, and there are multiple Essential Questions presented: “In what ways do we seek to remain true to ourselves?” “How do we relate to the world around us?” “What do we secretly fear?” and, “When should we stop and reflect on our lives?” By the end of Unit 3, students must be able to compose an explanatory essay. The mentor text for this unit is an excerpt from Richard Louv’s informational text Last Child in the Woods.  Within the Teacher's Edition, there is a break down of each essential question that is referenced throughout the chronologically ordered Grade 11 textbook. For example, within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, under the EQ “How do we relate to the world around us?” instructors are offered the following support for students: “Encourage students to discuss the ways they interact with others and with their physical environment. Ask them how have those interactions changed over time and why.”  Throughout the unit, students read fiction and nonfiction texts that relate to the essential questions and overall topic of the unit, The Individual and Society. The culminating writing and speaking/listening task directly relates back to the essential question and mentor text: “This collection focuses on understanding ourselves and the relationship among self, society and nature...For an example of a well-written explanatory essay you can use as a mentor text, review the excerpt from Last Child in the Woods.” Students also end Unit 3 with a reflection task that directly requires them to revisit the EQ’s, reflect on their reading throughout the whole unit, and their cumulative writing task. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, the title of the unit is The Quest for Freedom, which focuses on the Civil War and its aftermath, and there are multiple Essential Questions presented: “When is self determination possible?” “What divides us as human beings?” “How do we face defeat?” and, “What is the price of progress?” By the end of Unit 4, students must be able to compose an argument. The mentor text for this unit is Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s argument Declaration of Sentiments.  For example, within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, under the EQ “What is the price of progress?” instructors are offered the following support for students: “Ask students how progress continues to affect the environment. Are the effects of progress always bad? What can be done to limit the adverse effects of progress?”  Throughout the unit, students read fiction and nonfiction texts that relate to the essential questions and overall topic of the unit, The Quest for Freedom. The culminating writing and speaking/listening task directly relates back to the essential question and mentor text: “This unit focuses on the continuing work of bringing freedom and justice to all members of American society...For an example of a well-written argument you can use as a mentor text, review Declaration of Sentiments.” Students also end Unit 4 with a reflection task that directly requires them to revisit the EQ’s, reflect on their reading throughout the whole unit, and their cumulative writing task. 

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet  the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The 11th grade text is split into two, with Units 1-3 in the first text, and Units 4-6 in the second. In both textbooks, the reading material is supported with opportunities for students to develop higher level thinking. This can be found in Notice & Note, as it asks students to analyze tone, examine and analyze author’s purpose, or look at language conventions and how they influence the text. At the beginning of each unit, there are four essential questions for students to consider as they read the selections, and at the close, students compose a cumulative writing task that requires students to address the essential question; students must also reflect on the unit within the Reflect on the Unit section, specifically Reflect on the Essential Question. Within Analyze Text, there are a variety of question types that require students to look not only at the initial structure but to make inferences about word choice, narrative voice, and structure. The questions and prompts in Analyze the Text provide a variety of complexities from DOK 1 through DOK 4. Students experience questions and tasks within the sidebar that require higher order thinking that occur after an annotation or margin note is made; by students directly touching and rereading the text and reflecting, they may then more adequately analyze, compare and contrast, synthesize, critique, and evaluate.  

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, students read two texts: “On Being Brought from Africa to America,” by Phillis Wheatley, and “Sympathy,” by Paul Laurence Dunbar. Students must complete the Collaborate and Present section. Within this section, students must complete four steps: 
    • 1. Determine the important details 
    • 2. Create theme statements: "Decide as a group what the theme or themes are in each poem. You can use a chart to organize your ideas."  
    • 3. Compare themes: "Discuss with your group similarities and differences in the themes of the poems. Listen actively to members of your group, and ask each other to clarify any points that aren’t clear. Doing this will strengthen what your group presents to the class." 
    • 4. Present to the class. 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students read an excerpt from "Walden," an essay by Henry David Thoreau. Within the sidebar of the text, students are required to analyze the author’s craft by annotating first and then analyzing. Specifically, “Annotate: Mark an example of hyperbole in paragraph 5,” and “Analyze: What is Thoreau exaggerating in this sentence? What effect does this exaggeration have on the reader? What does this use of hyperbole reveal about Thoreau’s purpose?”
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 4, students read the "Declaration of Sentiments" and "Speech to the American Equal Rights Association," then: 
    • "Underline examples of repetition and parallelism in paragraphs 4-10. How does the use of these rhetorical devices emphasize important ideas in this section?"
    • "Mark the actions Stanton says she and the other women will take. Why does Stanton include these details in her argument?"
    • "Mark the reasons Truth says women ought to 'have their rights.' What is Sojourner Truth’s main claim? How do these reasons support her argument?"
  • In Student Edition, Unit 4: The Quest for Freedom, students are asked to compare two arguments, “Declaration of Sentiments,” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and “Speech to the American Equal Rights Association,” by Sojourner Truth. These texts are listed in the table of contents and the sidebar to the left reads “Compare Arguments.” Following the reading of both texts, students Compare Arguments to fill in a chart of each speech’s claim, evidence, appeals and call to action. Next students are asked four questions to discuss as a group: 
    • "With your group, review the claims you cited in your chart. In what ways are the claims similar? In what ways are they different?"
    • "Does each writer include enough evidence to support her claim? Are there other types of evidence they could have included to strengthen their arguments? Explain."
    • "Explain whether each argument appeals to logic or to emotion. Cite evidence from the text in your response."
    • "How does each writer strike a balance between arguing against something and arguing for something? How does including a positive call to action affect the argument?"
  • In Student Edition, Unit 6, students are asked to read the letter, “My Dungeon Shook: Letter to My Nephew,” by James Baldwin. Before they begin reading the directions under Setting a Purpose, teachers ask students to see if they can identify the rhetorical devices Baldwin uses to convince his nephew to believe in himself. The section Analyze Rhetorical Devices says “in paragraph 4, mark words that are repeated at least twice” and “what effect does the use of repeated words have on the passage?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Every single unit for the Grade 11 text includes an Essential Question (EQ) that students must track throughout each unit. All EQ’s are represented throughout each text and within all materials and tasks. Also, within every single unit, students must complete a Collaborate & Compare section, which requires students to individually evaluate, analyze, synthesize, etc. both texts, and students do this as they compare and contrast texts as well. Within the Collaborate & Present section, students complete small group work to better synthesize what they have learned across the two texts, while also utilizing previously gained skills throughout the unit and previous units. Within each Collaborate & Compare section, there are the following sections: Compare, Analyze, and Collaborate. Each of these section titles may vary depending upon the texts and text types, such as Compare Themes and Collaborate and Present. Students also build knowledge and integrate ideas across every individual text within the unit; students also usually compare texts further within the culminating task at the close of the unit.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1: Foundations and Encounters, students are asked to read the poem “Upon the Burning of Our House by Anne Bradstreet. After reading the poem, students are asked on page 52 to “read another well-known poem that contains allusions to biblical stories, such as “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost. With a partner, discuss what the allusion adds to the poem and whether the use of allusion was similar or different from Bradstreet’s allusions. In which poem is the writer’s beliefs more evident? 
  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, the Essential Questions are:
    • "Why are we bound to certain places?"
    • "What motivates people to explore the unknown?"
    • "What does it mean to be a stranger in a strange land?" 
    • "What happens when cultures collide?"
  • “Coming of Age in the Dawnland” by Charles C. Mann
    • "Notice & Note: Mark the foreign phrase the author uses in the second sentence of paragraph 12. What clues in the sentence help you figure out the meaning of the phrase? Explain."
    • "Mark a comparison in paragraph 6 of the diets of Patuxet and European citizens. What can you infer about the author’s purpose in including this comparison?"
    • Analyze the Text:
      • "DOK 4: Review instances in which Mann cites evidence from European primary sources from the 17th century. What does word choice and tone in the sources reveal about the opinions of these Europeans?
      • DOK 4: What do you think was Mann’s overall purpose for writing this text? Did he successfully achieve that purpose? Cite reasons and evidence in your answer."
    • Culminating task: "Write a literary analysis explaining how your chosen selection connects with the idea of being a stranger in a strange land or unfamiliar surroundings."
  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, within the Collaborate & Compare section, students read and compare the following texts: “On Being Brought from Africa to America,” by Phillis Wheatley, and “Sympathy” by Paul Laurence Dunbar. Students complete a Get Ready section and Check Your Understanding section for each text. Once completing Dunbar’s poem, however, students complete the following sections: Research, Analyze the Text, Create and Present, and Respond to the Essential Question.  At the beginning of each text, before students are expected to read, there is also a Prepare to Compare section that will set students up for success in providing reminders, helpful tips, and suggestions while reading the text to be successful overall in the collaboration of both readings. 

Once students read both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both individual texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students complete the following Compare Themes task: “With your group, complete the chart with details from both poems.” Students analyze for important details, voice and point of view, and sound devices; all of which can be located within the chart. 

Students will then complete the Analyze the Texts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:

  • “Contrast: Review the notes you made on voice in the chart. In what ways does voice differ between the two poems? Explain.”
  • “Make Inferences: What inference(s) can you make about the attitude toward slavery and oppression expressed by each poem?”
  • “Evaluate: Both poems rhyme. Which poem’s rhyme scheme did you find to be the most engaging? Explain why.”
  • “Interpret: What role does religion or religious faith play in each poem? Cite evidence from the poems in your discussion.”  

Students then complete the Collaborate and Discuss section, where students get in groups and “...continue exploring the ideas in these texts by having a group discussion in which you evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each argument...” Students are given specific steps to follow as support.

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 5: America Transformed, the Essential Questions are:
    • “To what degree do we control our lives?”
    • “ Why do humans cause harm?”
    • “ What are the consequences of change?”
    • “What makes a place unique?”
  • Texts students read include:
    • “To Build a Fire” by Jack London
      • "Notice & Note: Mark the advice the “old-timer on Sulphur Creek” had offered to the man. What did the main character think of the warning initially, and what does he think now?"
      • "Mark the point in paragraph 31 where the narrative shifts from the man’s perspective to the dog’s perspective. One naturalist idea is that humans are simply animals. How do the thoughts of the man and the instincts of the dog suggest that London view both as animals trying to survive?" 
      • Analyze the Text:
        • "DOK 3: What details from the story reflect what you know about realism? How do these details impact your understanding of the story?
        • DOK 4: What moral dilemma does the man face when his second fire fails? How do this dilemma and his subsequent actions influence the plot? How does the setting enhance the seriousness of this scene?" 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, within the Collaborate & Compare section, students read and compare the following texts: “How It Feels to Be Colored Me,” by Zora Neale Hurston, and an excerpt from The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. Students complete a Get Ready section and Check Your Understanding section for each text. Students also complete the following sections for each text after reading: Research, Analyze the Text, Create and Discuss, Respond to the Essential Question, Critical Vocabulary, Vocabulary Strategy: Synonyms and Antonyms, Vocabulary Strategy: Word Families and Language Conventions: Sentence Variety, Language Conventions: Spelling.  At the beginning of each text, before students are expected to read, there is also a Prepare to Compare section that will set students up for success in providing reminders, helpful tips, and suggestions while reading the text to be successful overall in the collaboration of both readings. 

Once students read both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both, individual, texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students must complete the following Compare Arguments task: “In a small group, complete the Venn diagram with similarities and differences between the selections.” 

Students will then complete the Analyze the Texts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:

  • “Compare: what are the differences between Wilkerson’s and Hurston’s descriptions of life in the South for African Americans? What ideas are emphasized in each text?”
  • “Evaluate: Which of these texts would be more effective at convincing people that the treatment of African Americans during this time period was unacceptable? Explain your answer.”
  • “Analyze: How do the Hurston essay and the excerpt from The Warmth of Other Suns address the difficulties of life for African Americans?”
  • “Contrast: Contrast the experience of the man who asked for the receipt...to Hurston’s experience with town passerby… How do these passages relate to the message of each text?” 

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

There are many opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. This can be a combination of reading, writing, speaking and listening. This can be found in Writing Tasks, Respond, Notice and Note, and other exercises throughout each reading assignment. These are meant to build upon the text and allow students to complete culminating tasks. Every unit is comprised of one or multiple Essential Questions. While the titles of the units hint at what each unit consists of, all readings, assignments, tasks, and culminating tasks are centered around the Essential Questions. Also located within the “Unit Tasks” section, is the “Reflect on the Unit” section where the topics, or Essential Questions, are revisited once more. All cumulative tasks are a combination of writing, speaking and listening, reading--or rereading--and all cumulative tasks reinforce all Essential Questions presented throughout the unit.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, Building a Democracy, students are asked to write a research report. The directions go on to explain that students can use the article “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies” in the unit to use as a mentor text. They also ask students to:
    • "provide an introduction that catches the reader’s attention, clearly states the topic, and includes a clear controlling idea or thesis statement. 
    • support main ideas with evidence from sources
    • examine sources you use for credibility, bias and accuracy
    • cite sources of any quoted text and ideas that are not your own
    • organize information in a logical way
    • connect related ideas effectively
    • use appropriate word choice
    • end by summarizing ideas or drawing an overall conclusion"
      • Once students have completed the research report, they are asked to adapt it for presentation to their classmates. They are given a specific rubric along with guided steps to lead the through the presentation. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students are presented with four essential questions, and the unit title “The Quest for Freedom,” which focuses on the Civil War and the aftermath of the Civil War. Based on the Teacher's Edition, instructors must connect to the essential questions: “Read aloud the Essential Questions and the paragraphs that follow them. Open the discussion of each idea by having students respond to the questions that conclude each paragraph.” The EQ’s are as follows:
    • When is self-determination possible?
    • What divides us as human beings?
    • How do we face defeat?
    • What is the price of progress?

Located within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, instructors are supported with additional information regarding the EQ’s. For example: With the Essential Question, “How do we face defeat?” instructors are provided the following support commentary, “Ask volunteers to share instances in which defeat has led them to keep trying and finally succeed. How do they think their earlier defeat changed how they felt when they succeeded?”

    • In Unit 4, students are presented with a culminating writing task where they must compose an argument; they are also responsible for debating an issue. The learning objectives can be found within the Plan section of the Teacher's Edition. For the writing task, the learning objectives are as follows in a bullet-pointed list, but not limited to: “Write an argument identifying current barriers to self-determination; Analyze a text for supporting evidence; Anticipate opposing arguments in a counterargument; Publish writing to share with an audience.” The learning objectives for the speaking task are as follows in a bullet-pointed list, but not limited to: “Adapt writing for a debate; Use effective verbal and nonverbal techniques; Participate in an informal debate; Participate in a discussion using the key terms claim and evidence.” Students will complete the following sections for the writing task: Plan, Develop a Draft, Revise, Edit, and Publish. 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 4: The Quest for Freedom, students are asked to write an argument. The directions also explain that students can use the "Declaration of Sentiments" as a mentor text. More specifically, students are asked to 
    • "make a clear and persuasive claim
    • ask questions that help develop your claim and research the answers by locating relevant sources and synthesizing the information they provide
    • develop the claim with valid reasons and relevant evidence
    • anticipate counterarguments or opposing claims and address them with a well-supported rebuttal or defense
    • establish clear logical relationships among claims, rebuttals, reasons and evidence
    • write a satisfying conclusion that effectively summarizes the claim
    • demonstrates appropriate and precise use of language maintaining a formal tone
    • correctly cite sources you use" 
      • After finishing the argument, students are asked to adapt their argument for a classroom debate. The directions explain that students will listen to other debates, ask questions to understand the ideas and respond appropriately to each other. 

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/language in context.

At the beginning of every unit, students are presented with the Academic Vocabulary section, where students must complete a Word Network chart for five academic terms utilized and practiced throughout the entire unit, with most texts, and reinforced at the close of the unit within the culminating task. Also, before students read almost every single text, students are presented with the Critical Vocabulary section that presents five to ten words that are extremely important to the overall understanding of the text selection; students are required to practice these terms, just as they have with the Academic Vocabulary, by answering questions before and after reading the text. Students also experience a sidebar and footnotes per reading selection where they are further supported with unfamiliar vocabulary within the text being read. Within each unit, students are presented with the Collaborate & Compare section--where they must read two texts and compare--and vocabulary is also presented within this section and the tasks that follow. Another Critical Vocabulary section follows the reading and is used to check for understanding after reading. These tasks may be cloze sentences, using the words another way, answering questions containing the words, or other assessments.  Supports for English Learners in the Teacher’s Edition include notes about especially challenging words, phrases, or concepts that may need further explanation for language learners.

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 1, within the unit introduction, students are presented with academic vocabulary titled Academic Vocabulary. Students practice and learn five words: adapt, coherent, device, displace, and dynamic. The directions are as follows: “Discuss the completed Word Network with a partner, making sure to talk through all of the boxes until you both understand the word, its synonyms, antonyms, and related forms. Then, fill out a Word Network for each of the four remaining words. Use a dictionary or online resource to help you complete the activity.” Within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, instructors are presented with the literal definitions of all five words and further support instructions. Students also reuse these unit vocabulary words within the cumulative task at the close of the unit.
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, students read “Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce. The Critical Vocabulary section presents the following words: summarily, effaced, presaging, malign, poignant, undulations, interminable, ineffable. Students complete a cloze activity for each word. For example: "Maya’s previously_____ joy was quickly _____ when she received the bad news." While reading, these eight words are presented in bold and defined in the margin. After reading, students underline words that are used incorrectly in sentences featuring the target vocabulary. “Carlito was asked to put up paintings on the newly effaced, white walls, which he did summarily - it took him the entire day.” Following this section is a vocabulary strategy: Etymology. The strategy is explained. Students apply the strategy to five other words from the text by explaining the connection between the definition of the word and is etymology using the clues provided.
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 3, students read an excerpt from Walt Whitman’s iconic poem, “Song of Myself.” Within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition, teachers must instruct students to do the following: “...turn to a partner to discuss the following questions. Guide students to include the academic vocabulary words analogy and denote in their responses. Ask volunteers to share their responses with the class.” The questions are as follows: “How does Whitman use analogies throughout the poems?” and “How can you make a distinction between the denotation and connotation of Whitman’s words?”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students are asked to read Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address. In the sidebar under the heading When Students Struggle, the directions ask the teacher to “invite students to pick one or two paragraphs from the speech and note any words they are not sure how to pronounce. Have them look up the words to learn their correct pronunciations. Encourage students to note any silent letters or difficult letter combinations. Then, have students pair up and practice reading the paragraphs aloud to one another. Circulate among the teams to make sure words are being pronounced correctly.” 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 6, students read “Ambush” by Tim O’Brien. The Critical Vocabulary section presents the following words: platoon, grope, silver, ponder, peril, gape. Students demonstrate prior knowledge of the vocabulary words by matching the word with its definition. While reading, these six words are presented in bold and defined in the margin. After reading, students respond to questions featuring the target vocabulary. “She was disappointed to find only a small _____ of cheese.” Following this section is a vocabulary strategy: Connotation and Denotation  After the strategy is explained, students apply the strategy by working with a partner to list five words from the story that have a strongly positive or negative connotation, finding definitions and synonyms for each, and discussing how using synonyms with different connotations would affect the meaning.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. 

Students develop substantive understanding of a central topic and of all texts in each unit through writing which is used throughout each unit to help students learn as well as show students’ understanding of the texts. Writing assignments are scaffolded so students will develop a sense of understanding of what they are reading before they begin writing. Within each text, students will complete smaller writing assignments such as answering questions in the section Analyze the Text or responding to the essential question. At the close of every single text read, students must compose a short response, short essay, or respond to questions regarding the reading; every reading is directly related to an Essential Question (EQ). For Grades 11 - 12, there are a total of four EQs per unit, which allows students more student-choice. After each text, students complete a more in-depth assignment under the heading Create and Discuss, which can have students complete an essay, respond to a writing prompt, or write in preparation for a discussion. There are several learning tools to help students develop more substantial writing habits which are included in the Language Conventions section. Finally, at the end of each unit, students are asked to complete a culminating writing task that synthesizes student understanding. This is a multi-step assignment that is carefully scaffolded for student success. In addition, students can write in response to the reflection questions at the end.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, students must compose a literary analysis. The process writing directions are: “In this unit, you have read works about early explorations in America. Andrés Reséndez based his article 'A Desperate Trek Across America' on Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca’s La relación,’ a first-hand account of the ill-fated Spanish expedition to Florida beginning in 1528. Although Reséndez’s narrative article on Cabeza de Vaca’s account is not a formal analysis, he uses several techniques which you can apply to the literary analysis you are going to create for your next writing task. As you write your literary analysis, you can use the notes from your Response Log, which you filled out after reading the texts in this unit.” The writing prompt is: “Write a literary analysis explaining how your chosen selection connects with the idea of being a stranger in a strange land or unfamiliar surroundings.” Students must follow the guidelines below :
    • “Make a clear thesis statement or claim.”
    • “Give reasons for your claim in a logical order.”
    • “Support your claim with details and evidence from the text.”
    • “Quote passages from the text.”
    • “End your analysis with a strong conclusion.”

There are multiple steps in this process writing assignment:

    • 1. Plan
    • 2. Develop a Draft
    • 3. Revise
    • 4. Edit
    • 5. Publish
  • In Unit 1, the essential questions are as follows: “Why are we bound to certain places?” “What motivates people to explore the unknown?” “What does it mean to be a stranger in a strange land?” “What happens when cultures collide?” Within the final, culminating writing activity, students must then reflect on the EQs, regarding their writing overall and how the texts and their experiences relate to the EQs.
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 2, students are asked to read the short story “A Soldier for the Crown” by Charles Johnson. After reading the text on page 139, students are asked to “write a three to four paragraph opinion essay about whether taking risks is worthwhile. Consider whether some risks are worth taking even if they could have serious consequences.” Additional directions tell students that, “in the first paragraph, introduce your opinion about taking risks. Use details from the text as well as real-life examples to support your view on taking risk. Include your own commentary to support your opinion. Include a strong conclusion that restates your opinion and summarizes your reasons.
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students read an excerpt of Walt Whitman’s iconic poem, “Song of Myself.” At the close of the reading, students must write an argument: “Whitman has been accused of being an ‘egoist,’ or overly focused on himself, by some readers of his poetry. Use your reading of the selections from ‘Song of Myself’ to write a three- or four-paragraph argument either supporting or refuting this claim.” In Unit 3, the essential questions are: “In what ways do we seek to remain true to ourselves?” “How do we relate to the world around us?” “What do we secretly fear?” “When should we stop and reflect on our lives?” 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 4, students are asked to read the Declaration of Sentiments by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. After reading the text, on page 409, students are asked to compare and contrast it with the Declaration of Independence. The directions explain that students should “formulate a thesis statement where you tell which argument you found the most effective. Determine your method of organization. Choose between the block method where you discuss one argument and then the other or the point-by-point method where you organize by discussing each argument one characteristic at a time. Be sure to evaluate the writer’s claims and the evidence that they used to support the claim. Discuss whether the evidence was convincing. Conclude with a statement that confirms your thesis statement and that flows from the evidence you cited.
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5, students are asked to read the article “Why Everyone Must Get Ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution” by Bernard Marr. After reading the article, students are asked to write a one paragraph argument “that the fourth industrial revolution will occur or the idea that the fourth industrial revolution will not occur.” The instructions also ask students to have a clear claim, include evidence as support, address one counterargument, and defend your claim against that counterargument. In Unit 5, the essential questions are as follows: “To what degree do we control our lives?” “Why do humans cause harm?” “What are the consequences of change?” “What makes a place unique?” 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 6, students are asked at the conclusion of the unit to write the culminating writing task of a personal essay. The example explains that students will “synthesize information from one or more of the texts and is connected to one of the Unit Essential Questions.” The instructions then give a series of characteristics that are found in strong personal essays as well as a writing plan, draft development, and explanation on how to revise, edit and publish their work. 

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

After each individual text is presented within each unit, students must complete the “Research” section that requires students to branch outside of the text, within the specific topic posed by the Essential Question. The purpose is for students to further research the elements discussed or introduced within or surrounding specific texts. Also located within the “Research” section are “Connect” and “Extend” tasks that reinforce synthesis and additional research. And, throughout each grade level textbook, at least one culminating activity between the six units requires students to compose an extensive research report.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 1, students are asked to read an excerpt from Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford.

    • After reading the text, on page 64 under the heading “Vocabulary Strategy,” students are asked to think about the archaic vocabulary found in the writing.

    • Then, students are asked to research the meaning of several archaic vocabulary words found in the text using several strategies listed in the text.

    • Students are instructed to “identify each strategy you used and explain how it helped you find the word’s meaning.”

  • In the Teacher's Edition,  Unit 2, students complete the cumulative writing task where they must compose a research report: 
    • “This unit focuses on what it takes to build and maintain a democracy, and how this relates to sharing power and building alliances among people and groups. 
    • For this writing task, you will write a research report...Write a research report exploring how the founding documents, systems, or fundamental principles facilitate shared power and constructive alliances in our democracy.” 
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students are asked to read the poem “In the Season of Change” by Teresa Palomo Acosta.
    • After reading the poem, on page 248, students are given information on another text Acosta has written about an ethnic group called Las Tejanas.
    • They are then asked to “research the meaning [of the terms below] to find out more about these groups. Complete the chart below.”
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, students read Second Inaugural Address, a speech by Abraham Lincoln, and are presented with the “Research” section: "Lincoln had a vision of a reunited and healing nation, but he was assassinated before he could put any policies in place. Research the aftermath of the Civil War. List two events that suggest the nation had begun to heal. Then, list two events that suggest the nations was still fractured.”  Students are given a chart for organizational support. 
    • There is a “Research Tip” provided in the sidebar of the Student Edition: “Some issues pertaining to the Civil War are still divisive today. When researching, try to focus on scholarly sites. These sites generally have urls that end in .org or .edu. 
    • "Be sure to evaluate any source for bias.” 
    • There is also an “Extend” task presented within the “Research” section: “Choose one of the events you listed and research it more in depth. What were some long-term effects of this event? Share with the class what you learn.”
  • In the Student Edition, Unit 5, students are asked to read two texts: an excerpt from The Jungle by Upton Sinclair and “Food Product Design” an excerpt from Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser. 
    • On page 556, students are asked to compare the author’s purpose. Specifically, the directions say “in a small group, complete the table with similarities and differences between the two authors, noting how these characteristics reflect their purposes. 
    • Then, work together to write a paragraph comparing their purposes.” 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, students read “A Rose for Emily” and are presented with the “Research” section: “Miss Emily’s house and life are anchored in the 1870’s. Details about customs, transportation, and social behavior are woven throughout the story. Research what architecture, clothing, and manners were like in this period. Try to find information that matches details in the story. Record what you learn in the chart.”
    • Students are given a chart that indicates the following sections: Architecture, clothing, and manners. 
    • There is a “Research Tip” provided in the sidebar of the Student Edition: “In addition to searching for 1870s architecture, you could also search for Victorian architecture. The Victorian era was the period during which Queen Victoria ruled the British Empire. It lasted from 1837 to 1901 and had a tremendous effect on the United States.” 
    • There is also an “Extend” task presented within the “Research” section: “Print images of the architecture and clothing of the period, and share the images with the class.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 (meet, partially meet, do not meet) the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Students are presented with an “Independent Reading” section within the Grade 11 textbook where they are required to use their understanding of the Notice & Note Signposts to aide in their reading, analysis, and deconstruction of their self selected independent reading texts. Within the “Independent Reading” section of the Teacher's Edition instructors are presented with English Learner Support and “When Students Struggle…” sections, as well as lexile levels to help instructors make a more quantitatively conscientious choice for students that struggle to select texts. Also, at the close of the paper copy of the textbook, students also must complete a “Collaborate and Share” section that requires students to discuss a summary of the text(s), signposts seen throughout, what they enjoyed, and a recommendation to a fellow student or group of students.

In addition, the online portal offers assessments after students have read each individual text that include text-reference based questions at the close of every independent reading; and the assessments include the Notice & Note Signpost skills and skills learned throughout the entire unit. And, each unit is centered around an Essential Question that is part of the design of the “Independent Reading” section of the textbook, as all texts in some way revolve around the concepts of the EQ(s). Also, each unit includes the “Suggested Novel Connection” novel that can be incorporated within the whole class model. Students can read this text independently, and unlike the shorter independent reading selections, the suggested novel is generally less complex than the whole class texts. Most students will be able to tackle this text independently, on their own.

In addition to the response log and annotations, each text in the independent reading collection is followed by an assessment which the teacher can assign. The assessment begins with selected response items and includes a short constructed response prompt as well as an extended response prompt. Questions in the assessment are primarily text-based items.

The texts in the independent reading collection represent a variety of modes, genres, and complexities which provides students the opportunity to build stamina through a volume of independent reading or to build strength by reading stretch-level texts.

In the Student Edition, ED Online, Unit 1 Independent Reading:

    • Memoir: from The Way to Rainy Mountain by N. Scott Momaday
    • Poem: “To My Dear and Loving Husband” by Anne Bradstreet
    • Historical narrative: from La relacion by Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca
    • Historical narrative: from The General History of Virginia by John Smith
    • Poem: “New Orleans” by Joy Harjo
    • Suggested novel: The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, the Essential Questions are: “What does oppression look like?” “How do we gain our freedom?” “How can we share power and build alliances?” “How do we transform our lives?” The independent reading selections are:
    • Speech: Speech to the Virginia Convention by Patrick Henry
    • Public Document: An excerpt from The United States Constitution: The Bill of Rights
    • Aphorisms: An excerpt from Poor Richard’s Almanack by Benjamin Franklin
    • History Writing: “Abigail Adams’ Last Act of Defiance” by Woody Holton
    • Poem: “Democracy” by Langston Hughes
    • Suggested Novel Connection: 1776 by David McCullough
  • In the Student Edition, ED Online, Unit 3 Independent Reading:
    • Essays: from Nature and from Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • Article: “The Pointlessness of Unplugging” by Casey N. Cep
    • Poem: “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • Poem: “Pastoral” by Jennifer Chang
    • Suggested novel: Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, the Essential Questions are: “When is self-determination possible?” “What divides us as human beings?” “How do we face defeat?” “What is the price of progress?” The independent reading selections are:
    • Letter: “Letter to Sarah Ballou” by Sullivan Ballou
    • Diary: An excerpt from A Diary from Dixie by Mary Chesnut
    • Speech: An excerpt from What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? By Frederick Douglass
    • Spirituals: “Go Down, Moses”; “Follow the Drinking Gourd”; “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” 
    • Poem: “Imagine the Angels of Bread” by Martín Espada
    • Suggested Novel Connection: Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • In the Student Edition, ED Online, Unit 5 Independent Reading:
    • Short story: “The Men in the Storm” by Stephen Crane
    • Short story: “A Journey” by Edith Wharton
    • Short story: “ A Wagner Matinee” by Willa Cather
    • Article: “Evidence that Robots Are Winning the Race for American Jobs” by Claire Cain Miller
    • Article: “Healthy Eaters, Strong Minds: What School Gardens Teach Kids” by Paige Pfleger
    • Suggested novel: Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, the Essential Questions are: “How do we deal with rejection or isolation?” “For whom is the American Dream relevant?” “When should personal integrity come before civic duty?” “What would we do if there were no limits?” The independent reading selections are:
    • The following poems: “The Weary Blues” by Langston Hughes; “Song of the Son” by Jean Toomer; “From the Dark Tower” by Countee Cullen; “A Black Man Talks of Reaping” by Arna Bontemps.
    • Essay: “Martin Luther King Jr.: He Showed Us the Way” by César Chávez
    • Essay: “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan
    • Story Story: “Reality Check” by David Brin
    • Article: “YouTube Stars Stress Out, Just Like the Rest of Us” by Neda Ulaby
    • Suggested Novel Connection: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald 

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the expectations for instructional supports and usability indicators.  The materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards, as well as offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Teachers are provided with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, and digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Criterion 3a - 3e

7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criterion for materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. Student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids. The materials include a publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The visual design is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. 

The materials in Grade 11 contain six different units which are all designed around an essential question. The units are titled: Foundations and Encounters, Building a Democracy, The Individual and Society, The Quest for Freedom, America Transformed, and Contemporary Voices and Visions. Each unit contains a section called “Analyze and Apply” with a variety of different text genres to explore the question, a section titled “Collaborate and Compare” which has students comparing two pieces, a selection of independent reading and a culminating writing task. Within each unit there is also one text that is identified as the “Mentor Text” for that unit. At the beginning of each unit in the Teacher's Edition there is a page titled “Instructional Overview and Resources”. On this page there is the suggested pacing for the unit along with the pacing for each text and the culminating writing task. Each unit launches with an explanation of the essential question and a specific quotation that connects to this point as well. After the unit begins, teachers are able to guide their students through each text which is followed by a “Check Your Understanding” activity that asks students multiple choice questions on the text, “Analyze the Text” which asks students more thoughtful questions on the passage, a “Research” section that asks students to research something in connection with the text and “Create and Present” which asks students to apply what they have learned. 

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2: Building a Democracy, students are asked to read the historical writing “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies” by Ron Chernow. Before reading the text, the instructions explain that as students read they should “look for clues that reveal similarities and differences between Jefferson’s and Hamilton’s personalities and beliefs.” After reading the text, students are asked to “Check for Understanding” and then complete five analysis questions. After that, they are asked to research the Federalist Papers (which are mentioned in the writing) and answer three questions about them. Next, they are asked to write an essay that provides a point by point comparison between Hamilton and Jefferson, and then present their findings to the class. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4: The Quest for Freedom, students are asked to read the short story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce. Before reading the text, students are asked to “think about how the story is structured. How does its organization build suspense and keep you interested? How does it reveal the events leading up to the protagonist’s dilemma to the reader?” Then, after reading the text, students are asked three questions under the heading “Check for Understanding” before answering five analysis questions. Then, they are asked to do research on Civil War spies (a topic mentioned in the story) before being asked to write a short story that includes specific details about main character, plot and setting. Then, they are asked to find a partner and share stories along with discussing the elements of the short story that are present. 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 6: Contemporary Voices and Visions, students are asked to read the speech “Speech on the Vietnam War, 1967” by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Before reading the speech, students should “look for connections between King’s opposition to the war and his civil rights work”. After reading the text, students are asked three questions to “Check for Understanding” as well as five analysis questions. Then, they are asked to research the two major laws that were passed to address issues that King discusses in paragraph 3 of his speech. Once completed, students are asked to write an article where they “pretend to be a journalist living in 1967. Write an article that supports or opposes King’s claims.” Then, they are asked to have a group discussion on the effectiveness of King’s speech.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

Within the textbook, there are six units of study. Per unit, the suggested pacing is thirty days, and the days allotted to certain lessons, for pacing, depend upon the text, text type, tasks, etc. required of students. Larger texts such as Shakespearean plays, novels, excerpts from novels, epic poems, and larger short stories are text selections with tasks that instructors will need to spend more time with their students on, and this is reflected in the pacing guide. The “Collaborate & Compare” section, where students are comparing two texts, usually require the longest time period of focus; this is so that each text and task allows students to gain the maximum understanding of content. For Grades 11 and 12, students experience two “Collaborate & Compare” sections where each are three to five days--totaling similarly with Grades 9 and 10. What stays consistent in terms of pacing, regardless, is the Independent Reading and End of Unit sections--two and three days. The Unit Introduction also is consistent totalling one day. The suggested pacing and overview of unit can be found in the “Instructional Overview and Resources” section. 

Within Unit 1, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • “The World on the Turtle’s Back”: 5 days
  • “Balboa”: 3 days
  • “A Desperate Trek Across America”: 5 days
  • “Here Follow Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666”: 2 days
  • From Of Plymouth Plantation / Coming of Age in the Dawnland from 1491: 9 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 2, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • The Declaration of Independence: 3 days
  • “Thomas Jefferson: The Best of Enemies”: 4 days
  • American Experience: “Alexander Hamilton”: 3 days
  • “A Soldier for the Crown” 3 days
  • From The Autobiography: 3 days
  • “On Being Brought from Africa to America” / “Sympathy”: 3 days
  • “Letter to John Adams” / from “Lean In”: 5 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 3, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • From “Song of Myself”: 2 days
  • “My Friend Walt Whitman”: 3 days
  • Poems by Emily Dickinson: 6 days
  • “In the Season of Change”: 2 days
  • From Walden / from Last Child in the Woods: 6 days
  • “The Minister’s Black Veil” / “The Pit and the Pendulum”: 5 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 4, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • Second Inaugural Address: 3 days
  • “To My Old Master”: 4 days
  • Civil War Photographs: 3 days
  • “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”: 3 days
  • “Building the Transcontinental Railroad”: 4 days
  • Declaration of Sentiments / Speech to the American Equal Rights Association: 4 days
  • “Runagate Runagate” / from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: 3 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 5, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • “To Build a Fire”: 4 days
  • “The Lowest Animal”: 3 days
  • “Why Everyone Must Get Ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution”: 4 days
  • “The Story of an Hour”: 3 days
  • “Chicago”: 3 days
  • From The Jungle / “Food Product Design” from Fast Food Nation: 7 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Within Unit 6, the texts are consistent with the following days: 

  • Unit Introduction: 1 day
  • “A Rose for Emily”: 3 days
  • “Mending Wall”: 2 days
  • The Crucible: 5 days
  • The Crucible (production): 1 day
  • “My Dungeon Shook: Letter to My Nephew”: 2 days
  • “Speech on the Vietnam War, 1967”: 3 days
  • “Ambush”: 2 days
  • “The Universe as a Primal Scream”: 2 days
  • “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” / from The Warmth of Other Suns: 2 days
  • “Poetry” / “The Latin Deli: An Ars Poetica”: 2 days
  • Independent Reading: 2 days
  • End of Unit (task): 3 days

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.)

The Grade 11 materials are organized into a consistent structure with careful attention to lesson design. Students move from an introduction to the essential questions and focus elements of the text instructions into a close reading with significant scaffolding and support included, to post-reading instruction to deepen knowledge and develop skills. The textbook, whether print or digital, includes prompts or live links to an accompanying digital resource that provides an opportunity for independent learning or intervention instruction. This can be selected by the student or assigned by the teacher. 

Each unit in grade 11 begins with an introduction to the essential question for the unit, an introduction to the essential academic vocabulary, and a brief reminder to use Notice & Note strategies (learned and practiced in previous grades, but no longer supported with direct instruction) while reading in the unit. Each text is structured similarly. 

  • Get Ready provides students with a Quick Start to connect prior knowledge, instructions for analyzing the mode or genre of text, a preview of critical vocabulary within the text, and an opportunity to focus on language conventions demonstrated within the text. 
  • While reading, students are prompted in the margins to annotate the text including elements of Notice & Note strategies, use of selected conventions, elements of the essential focus of analysis. Critical vocabulary is also defined in the margins. 
  • After reading, students respond to constructed response prompts in the Analyze text section. Research suggests areas to explore further. Create and Present asks students to write and present analysis, research, and synthesis of ideas from across the text or multiple texts. Critical Vocabulary and Language Conventions are also reviewed at the end of the reading.
  • Students with access to the digital texts are prompted to visit the appropriate Studio (i.e. the Vocabulary Studio or Writing Studio) for specific support including explanation of a topic with examples and practice. This may be suggested in a margin note in the printed text or with a live link in the digital text.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

The publisher does provide a Standards Correlation resource that lists each standard and the page number of the student resource or related Studio where the standard is addressed or assessed. The pages indicated include a specific set of questions, tasks, or assessment items. While the user will not see a specific item assigned to a standard (i.e. "RL.12.3 is found on page 12 and page 12 includes directions for annotating text and inference recorded in a reading log"), the items on the page may represent a variety of applications.

However, the standards are not called out specifically in a consistent manner within the Teacher's Edition or Student Edition to make these connections explicit and reinforce the skills they are learning.

The Common Core State Standards document includes each standard and the page where instruction and assessment can be found in the student text. The page number refers to the printed text and does not reflect navigation through the digital text. 

  • RL.12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. 
  • SE: 7, 20, 40, 60, 78, 104, 122, 124, 125, 176, 198, 226, 248, 272, 278, 302, 310, 320, 322, 348, 376, 392, 446, 476, 510, 518, 521, 530, 542, 556, 558, 572, 606, 624, 638, 662, 664, 665, 667, 674, 676, 677, 708, 713, 720, 752, 764, 766, 767
  • On page 40, students are instructed to:
    • "Notice & Note: Highlight details in paragraph 11 that tell what Cabeza de Vaca does to survive the cold night."
    • "Infer: What does the quotation tell you about Cabeza de Vaca?"
  • On page 60, students are instructed to:
    • "Annotate: Highlight the passive-voice verb in item 3 of the list, and underline the active verbs."
    • "Respond: What is the effect of using the passive voice in this item?"

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The Student Edition pages are perforated and have hole punches for easy transfer to a binder or for single use; students are also expected to include margin notes and annotations throughout each text read, thus, there is ample room for margin notes. Elements throughout every unit are color coded for easy identification; for example, Unit Intro (yellow), Collaborate & Compare (orange), Independent Reading (dark orange), Writing Task (purple), each text within each unit is a varying different shade/ color to indicate a change in text. The tasks and activities included follow the color tab along with the paired text. 

Each section is labeled in the same manner, such as “Analyze the Text,” “Research,” and “Create and Discuss”; there is a definite pattern and organization before, during, and after each text read. The Teacher's Edition is a mirror image of the student edition; the main difference between the Teacher's Edition and Student Edition is that the Teacher's Edition includes additional and extensive teacher notes within the sidebar. While this might be confusing at first, acclimation occurs over time and is extremely helpful as instructor can empathize with what students are seeing. 

All response logs are located at the close of the Student Edition for quick access. 

Within the online platform the following supports are included for students: Reading Studio, Writing Studio, Speaking & Listening Studio, Grammar Studio, and Vocabulary Studio. Instructors are also provided with a “Digital Sampler,” which previews formative assessments, engaging instruction progress monitoring & differentiation, summative assessment, and professional support. The digital materials, when providing students with scores immediately, informs instruction. Additionally, where relevant, the print copy of the Student Edition and Teacher's Edition encourage students to visit the website for additional supports such as the studios. The online application also offers complete and full texts including Additional Connections, which are usually novels or novellas for extended reading, not included within the print text. And, the images included are relevant and adhere to the topics that are covered per unit.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criterion for materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The materials contain a Teacher's Edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the Student Edition and in the ancillary materials. The materials contain a Teacher’s Edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary. The Teacher’s Edition explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. The materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies. 

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning..

Within the paper materials delivered to teachers, the following supports are included: 

  • Teacher’s Edition textbook
  • Student Edition textbook
  • Digital Sampler: A New Comprehensive Literacy Solution
  • Assessment Guide
  • Social-Emotional Learning with Learning Mindset
  • Novel & Trade Book Brochure
  • Table of Contents Brochure
  • Research Foundations: Evidence Base
  • Common Core State Standards Correlation

And, while each of the above has a separate booklet to inform instructors on how each is used throughout HMH, within the Teacher's Edition of the textbook, each of the above is touched on, again, at the very front of the textbook. Also consistent within the beginning of the book, instructors are presented with a condensed overview of the online platform.

Instructions within the Teacher's Edition give specific supports on Dr. Kylene Beers and Dr. Robert E. Probst’s text Notice & Note and how to implement the text holistically throughout each textbook via the sections at the beginning of the Teacher’s Edition; “The Perspicacious Reader (And yes, you want to be one)” and “Reading and Writing Across Genres.” Throughout the textbook, Notice & Note strategies are applied explicitly at the beginning of each Notice & Note Reading Model--an identified text that students are required to practice specific Sign Posts with. Also, throughout both the Teacher's Edition and Student Edition, there are annotation supports for the Sign Posts and what students should be identifying while reading.

Within each unit in the paper materials, instructors are given an “Instructional Overview and Resources” section that previews instructional focus, online Ed resources, English Learner support, differentiated instruction, online Ed assessment, and suggested pacing. And, at the beginning of each unit, instructors and students alike are given a unit introduction where the essential question (EQ) is reviewed. During this section, there is a plethora of teacher notes within the Teacher's Edition along the sidebar to assist students to reach maximum understanding and comprehension of the concepts of the unit, including but not limited to the following sidebar sections in the Teacher's Edition: Connect to the Essential Question, Discuss the Quotation, Academic Vocabulary, Respond to the Essential Question, Learning Mindset, and English Learner Support.

Before every text read and deconstructed, instructors are presented with a “Plan” section that usually includes genre elements, learning objectives, a text complexity analysis, online Ed resources, summaries (in English and Spanish), and small group options. Before each text instructors are also presented with Text X-Ray: English Learner Support: "Use the Text X-Ray and the supports and scaffolds in the Teacher’s Edition to help guide students at different proficiency levels through the selection.” Within this section there are supports for listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Also, the Teacher's Edition is an exact replica of the Student Edition with the exception of all additional teacher notes located within the sidebar--for which there are many. For every section that students encounter, there is an equal teacher note that includes instructions or dialogue to students, directions, answers, and higher order thinking prompts/questions to push students further. Within the Teacher's Edition, there are also ample ELL supports as well as challenges for students that master the material the first time. Also, expressed within the answers located in the side bar for corresponding sections in the Student Edition, instructors are presented DOK levels.

Within the Teacher's Edition, like the Student Edition, there are colored tabs at the top of the pages that indicate different sections for easy moving throughout and within the textbook; these match the Student Edition so that instructors may see and empathize with what students are seeing to make instruction and learning more meaningful and seamless.

The sections within each unit within the Teacher's Edition, for individual texts, are as follows:

  • Plan
  • Teach
  • Apply

Lastly, within the online Ed application, the following supports are included for instructors, some of which mirror the student portal access:

  • Professional Learning
  • Speaking & Listening Studio
  • Student Edition
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Current Events
  • Reading Studio
  • Grammar Studio
  • Teacher’s Edition
  • Text Library
  • Media Projects
  • Writing Studio
  • Vocabulary Studio
  • Assessment
  • Intervention, Review, & Extension
  • State-Specific Resources

Also located within the Teacher's Edition of the online portal is the “Data & Reports” tab that includes an assessment report, standards report, and growth report. These tools inform instructors on their next steps with students to inform instruction.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

Instructors are presented with a large body of supporting materials to improve knowledge of the subject. At the beginning of each unit, educators are provided with an “Instructional Overview and Resources”. This outline contains the instructional focus as well as the reading, writing, speaking & listening, vocabulary and language convention targets for each individual text. In addition, they provide online resources, english learner support, differentiated instruction as well as a suggested pacing guide for the texts in this section. Before each text, they provide detailed notes for educator support including how-guides, example scripts for teacher-student interaction, detailed explanations of the content, and the learning objectives. In addition, they explain the genre elements, provide details on the text complexity including qualitative measures and a brief summary of what students will be reading. In more specific detail they are provided a “Text X-Ray for English Learner Support”, this gives educators detailed information on how to introduce the selection, cultural references and how to support students’ at various levels of proficiency. At the end of each unit, students are tasked with writing a “Culminating Writing Task”. Educators are given student exemplars as well as a rubric to help support and assess students’ writing. Throughout each text there are sidebars that provide additional support for teachers, a box that is titled “When Students Struggle” that gives additional insight to educators for any issues that may arrive and even social-emotional support for students which are the boxes labeled “Learning Mindset”. Instructors are presented with a large body of supporting materials to improve knowledge of the subject. At the beginning of each unit, educators are provided with an “Instructional Overview and Resources”. This outline contains the instructional focus as well as the reading, writing, speaking & listening, vocabulary and language convention targets for each individual text. In addition, they provide online resources, English learner support, differentiated instruction as well as a suggested pacing guide for the texts in this section. Before each text, they provide detailed notes for educator support including how-guides, example scripts for teacher-student interaction, detailed explanations of the content, and the learning objectives. In addition, they explain the genre elements, provide details on the text complexity including qualitative measures and a brief summary of what students will be reading. In more specific detail they are provided a Text X-Ray for English Learner Support, this gives educators detailed information on how to introduce the selection, cultural references and how to support students’ at various levels of proficiency. At the end of each unit, students are tasked with writing a Culminating Writing Task. Educators are given student exemplars as well as a rubric to help support and assess students’ writing. Throughout each text there are sidebars that provide additional support for teachers, a box that is titled When Students Struggle that gives additional insight to educators for any issues that may arrive and even social-emotional support for students which are the boxes labeled Learning Mindset

  • In Unit 1, students are asked to read the short story “Balboa” by Sabina Murray. While reading the text, the Teacher's Edition provides a sidebar of supports for educators. For example, they define how the words protrude, provision and discord are used at this point in the text and then provide a specific question prompt for each one. For the word discord they explain that an educator should “ask students to explain why recognizing the Indians’ discord benefited Balboa.”
  • In Unit 3, students are asked to read the short story “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Before reading the text, students are given a brief explanation about the Dark Romantic period. In the sidebar on the right hand side, educators are given additional insight with the directions explaining to “point out to students that so far in this unit, they have read works by writers who celebrate the individual and the imagination (Whitman & Dickinson)...explain that the Dark Romantics delved into the individual as well, exploring the inner lives of their characters and the complex forces that motivate and sometimes warp human behavior. This deeply psychological subject matter is reflected in the literary elements of the stories of Poe and Hawthorne.” 
  • In Unit 5, students are asked to write a short story as a culminating writing prompt. Students are instructed to begin drafting their story and in the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition it says that educators should “give students time to create a plot diagram independently. Have them organize their ideas from brainstorming, but encourage them to add or alter ideas if necessary to create an engaging plot. As students work, monitor their progress by making sure students’ plots include a well-defined conflict, along with complications contributed by the characters’ actions and motivations….” Then, later on in the explanation, it gives suggestions for additional supports for students such as “suggest students write a psychological profile of their main character before beginning their stories. Explain to students that the profile should relay aspects of the character’s background that contribute to his or her personality and behavior.”

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The instructional materials are available in two forms, print and digital. The print version of the Teacher's Edition includes annotated student edition materials that explain the design of the materials, pacing, instructional strategies, assessment, and how the approach fosters a growth mindset and independence. A separate standards alignment document is included as well as an assessment guide.

The digital teacher materials include professional learning modules that introduce all of the materials and allow a teacher to explore the concepts presented in the student materials. These modules are primarily videos with brief activities that allow teachers to learn at their own pace. Through the teacher materials and learning modules, the approach to teaching reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language components are clearly explained and demonstrated.

The Professional Learning Modules include:

  • Introduction: understand the organization of the materials
  • Exploration: dig deeper into the specific expectations and strategies within the units of study
  • Reflection: synthesize information and record learning
  • Application: begin planning classroom use
  • Getting started: demonstrate application

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

The Teacher's Edition begins with an introduction to the consultants who created the program. Each is respected across the English Language Arts/Literacy community and represent widely published strategies based on research and documented success. The materials also include a handbook of the research foundations that underpin the entire program.  Topics supported by the research include student-centered learning; the integration of reading, writing, speaking and listening; data-driven growth demonstrated through a balanced assessment system; and blended professional learning and services that support modeling and coaching of instructional strategies and practices. 

Program consultants are:

Kylene Beers Nationally known lecturer and author on reading and literacy; coauthor with Robert Probst of Disrupting Thinking, Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading, and Reading Nonfiction; former president of the National Council of Teachers of English. Dr. Beers is the author of When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do and coeditor of Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice, as well as articles in the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy. Former editor of Voices from the Middle, she is the 2001 recipient of NCTE’s Richard W. Halle Award, given for outstanding contributions to middle school literacy. She recently served as Senior Reading Researcher at the Comer School Development Program at Yale University as well as Senior Reading Advisor to Secondary Schools for the Reading and Writing Project at Teachers College.

Martha Hougen National consultant, presenter, researcher, and author. Areas of expertise include differentiating instruction for students with learning difficulties, including those with learning disabilities and dyslexia; and teacher and leader preparation improvement. Dr. Hougen has taught at the middle school through graduate levels. In addition to peer-reviewed articles, curricular documents, and presentations, Dr. Hougen has published two college textbooks: The Fundamentals of Literacy Assessment and Instruction Pre-K–6 (2012) and The Fundamentals of Literacy Assessment and Instruction 6–12 (2014). Dr. Hougen has supported Educator Preparation Program reforms while working at the Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at The University of Texas at Austin and at the CEEDAR Center, University of Florida.

Elena Izquierdo Nationally recognized teacher educator and advocate for English language learners. Dr. Izquierdo is a linguist by training, with a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics and Bilingual Education from Georgetown University. She has served on various state and national boards working to close the achievement gaps for bilingual students and English language learners. Dr. Izquierdo is a member of the Hispanic Leadership Council, which supports Hispanic students and educators at both the state and federal levels. She served as Vice President on the Executive Board of the National Association of Bilingual Education and as Publications and Professional Development Chair.

Carol Jago Teacher of English with 32 years of experience at Santa Monica High School in California; author and nationally known lecturer; former president of the National Council of Teachers of English. Ms. Jago currently serves as Associate Director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. With expertise in standards assessment and secondary education, Ms. Jago is the author of numerous books on education, including With Rigor for All and Papers, Papers, Papers, and is active with the California Association of Teachers of English, editing its scholarly journal California English since 1996. Ms. Jago also served on the planning committee for the 2009 NAEP Reading Framework and the 2011 NAEP Writing Framework. 

Erik Palmer Veteran teacher and education consultant based in Denver, Colorado. Author of Well Spoken: Teaching Speaking to All Students and Digitally Speaking: How to Improve Student Presentations. His areas of focus include improving oral communication, promoting technology in classroom presentations, and updating instruction through the use of digital tools. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Colorado.

Robert E. Probst Nationally respected authority on the teaching of literature; Professor Emeritus of English Education at Georgia State University. Dr. Probst’s publications include numerous articles in English Journal and Voices from the Middle, as well as professional texts including (as coeditor) Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice and (as coauthor with Kylene Beers) Disrupting Thinking, Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading, and Reading Nonfiction. He regularly speaks at national and international conventions including those of the International Literacy Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, the Association of Supervisors and Curriculum Developers, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. He has served NCTE in various leadership roles, including the Conference on English Leadership Board of Directors, the Commission on Reading, and column editor of the NCTE journal Voices from the Middle. He is also the 2004 recipient of the CEL Exemplary Leader Award.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Students and teachers are well informed regarding strategies and suggestions in how achievement and progress can be achieved. Based on the systems provided, it is easy for instructors to present the literacy program, suggestions for support, progress, and achievement strategies to parents and other stakeholders.

However while the instructional materials include strategies for informing students about the ELA/literacy program, there is no evidence that this program is shared with other stakeholders, nor are there suggestions for parents and caregivers to support their student’s progress and/or achievement. The program assists students to be autonomous learners and teaches strategies to reach grade level standards. There is progress tracking data available to provide teachers with information to differentiate.

  • The materials provide opportunities for ongoing assessment and data reporting utilizing a Report on Student Growth and Report on Standards Proficiency.
  • Reports in Ed allow teachers to view progress by class, students, assignments, and skill level. Teachers can adjust instruction based on the results in real time.
  • The materials include opportunities for formative assessments, peer reviews, and Reflect on the Unit questions which students can use to monitor their progress.
  • The assessment materials provide data for students and teachers on ongoing progress. Teachers and students have access to growth measurements, unit assessments, and ongoing formative assessments such as daily classwork checks.
  • Teachers have ways to differentiate and adjust a student's instructional path including but not limited to the instructional purpose, standard, or genre. There are also a variety of supports that teachers can assign based on assessment data. These features are accessible in the online features.
  • Students can also track their data and access support material in the online features.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criterion for materials offer teacher resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. The materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized and they provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up. The materials include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. The materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

Each unit includes an abundance of formative assessment opportunities that provide teachers an opportunity to quickly and regularly adjust instruction as needed to continuously support progress. Items represent a variety of forms and measures including on-demand and process writing, comprehension as well as analysis, and various modes and media. 

Formative assessment opportunities within each unit occur daily and include;

  • Check your understanding
  • Selection tests
  • Writing tasks
  • Independent reading
  • Usage data
  • Online essay scoring
  • Teacher observations
  • Research projects 

Unit assessments identify mastery of skills covered during the course of the unit across all literacy strands and occur six times per year - at the end of each unit. 

Adaptive growth measures occur three times per year and allow teachers to gain an understanding of where students are on the learning continuum and identify students in need of intervention or enrichment.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

The Teacher's Edition includes an opportunity to see all standards addressed and assessed with each lesson. Individual standards are not noted for each item; rather, standards are presented en masse in the alignment materials and addressed in an integrated manner within the materials. The standards for Common Core State Standards as well as several states are listed. 

It is possible for teachers to determine which specific standard(s) is assessed but item-level alignment is left to teacher judgement. 

In both the student edition and Teacher's Edition, standards are listed directly under the title of the instructional element for each text. Clicking on the “show details” link provides a detailed list of all standards before opening the link to the activity or materials. 

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up

Unit assessment identify mastery of skills covered during the course of the unit across all literacy strands and occur six times per year - at the end of each unit. 

Adaptive growth measures occur three times per year and allow teachers to gain an understanding of where students are on the learning continuum and identify students in need of intervention or enrichment. Actionable reports are available in the digital resource. Teachers can review student performance then assign specific texts, tasks, or supports such as elements of a Studio as needed. Tutorials in the form of videos are available for professional learning and can be accessed any time.  These tutorials explain how to create and access class and student reports to monitor progress. 

Formative assessment opportunities within each unit occur daily and include;

  • Check your understanding
  • Selection tests
  • Writing tasks
  • Independent reading
  • Usage data
  • Online essay scoring
  • Teacher observations

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Teachers can monitor student progress through formative assessment analysis and provide actionable feedback or select appropriate instructional strategies consistently.  Each text is structured to develop routines such as annotating text for literary elements, Notice & Note strategies, vocabulary development, and instructional focus as introduced before reading. Each unit ends with a writing task, presentation or collaboration, and a reflection on learning across the unit which gives the student a voice in determining next steps based on identified needs or interest. 

Routine structures include analysis of a mentor text as well as reference to the mentor text when assigning the end of unit task. 

Guidance often takes the form of a reminder to reference a topic in a Studio to support learning as needed. For example, after reading “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne, students are assigned an essay. In the margin, students are directed to Writing Narratives in the Writing Studio. Also, there is the Assessment Guide presented to instructors that captures growth measure, diagnostic assessments, interim assessments, and etc. All of these components display measurable tracking per individual student online when students complete assessments through the online platform. Instructors are able to check student progress, view diagnostic skills-based assessment results, view the student growth report, and diagnostic screening(s).

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Each unit includes a selection of texts that students can read independently if they choose. Each text provides students an opportunity to further explore the essential question and include a variety of genres that inspire motivation to read and various complexities to build stamina through a volume of reading. 

The independent reading section of each unit in the student edition begins with a review of the essential question for the unit, a reminder of Notice & Note signposts and how they applied to texts in the whole-class study, and a live link to the reading studio for additional supports. After the independent reading texts, students can reflect on the texts and apply their learning to the end of unit writing task. 

Each unit also includes a suggested novel that is related to the essential question. Students continue to apply reading strategies learned in class to support analysis of text recorded in the reading journal. Teachers can also collect assessment data from digital assessments assigned to students as they read.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criterion for materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards. The materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. The materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards. The materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.  

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

The teacher’s edition includes a plan or roadmap for the unit at the beginning of each unit. The plan includes the instructional focus aligned to grade-level standards, resources to support whole class instruction, specific resources to support English learners, and strategies for differentiated instruction. This includes resources to support students who struggle and resources to provide further challenge. 

Also included within each unit, throughout the unit, strategies and sections such as Learning Mindset, English Learner Support, Plan, Text X-Ray: English Learner Support, Notice & Note, To Challenge Students, Applying Academic Vocabulary, When Students Struggle, etc. These strategies and sections assist instructors in helping students reach or exceed the grade-level standards. Most of these sections and strategies are located within the side-bar of the Teacher's Edition; however, there are supports located directly within the Student Edition for student assistance. These supports include online links to the online platform, for example: “Go to the Grammar Studio for more on noun clauses,” “go to the Vocabulary Studio for more on patterns of word changes,” “Research Tip,” “Academic Vocabulary,” among other helpful tips and strategies.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

All students are expected to engage with grade-level texts. The text sets for whole class instruction and for independent reading include a range of complexities across the grade band with some just below and some just above. Strategies to scaffold complex text, access grade level learning targets, and support specific cultural references or contexts are provided in the teacher resource materials in print and online. The “Text X-Ray: English Learner Support” section, in the teacher materials, include suggestions for how to introduce the primary content or literary topics in the text, cultural references explained, and strategies for listening, speaking, reading, and writing relative to the text. During the reading of the text, a box labeled “When Students Struggle…” provide detailed explanations of intricacies within the text and how to provide support for understanding. Suggestions for assigning specific tutorials in one of the Studios is noted as appropriate. Margin notes accompany the text to provide “English Learner Support” to identify specific needs or topics relative to identified sections of text.

Also, located within the Teacher's Edition, before every text, there is a summary section with both English and Spanish summary translations.

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet  the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Each unit plan includes suggestions for periodically challenging students, and Challenge tasks build on whole-class activities to extend or deepen learning. However, these opportunities are in less than half of the texts with no opportunities in the others. Some of these tasks require students to do additional work rather than a differentiated task. For example, students may extend a research topic, make inferences across multiple texts, hold a staged reading, write a memoir, compare poems, identify allusions, or sketch and analyze the Globe Theater. Students can also select more challenging texts for independent reading, but the focus is more on adding tasks than growing literacy.

Also, within and throughout each unit there are sections such as “To Challenge Students…”; goal setting sections such as “Learning Mindset” to challenge students; open ended response questions within the “Respond to the Essential Question” section; and, extension tasks/questions within Research sections.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

At the beginning of each unit, specific strategies for small-group options are provided with detailed support for at least two methods of grouping students during class instruction. Also, throughout every unit, instructors are presented with various whole class questions located within the sidebar of the Teacher's Edition; there are also questions and tasks located within the sidebar of the Student Edition, that are up to instructor discretion for how they may be answered--individually, in pairs, groups, or whole class--along with the annotation models and tasks throughout each reading. Students may be paired or placed in groups to read. 

  • Within the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, students read The Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson. The Small-Group options are as follows:
    • “Activating Academic Vocabulary”: Students are given academic vocabulary, and they must use their words to discuss the new section of text in pairs. 
    • “Three-Minute Review”: The instructor will pause during reading or lecture; students will then take three minutes to “work independently to reread material, review class notes, and write clarifying questions...then hold a brief discussion and clarification.”
  • Within the Teacher's Edition, Unit 5, students read “To Build a Fire,” written by Jack London. The Small-Group options are as follows:
    • “Double-Entry Journal”: Students create a shared response where they take notes and quotes from the text.
    • “Reciprocal Teaching”: Students are provided sentence stems, and using the stems, must compose three to five questions regarding the selection. Students then participate in a discussion where they must ask their questions without duplicating another’s response.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criterion for materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms. Digital materials are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers, “platform neutral,” follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations and the materials can be easily customized for local use. The materials do not include a collaboration platform.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The digital materials included with the textbooks are web-based compatible programs. They are able to be accessed across multiple browsers including Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Edge. They are able to be opened with both Apple and PC products as well as smart phones of both kinds including Microsoft, Apple and Google operating systems. In addition, they follow a universal programming style and both students and teachers should be able to access them using tablets including Apple iPads and Microsoft Surfaces, mobile devices like an iPhone or Samsung Galaxy or computers such as a Chromebook or iMac. All digital material including documents, slide decks and videos were accessible on desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile devices. The digital format is clear and easy to read. The navigation on all devices were smooth and straightforward.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. 

EDonline substitutes digital texts for print matter with a formatting that appears much like the bound textbooks. Text sets are augmented by exclusively digital texts such as audio or video recordings. Available in the student edition, these digital texts place control of viewing and listening in the student’s hands, modifying traditional classroom use. Students can replay as much as needed to focus on evidence in the digital text and analyze craft as well as use in assigned tasks. This may be particularly helpful for language learners and struggling students. 

Technology reaches redefinition by providing immediate flexibility of text and task selection; asking students to do digital tasks like creating a blog, video, or podcast; allowing students to annotate text while reading then collecting those notes for review; providing a variety of formative assessments that teachers can track for evidence of need for intervention or extension; and linking Studio resources to points in the text or tasks that may benefit from a tutorial or review. 

EDonline allows teachers the opportunity to assign selected texts or tasks in response to assessment data. Teachers can assign whole or parts of Studio resources as they recognize need.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. 

The digital materials essentially include that which the textbooks include; however, there are more materials online that support extension and remediation. The online materials assist instructors in personalizing learning for students as the online platform creates a baseline for progress monitoring regarding everything from analysis to the cumulative writing task. And, “Into Literature gives you the ability to curate a unique learning path for each student through ongoing assessments that yield actionable data...” 

Also, included within the Digital Sampler booklet for instructors, the section “Engaging Elements Captivate Student Interest” details the Stream to Start videos that assist in personalized learning as students are captivated before reading. Also, this section of the booklet details specified and individual guidance on how to close read within the online portal, specific videos for students that struggle with certain standards/skills, and interactive graphic organizers to students that need a challenge or additional support (included but not limited to Word Networks and Response Logs). And, students don’t need Wifi to access the materials: “...download when you’re online and access what you need when you’re offline. Work offline and then upload when you’re back online.” The materials are accommodating to students even if they do not have access to internet in their homes.

Additionally, “Interactive peer and teacher feedback loops dramatically improve student performance. An additional 55+ assignable, interactive writing lessons and Level Up tutorials that focus on specific skills are available in the Writing Studio.” For example, “Online scoring allows students to receive quick feedback before submitting their work and gives teachers the option of a supported grading process.” 

And, while there are a plethora of other ways students can personalize their learning with aid of the instructor, these are also worth mentioning: 

  • “Online Independent Reading Gives Students Voice and Choice”
  • Extensive Digital Library
  • “Give Students Ownership to Manage Their Learning”
    • Students are able to “...quickly access texts and resources...track their progress throughout the year...monitor upcoming due dates and let the teacher know when their work is ready for feedback.”
  • “Quickly Differentiate Using Real-Time Data”
  • “Assign New Learning Opportunities with Studio Educational Resources”
    • Reading Studio
    • Writing Studio
    • Speaking & Listening Studio
    • Grammar Studio
    • Vocabulary Studio
  • “Self-Guided Lessons Allow for Remediation, Support, and Extension”

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Into Literature textbook series is designed for instructor and student choice. All online materials as well as paper materials are easily customizable for district, administrative, instructor, and student use. 

Within the Research Foundations: Evidence Base booklet: “For teachers, Into Literature provides a flexible design, including expanded access to rich and varied digital resources for each literacy strand.”

In the Digital Sampler Booklet, in the section titled, “The Ultimate Flexibility to Teach Your Way” instructors may “Use Into Literature’s instructional path or create [their] own unique units with intuitive online planning tools.” Some pathways instructors can use to inform their decisions on what and how to use the curriculum are “Teach by Theme,” “Teach by Instructional Purpose,” “Teach by Standard,” and “Teach by Genre”--all of which can be found with these titles in the online platform. Instructors can also choose selections, customize instructions (especially in the online platform as they can build exams and tasks), and assign activities.

The textbook itself is easily customizable as in the Student Edition, pages are perforated and expected to be written upon by students; also, instructors may utilize what they choose from the units as additional material can be found in the online platform: “Interactive peer and teacher feedback loops dramatically improve student performance. An additional 55+ assignable, interactive writing lessons and Level Up tutorials that focus on specific skills are available in the Writing Studio.”

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and students to collaborate with each other. Collaboration within the curriculum only occurs in person within groups; there is no utilization of online platforms or technologies that promote teacher or students collaboration.

  • There is no evidence of any online collaboration between students in any format whether that be discussion, editing and reviewing, websites, or webinars.
  • Although there are digital resources such as the Speaking & Listening Studio with self-paced lessons for students, there is not a digital discussion board or any evidence of a website to host student to student or student to teacher collaboration.
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Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 11/07/2019

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
HMH Into Literature Grade 11 Student Print/Digital Package 978-1-328-60750-8 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2020
HMH Into Literature Grade 11 Teacher Print/Digital Package 978-1-328-60806-2 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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