Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials for Grade 11 do not meet the expectations of alignment to standards. The texts and tasks partially meet the demands to support students' development of literacy skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. While materials do include texts that are organized to support students' understanding of topics and/or themes, the materials only partially meet the expectations of comprehensive support for writing, vocabulary development, and text-based questions and tasks that build critical thinking and grow knowledge.

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
25
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
14
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Grade 11 partially meet the expectation of Gateway 1. Most of the texts are at the right level of quality and at the appropriate level for students to grow their literacy skills. The materials include a range of texts that are appropriately rigorous from a quantitative lens, although the qualitative factors vary. The placement of materials for students to get exposure to increasingly rigorous materials of the course of the year is inconsistent, and the teacher may need to supplement to attend to students' access to robust range and depth of reading. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, and culminating tasks represent the demands of the standards. Speaking and listening work is limited and does not include comprehensive supports for teachers to employ practice with academic vocabulary and discussion work over the course of the school year

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
12/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 11 partially meet the expectation that texts are at the right level of quality and at the appropriate level for students to grow their literacy skills. The materials include a range of texts that are appropriately rigorous from a quantitative lens, although the qualitative factors vary. The placement of materials for students to get exposure to increasingly rigorous materials of the course of the year is inconsistent, and the teacher may need to supplement to attend to students' access to robust range and depth of reading.

NOTE: Indicator 1b is non-scored and provides information about text types and genres in the program.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The texts are high quality and worthy of students’ attention due to literary richness, rhetorical technique, and/or topical relevance. A large number or texts come from authors that are well-known, award-winning or iconic. A number of undisputed classic texts are present, including works for male, female, and multicultural authors. There is sufficient effort to include texts on topics of current interest or select older texts that have a potential to resonate with contemporary students.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller is rich in theme, character, and plot that invites careful reading and analysis. An article on McCarthyism follows the play, inviting further analysis and study of the play’s symbolic commentary on political events of the 1950s.
  • In Unit 2, The Excerpt from “Walden,” by Henry David Thoreau is a multilayered text that requires careful reading to decipher multiple symbolic meanings and is written by an iconic author.
  • In Unit 3, “The Gettysburg Address” by Abraham Lincoln is a historical work that shines light on a tumultuous time period. This speech is worthy of students time and attention.
  • In Unit 5, “Thoughts on the African-American Novel” by Toni Morrison presents a complex argument situating literary production and reception in a range of historical and cultural contexts, a purpose that will require careful reading and rereading for Grade 11 students and is written by an award winning author.
  • In Unit 5, “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner presents complex language and themes inviting careful reading, a macabre theme that will interest many students, and is written by an iconic author.
  • In Unit 6, Excerpt from “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.” is a text rich in ideas and language warranting careful reading and analysis, Invites interest of students concerned about civil rights and social cause, and is written by a well-known speaker.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level and consider a range of student interests. Over the course of a year, students are exposed to a variety of text types including, short stories, poems, drama, essays, and speeches. The materials provide a Table of Contents per unit that lists the text titles, authors, and types of pieces.

Examples of the distribution of text types to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2: American Romanticism
    • Short Story: “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Irving and “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • Poetry: “Old Ironsides” by Oliver Wendell Holmes and “The First Snowfall” by James Russell Lowell
    • Essay: excerpt from Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson and an excerpt from Walden Henry by David Thoreau
    • Non-Fiction: excerpt from Woman in the Nineteenth Century by Margaret Fuller
    • Parody: “What Troubled Poe’s Raven” by John Bennett
    • Novel Excerpt: from The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Unit 4: Regionalism and Naturalism
    • Memoir: from Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain
    • Short Story: “The Outcasts of Poker Flats” by Bret Harte
    • “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin and “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
    • Newspaper Article: “More of the Filibusters Safe” The New York Press
    • Cartoon: Calvin and Hobbes by Watterson
    • Journal Article: “Why I Wrote ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’” byCharlotte Perkins Gilman
  • Unit 6: Contemporary Literature
    • Drama: excerpt from A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
    • Memoir: from Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi
    • Letter: excerpt from “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • Interview: “Necessary to Protect Ourselves” by Malcolm X
    • Essay: “Martin Luther King Jr.: He Showed Us the Way” by Cesar Chavez , “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan, and “Straw Into Gold: The Metamorphosis of the Everyday” by Cisneros
    • Poetry:“Revolutionary Dreams” by Nikki Giovanni and “The Man in the Moon” by Billy Collins

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

The materials include a variety of texts that are appropriate for 11th grade students and range in complexity. Texts that are moderate in complexity are accompanied by tasks that increase the level of rigor by demanding higher order thinking skills and analyses. Texts that are exceedingly complex are accompanied by a variety of scaffolds such as graphic organizers and discussion questions. Texts range in quantitative measure from Lexile 710 to Lexile 1620, as well as challenging poetry from Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Texts that fall below the Grade 11 quantitative band include qualitative features or reader and task considerations that make them appropriate for Grade 11 students. For example:

  • In Unit 1, students read “Coyote and the Buffalo” retold by Mourning Dove which measures at Lexile 710. The text includes words from the Salish language with definitions included in the footnotes of the text. Students analyze the text and interpet the moral of the story. Students are also asked to draw conclusions about the Okanogan society based on the folk literature.
  • In Unit 4, students read the short story, “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman which measure at Lexile 930. Qualitative features make this text appropriate for Grade 11 students. Qualitatively, the text is complex based on its extensive use of symbolism, formal language, complex sentence structures, theme, and its social context.

Texts that rise above or meet the Grade 11 quantitative band include qualitative features or reader and task considerations that make them appropriate for Grade 11 students. For example:

  • In Unit 5, students read T.S. Eliot’s poem, “The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock” which is a challenging poem. The poem meets grade level complexities due to allusions, and themes of alienation and repression, which might pose challenges to students. Its modernist form and experimental style can also be challenging for students to grasp. The materials offer students “Language Coach” and Stream of Consciousness supports in the margin notes.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)There is a clear variety and appropriate leveling of texts. The complexity of texts varies from passage to passage with each unit representing a range of text types and complexity levels.

Students are given opportunities to build literacy skills. Over the course of the year, students engage with texts that vary in rigor and complexity. Many texts are accompanied with guidance and tasks that build students’ skills over the course of the school year, and provide opportunities for growth. Questions placed alongside the text and after the text prompt students to identify and comment on the effect or meaning of focus text features. However, the level of questions does not increase significantly over the course of the year, and tasks are scaffolded and passages labeled consistently across the year. Students do not become prepared to execute these skills on their own.

Some examples of how students engage with differently rigorous activities and texts over the course of the school year include the following:

  • Unit 2: American Romanticism: The texts and tasks in this unit focus on text analysis of poetry, essays, foundational works of American literature, speeches, short stories and an image collection. There is a clear progression of complexity throughout the unit with the most challenging texts and tasks found at the end of the unit. The unit begins with the short story, “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving which has a lexile of 1120. Students analyze imagery and provide examples of satire with this text. The rigor of texts (many of which do not have lexile levels such as poems and image collections) are accompanied by tasks that increase in complexity. For example, later in Unit 2, after reading “Walden” by Henry David Thoreau, students are to “Review the philosophical ideas you summarized as you read. Choose two ideas - Thoreau’s view of the poor, for example, or the way he feels about civilized life. Explain whether or not you think the ideas you chose have merit, citing reasons for your opinions.” Next students are to compare two texts. In “Thoreau Still Beckons, if I Can Take My Laptop” (page 389), Cynthia G. La Ferle argues that “making choices is so much more difficult in a culture fueled by sheer busyness and commercialism. There are few places...where one can escape. Do you agree that it would be more challenging for a modern American to live as Thoreau did? Explain why or why not using details from both texts to support your opinion.”
  • Unit 7: The Power of Research: In Unit 7 students will take the questions they explored in previous units to a new challenging level through the task of completing formal research. Students will read informational texts about research and apply the skills practiced in previous units in a longer, sustained activity. Students will choose a topic, find relevant sources, evaluate sources, take notes avoiding plagiarism, verify information and follow the writing process when writing their research.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The materials provide text complexity analysis for texts throughout the materials. Lexiles, Fry, and Dale-Chall readability are provided in the unit overview at the beginning of each unit. There are no qualitative measurements, nor are any reader and task considerations included to create a complete text analysis. There is also no rationale included for the purpose or placement in each grade level. Examples include:

Unit 2: Celebrating the Individual: American Romanticism

  • “The Devil and Tom Walker” Lexile 1120, Fry 9, Dale-Chall 7.3 (\
  • from “Self-Reliance” and from “Nature” Lexile 1010/980, Fry 10/7, Dale-Chall 7.0/6.8
  • from “Walden” Lexile 1280, Fry 12, Dale-Chall 6.5
  • “The Minister’s Black Veil” Lexile 1260, Fry 10, Dale-Chall 7.8

Unit 3: An Age of Transition: From Romanticism to Realism

  • from “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave” Lexile 970, Fry 7, Dale-Chall 6.1
  • from “Incidents in the Life of the Slave Girl” Lexile 810, Fry 6, Dale-Chall 5.9
  • “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” Lexile 1000, Fry 9, Dale-Chall 6.9

Unit 5: A Changing Awareness: The Harlem Renaissance and Modernism

  • “How it Feels to be Colored Me” Lexile 920, Fry 11, Dale-Chall 6.4
  • “Photo essay: The Grapes of Wrath” Lexile 1200, Fry College, Dale-Chall 7.6
  • “A New Kind of War” Lexile 990, Fry 9, Dale-Chall 5.7
  • “A Book of Great Short Stories” Lexile 1030, Fry 9, Dale-Chall 7.0

Unit 7: Investigation and Discovery: The Power of Research

  • “Why Soldiers Won’t Talk/The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner” Lexile 940, Fry 9, Dale-Chall 6.4
  • “From Stride Toward Freedom” Lexile 1060, Fry College, Dale-Chall 8.8
  • “From Coming of Age in Mississippi” Lexile 880, Fry 10, Dale-Chall 5.9
  • “Census Data: The US Population” Lexile 1150, Dale-Chall 7.8 (No Fry readability)
  • “Straw into Gold: The Metamorphosis of the Everyday” Lexile 920, Fry College, Dale-Chall 6.5

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Students will read a range of texts and a variety of genres but reviewers noted that additional guidance may be needed to help students develop stamina for long complex texts. Texts (in the print edition) are generally short works, or very short excepts (1-4 pages) of longer works, meaning students do not have ample opportunities to engage in reading large volumes.

Volume: While materials offer support via NovelWise, “a Website that helps students choose a novel or other book-length work to read.” There is no tracking or monitoring of independent reading in these materials and lack explicit instructions on implementation. Students are provided a variety of supports through the NovelWise site, including “study guides, reading strategies and literary elements instruction, presentations to introduce classic novels, and project ideas.” Some of the suggested independent reading texts are as follows:

Unit 2: People Watching

  • Into the Wild by John Krakauer
  • The Chosen by Chaim Potok
  • The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  • Finding Fish by Antwone Fisher

Unit 8: A Way with Words

  • Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
  • Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  • Funny Letters from Famous People by Charles Osgood

The materials contain a range of texts, including by not limited to:

  • Poetry
  • Fable
  • Editorials
  • Essays
  • Speeches
  • Short Stories
  • Magazine Article
  • Film Clip
  • Autobiography
  • Drama

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
13/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials partially meet the expectations of the criteria around alignment to the standards. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, and culminating tasks represent the demands of the standards. Speaking and listening work is limited and does not include comprehensive supports for teachers to employ practice with academic vocabulary and discussion work over the course of the school year. Writing lessons are many and include connections to the types and on-demand requirements put forth by the standards, and the materials include support for teaching revision. The grammar instruction included partially prepares students for the needs of the grade level.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text; this may include work with mentor texts as well).

The materials include a range of text dependent questions and tasks throughout each unit. Questions and tasks cover a wide continuum of standards and strategies. Each unit offers many opportunities for students to engage in evidence-based discussions and activities. Most of the questions and tasks are text-dependent and ask students to engage with the text directly. Students are given opportunities to use evidence pulled directly from the text as well as make inferences.

Before each text, students are directed to take notes in the Reader/Writer Notebook as they read. Most questions in the margins of the text require students to note and interpret grammatical, literary, and rhetorical features. Each excerpt has close read questions which are on the page next to the text itself for students and teachers to reference directly. Key passages are outlined in a red box with text-dependent questions for the teacher. At the end of each selection or compared groups of selections there is a section of three to five questions sub-headed Text Analysis Questions. These questions guide students directly back to the text. Questions and tasks cover comprehension, summarizing, clarifying, drawing conclusions, making inferences evaluating, synthesizing ideas, and analyzing and identifying literary devices.

Students engage with and draw evidence from the texts through Tiered Discussion Prompts, After Reading Questions, Analyzing Visuals and Reading-Writing Connection questions and tasks. Examples of these include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students study Early American Writing, students are asked to:
    • Summarize: What was life like in the Americas prior to the arrival if the Europeans?
    • Analyze: How do the William Wood and William Bradford quotations illustrate the clash of cultures that occurred when Europeans and Native Americans first met?
    • Evaluate: Were Wood and Bradford fair in their assessment of the landscape and population of North America?
  • In Unit 3, students read selected poetry by Emily Dickinson and answer, “What essential truths about death and dying does Dickinson convey in the following poems? Cite specific details.”
  • In Unit 4, students are asked to write down unfamiliar words from the frontier dialect of Mark Twain’s “The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.” Questions beside the texts ask students to note features of the tall tale genre in the text.
  • In Unit 5, questions accompanying Zora Neale Hurston’s, “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” ask students to state the main ideas of designated passages, reread passages and analyze rhetorical technique, and observe how grammar and style serve to highlight particular details.
  • In Unit 5, students read the text, “My City” and analyze the visuals by describing, “What details in this photo correspond to the poet’s vision of the city?”
  • In Unit 6, after reading “Stride Toward Freedom” students:
    • Clarify: In King’s view, what three qualities must a movement have in order to achieve the goal of integration?
    • Synthesize Sources: Review the chart you created as you read both texts. What are the main differences between the two leaders? What beliefs, if any, do they have in common? Be specific with your answers.
    • Analyze Genres: Think about the two works you just read. How do these two genres allow people to express their opinions in similar and different ways?
    • Biographical Context: Reread the autobiographies of of King and Malcolm X. What aspects of their personal histories may have influenced their different approaches to fighting racial injustice?

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks that build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts and integrates strategies to help students build literacy skills. The materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and activities which build to a variety of tasks, including, but not limited to: short, on-demand written responses, longer (processed) essays, storyboards, re-writing in the author’s style, and movie scripts. These tasks and activities often ask students to compare/contrast works that have been presented as sets or series or synthesize the meaning, themes, or central ideas of the text sets.

Additionally, tasks often connect to a non-traditional text form such as a news report or movie scene.

At the end of majority of the texts or text sets, a culminating activity is provided. Each of the culminating activities within the unit lead to a larger culminating task for the unit. At the end of each unit there is a Writing Workshop, including a Timed Writing Practice, along with a Multiple Choice Assessment Practice. Also at the end of each collection of texts within an Era, there is a Wrap-Up Writing where students are asked to evaluate or analyze the texts from the time period.While these culminating activities seem to build off of each other, the standards associated with the writing and speaking activities are not well-supported throughout the entire unit; either through other writing tasks nor the reading questions aligned with core passages.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, after reading about the Native American Experiences, students complete a Wrap Up Activity that asks students to look back through the selections in the section and describe an early Native American value that many people still hold today. During the writing workshop students write a persuasive essay. The Teacher Edition states, “You have seen how some of our country’s founding fathers crafted arguments to support their claims, or positions, and to persuade readers to think a certain way. In this workshop, you will have the opportunity to assert a claim by writing a persuasive essay.” Writing Task: Write a persuasive essay that argues a strong claim on an issue. Support your claim with reasons and evidence that will convince your audience to think or act in a certain way toward an issue that interests you.Students are provided “idea starters” as well as “the essentials”: common purposes, audiences, and formats.
  • In Unit 3, the Writing Workshop states, “In this unit, you discovered the events, figures, and literature of the Civil War. The World Wide Web is home to discussions about the era and about the significant issues of today. Now, you will write about one legacy of your era in an online feature article-- an informative piece of writing on a topic or trend.” Writing task: Inform your audience by writing an online feature article that answers this research question: What is one topic, trend, or person, or phenomenon that has defined your time? Choose a topic that people will still read and talk about 100 years from now. Students are provided “idea starters” as well as “the essentials”: common purposes, audiences, and formats. During the unit students study about the Civil war and practice informational writing.
  • In Unit 4, students are asked to create a chart before reading Jack London’s “The Law of Life,” in which they are directed to record clues that help to reveal theme. The headings in the chart (“conflict,” “character,” “setting,” and so on) correspond to questions presented before the story (“What is the resolution of the primary conflict?” “What traits to the main characters display?” “What about the physical or cultural setting significant?”) A completed chart would supply evidence and thinking for some culminating questions: “Look back at the details about narrative elements you recorded in your chart as you read. Taken together, what do these details suggest about the fate of Koskoosh and all humans?” And “What comment on the human condition does Londom make through Koskoosh’s last thoughts?” Text-specific questions in the margin of the text also prompt thematic analysis that applies to the tasks in the culminating questions: “Reread lines 57-58. In one or two sentences, summarize the theme expressed here about the relationship between nature and the individual.” A culminating task at the end of the section “The Rise of Naturalism” similarly calls on students to draw examples and ideas from marginal questions in preceding texts. The activity presents five quotes that encapsulate the “central assumption of naturalism,” and then directs students to “Choose the quotation on this page that you think best represents a key theme of ‘The Open Boat’ or ‘The Law of Life. Write an essay defending your choice, using details from the story as support.”

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Within the teacher’s edition of the text, a focusing question is posed, which is general and broad. The “big” question is used direct students to major themes. This question is repeated with supporting discussion questions throughout the sets of texts. Additionally teachers are provided “Tiered Discussion Prompts” that are text specific and connect to the big question. For example, In Unit 2 the “big/focus” question on page 229 states, “When is it time to take action?” “With a partner, think of examples from sports, politics, or everyday life when the time was right for decisive action. Then for one example, analyze why it was the right action at the right time.”

Some evidence of developing discussion protocols is present, it is not frequent throughout the teacher’s guide. Tiered Discussion Prompts, accompanying texts appear in the teacher edition which provide some protocols for discussion. There is limited guidance for small-group or peer-to-peer discussions or student-led conversation. The Speaking and Listening Handbook placed after the main units outlines basic principles and strategies for discussing and listening. For example, in Unit 5, page 881 students are asked, “Describe a dream or goal that you have that has not yet been realized. How do you feel about the situation and why? What is the poem’s main message or theme? and Do you agree or disagree with the speaker’s opinion regarding the impact of deferred dreams? Explain.”

Throughout the unit, there are opportunities for discussion prompted by the teacher in whole class instruction. There are few noted opportunities for students to discuss in a variety of groupings. Only a few mentions of small group discussion are present in the materials. For example, in Unit 4, the teacher’s Tiered Discussion Prompts accompanying an excerpt from Mark Twain’s Life on the Mississippi ask students to analyze and express ideas orally: “Analyze: How does Twain reveal the tension between master and apprentice as the scene progresses?”

Modeling of academic vocabulary is limited. The function of most of the discussion questions is as an ice-breaker and/or interest grabber before reading rather than an evidence-based discussion encouraging the use of academic vocabulary. For example, on page 1229, “Academic Vocabulary in Speaking: imagine that Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X were discussing their respective beliefs about confronting racism. What do you think they would say to each other? In a small group, debate this complex issue by representing these two men's beliefs. Remember to keep the debate polite, focused, and in-line with the beliefs of Malcolm X and King. Use at least three academic vocabulary words in your debate.” While students are encouraged to use academic vocabulary there is no protocol to help students set this up. Nor are protocols for how to run a debate provided.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Activities requiring students to listen and speak to share information are embedded across the year’s instruction. Throughout the textbook, there are opportunities for discussion prompted by the teacher in whole class instruction. There are few noted opportunities for students to discuss in a variety of groupings. Some activities include discussion about what has been read and researched as well as preparing for group discussion. However, most activities, especially those placed at the beginnings of units, rely on opinion or life-experiences rather than research or textual evidence. Fewer activities involve gaining understanding from multiple sources or include follow-up questions.

The speaking and listening tasks are often presented as “Extension” activities, but they connect to readings or the section as a whole. There are tasks in the Speaking & Listening Workshop section of each unit in which students re-work a written assignment and create a speech or powerpoint presentation. Teachers have some guidance throughout the units, but could use more explicit details to help engage all learners with speaking and listening skills.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, after reading “Of Plymouth Plantation” by William Bradford students explore personal accounts of exploration and settlement and then “In a group of four students debate the following statement, The narrators of the selections in this section are unreliable because of their personal and and emotional involvement in the events and experiences they relate.” After reading a movie review of “The Crucible” students are to "Imagine you are a Puritan villager in charge of welcoming new settlers. Using the selections you’ve just read as your resource, write and deliver an informal speech to your new neighbors, welcoming them and sharing a little about the values and beliefs in your community.”
  • In Unit 2, teacher directed discussion questions are provided throughout the unit to guide students in the reading. Examples include,Students are prompted to understand the ideas in The Tragedy of Slavery on page 306. “Consider what you know about slavery from the account by Olaudah Equiano in In Unit 1 or from any other account your read or seen. What conclusion might you draw from this section, which describes slavery a generation after Equiano’s account was published?”For the poem, “Snowbound” on page 359, “Does Whittier succeed at making the chore that this stanza presents seem wondrous?”
  • In Unit 3, students view a pen and ink on paper titled “Lincoln at Gettysburg” with the following discussion prompt, “Examine the image of Lincoln shown here. Based on your reading and your prior knowledge of President Lincoln, give a brief oral critique of how he is portrayed in this painting. Discuss the style of the work as a whole, Lincoln’s placement in relation to other figures in the painting, the colors used, and any other aspects you consider important. Be sure to use precise, formal language in your speech.”
  • In Unit 4, teacher directed discussion questions are provided throughout the unit to guide students in the reading. For example, after students read “The Rise of Naturalism” the following discussion prompts are provided,How did the work of naturalist writers reflect the harsh realities of the late 19th century?Review what the texts says about naturalists in literature. Would you describe today’s writing as “naturalistic”? Why or why not? After reading “A New Role for Women” the following prompts are provided for discussion,Reread the first paragraph. What does the quotation suggest about women’s placement in society in the late 1800’s? Does the quotation have any relevance today? Why or why not? How did Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin and Edith Wharton contribute to the women’s movement?

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The 11th grade textbook offers opportunities for students to write in both process and on-demand formats and incorporates technology when appropriate. Throughout the units, short-constructed, on-demand writings are found. In addition, the end of units provide a processed writing task in a Writing Workshop strategy. The Writing Workshop strategy provides guidance in the steps of the writing process. The process writing assignments include segments on: planning, drafting, revising and editing, publishing with several opportunities for publishing. Digital publishing is often encouraged.

Examples of the mix of on-demand and process writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, page 280, students write an essay to answer the prompt, “Write a persuasive essay that argues a strong claim on an issue. Support your claim with reasons and evidence that will convince your audience to think or act in a certain way toward an issue that interests you.”
  • In Unit 2, page 495, students write on demand with a timed write to answer, “Write a short story in which characters react to an unexpected event in their own neighborhood. In your story, try to entertain peers and adults by presenting a lively description of how the main character and others handle the unexpected event and what happens as a result.”
  • In Unit 3, page 620, students write during Writing Workshop to answer the prompt, “Inform your audience by writing an online feature article that answers this research question. What is one topic, trend, person or phenomenon that has defined your time. Choose a topic that people will still read and talk about 100 years from now.”
  • In Unit 4, page 843, students write on demand with a timed writing to answer, “Write a comparison and contrast essay about two of your favorite literary texts. Your essay should concentrate on key aspects of the text, such as characters, theme, setting, plot, and conflict. Your essay should give your audience, such as your teacher and classmates, new insights into the literary texts.”
  • In Unit 5, page 834, students complete an essay during Writing Workshop to address the task, “Write an analytical essay that examines a literary movement or the broader ideas reflected in an author's various works. Keep your audience in mind as you gather evidence and details to support your controlling idea.”
  • In Unit 5 on page 844, students incorporate digital resources to, “Work with classmates to gather and develop content for a class newspaper. Then, use computer software to create your newspaper.”
  • In Unit 6, on page 1035, students write on-demand, “Write a paragraph about a memory of your own that you can still recall in crisp detail. What images, feelings, sounds, or smells come to mind Why do you think this moment lingers in your memory?”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The 11th grade curriculum provides opportunities to meet the variety of writing styles mandated by the standards. These styles include: argumentative, explanatory, and narrative writing.

Examples of opportunities for students to address the different types of writing reflected by the standards include, but are not limited to:

  • Argumentative: In Unit 6 on p. 1177, an example of argumentative writing can be found.“Think about the adjustments veterans must make when they return from combat. What does society do to help ease their transition back into civilian life? Write a three-to-five paragraph essay on the importance of supporting veterans during this time of transition. Include specific suggestions of ways this might be effectively achieved.”
  • Explanatory: In Unit 5 on p.893, an example of explanatory writing is found. “Many factors shape your outlook--your personality, your life experiences, your state of mind. Write one or two sentences describing your outlook. Then, explain the factors you think have most influenced the way you look at the world.”
  • Narrative: In Unit 1 on p. 91, an example of narrative writing is found. “Write a personal account. Equiano uses details to provide powerful first-person testimony. Choose an experience or a scene you want to describe. Write a one-page account to communicate the power of the experience. Include vivid details.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis and/or evaluation of information, supports, claims.

Throughout the materials, a variety of writing tasks provide opportunities for research-based, evidence-based writing. Writing tasks include formal and informal writing to support analysis of poetry and prose. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, an example of an analytical writing prompt is found. This is a short response piece. “Nathaniel Hawthorne is also a master of the gothic genre. Do you think Zweig’s comments about Poe can apply to Hawthorne’s work as well? Write a brief response, citing evidence from ‘The Minister’s Black Veil’ to support your opinion.”
  • In Unit 4, students read stories and materials instruct students to "Think about how women's roles have changed of the times of Kate Chopin and Edith Wharton. Using the stories you've just read and your knowledge of American society today, write a comparison of women's roles then and now.”
  • In Unit 6, a writing prompt involving the creation of an argument backed by research is found. “The 2000 census report identifies four categories of change in the American population-- geographical center, population size, race and origin, and age. Which category of change do you think will have the greatest effect on America in the 21st century? State your opinion and support it with reasons and evidence from the census report you have just read, the Census Bureau Web site, at least one other internet or print resource, and, if you wish, examples from your own experience.”
  • In Unit 7, students are guided through a research workshop and a writing process workshop. In these workshops students will be guided through the writing of a research paper that is to be based on one of the four questions of literature, history and life students have explored throughout the year. Students will have opportunities to use evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis and/or evaluation of information, supports, and claims in each of their individual research projects.

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level. Over the course of the year’s worth of materials, grammar/convention instruction is provided, however it does not increase in sophisticated contexts.

The materials offer grammar instruction and support over the course of the year. The Essential Course of Study (ECOS) table at the beginning of the Teacher’s Edition identifies grammar and language instruction and exercises present in each unit. (T23-T28) This page shows the progression of skills and language standards, starting with Latin roots, and moving on to dialect and language devices (such as alliteration), and ending the unit with the mechanics of excerpting poetry and punctuating quotations. Some grammar, mechanics, and conventions are taught explicitly (e.g., use alliteration) providing opportunities for students to grow their fluency through practice and application.The materials offer a “Language Coach” and “ Grammar and Style” notation embedded in most texts as well as a “Grammar and Style” practice activity at the end of some selections. Additionally, the materials offer “Grammar in Context” support with samples in the “Writing Workshop” section of each unit as well as a “Grammar Handbook,” along with other support resources, at the end of the text.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2, Grammar and Style, page 1298, students are instructed that, “Conjunctive adverbs act as transitions between complete ideas, indicating the logical connections between them. Common conjunctive adverbs include consequently, however, nevertheless, and furthermore. A semicolon shows the close relationship between two independent clauses. In general, place a semicolon before the conjunctive adverb and then a comma after the conjunctive adverb. Also, look for places where you might strengthen the connections among your ideas by inserting semicolons and conjunctive adverbs.”
  • Unit 5, Grammar and Style, page 904, teachers are instructed to tell students, “Authors sometime use sentence fragments to highlight details, add emphasis or slow the pace or fluency of a passage. Ask students to identify the fragments in lines 108-111 and to explain their effect.” At the end of the selection, students are asked to refer back to the lesson and look at varying sentence style, “Zora Neale Hurston’s independent and unconventional personality shines through in her writing style. She wasn’t afraid to bend the rules of formal writing, adding punch and emphasis through the use of sentence fragments.”
  • Unit 6, Grammar and Style, page 1174, teachers are instructed to, “Point out that word choice is a key component in a writer’s distinct voice. Review that sensory verbs evoke sensory reactions while describing actions. Steinbeck uses many sensory adjectives and verbs in this essay because he wants the reader to imagine and feel what soldiers feel.”

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials for Grade 11 do not meet the expectations of Gateway 2. While the texts are organized around topics and themes in service of building students' knowledge, the tasks and question sequences only partially support students in building critical thinking skills. The year long instructional components supporting research, and vocabulary development partially meet the expectations. The instructional materials do not meet expectations for growing students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

14/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for meet Grade 11 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently.

Each unit has texts that connect through time period and are sub-grouped around a particular literary movement. Although the selections provided represent the time periods and build knowledge of American Literature throughout history, the materials connect the pieces by providing “Questions of the Times” that help provide context for each of the texts read. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, An Emerging Nation: Early American Writing: 1600-1800. Students are presented the following questions that will focus their reading/learning; Who owns the land? What makes an explorer? Are people basically good? And Who has the right to rule? Some of the texts that are read include:
    • “The World on the Turtle’s Back”, An Iroquois Creation Myth
    • “Coyote and Buffalo”, Folk Tale
    • “Changing Views of Native Americans”, Film Clip
    • “To My Dear and Loving Husband/Upon the Burning of Our House/Huswifery”, Poetry
    • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    • “Declaration of Independence”, Public Document
    • “Writers of the Revolution: Speech in the Virginia Convention”
  • In Unit 4, Regionalism and Naturalism: Capturing the American Landscape (1870-1910) Students are presented the following questions that will focus their reading/learning; What makes a place unique? Does the universe care? How are women’s roles changing? Why are there “haves” and “have-nots”? Some of the texts that are read include:
    • “from The Autobiography of Mark Twain” by Mark Twain
    • “from Life on the Mississippi” a memoir by Mark Twain
    • The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain
    • ““American Landscapes: A Media Study”, Image Collection
    • “The Wreck of the Commodore”, Newspaper Article
    • “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
    • “April Showers” by Edith Wharton

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The materials offer students opportunities to use evidence pulled directly from the text as well as make inferences while reading in order to help make meaning of the texts provided. Most discussion questions and tasks include analysis of language, key ideas, details and craft and structure. In the margins of the student text there are questions to call out specific details to note in the text. The sequenced questions allow for making meaning and building understanding of texts. Within the Tiered Discussion Prompts, there are questions labeled evaluate or analyze. The materials do include a range of text dependent questions and tasks throughout each unit. Questions and tasks cover a wide continuum of standards and strategies. However, questions and tasks do not build knowledge or grow in rigor throughout the year. Examples include:

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 1 after reading the text, “The Crucible Act” include:

  • “The setting of the literary work refers to the time and place in which the action occurs how do you think Miller uses setting to help create mood in Act One?”
  • “Reread lines 825-842. How does the fight between Proctor and Abigail signal a turning point in the play?
  • “In lines 52-80 stage directions and dialogue reveal the condition of the jail cell. What is it like? Cite evidence.”
  • “According to the stage directions, Abigail draw the sobbing, repentant Mary to her side “out of her infinite charity.’ Why is this comment ironic?”

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 4 after reading the text, “The Autobiography of Mark Twain” include:

  • “Direct students to lines 20-47. Use these prompts to help students explore young Twain’s motivation and character:”
  • “Why does Twain pretend to be mesmerized?”
  • “What does the passage reveal about young Twain’s character? Cite evidence.”
  • “Reread lines 14-19 looking for instances of Twain’s use of this rhetorical technique. Why do you think he uses overstatement here? How might his use of overstatement in a work of nonfiction affect readers?”
  • “In lines 203-210, use these prompts to help students explore Twain’s reflection upon his experiences with the mesmerizer.”
  • “Is Twain’s cynical response to his experience believable? Defend your opinion.”

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 5 after reading the text, “Helen” include:

  • “Note the use of the word apparition to describe the faces in the crowd. What does this suggest about the people?”
  • “Reread the first stanza of this poem about Helen. Identify the images that account for Helen’s grip on the imagination.”
  • “The speaker says that Greece is “unmoved” by Helen, but in fact the Greeks are moved by emotion. What emotion moves them when they see Helen?”
  • “Which images in the poem are most effective in conveying the feeling of the scene? Explain.”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Anchor texts are accompanied by linked activities and questions before, during, after reading, which are text-dependent and text-specific. The threads of questions connected to anchor texts are coherently sequenced due to a repeated three-part structure: Test Analysis and Reading Skill tasks, which students are directed to complete in their Reader/Writer Notebooks, introduce skills and topics such as reading folk literature, analyzing structure, rhetorical devices, diction, satire, imagery, figurative language. There are some opportunities for students to build knowledge between multiple texts. Questions placed alongside the text and after the text prompt students to identify and comment on the effect or meaning of focus text features. However, the level of questions does not increase significantly over the course of the year, and tasks are scaffolded and passages labeled consistently across the year. Students do not become prepared to execute these skills on their own.

In Unit 2 students respond to a Task Across Texts: “In the two text read, the authors looked to nature for inspiration. Using the provided chart with elements of nature, individualism, emotion or passion, imagination and supernatural, write the elements that you can find in the two works you have just read. Write a brief essay explaining why these two very different writers were good examples of the romantic movement.” Student read the texts “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving and “Thanatopsis” by William Cullen Bryant. Questions during the reading of these texts include:

  • “What kind of mood is established by the description of the swamp in line 40-47?”
  • “Which images in lines 189-192 suggest that Tom’s discovery won’t be a pleasant one?”
  • “Reread lines 341-345. What message do these images suggest about material possessions and those who seek them?
  • A What inferences can you make about how each of the following images supports characterization and mood?
  • “The trees and the swamp (lines 31-37)
  • “The hewn trees (lines 96-103)
  • “Tom’s new house (lines 115-118)”
  • “Read lines 17-22. Discuss the imagery Bryant uses to describe a person who is dying.”
  • “According to the speaker, how does nature help people cope during times of sadness?”
  • “Why, according to the speaker, should people greet death without fear?” (240)
  • The title of the poem combines the Greek words thanatos (“death”) and opsis (“a vision”). Cite specific details from the poem to explain the vision of death presented in “Thanatopsis.”

Questions placed alongside the text and after the text prompt students to identify and comment on the effect or meaning of focus text features. Lines are called out with each question. Students do not become prepared to execute these skills on their own.

Unit 5 focuses on The Harlem Renaissance and Modernism from the years 1910-1940. The unit is further divided into text sets through the topics The Harlem Renaissance, The New Poetry, The Modern Short Story, and Journalism as Literature. At the beginning of each text set there is a brief historical description. At the end of each of these topic based text sets students complete a Wrap Up activity. For example after reading the text set The Harlem Renaissance which includes poetry, an essay, and a text criticism, students use the texts to answer the following prompt: “Imagine that you are a publisher who is planning to print the works beginning on page 878 in a slim anthology called The Harlem Renaissance. You’d like to organize the works into thematic groupings to help your readers gain a sense of some of the issues and concerns that these writers, despite their varied experiences, collectively held in common.” Students are asked to consider which selections deal with similar topics or themes, what overarching phrases might best express those topics or themes, what specifically, from each selection led you to place it in its particular grouping.

The level of questions does not increase significantly over the course of the year, and tasks are scaffolded and passages labeled consistently across the year. Students are frequently directed where to look for evidence when analyzing a text.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meets the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating task include the Wrap-Up activity after major text sets within each unit, the multi-step project at the end of each unit, and the end-of-year research project that makes up Unit 7. Activities that are related to culminated activities are sprinkled through the units, without explicit connections to the upcoming culminating task and the skills and knowledge students will be expected to demonstrate. Culminating tasks, and the activities leading to them, integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. The questions and tasks partially support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. . The majority of the culminating tasks do not support students’ ability to demonstrate knowledge of a topic, but rather students are demonstrating skills gained.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Unit 1: Early American Writing

Students will complete a task that compare writings in Unit 1. Consider these ‘literary questions’ discussed in the selections you have read:”

  • What is true love?
  • Why do bad things happen to good people?
  • How can faith sustain us?
  • How can people best serve God?
  • Are people worthy?
  • Are people basically good or bad?

“Choose one of the questions above, and in a brief essay explain how two of the Puritan authors in this section might have responded. (Although Arthur Miller’s play was written in the twentieth century, you can include The Crucible since it accurately reflects the Puritan mind-set.) Give specific evidence from the texts to support your opinions and ideas.” (225)

After reading texts from the Writers of the Revolution, complete the following task:

  • “Writing to Persuade: Reflect briefly on each of the pieces you have just read, and find two you find particularly persuasive. Then, imagine you are a colonist of the time and write a letter in which you voice your support for the ideas of the writers chosen. Be sure to cite specific phrases or lines that you find convincing. Add your own thoughts and opinions to try to further persuade readers to support the rebellion.” (279) Consider:
    • “Thought provoking of incendiary sentences or passages
    • “Your opinions on the issues discussed in the selections
    • “How to express your viewpoint clearly and convincingly.” (279)

Students are supported somewhat in completing the “Writing to Persuade” task above by questions and activities that appeared earlier in the unit focusing on persuasive writing, such as the following:

  • After Thomas Paine’s “The Crisis”: Review the persuasive techniques on page 249. [Emotional appeals, Ethical appeals, Appeals to Association, Appeals to Authority] Then, find six examples of Paine’s strong persuasive appeals. In a chart, record your examples, and explain the types of appeals. How does Paine’s use of persuasive language affect the tone of this essay? Cite evidence from your chart to support your answer” (256)

The “Writing to Persuade” activity above supports students’ ability to complete the culminating task at the end of Unit 1, which combines reading and writing skills:

End of Unit 1 Task: Project:

  • Persuasive Essay: “You have seen how some of our country’s founding fathers crafted arguments to support their claims, or positions, and to persuade readers to think a certain way . . .Write a persuasive essay that argues a strong claim on an issue. Support your claim with reasons and evidence that will convince your audience to think or act in a certain way toward an issue that interests you.” (280)
  • Students are demonstrating persuasive writing, but do not have to write about any knowledge gained from the unit.

Unit 5: The Harlem Renaissance and Modernism

After reading “Thoughts on the African-American Novel” by Toni Morrison complete a text analysis. In this critical essay Morrison uses the following rhetorical devices to make her words for effective:

  • “Personal accounts: . . .
  • “Repetition: . . .

“As you read, think about how Morrison uses each rhetorical technique to clarify her meaning and to evoke a response from her readers” (909). (Sample chart provided)

End of Unit 5 Task:

“Write a persuasive essay that asserts a claim about a substantive issue of our time. Support your claim with reasons and evidence that will convince your audience to accept your position of take a specific action.” The activities in the unit leading up the assignment occasionally support students ability to complete the task, though the unit does not represent a sustained effort to prepare students. Students research issues to complete this task and share some knowledge gained.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials attempt a year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Each text is provided with the following vocabulary components located in the Teacher’s Edition:

  • Vocabulary Skill: “Vocabulary in Context” and “Vocabulary to Preteach” based on the text.
  • Own the Word: As students read, opportunities are provided for the teacher to stop to teach vocabulary words in context.
  • Differentiated Vocabulary Support: Vocabulary support is sporadic throughout each unit.
  • For English Language Learners: Language Coach: These are tips found in the teacher’s edition that assist in teaching specific vocabulary strategies for words such as roots, affixes, etymology, multiple meanings, word origins, etc… These are designed to use with English Language Learners but can be helpful to all students.
  • For Struggling Readers - Additional words from the text are identified as ones that students may need more support.
  • For Advanced Learners - Challenge vocabulary suggestions.
  • After Reading Vocabulary Assessment: This is found at the end of each text and includes true/false, multiple choice, short answer, and/or fill in the blank questions for students based on the words taught throughout the story.

Reviewers noted that the vocabulary strategies and tasks are often repeated and lack variety in how students engage with vocabulary. Materials lack consistent protocols for presentation as well as opportunities for students to review and reuse previously learned vocabulary. These factors may limit students’ abilities to build words across texts.

Examples include:

Unit 2

Text: “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving

  • Vocabulary Skills

Vocabulary in Context: (prefatory activities ahead of Irving’s “The Devil and Tom Walker”): “The following words are critical to the story of a miser would trade his soul for money. Check your understanding of each one by rewording the sentence in which it appears.” (319)

  • “The melancholy sight of the graveyard chilled him.”
  • “The persecution of the Puritans went unchallenged.”
  • “The mention of gold awakened his avarice.”

(Five more sentences/words follow: usurer, speculating, propitious, ostentation, censurer)

Students are directed to complete this task in their Reader/Writer Notebook.

  • Academic Vocabulary in Writing: Irving uses several examples of wicked characters to reinforce the idea that greed is bad. In a short paragraph, indicate how Irving could have also included positive role models to illustrate moderation. Use three of the Academic Vocabulary words in your writing. (construct, expand, indicate, reinforce, role) (334)
  • Vocabulary Strategy: The Latin Root spec

When Tom Walker’s neighbors speculated in land, they were hoping to spot
opportunities for a quick profit. The Latin root spec in the word speculating
actually means “to look at” or “to see or behold.” Words containing this root, or
the related forms spect and spic, usually have something to do with light, sight,
or clarity.” (334)

  • Vocabulary Strategy: “The Greek Prefix syn-” “The origin of the prefix syn-, which appears are the beginning of the vocabulary word synthesis, is the Greek language. Syn- means ‘together’ or ‘at the same time.’ This prefix, which may also be spelled sym- or syl-, is found in a number of English words, both scientific and nonscientific. To understand words with syn-, use your knowledge of the origin of the prefix, look for context clues, or consult a dictionary.” (1229)
  • “Practice. Choose the word from the word web that best completes each sentenced. Use context clues to help you or, if necessary, check a dictionary.” (1229) They were able to ____their watches and meet promptly at noon.Thought the halves of people’s faces are exactly ____, they are fairly close.” (1229)

Additional resources such as copy masters, can be found in the Resource Manager. Think Central is an online tool that provides additional vocabulary resources for students to practice and review vocabulary. Directives are provided in the Teacher’s Edition.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

While the materials provide a variety of writing forms prescribed by the CCSS, they do not show evidence of a cohesive plan for building and applying skills with increasing mastery and complexity through the year. The largest writing assignments, placed at the end of units as culminating tasks, do not appear to be sequenced in way that builds on increasing mastery. The shorter writing tasks and instruction in each unit sometimes help build coherently toward the longer tasks, though not consistently. The writing instruction offered is often vague and general, not reflective of a coherent approach to writing. The instruction offered in the Writing Workshop sections of the culminating writing tasks demonstrates more coherence , leading students systematically through the steps of topic selection, planning/prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing and publishing, although the teacher may need to supplement to ensure time for these components. .

For example:

Unit 2: American Romanticism

Throughout the unit there are frequent writing opportunities for students. Students engage in various types of writing and culminates in students writing a short story. Some examples include:

  • Writing to Evaluate

“With a group of classmates, come up with several criteria for evaluating the poems on pages 344-363. Then use your criteria to write a brief evaluation of the work of the Fireside Poets as a whole. (365)

  • Writing to Analyze

“Select one of the questions above and respond to it in a focused, well- developed paragraph. Give at least one example from your life to support your answer. Then write one more paragraph analyzing how one of the transcendental writers whose work you’ve just read might have responded to the same question.” (409)

  • Quickwrite

“Recall a time when someone close to you changed in a way that made him or her seem like a different person. Write a paragraph to describe the change. Explain why it made you see the person so differently.” (469)

  • Culminating Writing Task:

There is one identified processed piece of writing at the end of each unit. These pieces do connect to the texts in the unit, broadly, and are “culminating” activities. Students are offered “idea starters” and “the essentials” (purposes, audiences, and formats) to get started. The text offers support in “planning/prewriting,” “drafting,” “revising,” and “editing and publishing.”

  • Writing Workshop: Short Story Prompt: “Write a short story that is engages readers with a strong plot, complex characters, and a vivid setting. Build your story around a central conflict.” (486)

Unit 6: Contemporary Literature (1940-Present)

Throughout the unit there are frequent writing opportunities for students. Students engage in various types of writing and culminates in students writing a resume’. Some examples include:

  • Quickwrite: “Think of a big event or an important moment from your recent past; write a paragraph describing your feelings about it. Then imagine how you will feel about this same event ten years from now. How might your perspective have changed? Pretending to be your future self, write a second paragraph describing the event from this later perspective.” (1301)
  • Extended Response: “As you read this dialogue, in which a mother discusses her son with her daughter, look for conflicting ideas about love for and duty to family members. Which character has a stronger voice here, Mama or Beneatha? Write a paragraph on the dominant character and the theme she expresses.” (1169)
  • Essay: “Choose a topic that lets you draw on your personal experiences-- a longtime hobby, a trip you took, your family history. Write an one-page essay that communicates your unique perspective on this subject. Be sure to include relevant details from your own experiences in the essay.” (1271)

Processed writing examples include:

  • Writing to Reflect: “Every writer of any significance brings something new to a literary tradition, whether in subject matter, style, or way of looking at the world. As you reflect on the selections you have just read, consider what unique contributions might be attributed to each writer. Choose one author and write an essay about how his or her writing, as shown in this unit, can be said to do something different from writers of previous generations.” (1311)
  • Writing Workshop: Resume: “Write a resume for a potential employer. Be sure to highlight the work, educational, and personal experiences and skills that qualify you for the position.” 1312)

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 partially meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

The Teacher’s Edition does not offer a complete or thorough progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic. Rather, research assignments and tasks are sparse throughout units. The materials offer a final unit titled, “What is the Power of Research.” This unit offers an extensive approach to research, but is self-contained. When research is assigned, students are given some instruction and strategies to support their research, but the materials do not organize research projects in a way that fosters independence in students’ research abilities. The research tasks are often stand-alone projects. Examples include, but are not limited to:

Unit 3: From Romanticism to Realism

  • Online Feature Article: “In this unit, you discovered the events, figures, and literature of the Civil War. The World Wide Web is home to discussions about the era and about the significant issues of today. Now, you will write about one legacy of your era in an online feature article-- an informative piece of writing on a topic or trend.” Inform your audience by writing an online feature article that answers this research question: “What is one topic, trend, or person, or phenomenon that has defined your time? Choose a topic that people will still read and talk about 100 years from now.” Students are provided “idea starters” as well as “the essentials”: common purposes, audiences, and formats, tips on planning and choosing a topic, gathering and synthesizing authoritative sources, drafting, grammar, and editing. (620-626)
  • Updating an Online Feature Article: Update your Online Feature Article to replace dead links, improve design, and navigation, and provide updated information on your topic. Tips for maintaining your article as well as ways to modify and improve your article are provided. (628-629)

Unit 6: Contemporary Literature

  • “Consider the state of the civil rights in America today, in light of the goals and visions of the writers you have just read. In your opinion, have we reached total equality? Or would you say that we have arrived somewhere in between total equality and total oppression? Review the literature in this section and write a retrospective editorial in which you support a claim about whether or not the goals and visions of these writers have been realized.” (1259)

Considerations include:

  • Which ideas and details from the selection will help you articulate the vision of the civil rights leaders
  • What stories, examples or other details will help you support your view of Civil Rights in America today
  • Who your audience will be and what you want them to think or do
  • How to express your argument clearly and respectfully (1259)

Unit 7: What is the Power of Research

  • This unit focuses entirely on crafting a research paper. It is the last unit in the textbook, thus the research paper is the final, culminating task. Similar to the previous units, the materials provide focusing questions. The unit then provides students with a “Research Strategies Workshop” that provides steps, tips, and suggestions on the following:
  • Select and shape a topic
  • Plan research
  • Find relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, including primary and secondary sources and online resources; use advanced searches effectively
  • Assess the credibility, as well as the strengths and limitations, of each source, including nonfiction books, newspapers, periodicals, and Web sites
  • Make source cards and take notes
  • Paraphrase and summarize information
  • Avoid plagiarism by quoting directly and crediting sources
  • Verify information, detect bias, and develop own perspective

Following the Research Strategies Workshop is the Writing Workshop:

  • Write a Research Paper: As you have seen in this unit, the purpose of conducting research isn’t simply to repeat information that you have read elsewhere. Rather, the goal is to draw your own conclusions about a research question based on a variety of sources. In this workshop, you will select, organize, and analyze information in a carefully documented research paper. Specific topics include:
    • Document sources
    • Prepare works cited list
    • Format your paper
    • Use punctuation with parenthetical citations
    • Use correct style for direct quotations

Students are provided with more instructions, strategies, and tips as they research and draft their paper.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 11 do not meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class. Examples include:

At the end of each unit is a page that introduces “Ideas for Independent Reading.” Included in this page are novels/ independent readings that relate to the questions from the unit. There is no design, accountability, nor suggested pacing for these novels. Additionally, there is no information regarding the qualitative or quantitative information around these novels to support teachers in providing guidance for student choice.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2017/08/31

Report Edition: 2012

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Holt McDougal Literature Gr 11 Student Edition 978‑0‑5476‑1841‑8 Copyright: 2012 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012
Holt McDougal Literature Gr 11 Teacher Edition 978‑0‑5476‑1848‑7 Copyright: 2012 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA High School Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complements the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations