Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials for Grade 10 partially meet the expectations of alignment to standards. The texts and tasks partially meet the demands to support students' development of literacy skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Materials partially support students in building their knowledge of topics and themes as well as growing vocabulary. Materials include some support for comprehensive writing and research instruction.

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
25
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
16
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Grade 10 partially meet the expectation of Gateway 1. Most of the texts are at the right level of quality and at the appropriate level for students to grow their literacy skills. The materials include a range of texts that are appropriately rigorous from a quantitative lens, although the qualitative factors vary. The placement of materials for students to get exposure to increasingly rigorous materials of the course of the year is inconsistent, and the teacher may need to supplement to attend to students' access to robust range and depth of reading. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, and culminating tasks represent the demands of the standards. Speaking and listening work is limited and does not include comprehensive supports for teachers to employ practice with academic vocabulary and discussion work over the course of the school year

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
12/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 10 partially meet the expectation that texts are at the right level of quality and at the appropriate level for students to grow their literacy skills. The materials include a range of texts that are appropriately rigorous from a quantitative lens, although the qualitative factors vary. The placement of materials for students to get exposure to increasingly rigorous materials of the course of the year is inconsistent, and the teacher may need to supplement to attend to students' access to robust range and depth of reading.

NOTE: Indicator 1b is non-scored and provides information about text types and genres in the program.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The texts are high quality and worthy of students’ attention due to literary richness, rhetorical technique, and/or topical relevance. A large number or texts come from authors that are well-known, award-winning or iconic. A number of undisputed classic texts are present, including works for male, female, and multicultural authors. There is sufficient effort to include texts on topics of current interest or select older texts that have a potential to resonate with contemporary students.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut, is a humorous, satirical short story with a dystopian setting that would be of high interest to Grade 10 students.
  • In Unit 1, “The Race to Save Apollo” by Michael Useem is an informational narrative text that includes both academic and content vocabulary. The text is used to build knowledge about the history of space exploration in the In United States.
  • In Unit 2, “Tell the Truth but tell it slant” by Emily Dickinson is rich in vocabulary and themes that are worthy of multiple critical reads.
  • In Unit 4, “The Interlopers” by Saki is a short story, written by a well known British author. The text is rich with rich language and symbolism.
  • In Unit 9, “Nobel Peace Acceptance Speech” by Elie Wiesel, gives students insight to the historical oppression during the holocaust. This is a multilayered text that requires close analytical reading.
  • In Unit 9, “Montgomery Boycott” by Coretta Scott King highlights a historical event with a personal perspective. The text is rich with historical content and uses anecdotes and vivid descriptions that will captivate Grade 10 students.
  • In Unit 11, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare is a time honored text which is rich in language and symbolism. Many contemporary texts allude to this text.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level and consider a range of student interests. Over the course of a year, students are exposed to a variety of text types including, short stories, poems, drama, and essays. The materials provide a Table of Contents per unit that lists the text titles, authors, and types of pieces.

Examples of the distribution of text types to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2: “Word Portraits: Character Development”
    • Short Story : “Shoofly Pie” by Naomi Shihab Nye
    • Poem: “Tell the Truth but tell it slant” by Emily Dickinson
    • Drama: A Marriage Proposal Anton Chekhov
    • Newspaper Article: “A Mexican Feast for Bodies and Souls” by Dave Roos
    • Essay: “The Teacher Who Changed My Life” by Nicholas Gage
  • Unit 5: “Why Write? Author’s Purpose”
    • Short Story: “And of Clay Are We Created” by Isabel Allende
    • Poem:“Peruvian Child” by Pat Mora
    • Poem: “Lady Freedom Among Us” by Rita Dove
    • Humorous Essay: “The Plot Against People” by Russell Baker
    • Textbook Diagrams: “How a Leaf Works”
    • Functional Document: “Tree Planting Guide”
    • Narrative Non-Fiction: “Blowup: What Went Wrong at Storm King Mountain” by Sebastian Junger
  • Unit 8: “Signatures: Author’s Style and Voice”
    • Short Story: “The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe
    • Poem: “When I heard the Learn’d Astronomer” by Walt Whitman
    • Poem: “Birches” by Robert Frost
    • Excerpt from Novel: Caramelo by Sandra Cisneros
    • Personal Letter: “Letter to His Mother” by Walt Whitman
    • Critique: “Author Brings Back Memories of Not So Long Ago” by Yvette Cabrera

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

The materials include a variety of texts that are appropriate for 10th grade students and range in complexity. Texts that are moderate in complexity are accompanied by tasks that increase the level of rigor by demanding higher order thinking skills and analyses. Texts that are exceedingly complex are accompanied by a variety of scaffolds such as graphic organizers and discussion questions. Texts range in quantitative measure from Lexile 760 to Lexile 1380, with one text measuring Lexile 440 as well as including challenging Shakespearean texts.

Texts that fall below the Grade 10 quantitative band include qualitative features or reader and task considerations that make them appropriate for Grade 10 students. For example:

  • In Unit 2, students read the text “Like the Sun” by R.K. Narayan which measures Lexile 740. This text is connected to the poem “Tell all the Truth but tell it slant” by Emily Dickinson and “The Possibility of Evil” by Shirley Jackson which measures at Lexile 1110. The combination of these texts, as well as the student task to compare and contrast ways the characters respond to moral dilemmas to find the different perspectives about telling the truth make this text appropriate for Grade 10 students.
  • In Unit 9, students read text from Night by Elie Wiesel which measures at Lexile 440. This memoir has a mature topic and subject matter. This text is connected to Elie Wiesel’s Nobel Acceptance Speech. Students connect, analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions across both texts which make it appropriate for Grade 9 students.

Texts that rise above the Grade 10 quantitative band include qualitative features or reader and task considerations that make them appropriate for Grade 10 students. For example:

  • In Unit 11, students read The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. This text will be challenging for Grade 10 students. To help students access the challenging text, students learn about the life of Shakespeare as well as the characteristics and language of a Shakespearean Drama.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)There is a clear variety and appropriate leveling of texts. The complexity of texts varies from passage to passage with each unit representing a range of text types and complexity levels.

Questions increase in rigor throughout the year for some literacy skills. For example, the first three units study literary elements. Students work through the narrative structure, characterization and point of view, and setting, mood and imagery. In Unit 1 students are asked to analyze plot and conflict. In Unit 2 students analyze characters to describe them as either static or dynamic. In Unit 3 students discuss how the setting impacts characters. Towards the end of the year, students study author’s craft. Students work through the the language of poetry, author’s style and voice, and the impact of history and culture on an author. In Unit 9 students draw conclusions about a character and analyze character motives using details from the text. However, questions placed alongside the text and after the text prompt students to identify and comment on the effect or meaning of focus text features. The level of questions does not increase significantly over the course of the year, and tasks are scaffolded and passages labeled consistently across the year. Students do not become prepared to execute these skills on their own.

Also, both writing and speaking and listening tasks are also not sequential and are all heavily scaffolded with supports and structures. Students are not growing towards independence with these skills. It is important to note that even the last two process-writes of the year, are fully outlined and supported, not allowing students more autonomy or an increase in their skills. For example, in Unit 1 students prepare for a timed writing during Writing Workshop. Students are asked to analyze the writing task. The writing task is modeled for students with the topic and purpose underlined. The audience is circled for students. Students are then given a list of questions to help them identify the main conflict of the text before responding, revising, and editing. At the end of the year, during Unit 5, the same process is included. Students are still being given the writing task with annotated topic, purpose, and audience as well as specific questions about literary movements to answer as they begin to write before continuing through the writing process. Speaking and listening workshops introduce a new topic/skill each time. Skills rarely build off of previous assignments and are not practiced during the lesson.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The materials provide text complexity analysis for texts throughout the materials. Lexiles, Fry, and Dale-Chall readability are provided in the unit overview at the beginning of each unit. There are no qualitative measurements, nor are any reader and task considerations included to create a complete text analysis. There is also no rationale included for the purpose or placement in each grade level. Examples include:

Unit 1: The World of a Story: Plot, Setting and Mood

  • “Harrison Bergeron”: Lexile 840; Fry 8; Dale-Chall 6.6
  • “The Race to Save Apollo 13”: Lexile 1080; Fry 10; Dale-Chall 8.1
  • “Exile”: Poem - (Poems do not receive a text complexity analysis because they lack conventional punctuation).

Unit 3: A Writer’s Choice: Narrative Devices

  • “There Will Come Soft Rains”: Lexile 910; Fry 9; Dale-Chall 6.1
  • “The Man in the Water”: Lexile 950; Fry College; Dale-Chall 6.7
  • “Dyaspora”: Lexile 1140; Fry 9; Dale-Chall 6.6

Unit 6: Make a Case: Argument and Persuasion

  • “Abolishing the Penny Makes Good Sense”: Lexile 1040; Fry 11; Dale-Chall 7.2
  • “A Chip of Glass Ruby”: Lexile 990; Fry 7; Dale-Chall 6.3
  • How Much Land Does a Man Need/from The New Testament: Lexile 1110/1150; Fry ⅞ Dale-Chall 5.8/6.8

Unit 8: Signatures: Author’s Style and Voice

  • “The Pit and the Pendulum”: Lexile 1020; Fry 7.5; Dale-Chall 7.7
  • “Only Daughter”: Lexile 800; Fry 10; Dale-Chall 6.9
  • “Author Brings Back Memories of Not So Long Ago” (Newspaper Column): Lexile 1240; Fry 5; Dale-Chall 7.4

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Students will read a range of texts and a variety of genres but reviewers noted that additional guidance may be needed to help students develop stamina for long complex texts. Texts (in the print edition) are generally short works, or very short excepts (1-4 pages) of longer works, meaning students do not have ample opportunities to engage in reading large volumes.

Volume: While materials offer support via NovelWise, “a Website that helps students choose a novel or other book-length work to read.” There is no tracking or monitoring of independent reading in these materials and lack explicit instructions on implementation. Students are provided a variety of supports through the NovelWise site, including “study guides, reading strategies and literary elements instruction, presentations to introduce classic novels, and project ideas.” Some of the suggested independent reading texts are as follows:

Unit 1: The World of a Story

  • Bless the Beasts and Children by Glendon Swarthout
  • The Piano Lesson by August Wilson
  • The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger

Unit 2: Character Development

  • A Death in the Family by James Agee
  • The Heart of a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers

Unit 4: Theme

  • Four Spirits by Sena Jeter Naslund
  • Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
  • Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 by Anna Deavere Smith

The materials contain a range of texts, including by not limited to:

  • Poetry
  • Editorials
  • Essays
  • Speeches
  • Short Stories
  • Narrative Nonfiction
  • Film Clip
  • Memoir
  • Historical Narrative
  • Drama

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
13/16
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials partially meet the expectations of the criteria around alignment to the standards. Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, and culminating tasks represent the demands of the standards. Speaking and listening work is limited and does not include comprehensive supports for teachers to employ practice with academic vocabulary and discussion work over the course of the school year. Writing lessons are many and include connections to the types and on-demand requirements put forth by the standards, and the materials include support for teaching revision. The grammar instruction included partially prepares students for the needs of the grade level.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text; this may include work with mentor texts as well).

The materials include a range of text dependent questions and tasks throughout each unit. Questions and tasks cover a wide continuum of standards and strategies. Each unit offers many opportunities for students to engage in evidence-based discussions and activities. Most of the questions and tasks are text-dependent and ask students to engage with the text directly. Students are given opportunities to use evidence pulled directly from the text as well as make inferences.

Before each text, students are directed to take notes in the Reader/Writer Notebook as they read. Most questions in the margins of the text require students to note and interpret grammatical, literary, and rhetorical features. Each excerpt has close read questions which are on the page next to the text itself for students and teachers to reference directly. Key passages are outlined in a red box with text-dependent questions for the teacher. At the end of each selection or compared groups of selections there is a section of three to five questions sub-headed Text Analysis Questions. These questions guide students directly back to the text. Questions and tasks cover comprehension, summarizing, clarifying, drawing conclusions, making inferences evaluating, synthesizing ideas, and analyzing and identifying literary devices.

Students engage with and draw evidence from the texts through Tiered Discussion Prompts, After Reading Questions, Analyzing Visuals and Reading-Writing Connection questions and tasks. Examples of these include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 2, an activity before Anton Chekhov’s “A Marriage Proposal” has students create a chart of traits for each main character. Questions in the margins of the text ask text specific/dependent questions about character development in a farce: “Reread lines 104-120. What pattern of behavior appears evident in Natalia’s responses to Lomov’s claims.”
  • In Unit 4, on page 478, Question B directs students to, “reread stanzas one, three, and five. Identify the images of war presented in each stanza. What do these images have in common?”Page 481 includes a text analysis question for making inferences; “According to the speaker of each poem why do people fight wars? Cite evidence to support your answer.” Then on Page 481, Question 7 states, “evaluate which poem makes a stronger statement about war and its victims? Give evidence from the poem to support your opinion.”
  • In Unit 6, an activity ahead of Carl Sagan’s “On Nuclear Disarmament,” as well as questions alongside the text, ask students to identify and evaluate the validity of multiple examples of inductive reasoning: “As you read, use a graphic organizer like the one shown to help you analyze Sagan’s inductive reasoning.”
  • In Unit 8, Poe’s “The Pit and the Pendulum” are followed by three comprehension questions and five analysis questions on topics including character, sound devices, and imagery. “Consider the narrator’s words, thoughts, and actions in ‘The Pit and the Pendulum. What can you infer are his greatest strengths in his battle against the inquisitors? Support your answer with details from the story.’ This analysis question, like the others, require student engagement with the text.
  • In Unit 10, after reading “The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights” students answer questions such as:
    • “What theme about knighthood does Steinbeck communicate in the selection? Cite evidence to support your answer.”
    • “Steinbeck’s style features many tightly constructed characterizations. Choose a passage of at least five lines that illustrates the author’s ability to create a briefe, effective portrait. Explain your choice.”

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks that build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts and integrates strategies to help students build literacy skills. The materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and activities which build to a variety of tasks, including, but not limited to: hort, on-demand written responses, longer (processed) essays, storyboards, re-writing in the author’s style, and movie scripts. These tasks and activities often ask students to compare/contrast works that have been presented as sets or series or synthesize the meaning, themes, or central ideas of the text sets.

Additionally, tasks often connect to a non-traditional text form such as a news report or movie scene.

At the end of majority of the texts or text sets, a culminating activity is provided. Each of the culminating activities within the unit lead to a larger culminating task for the unit. At the end of each unit there is a Writing Workshop, including a Timed Writing Practice, along with a Multiple Choice Assessment Practice. While these culminating activities seem to build off of each other, the standards associated with the writing and speaking activities are not well-supported throughout the entire unit; either through other writing tasks nor the reading questions aligned with core passages . The questions in the end of unit assessment (based on the two new texts) are mostly aligned with the reading skills presented throughout the unit but do not represent a true assessment as they appear to be printed in the student edition along with the new selections to read.

In Unit 2, students read, “The Possibility of Evil” and answer a short constructed response that asks, “Has Miss Strangeworth lost her sanity? Is she truly evil? Using evidence from the text, write one or two paragraphs in response to these questions. Be sure to present a clear opinion in your answer, and use quotations from the story to support your argument.” S“A Celebration of Grandfathers” / “Simply Grand” Then, “After reading ‘A Celebration of Grandfathers’ and ‘Simply Grand,’ what general statements can you make about the grandparent-grandchild relationship? Write an essay in which you make three generalizations about this relationship. Use information from both selections and your own experiences to support your response.” Students also respond to, “Suppose Lomov and Natalia have just gotten married. Write a half-page dialogue in which they discuss the behavior of their relatives at the wedding. In your dialogue, include details that contribute to a definite mood or tone.” The culminating unit task during Writing Workshop asks students to, “ Write a short story that is centered on an event or experience that you find interesting. Use sensory language, dialogue and suspense to develop the story’s setting, characters, plot, mood , and theme.

  • In Unit 7 students read, “There Will Come Soft Rains” / “Meeting at Night” / “The Sound of Night” and answer an Extended Constructed Response question, “Write three-to-five paragraphs comparing and contrasting the themes of each poem. In your response, consider the figurative language used in each poem. How does the figurative language reflect the time and place in which the poem was written and help illustrate its theme?” They then read, “Lord Randall” / “Ballad / Balada” / Midwinter Blues” and “Compare and contrast the experiences of each speaker. What do their experiences suggest about the nature of romantic love? Support your argument with details from the poem in a three-to-five paragraph response.” The culminating unit task during Writing Workshop asks students to, “Choose a poem, and write an analysis. In your essay, analyze the poet’s use of stylistic elements and their effects, using quotations and other evidence from the poem to support your ideas and help your audience gain a new understanding of the poem’s meaning.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Within the teacher’s edition of the text, a focusing question is posed, which is general and broad. The “big” question is used direct students to major themes. This question is repeated with supporting discussion questions throughout the sets of texts. Additionally teachers are provided “Tiered Discussion Prompts” that are text specific and connect to the big question. For example,in Unit 3, on page 308, the Big Question for Unit is, “Does knowledge come at a price? Discuss, think about a time when your desire for knowledge got you into a tough situation. Then create a cause-and-effect chart like the one shown to represent this experience. Share your chart with your classmates, and then discuss if pursuing knowledge is ever worth risking trouble.”

Although some evidence of developing discussion protocols is present, it is not frequent throughout the teacher’s guide. Tiered Discussion Prompts, accompanying texts appear in the teacher edition which provide some protocols for discussion. There is limited guidance for small-group or peer-to-peer discussions or student-led conversation. The Speaking and Listening Handbook placed after the main units outlines basic principles and strategies for discussing and listening. For example in Unit 10, teacher directed discussion questions are provided throughout the unit to guide students in the reading. In Antigone, page 1078: “At this point in the play, Creon doesn’t know that Antigone has buried her brother out of loyalty to family and principle. In lines 111-120, what does he think is the reason for this refusal to obey his decree?” and on page 1082, “How does the sentry feel in Scene 1 when he leaves Creon to find out who had buried Polyneices?”

Throughout the unit, there are opportunities for discussion prompted by the teacher in whole class instruction. There are few noted opportunities for students to discuss in a variety of groupings. Only a few mentions of small group discussion are present in the materials. For example, in Unit 10, on page 1066, “what is your ultimate loyalty? Discuss: rank the principles shown on the list in order of their importance to you. Imagine situations that might bring these principles into conflict and think about what you would choose. With a small group, discuss your rankings and your reasoning. Teacher instructions state, “What is your ultimate loyalty? Ask students to define loyalty. Then read the question and discuss. Continue this exploration with the discuss activity.” Also, on page 401, in the Speaking and Listening Workshop, this activity asks students to present their literary analysis. As a follow-up activity to presenting the literary analysis, a prompt is included, “Provide feedback to your classmates by responding thoughtfully to the different perspectives they have to offer. As you discuss the presentation with your classmates, summarize points of agreement and disagreement. When there is disagreement, justify your own view, but also be willing to consider the views of others”. This is an excellent example of content-based, whole-class discussion using evidence and academic language. However, it is only offered as a follow-up activity and not as a main focus of study.

Modeling of academic vocabulary is limited. The function of most of the discussion questions is as an ice-breaker and/or interest grabber before reading rather than an evidence-based discussion encouraging the use of academic vocabulary. For example, an activity in Unit 4 has students prepare for and participate in a purposeful group discussion, including assigning roles, establishing rules, and doing preparatory research. This activity meets the standards related to effective group work (preparation, collegiality, decision making). It does not model or encourage use of academic language and syntax, or specify the importance of evidence-based discussion.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Activities requiring students to listen and speak to share information are embedded across the year’s instruction. Throughout the textbook, there are opportunities for discussion prompted by the teacher in whole class instruction. There are few noted opportunities for students to discuss in a variety of groupings. Some activities include discussion about what has been read and researched as well as preparing for group discussion. However, most activities, especially those placed at the beginnings of units, rely on opinion or life-experiences rather than research or textual evidence. Fewer activities involve gaining understanding from multiple sources or include follow-up questions.

The speaking and listening tasks are often presented as “Extension” activities, but they connect to readings or the section as a whole. There are tasks in the Speaking & Listening Workshop section of each unit in which students re-work a written assignment and create a speech or powerpoint presentation. Teachers have some guidance throughout the units, but could use more explicit details to help engage all learners with speaking and listening skills.

Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, Students are asked to analyze and compare a text account and a film depiction of the Apollo 13 mission, “Evaluate the ways in which the nonfiction account and the film select different details to create suspense. They should evaluate how the details add to the suspense of the print version and the film version of this event. Students should indicate what details they might have emphasized and explain how those selections would contribute to the film.” Using this prompt for discussion is offered as an option, and there is no protocol offered for a discussion activity. (139)
  • In Unit 3, students adapt a written literary analysis as a class presentation. Students are guided through the process of revising the analysis for an oral delivery, as well as including verbal and nonverbal techniques. Students in the audience are given directions for listening, “Evaluate a classmate’s presentation using these points,
    • Clearly states and keeps focus on a controlling idea.
    • Follows a logical structure that helps achieve the purpose of the presentation and makes the speaker’s meaning clear.
    • Provide feedback to your classmates by responding thoughtfully to the different perspectives they have to offer.
    • As you discuss the presentation with your classmates, sum up points of agreement and disagreement. When there is disagreement, justify your own view, but also be willing to consider the views of others.
    • The activity meets the indicator’s expectation for listening and speaking about research and reading, and for preparing for engagement with the group. It encourages students to ask follow-up questions. (401)
  • In Unit 9, students were asked to compare three depictions of 9/11; in a cartoon, a book cover, and a website. Students were instructed to compare the images. “In your opinion, which image communicated the mood of these times most effectively? Give specific reasons for your views.” Using this prompt for discussion is offered as an option, and there is no protocol offered for a discussion activity. If used as a discussion prompt, this activity would meet the indicator’s expectation of using discussion and listening to gain understanding, using evidence from multiple sources. (1029)

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The Grade 10 materials provide opportunities for students to write in both process and on-demand formats and incorporates technology when appropriate. Throughout the units, short-constructed, on-demand writings are found. In addition, the end of units provide a processed writing task in a Writing Workshop strategy. The Writing Workshop strategy provides guidance in the steps of the writing process. The process writing assignments include segments on: planning, drafting, revising and editing, publishing with several opportunities for publishing. Digital publishing is often encouraged. There are a variety of Short Constructed Responses and Extended Constructed Response at the end of text sets that are on-demand writing assignments. These responses connect to one or more selections in the previous text sets. The responses vary in mode and do offer revision tips and direct the students to the thinkcentral.com site for interactive support. The quick writes are placed at the beginning of text sets and connect to the Big question that focuses the students and provides a common theme to consider while reading the texts.

Examples of the mix of on-demand and process writing include, but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, on page 48, “In the material ahead of ‘Alice Walker’s ‘Everyday Use,’ students are given a quick write prompt: ‘If you could save only one precious possession of yours from being destroyed or left behind, what would you save? Write a short paragraph identifying the item and telling why it is valuable to you.’”
  • In Unit 4, on page 498, during Writing Workshop, students address the prompt, “Writing Task: write a comparison and contrast essay in which you identify the similarities and differences between two subjects. Make sure to include a controlling idea that is supported by details, quotations, and other evidence.”
  • In Unit 4 on page 505, students incorporate digital resources when students are told to, “submit your essay to an online literary magazine or your school newspaper or prepare a computer slide presentation for an interested local organization or group.”
  • In Unit 8 on page 914, students write an article to address the prompt, “Write an online feature article that informs the audience about a topic that interests you.”
  • In Unit 11, on page 1198, students write on-demand, “Think of a time you made a wrong decision, even though your intention was good. Write a paragraph explaining why you have this unexpected outcome.”

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards. May include “blended” styles.

The 10th grade curriculum provides opportunities to meet the variety of writing styles mandated by the standards. These styles include: argumentative, explanatory, and narrative writing. Some of the styles could be considered “blended” writing styles.

Examples of opportunities for students to address the different types of writing reflected by the standards include, but are not limited to:

  • Blended Style: In Unit 3 on p. 393, a blend of argumentative and narrative writing styles is found. “Is technology more harmful or helpful to us? Consider both the advantages and disadvantages of living in a heavily mechanized society. Use your objective summaries of both the short story and the newspaper article to help you form an opinion.”
  • Argumentative: In Unit 6 on p. 645, and example of argumentative writing is found. “Write a three-to-five paragraph editorial in which you argue that children reap greater benefits from participating in structured activities.”
  • Explanatory: In Unit 7 on p. 823, an example of explanatory writing is found. “Make a short to-do list of things you’d like to accomplish if success were assured Then, with a partner, discuss your list. What are some of the entries? How do you feel inside as you imagine completing these tasks?”
  • Narrative: In Unit 11 on p. 1164, an example of narrative writing is found. “Write a video script about a character who is struggling with the consequences of a choice. In your script, develop and resolve the conflict the character faces. Make sure your script uses dialogue and well-chosen details that create a vivid picture of the events you want to present in your video.”

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for research-based and evidence-based writing to support analysis, argument, synthesis and/or evaluation of information, supports, claims.

Throughout the materials, a variety of writing tasks provide opportunities for research-based, evidence-based writing. Writing tasks include formal and informal writing to support analysis of poetry and prose. Many opportunities for the composition of arguments are found within the text. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 4, a written analysis is found which involves comparison and contrast of two different pieces of literature read in the unit. “The stories in the unit are from different time periods, but they share a similar theme about conflict: ‘After a time, hatred becomes pointless.’ Compare and contrast the ways each story expresses this theme. Using examples from the stories, write a three-to-five paragraph response.” The stories are as follows:
    • “When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine” Short Story by Jhumpa Lahiri (454)
    • “Two Friends” Short Story Guy De Maupassant (440)
    • “The Interlopers” Saki (428)
  • In Unit 4, students making claims and provide evidence based on the following prompt. “Of the three poems on pages 816-820, which best matches Young’s description of the blues? Use excerpts from the poems and descriptive details from the essay to support your response.”
  • Another example of argument requiring evidence from text is found on in Unit 6. “How does the dialogue and imagery in “Mending Wall” help illuminate the differences between the speaker and his neighbor? How do the differences between them help reveal the poem’s theme? Using examples and direct quotations from the poem, write a three-to five paragraph response.”
  • In Unit 4, students will “Write a comparison-contrast essay in which you identify the similarities and differences between two subjects. Make sure to include a controlling idea that is supported by details, quotations, and other evidence.”

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level. Over the course of the year’s worth of materials, grammar/convention instruction is provided, however it does not increase in sophisticated contexts.

The materials offer grammar instruction and support over the course of the year. The Essential Course of Study (ECOS) table at the beginning of the Teacher’s Edition identifies grammar and language instruction and exercises present in each unit. (T23-T28) This page shows the progression of skills and language standards, starting with Latin roots, and moving on to dialect and language devices (such as alliteration), and ending the unit with the mechanics of excerpting poetry and punctuating quotations. Some grammar, mechanics, and conventions are taught explicitly (e.g., use alliteration) providing opportunities for students to grow their fluency through practice and application.The materials offer a “Language Coach” and “ Grammar and Style” notation embedded in most texts as well as a “Grammar and Style” practice activity at the end of some selections. Additionally, the materials offer “Grammar in Context” support with samples in the “Writing Workshop” section of each unit as well as a “Grammar Handbook,” along with other support resources, at the end of the text.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Unit 2, Grammar in Context: Short Story: Verb Tense, page 283, students are prompted to, “Write a short story that is centered on an event or experience you find interesting.” Students are reminded that, “Verb tense tells the time of the action or idea that the verb tense expresses. Follow these tips: When describing events that occur at the same time, use verbs in the same tense. When describing events that occur at different times, use different tenses to show the sequence of events, or the order in which they happened
  • Unit 6, Reading-Writing Connection, page 684, students are prompted to, “In two to three paragraphs, write a summary of the American Medical Association’s arguments for using animals in biomedical research. Revising Tip: Review your response. Did you use formal language like that the American Medical Association uses in its paper? If not, revise for a more formal style.”
  • Unit 11, Grammar and Style Note, page 1249. Students are instructed to,”Reread lines 36-38: Here, Shakespeare uses the adjective clause “who...shall receive the benefits of his dying” to convey Brutus’s implication that Antony will gain from Caesar’s death. Next students receive the prompt, “To what extent do you consider Mark Antony to be motivated by conscience? Using examples from the text, write a one- or two-paragraph response that explains how ANtony’s decisions reflect his internal sense of what is right and wrong.” Finally students are given the revising tip, “Review your response. Have you used adjective clauses and reciprocal pronouns to add descriptive details? If not revise your response.”

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials for Grade 10 partially meet the expectations of Gateway 2. The materials include texts organized around themes and topics to build knowledge, although the questions and tasks accompanying them only partially support students' literacy development. Vocabulary, writing, and research work may need supplementing by the teacher to ensure student profiency in these areas by the end of the school year.

Criterion 2a - 2h

16/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently.

These units are based around literacy skills, not a topic or theme. Units 1-9 are each centered around building skills and knowledge around a particular literary element or topic. In Units 10 and 11 present major texts under the title “World Classics” allowing application of skills and knowledge developed in earlier chapters. In Unit 12 guides students through a research project, also promoting application of skills and knowledge developed in earlier chapters. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, The World of a Story: This unit focuses on plot, setting, and mood. Students read Everyday Use by Alice Walker (48), To Build a Fire by Jack London (78), Apollo 13, by Ron Howard (136) and the poem “Exile” by Julie Alverez (140).
  • In Unit 5, This unit focuses on author’s purpose. Students read The Plot Against People by Russell Baker (532), And of Clay We Are Created by Isabel Allende (584) and the poem “Peruvian Child,” by Pat Mora (602).
  • In Unit 10, This unit focuses on Greek tragedy and medieval romance. Students read the Antigone by Sophocles (1066), Le Morte d’Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory (1110), Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes (1144) and Man of La Mancha by Dale Wasserman

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The materials offer students opportunities to use evidence pulled directly from the text as well as make inferences while reading in order to help make meaning of the texts provided. Most discussion questions and tasks include analysis of language, key ideas, details and craft and structure. In the margins of the student text there are questions to call out specific details to note in the text. The sequenced questions allow for making meaning and building understanding of texts. Within the Tiered Discussion Prompts, there are questions labeled evaluate or analyze. The materials do include a range of text dependent questions and tasks throughout each unit. Questions and tasks cover a wide continuum of standards and strategies. Examples include:

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 3 after reading an excerpt from , “A Separate Peace include:

  • Excerpt from “A Separate Peace” by John Knowles At what point does the story switch from the present to the past? Cite the clues that signaled this flashback.”
  • “From what point of view is this story told? Explain how you can tell. How does the point of view contribute to the tone of the story?”
  • “Reread lines 3-21. What do you learn about the narrator from his own thoughts about the tree and his past?
    “Review the boxed text. What do the descriptions of the tree--in the present and in the flashback--help to emphasize?”
  • The Best Practices Toolkit provides a transparency to provide a structure for students to analyze the author’s craft in each text.

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 5 after reading the text, “The Interlopers” include:

  • “What aspects of setting are emphasized?
  • “How does the setting affect the characters?
  • “How does the setting relate to the story’s main conflict?
  • Think about the story’s setting and the way it affects Ulrich and Georg. What theme related to setting do you think Saki communicates in the story. Cite evidence to support your claim”.

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 7 after reading the text, “Sam, Dunk, and Hook” include:

  • “The speaker describes the players as ‘Beautiful and Dangerous’ in line 40. Find Two examples of figurative language that suggest either of these qualities. Explain your choices.”
  • “Contrast the two poems, citing three differences. Think about each poet’s treatment of the subject, as well as his use of poetic techniques.”

Examples of questions and tasks in Unit 11 after reading the text, Julius Caesar include:

  • “Point out the keywords that are emphasized by the rhythm in lines 3-7. Why might Shakespeare have chosen to stress them?”
  • “Consider the use of parallelism in the boxed lines. What words of phrases are parallel?”
  • “Notice the rhetorical questions that Marullus asks in line 37 and in lines 48-51. Through this rhetorical device, what +is he trying to emphasize?”
  • Notice that Shakespeare chose prose instead of blank verse to Casca’s speeches. Which of Casca’s character traits may have inspired this choice?”
  • Reread lines 61-69 and 77-85. What feelings does Brutus reveal in these two soliloquies?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

There is no clear explanation of how integration of skills builds from unit to unit, with limited guidance available for teachers. While questions may support a general understanding of the texts themselves, they do not support building students’ knowledge about the content or topics/themes introduced by the texts. There are some opportunities for students to build knowledge between multiple texts.

For example the Unit 2 focus is Character Development. Students read “Shoofly Pie” by Naomi Shihab Nye and answer questions such as:

  • “Reread lines 1-18. Base on your experiences, do you find Mattie’s reaction to her accident believable? Why or why not?”
  • Based on the story so far, would you want to work at the Good for You Restaurant?
  • Why do you think Mattie considers working at the Good for You Restaurant?
  • What is the Good for You Restaurant like?”
  • “Review the chart you created as you read. How did the connections you made help you understand the effect of grief on one or more of the characters? Discuss specific examples in the story.”
  • “Reread lines 465-482. Has Mattie gotten over her grief by the end of the story?”

While the questions support students comparing texts and support a general understanding of the texts themselves, they do not support building students’ knowledge about the content or topics/themes introduced by the texts. The focus of students’ work may need support from the teacher to focus on characterization and point of view which is the stated focus of the unit.

The Unit 4 focus is Theme. Students read the texts, ““Letter to a Young Refugee from Another: by Andrew Lam and “Song of P’eng-ya” by Tu Fu and answer questions such as:

  • “Ask students what message the photographer is trying to convey.” (491)
  • “What do you think is the most natural reaction toward someone who causes pain and suffering? How would you react?”
  • “According to Lam, what is the inevitable result of seeking revenge.”
  • “How would you sum up Andrew Lam’s conclusions about hate and revenge? How do you think Lam came to his conclusions?”
  • “Based on lines 27-42, what comforts the speaker, that he and his family are refugees?”

The Task Across Texts states, “Now that you have read both selections about refugee life, you are ready to identify each author’s message. The following Point of Comparison chart will help you get started.” The questions and task do not support building students’ knowledge about the content or topics/themes introduced by the texts.

The level of questions does not increase significantly over the course of the year, and tasks are scaffolded and passages labeled consistently across the year. Students are frequently directed where to look for evidence when analyzing a text.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The questions and tasks partially support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. The representation of these skills is not diverse. These tasks focus mostly on general analysis, general responses, opinion responses of characters, themes, or setting as well as relying heavily on the strategy of compare/contrast.

The materials provide culminating tasks at the end of sets as well as at the end of units. The end of text or text set culminating tasks are always writing tasks in the form of the “Short Constructed Response” and the “Extended Constructed Response,” which do not always focus on the unit’s topics. The end of unit tasks, however, are standards-driven, with a “Writing Workshop” essay assignment and often a speaking task that is related to the Writing Workshop writing piece. Overall, the culminating activities and tasks illustrate cohesiveness within the materials, yet they fall short of providing diverse opportunities for students to engage with texts at a higher/deeper level of analysis/interpretation, thus only partially meeting the criteria for this indicator.

The following examples represent culminating tasks that show mastery of skills, but not necessarily demonstration of knowledge of a topic:

  • Unit 1: The World of a Story: Plot, Setting, and Mood
    • “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker
    • “Review the notes you took as you read. What positive and negative traits does each character have?”
    • “Use the chart shown to explore the various ways that Dee is in conflict with her family. Which conflicts are resolved and which are not.”
    • Task: Imagine that Dee visits the family again ten years after the events in ‘Everyday Use.” Write one page showing what she, Mama, and Maggie are now like and how they interact. What conflicts between them are still unresolved?
    • End of Unit 1 Task:Literary Analysis
    • Writing Task: “Write a literary analysis of a short story you have read. Your analysis should use quotations and details from the story to develop your topic and help your audience find new meaning or significance in the work.” Students are provided “idea starters” as well as “the essentials”: common purposes, audiences, and formats.”
    • Performance Task: Adapt your literary analysis into an oral presentation that is appropriate for your audience. Practice delivering your presentation concisely so it is easy to follow.
  • Unit 3: A Writer’s Choice- Narrative Devices
    • “By the Waters of Babylon” by Stephen Vincent Bene’t
    • What is the tone of this story? How does the use of John as a narrator affect the tone?
    • What is the theme, or message of this story? Cite evidence to support your conclusions.
    • John is an example of a naive narrator-- a narrator with limited knowledge, who does not fully understand what he experiences. Why did Benet choose this kind of narrator for “by the Waters of Babylon”?
    • Short Constructed Response Prompt: : Do you agree with John thet too much knowledge can harm people and that “truth should come little by little”? Write a one-to-two paragraph response, drawing on the story and real life events.
    • Writing Prompt: Is technology more harmful or helpful to us? Consider both the advantages and disadvantages of living in a highly mechanized society. Use your objective summaries of both the short story and the newspaper article to help you form an opinion.
    • End of Unit 3: Literary Nonfiction Analysis: “The nonfiction texts in this unit are personal essays, reflecting each author’s thoughts or feelings about an experience. To analyze an essay, or determine its deeper meaning, you examine how the author uses stylistic elements to help you connect with an experience. In this workshop, you will learn how to write and analysis of literary nonfiction that examines the effects of an author’s choices.”
    • Writing Task: Write a literary analysis of an essay. In your response, analyze the author’s use of stylistic elements and their effects, using quotations and other evidence from the essay to support your ideas and convey your understanding of the essay’s meaning to your audience.” Students are provided “idea starters” as well as “the essentials”: common purposes, audiences, and formats.
    • Speaking and Listening Workshop - Presenting a Literary Analysis “When you write a TV program that profiles someone, the technique used to tell the story-- interviews, video clips, narration, and soundtrack-- can help you connect with the person’s experiences. When you tell a friend about it, you explain how the storytelling elements helped make the person’s life meaningful to you. Your personal response to the program is similar in many ways to an oral presentation of your analysis of an essay.
    • Task: Adapt your literary analysis into an oral presentation. Practice your presentation, then deliver it to an appropriate audience who has read the story. (400)

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meets the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials attempt a year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Each text is provided with the following vocabulary components located in the Teacher’s Edition:

  • Vocabulary Skill: “Vocabulary in Context” and “Vocabulary to Preteach” based on the text.
  • Own the Word: As students read, opportunities are provided for the teacher to stop to teach vocabulary words in context.
  • Differentiated Vocabulary Support: Vocabulary support is sporadic throughout each unit.
  • For English Language Learners: Language Coach: These are tips found in the teacher’s edition that assist in teaching specific vocabulary strategies for words such as roots, affixes, etymology, multiple meanings, word origins, etc… These are designed to use with English Language Learners but can be helpful to all students.
  • For Struggling Readers - Additional words from the text are identified as ones that students may need more support.
  • For Advanced Learners - Challenge vocabulary suggestions.
  • After Reading Vocabulary Assessment: This is found at the end of each text and includes true/false, multiple choice, short answer, and/or fill in the blank questions for students based on the words taught throughout the story.

Reviewers noted that the vocabulary strategies and tasks are often repeated and lack variety in how students engage with vocabulary. Materials lack consistent protocols for presentation as well as opportunities for students to review and reuse previously learned vocabulary. These factors may limit students’ abilities to build words across texts.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Unit 1 Text: “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

  • Vocabulary Skill:
  • Vocabulary in Context: “Diagnose Word Knowledge: Have all students complete
  • Vocabulary in Context. Check their words and phrases against the following: (words
  • definitions provided). Preteach Vocabulary: Use the following copy master to help
  • Students use context clues to determine the meaning of each boldfaced word.

1. Read item 1 aloud, emphasizing vigilance.

2. Point out “so they seldom broke laws” and “the government was watching” . Elicit possible meanings for vigilance, such as “Watchfulness” or “alterness”.

3. Repeat the procedure for items 2-6.” (37)

  • Academic Vocabulary in Speaking: affect, communicate, definite, establish, identify

Identify the social tendencies Vonnegut is warning against in “Harrison Bergeron.” Analyze the flaws of the society he depicts and discuss with a partner what Vonnegut seems to be recommending. Use at least one Academic Vocabulary word (listed above) in your discussion.

Vocabulary Strategy: The Greek Root syn

The vocabulary word synchronize contains the Greek word root syn, which means “together” or “similar.” This root is found in a number of English words. To understand the meaning of words with syn, use context clues as well as your knowledge of the root.

Practice: Write the word from the word web that best completes each sentence. Use context clues to help you or, if necessary, consult a dictionary or glossary.

Unit 3

Text: “There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury

Unit 3 does not have vocabulary in context words or words that are pretaught).

  • Vocabulary: Own the Word:

Silhouette: Ask students when or why they might see someone in a slhouette.

Paranoia: Point out that paranoia is from the Latin prefix para-, meaning “mind,”

and paranos, meaning “madness.” A person suffering from paranoia is

said to be paranoid. Have students explain when or why a person might

feel paranoid.” (328)

  • Vocabulary Assessment (335)

Additional resources such as copy masters, can be found in the Resource Manager. Think Central is an online tool that provides additional vocabulary resources for students to practice and review vocabulary. Directives are provided in the Teacher’s Edition.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Writing instruction in the 10th grade curriculum includes activities and tasks that are varied, building on and expanding on the experiences and readings students complete. Skills are pulled out and scaffolded for student development and opportunities to revise/edit help students improve. Due to the varied purposes, lengths, and types of texts students are responding to, students may need extra support or practice should they struggle in a skill area. The materials do not provide increase in student demand of writing instruction over the course of the school year.

For example:

Unit 1: Share What You Know

Throughout the unit there are frequent writing opportunities for students. Students engage in constructed responses to the texts read, and culminates in students writing an analysis of the author’s style. All writing tasks are responses to text. Some examples include:

  • Extended Constructed Response: “Use Gonzales’s principles for survival to evaluate the performance of the man in “To Build a Fire.” How does he demonstrate effective survival behaviors? What does he fail to do that survivors tend to do?” (103)
  • Analyze Accounts in Print and Film: When making a film based on a real life drama, most directors feel an obligation to be true to the original story. In the nonfiction account. “The Race to Save Apollo 13,” the writer uses specific details to build suspense at critical moments. Does the filmmaker use the same details to create suspense in the film excerpt? Determine which details are emphasized in each account. To prepare, think about how the writer and the filmmaker used the techniques in each medium to incorporate.” (139)
  • Cumulative Writing Task: Literary Analysis: “Write a literary analysis of a short story you have read. Your analysis should use quotations and details from the story to develop your topic and help your audience find new meaning or significance in the work.” Students are taken through the entire writing process. The final step is to publish. Suggestions include: “Finally, you will share your literary analysis with an audience. Here are some options:
  • Submit your essay to the school literary magazine.
  • Publish your essay on a Web site for the fans of the author’s work.
  • Adapt your essay into an oral presentation and deliver it to an audience that has read the story.

Proofread your essay for errors. Make sure you have used reciprocal pronouns to note shared feelings or actions among the members of plural subjects. Then, publish your final essay where your intended audience is likely to see it.” (148-157)

Unit 6: Making a Case: Argument and Persuasion

Throughout the unit there are frequent writing opportunities for students. Students engage in quickwrites, constructed responses to the texts read, and culminates in students writing a literary analysis. All writing tasks are responses to text. Some examples include:

  • Short Constructed Response: Analysis:: “A character in one of Gordimer’s novels says, “The real definition of loneliness is to live without responsibility.” Write one or two paragraphs in which you discuss how this quotation relates to the main theme of “A Chip of Glass Ruby.” (709)
  • Quickwrites: “Write a paragraph about a device or an object that has outlived its usefulness. Explain what caused it to lose value, and discuss why some people might be reluctant to get rid of it.” (646)
  • Cumulative Writing Task: Literary Analysis: “Write a persuasive essay on an issue about what you have a strong opinion. In your essay, try to persuade a specific audience to agree with your position and take a stand or action on it. This.” (742) Students are not required to read texts to complete this task, but it may benefit students to do so. Additional supports such as ideas, graphic organizers, adding evidence, etc..are provided as students work through the writing process to complete the task. (742-75

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

The materials include research and writing projects to synthesize knowledge to understand topics. Students are provided a few opportunities to choose their own topics to research in the culminating activities and in a stand alone unit at the end of the year. Occasionally, other sources are required throughout the year and provide opportunities for students to explore new information. Examples include:

Unit 3: Share What You Know: How Do You Tell a Tale?

  • One of the focus areas in this unit is on synthesis and citing materials. An article is provided to introduce the ideas students will read in “There Come Soft Rain” by Ray Bradbury
  • Synthesis is introduced in this unit with the qualities of the synthesis and a chart to help guide students on collecting information. Students then read a newspaper article and asked to “Synthesize: Review the ideas and information you noted on your chart. How is Bradbury’s fictional home of the future similar to actual homes being developed by researchers? Support your answer with details from both texts.” (336)

Unit 5: Why Write? Author’s Purpose

  • Students will read for information using multiple sources in this unit. After reading “Why Leaves Turn Color in the Fall” by Diane Ackerman and “How a Leaf Works” from a textbook, students will write to the following prompt: “On the basis of the information in the textbook diagrams and Diane Ackerman’s essay, explain (1) the process of photosynthesis, (2) the reason leaves are green in summer, and (3) the reason leaves turn color in the fall. Define scientific terms in your explanation. “Instructions are provided for the students in a step by step manner to help them write the response.
  • After reading a document “How to Plant a Tree” and “The Tree Planting Guide” from an online source, students will address the following prompt: “Larry has just returned to South Carolina from a vacation in Northern Maine. He would like to plant some trees in his yard to bring beautiful fall foliage to his neighborhood. He knows nothing about selecting and planting trees or why leaves changing colors, so you must advise him. Which trees should he plant? How will the fall foliage compare to the foliage he saw in Maine? Write 2-3 paragraphs advising Larry on his project. Use information from “Why Leaves Turn Color in the Fall,” the textbook diagrams, and the functional document for planting a tree to support your response.” (555)

Unit 12: The Power of Research: This unit is dedicated to the research process.

  • Research Workshop -The final unit is divided into two parts. Prompt: Write a research paper to answer a question that interests you.” (Starting on page 1320)
  • The Research Strategies Workshop , introduces students to strategies they can use to do both academic and everyday research. Students learn about selecting and using various electronic and print resources. As they learn they also apply the information in hands-on activities designed to help them gain proficiency in using these various research tools and strategies. Topics include:
  • Plan Research
  • Use library and media-center resources
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources
  • Evaluate information and sources, including nonfiction books, periodicals, and Web sites
  • Collect your own data

Additional resources can be found at the online resource “ThinkCentral”.

]The Writing Workshop (Beginning on page 1342), provides a framework for students to apply the strategies they have learned to an academic writing assignment: a research paper. After analyzing a student model, students are guided through a step by step process in writing their own research papers. Additional supports are provided in the Resources Manager. Topics include;

  • Write a research paper
  • Formulate a major research question
  • Develop a plan for conducting research
  • Locate sources and assess their usefulness
  • Take notes
  • Prepare a source list
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote directly
  • Integrate information selectively, avoiding plagiarism
  • Document sources correctly, using a standard format for citations
  • Format your paper

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

At the end of each unit is a page that introduces “Ideas for Independent Reading.” Included in this page are novels/ independent readings that relate to the questions from the unit. There is no design, accountability, nor suggested pacing for these novels. Additionally, there is no information regarding the qualitative or quantitative information around these novels to support teachers in providing guidance for student choice.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2017/08/31

Report Edition: 2012

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Holt McDougal Literature Gr 10 Student Edition 978‑0‑5476‑1840‑1 Copyright: 2012 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012
Holt McDougal Literature Gr 10 Teacher Edition 978‑0‑5476‑1847‑0 Copyright: 2012 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA High School Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complements the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations