Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials for Fountas and Pinnell Classroom Grade 5 do not meet the expectations for alignment to the standards. Texts are of high quality but do not reflect the balance of text types called for in the standards. Texts partially meet the expectations for text complexity, though students may never grapple with grade-level text during the year. Texts may not demonstrate a progression in text complexity with appropriate scaffolds over the course of the year due to the variability of what is implemented. 

Questions and tasks, including speaking and writing tasks, used throughout the program, include some text-based options, however many do not require a return to the text to support answers in oral or written responses. Additionally, many of the discussion activities are labeled as optional and may be eliminated at the teacher’s discretion, thus reducing the volume of writing, speaking, and listening practice. 

Students have opportunities to engage in all writing types called for by the standards, however, there may be a span of several months between opportunities to engage in a particular writing type. Students do not have robust, necessary opportunities to engage in evidence-based writing. There is very limited grammar instruction provided in the program, and many of the standards are not addressed. The materials provide suggested activities with vocabulary instruction, but there is no explicit instruction of academic vocabulary and its usage after being introduced.

Materials contain limited explicit instruction of phonics, word recognition, and word analysis consistently over the course of the year. Assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year; however, assessments do not clearly inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students progress toward mastery, and many assessments are optional.

Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. However, materials recommend that foundational skills lessons occur for 10 minutes each day, which may not provide sufficient time for students to receive explicit instruction to work towards mastery of newly learned foundational skills. Lessons provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern.

While some Guided Reading lessons include fluency, there is no guarantee that all students will have an opportunity to receive these lessons since they are not a part of core instruction. A fluency rubric is included, but there is not sufficient support for the use of the rubric, nor is there support for instructional adjustments to help students progress toward mastery of fluency. There is no evidence of students receiving instruction on using self-correction while reading.

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality and Complexity

0
20
37
42
19
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
N/A
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
15
23
25
N/A
23-25
Meets Expectations
16-22
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality and Complexity and Alignment to the Standards with Tasks and Questions Grounded in Evidence

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The materials for Fountas and Pinnell Classroom Grade 5 do not meet the expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are of high quality but do not reflect the 50/50 balance of text types called for in the standards. Texts partially meet the expectations for text complexity as all anchor texts are read aloud to the students as a part of the Interactive Read-Alouds, therefore students may never grapple with grade-level text during the year. Texts may not demonstrate a progression in text complexity with appropriate scaffolds over the course of the year due to the variability of what is implemented. Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a variety and volume of reading over the course of the year. The materials provide some support for independent reading tracking and accountability. 

Questions and tasks used throughout the program include some text-based questions and prompts, including opportunities for evidence-based discussions, some may not require a return to the text to support answers in oral or written responses. Additionally, many of the discussion activities are labeled as optional and may be eliminated at the teacher’s discretion, thus reducing the volume of speaking and listening practice. While the materials provide some protocols for speaking and listening, they are largely focused on behavior and affective interchanges between students and may not provide a strong support system for evidence-based discussions. 

Students have opportunities to engage in all writing types called for by the standards, however, these types are not distributed across the school year and there may be a span of several months between opportunities to engage in a particular writing type. Because of this, students do not have opportunities for robust evidence-based writing activities as called for in the standards. There is very limited grammar instruction provided in the program, and many of the standards are not addressed. The materials provide suggested activities with vocabulary instruction, but there is no explicit instruction of academic vocabulary and its usage after being introduced. 

Materials contain limited explicit instruction of phonics, word recognition, and word analysis consistently over the course of the year. Assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year; however, assessments do not clearly inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students progress toward mastery, and many assessments are optional.

Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. However, materials recommend that foundational skills lessons occur for 10 minutes each day, which may not provide sufficient time for students to receive explicit instruction to work towards mastery of newly learned foundational skills. Lessons provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern.

While some Guided Reading lessons include fluency, there is no guarantee that all students will have an opportunity to receive these lessons since they are not a part of core instruction. A fluency rubric is included, but there is not sufficient support for the use of the rubric, nor is there support for instructional adjustments to help students progress toward mastery of fluency. There is no evidence of students receiving instruction on using self-correction while reading.

Criterion 1a - 1e

Texts are worthy of students’ time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade.

Materials support students’ advancing toward independent reading.

9/18
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Fountas and Pinnell Classroom Grade 5 do not meet the expectations of Criterion 1.1. Texts are of high quality, including many by published and award-winning authors, however, the text types included in the program do not reflect the 50/50 balance of text types called for in the standards. While the materials may include texts at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level, all anchor texts are read aloud the students as a part of the Interactive Read-Alouds, therefore students may never grapple with grade-level text during the year. Texts may not increase in complexity across the year as the design of the program does not provide for appropriately complex grade-level anchor texts that assure students see a progression in text complexity with appropriate scaffolds over the course of the year. Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a variety and volume of reading over the course of the year. The materials provide some support for independent reading tracking and accountability.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of high quality, worthy of careful reading, and consider a range of student interests.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the expectations for Indicator 1a. 

The Grade 5 materials include a variety of informational and literary texts that are of publishable quality. Anchor texts are found in Interactive Read-Alouds and Shared Readings. Materials include full-length, high-quality texts, including many published by award winning authors. Many texts include engaging pictures, colorful illustrations, character relationships and motives, and rich vocabulary. The range of topics are appealing and engaging to Grade 5 students. 

Anchor texts are of high-quality and consider a range of student interests, are well-crafted, content rich, and engage students at their grade level. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Empathy, students read Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco. The historical fiction includes vibrant illustrations and strong academic vocabulary.

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Conflict Resolution, students read Desmond and the Very Mean Word by Archbishop Desmond Tutu & Douglas Carlton Abrams. The realistic fiction story includes vibrant “illustrations that convey setting and mood.”

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: The Power of Knowledge, students read Seeker of Knowledge: The Man Who Deciphered Egyptian Hieroglyphics by James Rumford. The biography includes vibrant illustrations and strong academic vocabulary.

  • In the Reading Minilessons, Umbrella 5, students read Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco. The text highlights the similarities that people of Jewish heritage and African Americans have faced. This thought-provoking text contains rich language and colorful appealing illustrations.

  • In the Reading Minilessons, Umbrella 6, students read The Poet’s Dog by Patricia MacLachlan. The emotionally engaging story is told from a dog’s perspective and students will relate to the characters.

  • In the Reading Minilessons, Umbrella 16, students read Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People by Monica Brown. The text details the life of the Chilean poet told in a simple style. The illustrations are rich, informative, and vibrant. They incorporate words in both English and Spanish that highlight the poet’s life.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for Indicator 1b. 

The Grade 5 materials include Interactive Read-Aloud and Shared Reading that function as anchor texts, and separately, the balance is not 50/50. The Interactive Read-Aloud texts are balanced while the Shared Reading are predominately literary. However, if considered together, they do reflect a balance between informational and literary texts required by the standards. 

Materials reflect the distribution of text types/genres required by the grade level standards. Examples include:

  • Interactive Read-Aloud,Text Set: Biography, Ira’s Shakespeare Dream by Glenda Armand Martin

  • Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Tall Tales, Paul Bunyon by Steven Kellogg

  • Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Fairy Tales, Merlin and the Dragon by Jane Yolin 

  • Book Clubs, Mighty Jack, no author, graphic novel

  • Guided Reading, Naked Mole Rat: Survival Superhero, no author, expository nonfiction

Anchor texts reflect a 50/50 balance of informational and literary texts. Examples include:

  • Interactive Read-Aloud: 52% literary, 48% informational - 62 literary and 57 informational. Five selections are considered both literary and informational. 

  • Shared Reading: 70% literary, 30% informational - 40 literary and 17 informational.

  • Total: 58% literary, 42% informational 

Indicator 1c

Core/Anchor texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to documented quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Documentation should also include rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for Indicator 1c. 

The Grade 5 materials include suggested anchor texts that do not have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. The only core texts outlined are the Interactive Read-Alouds, which are read-aloud by the teacher and never read independently by students; therefore, it is possible for students to go through the year without ever independently reading a complex, grade-level text. Minilessons are tied to Interactive Read-Alouds and the skills acquired in those lessons are practiced using the students’ Independent Reading books. Additionally, due to the low complexity of the associated tasks, the texts are not sufficiently complex for Grade 5 students. 

Quantitative levels are provided for the Interactive Read-Aloud texts. Quantitative information is only provided for Independent Reading and Guided Reading texts. Materials include their own leveling system (The Fountas and Pinnell System), however, the levels are not included on the texts or lesson plans for the Interactive Read-Alouds. The Interactive Read-Aloud Lesson Folders include a qualitative rationale for each book in a section titled, About This Book, but it does not include a quantitative text complexity. The section includes the genre focus, how the book works, and important characteristics to notice or important text characteristics. The section does give additional information about the text characteristics, but does not provide text analysis. 

There are no formal qualitative rubrics present in the materials. There is no explanation of how the texts are associated with student tasks and no rationale for the purpose or placement of the texts at this grade level. Although not explicitly stated on the Interactive-Read Aloud cards, the materials direct teachers to refer to the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum to select appropriate learning goals for students. 

The methodology for placing students in texts for independent reading or for group instruction does not ensure students are reading complex text and may not provide adequate support for students to ensure adequate growth towards mastery of the standards for their grade level.

Most texts do not have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative and qualitative analysis and relationship to their associated student task. Examples include:

  • In the Reading MInilessons, no specific texts are provided. Teacher guidance from Reading Minilessons, LA.U25.RML1, states that teachers are to direct students to use historical fiction books they have previously read aloud. After students develop a definition of historical fiction as a genre, teachers then direct students by stating that as they read their independent reading text, they should consider if it fits the definition of historical fiction. There is no guidance on what books students should choose to ensure students are choosing historical fiction books.

  • Examples of texts that mostly fall within the appropriate quantitative complexity range are found in various Interactive Read-Alouds. While students listen to multiple texts, they do not have the opportunity to read the anchor texts independently. Additionally, the majority of associated tasks are low to moderate complexity and not consistently aligned to grade-level standards. Examples include but are not limited to: 

    • Shooting at the Stars (830L) is set in World War I. A fictional character narrates the story of a famous historical event, the Christmas Truce of 1914. The text contains a nonfiction opening followed by a fictional letter written in first person. There is visual variety which includes illustration, hand-drawn maps, sketches, hand-lettered text, and historical photographs. There is an author’s note, glossary, and index. Teacher choice of activities to accompany the text include an independent writing on a text feature, a shared writing creating a word web, searching the Internet for photographic evidence that supports the text. The tasks are moderately complex.

    • Seeker of Knowledge: The Man Who Deciphered Eygptian Hieroglyphics (830L) is a biography of Jean-Francois Champollion told in chronological order from his early life until his death at age 42. The book contains a foreword with background information as well as sidebars and a glossary.  Teacher choices of tasks to accompany the text include an independent writing explaining their emotion now that they have finished the book, using an online resource to translate a message into hieroglyphics, or performing a Reader’s Theater. The tasks range from low complexity to complex.

    • Sailing the Unknown (800L) is a historical fiction text wherein the text’s main character was the youngest sailor on Endeavor who first caught sight of New Zealand and then of England on the journey home. Although the story is fictional, most of the details are based on actual events. The text contains diary entries with dates of the number of days at sea. There is a foreword that contains the background knowledge needed for students to understand the text. The book also contains a world map.Teacher choice of activities to accompany the text include an independent writing, creating a map where the Endeavor sailed, or creating and sharing a n illustration. The tasks vary from low complexity to moderately complex.

  • Examples of texts that are not at the appropriate complexity level are found in various Interactive Read-Alouds. While students listen to multiple texts, they do not have the opportunity to read the anchor texts independently. Examples include but are not limited to:

    • Richard Wright and the Library Card (700L) is a fictionalized biography of Wright’s memoir, Black Boy, includes a recount of an episode from Wright’s life in Memphis, TN, in the mid-1920s. After recounting Wright's early life and fascination with reading, the chronological narrative focuses on one episode from Wright’s teenage years. The text includes mature themes that reflect social issues. This text falls below the text complexity stretch Lexile band for Grades 4-5. Teacher choice of tasks to accompany the text include an independent writing with their opinion of the book, researching the role of reading during slavery, or creatign a drawing showing how reading is important to them. The tasks range from low complexity to complex.

    • Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People (1520L) is a traditional biography that includes details of Pablo Neruda’s life chronologically from childhood through later life. The book describes Neruda’s life and poetic focus simply: his historical beliefs and related controversies are highlighted near the end of the book. The Author's Note provides some additional biographical details. The text includes poetic language and illustrations that support the scope of the book. This text falls above the text complexity stretch Lexile band for Grades 4-5. Teacher choices of activities include independent writing, researching free speech claims, or reading aloud poems from the collection. Tasks range from low complexity to moderately complex.

Anchor/Core texts and series of texts connected to them are not accompanied by an accurate text complexity analysis and a rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level.

Indicator 1d

Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band to support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year.

0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for Indicator 1d. 

The Grade 5 materials provide suggested titles for Interactive Read-Aloud texts; however, very few of the Interactive Read-Aloud texts are above grade level complexity, despite being read aloud to students. The teacher has the option to use the suggested text as an anchor text or “use books that have similar characteristics.” The System Guide includes a suggested sequence of texts within text sets according to complexity levels by month. However, the System Guide also indicates that the Interactive Read-Aloud texts can be presented in a different order or mixed and matched to create new collections, meaning that not all students are exposed to more complex texts as the year progresses. Additionally, materials do not include grade-level anchor texts that provide all students opportunities to read independently, therefore, text complexity across the year will vary widely depending on the texts selected by the teacher and students according to their independent reading level. 

Materials provide scaffolds in Teacher Edition within lessons throughout the year, though they are the same for all text sets, and at times do not match the complexity of the text. The associated tasks include many of the same question stems at the end of the year that are modelled at the beginning of the year. The program suggests teachers use their preferred benchmark assessment to determine if students can move up in complexity levels in independent reading books. Therefore, teachers cannot assure a year’s worth of growth in complexity of student reading because a student could stay in the same text complexity all year. 

Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

The complexity of anchor texts students read/listen to do not provide an opportunity for students’ literacy skills to increase across the year, and may not provide an entire year’s worth of growth. 

  • In the System Guide, teacher directions state that the Interactive Read-Aloud texts can be presented in a different order or even mix and match to create new collections. Since the Reading Minilessons are connected to the Interactive Read-Aloud texts, the questions and tasks within the Minilessons can be sequenced in whatever way the teacher chooses. This does not support growth in complexity across the year. 

  • In the Reading Minilessons book, the teacher directions state that in many Minilessons teachers will use books from several different text sets and they will see the same books used in more than one Umbrella: “Use these suggested mentor texts as examples in the minilessons in this umbrella or use books that have similar characteristics This does not show growth in complexity over the course of the year. Another example states that the mini lessons “in month eight, might draw on texts introduced earlier in the year.”

  • Students listen to and read a variety of texts throughout the year ranging in text complexity that are organized by theme and do not appear to be sequenced in a way that attends to a growth in complexity over the course of the school year. Very few Interactive Read-Aloud Texts are above grade level complexity, despite being read aloud to students. The suggested sequence for Grade 5 is:

    • The texts provided in Months 1-2, Text Set: Empathy: Mrs. Katz and Tush (530L), Smoky Night (530L), and The Poet’s Dog (640L). The complexity ranges from low to moderate complexity. Associated tasks are low to moderate.

    • The texts provided in Months 3-4, Text Set: Freedom: Under the Quilt of the Night (580L), Marti’s Song for Freedom (1000L), Dia’s Story Cloth: The Hmong People’s Journey of Freedom (1140L), Wall (590L), and The Composition (590L). The complexity ranges from low to moderate complexity. Associated tasks are low to moderate.

    • The texts provided in Months 5-6, Text Set: Ted and Betsy Lewin: Horse Song: The Naadam of Mongolia (870L), Elephant Quest (960L), Balarama: A Royal Elephant (910L), and Gorilla Wall (1010L). The complexity ranges from low to moderate complexity. Associated tasks are low to moderate.

    • The texts provided in Months 7-8, Text Set: Problem Solving/Resourcefulness: Green City: How One Community Survived a Tornado and Rebuilt for a Sustainable Future (770L), Destiny’s Gift (690L), The Soda Bottle School: A True Story of Recycling, Teamwork,and One Crazy Idea (620L), Finding the Music (660L), and Aliens Ate My Homework (730L). The complexity ranges from low to moderate complexity. Associated tasks are low to moderate.

As texts become more complex, appropriate scaffolds and/or materials are provided in the Teacher Edition (i.e., spending more time on texts, more questions, repeated readings, skill lessons).

  • In various lessons, teachers provide the same question stems to support students throughout the year, such as “turn and talk” and “tell what you noticed.” For example, in Reading Minilesson LA.U4.RML1, students “turn and talk” about a book with a partner and, in LA.U22.RML4, students “turn and talk” about how a text fits the definition of science fiction. The same “turn and talk” strategy is used with no variation later in the year. 

  • In Reading Minilessons throughout the year, skills do not repeat; therefore, a gradual release of responsibility of a skill cannot be measured. 

  • In Reading Minilessons, the format is the same from the beginning of the year to the final Minilessons. Advanced scaffolds are not introduced, even with more complex texts. The Minilessons format includes: 

    • The teacher uses a previously read text and presents the skill. 

    • The teacher records the student observations on a chart. 

    • Students talk with a partner about the skill. 

    • The teacher summarizes the learning and directs the students to pay attention to determine if the skill is applicable in their Independent Reading for the day. 

    • After Independent Reading, the teacher asks students to share if the skill was present in their independent reading for the day.

Indicator 1e

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year, including accountability structures for independent reading.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1e.

The Grade 5 materials provide opportunities for students to engage in a variety and volume of reading; however, teacher guidance and protocols to foster independence are limited. There is no provision to ensure that students are regularly engaged in reading grade-level text. While students do have access to a wide range and volume of texts, structures to establish and foster independence are not evident throughout the materials. Students listen to texts, read aloud together in groups, and read independently throughout the program. Students listen to texts in the Reading Minilessons and Interactive Read-Alouds. Students read independently in the Independent Reading program and Book Clubs. 

Accountability and tracking is limited to a downloadable reading log listing the title and author of the book and a check box to indicate completion of the text. No other method of accountability is present. Texts are not organized with built-in supports/scaffolds to foster independence because students and teachers can choose what to read within their assessed level at any time.

Instructional materials provide opportunities and supports for students to engage in reading a variety of text types and genres to become independent readers at the grade level. Examples include:

  • Interactive Read-Alouds: In the System Guide, Suggested Time Frame for Literacy Opportunities, directions state that teachers read aloud to students each day from an Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set. The Interactive Read-Aloud text sets include four to six texts that are read aloud to the students. There are 25 text sets for Grade 5 for a total of 120 books, including both fiction and nonfiction genres.

  • Guided Reading: In the System Guide, Suggested Time Frames for Literacy Opportunities, directions state that the teacher meets with three to four Guided Reading groups each day. Each Guided Reading group is composed of students reading at approximately the same level. There are 200 guided reading titles available for Grade 5 spanning F&P Levels Q-Z. 

  • Book Clubs: Each student has read or listened to the same book prior to taking part in literature circle conversations about the book. Teacher guidance suggests that most students will be able to read the books independently, but that some students may need to have it facilitated by audio recording or another student reading it aloud. Book Clubs are suggested to be held once a month for 20-30 minute.

Instructional materials identify some opportunities and supports for students to engage in a volume of reading. Examples include:

  • The Interactive Read-Aloud Session lasts approximately 15 minutes at the start of the literacy block. There are 120 texts included that comprise 25 Interactive Read-Aloud Text Sets,

  • The Reading Minilessons last approximately 5-15 minutes. 

  • During the next 60-minute block of instructional time, students are engaged in one or more of the following:

    • Teacher-led Guided Reading Groups (20-25 minutes each). There are 200 Guided Reading Text titles included in the program. 

    • Book Clubs (20-25 minutes each) include 32 text titles organized into eight text sets. 

    • Individual conferences (3-5 minutes each). 

    • Students not involved in these groups take part in independent reading or write in a Reader’s Notebook. The lesson ends with a five minute Group Share.

  • The proposed schedule of independent reading is 45 minutes daily while the teacher conferences with students using Conferring Cards. There is not a set number of texts a student will read during independent reading due to the flexible nature of how leveled texts are assigned to students. There are no recommendations regarding the suggested number of texts students should be reading across each unit or the year as a whole.

Teacher guidance is limited to foster independence for all readers (e.g., independent reading procedures, proposed schedule, tracking system for independent reading). Examples include:

  • In the System Guide, a general plan is provided for how to implement independent reading, but not a specific lesson plan. Directions suggest that teachers introduce students to independent reading through book talks, listen while individual students read a portion of a book, observe student’s control over their reading, and confer individually with students. The directions do not state how often these should take place. 

  • In Reading Minilesson 2, LA.U1.RML2, Share, directions state how independent reading is woven into lessons: “following independent reading time, gather students together in the meeting area to talk about their reading.” 

  • In the Reading Minilessons, Management Umbrella 3, Getting Started with Independent Reading, the following lessons are included: 

    • MGT.U3.RML1 focuses on how to work during independent reading time where students are provided guidance on how they will mostly read silently during silent reading time with some time spent conferencing and some spent writing. Writing about what they read is an optional activity. Suggestions are provided for students on how they might take notes on their thoughts as they read.

    • MGT.U3.RML2 focused on different approaches students might use to choose a book to read.

    • MGT.U3.RML3 focused on how students can determine if a book is on an appropriate level for them to read.

    • MGT.U3.RML4 focused on reasons students may have for abandoning a book and when it is appropriate to do so.

    • MGT.U3.RML5 focused on helping students understand how to keep their independent reading books and materials organized. 

  • Each Independent Reading book has a Conferring Card on different genres of fiction texts. They provide a brief introduction of the book, a summary for teachers who may not have read the book, and key characteristics of the book that the teacher may wish to focus on, general prompts that can be used with fiction texts, and academic vocabulary for teachers to begin using in conferring with students to build student experience with the academic language. Suggestions are provided in the System Guide to extend thinking beyond the book with a notation that it is optional and can be modified: "Occasionally you may want to encourage students to expand their thinking about the book through writing or drawing. Choose or modify a Writing About Reading prompt that would best support and extend a student's understanding of the text." 

  • In the System Guide, directions are provided for individual conferences and state that the teacher can have “brief conversations, between a young reader and an expert reader, [that] help you expand a student’s thinking about what makes a ‘good’ book.” Teachers use Conferring Cards during the conferences.

  • In the System Guide, directions state that when students discover a book they like, “point them to similar books in your classroom or school library to encourage more independent reading.” It also states that students should be allowed to choose books by topic of interest, not reading level: “Students read books of their choosing. Minilessons, brief conferences, and opportunities to share ideas support students’ learning.”

Criterion 1f - 1m

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

6/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Questions and tasks used throughout the program include some text-based questions and prompts, some may not require a return to the text to support answers in oral or written responses. While the materials provide some protocols for speaking and listening, they are largely focused on behavior and affective interchanges between students and may not provide a strong support system for evidence-based discussions. While there are frequent opportunities for evidence based discussions, there is little variety in the groupings utilized and nearly all discussion opportunities are labeled as optional within the program, therefore the classroom teacher may elect to eliminate or reduce time for students discussions. 

The bulk of writing tasks in the program are connected to reading response activities. Students have opportunities to engage in all writing types called for by the standards, however, these types are not distributed across the school year and there may be a span of several months between opportunities to engage in a particular writing type. Because of this, students do not have opportunities for robust evidence-based writing activities as called for in the standards. There is very limited grammar instruction provided in the program, and many of the standards are not addressed. The materials provide suggested activities with vocabulary instruction, but there is no explicit instruction of academic vocabulary and its usage after being introduced.

Indicator 1f

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and/or text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1f. 

The Grade 5 materials provide questions that are text-specific and text-dependent; however, the questions do not require students to return to the text to answer them, nor are the students required to provide text evidence to support their responses. The materials provide inconsistent support for students in making meaning of the topics being studied through teacher supports that accompany the Interactive Read Alouds.There are some general pieces of instruction for teachers but not specific directions to assist students. Some questions that serve as writing prompts provide sample student answers but do not include any specificity in what students should be providing in their answers. In the Interactive Read Alouds, teachers are provided with some support for planning and implementation of text-based questions and tasks through the inquiry task cards and the lesson folder.

Text-specific and text-dependent questions and tasks provide some support for students in making meaning of the core understandings of the texts being studied; however, students are not consistently required to return to the texts to provide support for their responses. Examples include:

  • In the Interactive Read Aloud, Text Set: Genre Study: Legends, students listen to Merlin and the Dragons by Jane Yolen and verbally answer: “Think about the relationship between Arthur and Merlin. How would you describe it? What makes you describe it that way? The white knight who defeated Vortigern was Arthur’s father. Why do you think Merlin chose this story to tell Arthur? What do you think the author wants you to take away from this story? Why do you think that?” Students are not directed to return to the text to support their responses.

  • In the Interactive Read Aloud, Text Set: Facing the Unknown, students listen to King of the Sky by Nicola Davies and verbally answer: “What word describes how this boy is feeling? The relationship between the boy and Mr. Evans is changing. What clues in the story show that? What messages do you think the author is giving us in this story?” Students are not directed to return to the text to support their responses.

  • In the Interactive Read Aloud, students listen to The Village That Vanished and verbally answer questions from the Discuss the Text section: “The story talks about both Chimwala and Abikanile having courage. What helps them to be brave?” Students are not directed to return to the text to support their responses.

  • In Book Clubs, Text Set: Biography, students read The Secret World of Walter Anderson by Hester Bass and verbally answer: “I wonder why Walter Anderson kept his artwork private. Do you think he expected to be famous, or even cared about fame? Talk about what a typical day on Horn Island was like for Walter. Why do you think he enjoyed being all alone with the animals and nature?” Students are not directed to return to the text to support their responses.

Teacher materials provide limited support for planning and implementation of text-based questions, tasks, and assignments. Examples include:

  • In the Interactive Read Aloud, teacher instructions on the inquiry task cards state: “Think about the essential question and big ideas on the previous page in order to formulate some questions that will help guide students in identifying projects for further exploration of the essential question.” In the lesson folders, the teacher's instructions state: “Invite students to share their thinking about the book.”

  • In Book Clubs, teacher instructions are provided for discussions. In Prepare for Discussion subheading, teachers instructions state: “Tell children when you will be meeting. To prepare for book club, read or listen to the book and think about what you want to say about it. Use a sticky note to make one or two pages that you want to talk about.” In the Discuss the Book subheading, teacher instructions state: “Invite children to talk about the book, building on each other’s ideas and providing a variety of perspectives. Remind them to demonstrate respectful listening behavior.” No support for what this should look or sound like is provided.

Indicator 1g

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1g. 

The Grade 5 materials provide some opportunities and behavioral protocols for students to engage in speaking and listening activities; however, materials do not provide strong protocols for a variety of evidence-based speaking and listening opportunities across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials. Speaking and listening instruction may not be applied frequently over the course of the school year. It does not include facilitation, monitoring, or instructional supports for teachers. The development of speaking and listening skills are not prioritized and teacher guidance on how these discussions are to be structured are not apparent throughout the materials. 

The Reading Minilessons provide nine lessons on setting up Book Clubs that include establishing protocols for speaking and listening in these activities; this is the only instruction on speaking and listening. Teacher guidance also indicates that the Minilessons can be omitted at the teacher’s discretion. 

Materials provide limited protocols to support students’ developing speaking and listening skills across the whole year’s scope of instructional materials. Examples include:

  • In Reading Minilesson LA.U1.RML2, teachers create a chart to help students remember the guidelines for Turn and Talk conversations:

    • Turn your body toward your partner.

    • Look at your partner.

    • Use a soft indoor voice.

    • Take turns telling your thinking.

    • Be silent and listen carefully while your partner speaks.

    • Say whether you agree or disagree with your partner or add on to what he said.

    • Give reasons for your thinking.

  • In the Reading Minilessons, the recommended teaching schedule for Umbrella 4: Getting Started with Book Clubs may be taught in Month 2. The nine lessons that teach speaking and listening protocols are scattered in the Minilessons. Examples include:

    • In Reading Minilesson LA.U3.RML2, teachers provide an inquiry-based lesson to help students understand possible ways to begin and end Book Club discussions.

    • In Reading Minilesson LA.U3.RML4, teachers provide an interactive lesson on ways that students can prepare for and give a good book talk during Book Clubs.

    • In Reading Minilesson, LA.U4.RML3, students are instructed to turn and talk with a partner about their Book Club discussion ideas but no guidance or protocols are provided.

    • In Reading Minilesson LA.U4.RML4, students engage in a fishbowl discussion and then discuss their observations on respectful behaviors during a discussion. The students and teacher work together to create a chart together that shows their observations and establishes protocols for respectful book club discussions. No teacher instruction or protocol is provided for how to implement a fishbowl discussion or lead the post-fishbowl conversation.

    • In Reading Minilessons LA.U4.RML5, LA.U4.RML6, and LA.U4.RML7, students continue conversations and reflections to develop guidelines for Book Clubs and how to hold conversations.

  • In Interactive Read-Alouds, Independent Reading, and Book Clubs, protocols for speaking and listening are not varied across the academic school year. The same directions are provided to teachers for the protocols in each section:

    • In Interactive Read-Alouds, all lesson folders tell teachers to “invite students to share their thinking about the books. Stop a few times to invite thinking and a brief conversation. Students may turn and talk in pairs or threes. Some stopping points and quick comments are suggested below.”

    • In Independent Reading, all conferring prompts suggest that teachers “may want to select from the prompts below to check in on the student’s enjoyment and understanding of the book, and to answer any questions. Sample and support the student’s oral reading and discuss writing in the Reader’s Notebook.”

    • In Book Clubs, all Conferring Cards tell teachers to “invite students to talk about the book. Remind them to take the group to places in the book they have marked and want to talk about. Facilitate the discussion by guiding students to think about the big ideas in the text.”

Speaking and listening instruction includes limited facilitation, monitoring, and instructional supports for teachers. This includes discussions during Interactive Read-Alouds, Independent Reading, and Book Clubs. Specific speaking and listening support provided is for students who are English Language Learners (ELLs).

  • Although there are nine Reading Minilessons focused on speaking and listening and developing protocols for Book Clubs, the Reading Minilesson Book states “If you are new to these minilessons, you may want to follow the suggested sequence, but remember to use the lessons flexibly to meet the needs of the students you teach: Omit lessons you think are not necessary for your students (based on assessment and your experiences with them interactive read-aloud). ...The minilessons are here for your selection according to the instructional needs of your class, so do not be concerned if you do not use them all within the year.”

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Family, an optional culminating task has students “organize an open mic night” with a theme related to families. Teacher directions state: “Be sure to communicate that there are many different kinds of families. In general, a family is the people who care for you. Help them to refine the theme and set up the parameters for presentations or performances. Also help them brainstorm a list of tasks to be accomplished to organize the event. However, do not set the agenda or choose a specific organizing principle for the theme; instead, facilitate student brainstorming and discussion. After the event, lead a discussion about what worked well and things students might want to do differently when organizing their next event.”

  • In the Word Study Lessons Book, Group Share (Reading), teachers are provided guidance that “[n]ot every student needs to share something every day. Also, you can have students share with a partner or in threes.” There is no specific guidance on how students should share or what form the conversations should take. 

  • In Book Clubs, Discuss the Book, teacher guidance states: “Invite children to talk about the book, building on each other’s ideas and providing a variety of perspectives. Remind them to use evidence to support statements about the text. If needed, select from the following prompts to support thinking and talking.” There is no specific evidence on how to teach students to build on each other’s ideas or how to use evidence. 

Indicator 1h

Materials support students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1h. 

The Grade 5 materials include opportunities for students to engage in speaking and listening work to demonstrate what they are reading, however, the majority of the opportunities are a partnered turn-and-talk or large group discussion. Many questions require students to utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and/or sources. However, due to the structure of the lesson plans, speaking and listening opportunities are nearly always presented as suggestions. Student discussions are incorporated in the Book Clubs and Interactive Read-Alouds; however, these can be modified or not completed if the teacher chooses. 

Students have multiple opportunities over the school year to demonstrate what they are reading, however there is little variation in the speaking and listening opportunities. The speaking and listening opportunities presented do not align to grade-level standards. Examples include:

  • In Reading MInilesson LA.U4.RML3, students listen to The Sinking of the Titanic and turn and talk with a partner pages 22 and 23 and what is different on those pages from the other pages in the book.

  • In Reading Minilesson LA.U7.RML2, teacher instructions state: “Turn and talk to your partner. Is this a free verse poem, or another type of poem? How do you know?”

  • In the Interactive Read Aloud Text Set: Problem Solving/Resourcefulness, students listen to Aliens Ate My Homework and verbally respond to questions including, “What does the author do to make the character seem real? Do you think he succeeds? Could this story happen in real life? What specific elements make this story a fantasy? What is Rod’s attitude toward the aliens at first? How does he feel about them by the end? How and why do his feelings change?”

Speaking and listening work requires students to utilize, apply, and incorporate evidence from texts and/or sources. Examples include:

  • In Interactive Read-Alouds, Discuss the Text, students listen to the text and the teacher asks text-based questions about the texts. Teacher-directed questions include:

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Empathy, students listen to Smoky Night and verbally answer: “Why do you think Eve Bunting had both Daniel and Mrs. Kim lose a cat in the story? Why doesn’t Daniel’s mother shop at Mrs. Kim’s store? What does that decision tell us about Daniel’s mother? Talk with a partner about that. Look at the art on these pages. Why do you think David Diaz chose to show scattered cereal in the background?”

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: The Writer’s Craft, students listen to Firebird: Ballerina Misty Copeland Shows a Young Girl How to Dance Like the Firebird and verbally answer: “How does the voice change on this page? Now who’s speaking, and how do you know? Let’s talk about how the art influenced your understanding of that. Why do you imagine the writer and illustrator decided to have a spread here with no words at all?”

  • In the Book Clubs, Discuss the Book section, teacher guidance states: “Invite children to talk about the book, building on each others’ ideas and providing a variety of perspectives. Remind them to use evidence to support statements about the text. If needed, select from the following prompts to support thinking and talking.” Prompts include:

    • In the Book Clubs, Text Set: Family, students read Rain Reign and verbally answer: “What are the differences in the way Uncle Weldon and Rose’s father treat her?”

    • In the Book Clubs, Text Set: Writer’s Craft: Graphic Novels, students read Ghosts and verbally respond to the prompt: “Cat meets two ghosts on Dia de los Muertos. Talk about her experience with the old woman and then with Jose. What did she learn from each of them?”

    • In the Book Clubs, Text Set: Writer’s Craft: Graphic Novels, students read Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier and verbally answer: “Cat’s parents blame her for Maya’s breathing attack because she took her hiking without medication. Do you think this is fair?”

Indicator 1i

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for Indicator 1i. 

The Grade 5 materials include no process writing instruction, tasks, and there are limited opportunities for students to edit and revise. Though there are numerous opportunities for on-demand writing to support a year’s worth of instruction, many of the assignments are optional. Interactive Read-Alouds, Minilessons, and Book Clubs all feature what may be considered on-demand writings, though no instructions are given on how students write their responses or if some should be over longer periods of time. While all students complete Minilesson writing activities, the Interactive Read-Alouds and Book Club writing tasks depend on which text sets the teacher chooses. The writing prompts in the Interactive Read-Alouds are one of multiple optional activities from which teachers may choose; other activities such as drawing or speaking about the readings are available. In Reading Minilessons, the Writing About Reading sections introduce the Reader’s Notebook where students reflect on and respond to prompts about what they read. Within the other types of Reading Minilessons, the Extend the Lesson sections offer optional activities for extending the learning through writing over time or in other contexts. In many of the Minilesson umbrellas, the Link to Writing section offers suggestions for writing or drawing about reading in a Reader’s Notebook. The materials do not include opportunities for students to write using digital resources where appropriate. 

Materials include some on-demand writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction.The majority of optional on-demand writing tasks are not standards-based and can be answered without using the text. Examples of optional on-demand writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction include but are not limited to:

  • In Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Grit and Perseverance, students listen to Brian’s Winter. One possible Respond to the Text activity is to write a review: “Think about this review of Brian’s Winter and your personal opinion of the book. Do you agree with this review? Why or why not? If you were to write a review of Brian’s Winter in a similar style as this one, what would it sound like?”

  • In Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Fiction/Poetry, students listen to Sequoia. One possible Respond to the Text activity is an independent writing task. Teacher directions state: “Go back through the text with students and note how many times the author uses sensory words such as listens, smells, feels, gazes. Ask students to talk to a partner about why the author may have chosen that focus. Then ask each student to think about a specific place where they might stand and watch and listen. Have them list what they would see, hear, smell, and feel in that place. Discuss the author’s message in relation to this experience.”

  • In Reading Minilesson LA.U3.RML3, Extend the Lesson, Writing About Reading, teacher directions state: “Have students use a reader’s notebook to write about the research an author had to do before writing a book. The book can be fiction or nonfiction.” This is an optional activity. 

  • In Reading Minilesson LA.U15.RML5, Extend the Lesson, Writing About Reading, teacher directions state, “Have students write in a reader’s notebook about a persuasive text they have read, including how they know the author was qualified to write the text.” This is an optional activity. 

  • In Book Clubs, Text Set: Empathy students read The Gift Giver (163rd Street Trilogy). In Extend the Discussion: Further Response, students answer the prompt: “The author concludes this story with a letter written to Doris from Amir. Write a letter back to Amir as if you are Doris. What do you think she would tell him about sixth grade and how things are different for her now?”

Materials do not include process writing opportunities that cover a year’s worth of instruction. There are limited opportunities for students to revise and edit writing. For example: 

  • In Reading Minilesson WAR.U3.RML3, the goal is for students to identify the qualities of a strong letter including content and conventions. The teacher displays a letter and asks what makes it a strong letter. The teacher creates a checklist that includes the qualities of a strong letter. Students write their own letters and talk with a partner about parts that could be improved in their letter. After referring to the checklist, students assess their own letters but are not required to edit or revise. Students share their letters in the meeting area. 

Materials include a limited number of digital resources to support student writing.

  • Graphic organizers are available online to print to assist students with planning writing. Otherwise, there are no digital resources for students to use online to produce or publish writing.

Indicator 1j

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1j.

The Grade 5 materials include many opportunities for students to complete a variety of writing tasks that reflect the distribution required by the standards; however, the genres are not evenly distributed nor offered throughout the school year, nor is explicit instruction offered in any of the required genres. Each umbrella includes writing tasks in the culminating lesson, but the tasks do not represent an even distribution across the genres. Optional writing tasks are listed on many of the Interactive Read-Aloud cards; however, the writing opportunity is a recommendation and is not required. Typically, three other tasks are offered on each card that are not related to writing, such as an art project, a math connection, a geography connection, or another discipline. Book Club cards also feature writing prompts; however, since the Book Club texts are optional, there is no guarantee which genres of writing a student may experience. While students do have the option to complete opinion, informative, explanatory, and narrative writing, there are fewer informative and narrative writing task options available throughout the program. 

Materials do not provide multiple opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. There is no explicit instruction of the writing modes called for in the standards. Students have the option to respond to reading with writing, but are not required to do so and do not receive any instruction on the writing mode.

Different genres/modes/types of writing are not evenly distributed throughout the school year. Nearly all writing tasks are connected to a text that has been read to students; however, the writing tasks are frequently presented as one of a few options, therefore students may not choose to engage with these tasks. 

  • Examples of optional informative/explanatory writing tasks include but are not limited to: 

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Empathy, students listen to Mrs. Katz and Tush. One possible Respond to the Text activity is for students to write a paragraph responding to the prompt: “Would you say this is an unlikely friendship? In what ways? What did the two have in common?”

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Hope and Resilience, students listen to Home to Medicine Mountain. One possible Respond to the Text activity is to complete an independent writing assignment. Teacher directions state: “On the last page of Home to Medicine Mountain the author writes, ‘The lessons (Benny Len and Stanley) learned from the journey would be with them always.’ Ask students to write a paragraph in the reader’s notebook describing what they think those lessons might be.”

    • In Book Clubs, Text Set: Caring for Our World, students read Redwoods. An Extend the Discussion: Further Response activity states: “In Redwoods, Jason Chin combines fact and fiction to create a story. Write about the parts of the book that are fiction and the parts of the book that are nonfiction. Support your writing with examples from the text.”

  • Examples of optional narrative writing tasks include but are not limited to: 

    • In Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Fiction/Poetry, students listen to This Is Just to Say: Poems of Apology and Forgiveness. One possible Respond to the Text activity is an independent writing assignment. Teacher directions state: “Ask students to choose a poem in the book they really like or that moved them somehow. Have students write their own apology poem that mirrors the poem they chose.” 

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Writer’s Craft, students listen to Encounter. One possible narrative writing assignment is for students to work in pairs to write a short readers’ theater “that captures the boy’s questions and fears” The teacher is directed to, “Reread the last sentence on page 7. Help students to realize that the European sounds like a barking dog to the boy because he is speaking in a language the narrator has never heard before. The boy and Columbus could not communicate with one another in speech. If they could have, what do you think they would have said?”

  • Examples of optional opinion writing tasks include but are not limited to: 

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Conflict Resolution, students listen to Thirty Minutes over Oregon. One possible Respond to the Text activity is a short write: “Why do you think this reconciliation was so important for everyone involved?” 

    • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Empathy, students listen to The Poet’s Dog. One possible Respond to the Text activity is an independent writing assignment. Teacher directions state: “Many of the reviews of The Poet’s Dog praise the story for being poignant. Review the meaning of the word poignant (deeply touching: evoking strong feelings). Then ask students to write a paragraph explaining whether they agree with the praise the story got for being poignant, and why or why not.”

Indicator 1k

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for Indicator 1k. 

The Grade 5 materials include writing opportunities that are focused on analyzing texts and developing claims from close reading; however, none of the writing tasks are required. Students may write in the Reader’s Notebook or other response activities that require them to practice and apply writing using evidence from texts and sources; however, there is little instruction on how to write using claims despite having many prompts across the year. 

On the Interactive Read-Alouds and Book Club cards, writing prompts require students to respond to a text and most require using evidence to support an idea. However, on the Interactive Read-Alouds cards, the writing prompts are one of four choices in the Respond to the Text sections; the other options are non-writing tasks. The Book Club cards include a writing prompt for each book in the optional Extend the Discussion: Further Response section. The Independent Reading Conferring Cards: Writing About Reading Prompts also include evidence-based writing activities, however, these prompts do not show a progression of skills throughout the school year. Across the year, students “write a sentence” or “write a few sentences” about the given texts; the expectation does not change. As all of the prompts in different sections are not required, it can not be assured that students would write on a regular basis. 

Materials provide some opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. The majority of writing opportunities are optional. Examples include:

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Family, students listen to The Raft and complete an optional writing task using evidence from the text. Teacher directions state: “The raft of the title played a number of roles in this story, and clearly the author thought it was important, because he named his story The Raft. Once it appeared, Nicky’s whole attitude about his summer changed for the better. Together with the class, brainstorm the roles the raft played in the story, both in plot events and in bringing Nicky and his granthoehr closer. Write students’ ideas on chart paper.”

  • In Reading Minilesson LA.U17.RML2, Writing About Reading (Optional), students make or fill in a graphic organizer to show how the information in a nonfiction book is divided into categories and subcategories. 

  • In Independent Reading, Conferring Card: Wayside School Gets a Little Stranger, Writing About Reading, Thinking Beyond the Text (Optional), students write about what they do and some things they learned about gravity in Chapter 14 of the book. 

Writing opportunities are rarely focused on students’ careful analysis and claims developed from reading closely and working with evidence from texts and sources. Examples include:

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Conflict Resolution, students listen to The Lion Who Stole My Arm and complete an optional writing task using evidence from the text. Teacher directions state: “I wonder if you can relate, even a little bit, to how Pedru felt about the lion. It’s complicated. How did you feel as Pedru was aiming his spear at Anjani, the lion who stole his arm? Do you think he was right or wrong to have let the lion live? Have students talk in small groups about their thoughts. After talking, ask students to write a paragraph in the reader’s notebook analyzing the decision Pedru made and how it affected their reactions to the story.”

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Conflict Resolution, students listen to Thirty Minutes Over Oregon and complete an optional writing task using evidence from the texts. Teacher directions state: “Discuss with students how the townspeople and Nobuo reconciled and built their friendship. Guide them to realize that it took gestures of friendship-actions, not just words. Then ask: Why do you think this reconciliation was so important for everyone involved? Ask them to write their thoughts and opinions in the reader’s notebook.”

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud Text Set: Empathy, students listen to Smoky Night and complete an optional writing task using evidence from the texts. Teacher directions state: “Discuss the plot of this story and the messages about shared experiences and empathy. Pose the question. Do you think Smoky Night is the best title for this story? Have students write a paragraph or two explaining why the title works or proposing a different title, with reasons why they would change it.”

  • In Reading Minilesson WAR.U6.RML2, Extend the Lesson, (Optional), students write book reviews of a book they have read in the lesson. This same lesson is used throughout the school year, and students share their book reviews with each other as a way to choose new books to read. 

  • In Book Clubs, Author Study: Jacqueline Woodson, Extend the Discussion: Further Response (Optional), students read Brown Girl Dreaming and complete a writing prompt: “Choose a memory from your own childhood and write a poem about it in the writing style of Jacqueline Woodson. If possible, meet with your book club to share your memory poems.”

  • In Independent Reading, Conferring Card: What Are You Figuring Now? A Story about Benjamin Banneker, Writing About Reading, Thinking Beyond the Text, students write about some aspect of Banneker’s life that they found inspiring. 

Indicator 1l

Materials include explicit instruction of the grade-level grammar and usage standards, with opportunities for application in context.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectations of Indicator 1l.

The materials contain lessons focused on spelling grade-appropriate words correctly. The materials include lessons for students to learn how to use references to access the spelling of words. Opportunities are missed for students to receive explicit instruction in multiple grammar standards, including those dealing with conjunctions or verb tenses. Additionally, there is no evidence of activities addressing punctuation standards, such as when to use a comma in a list. In The Fountas and Pinnell Literacy Continuum, there is a Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics Chart. On page 635, it specifically states that this chart is not intended to be a curriculum for instruction in formal grammar. The authors suggest that if a teacher wants to teach a short grammar lesson, it should be related to a book the teacher has read or some shared writing that the teacher and the students are doing together. Students have the opportunity to write a letter to the teacher on a weekly basis about their reading for that week. Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of some skills in context. However, materials do not have authentic opportunities for students to apply newly learned skills to their writing. 

Materials include limited explicit instruction of some grammar and usage standards for the grade level. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.

    • No evidence was found.

  • Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.

    • No evidence was found.

  • Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

    • No evidence was found.

  • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.

    • No evidence was found.

  • Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).

    • No evidence found

  • Use punctuation to separate items in a series.

    • No evidence found

  • Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.

    • No evidence found

  • Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).

    • No evidence found

  • Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

    • No evidence found

  • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary, Spelling Patterns, Card 3, the teacher writes word pairs on a chart (appoint/annoy, compound/breakdown). Students discuss different ways to spell phonograms.

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary, Routines and Procedures for Effective Teaching, page 34, during the Use References, the teacher encourages students to use reference materials to look up words to spell them correctly and to see how that reference supports students. 

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary, Word-Solving Actions 6, page 482, the teacher teaches the principle that when spelling words, students need to listen for the sounds in each syllable and write the letters that represent those sounds in sequence. The teacher demonstrates by writing two-syllable words and discussing how the sounds in each syllable make it easier to write a longer word. 

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary, Recognize Commonly Misspelled Words, and Rewrite Them Correctly, page 135, the teacher displays an example paragraph and guides students through the process of editing words spelling incorrectly.

  • Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

    • No evidence found

  • Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.

    • No evidence found

Materials include limited opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills in context, including applying grammar and convention skills to writing. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary, Word-Solving Action, Lesson 3, page 471, during the “Apply” section, the students look up words in the glossary and answer questions about how to spell the word. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary, Word-Solving Action, Lesson 4, page 474, students are put into groups. They each get assigned a different type of dictionary such as foreign language, geography, or electronic. The students answer questions in relation to their dictionaries. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, The Reading Minilessons Book, Write about Reading, Umbrella 3, RML 1, pages 586-587, the teacher explains that students are to write a letter each week about their reading for that week.

Indicator 1m

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1m. 

The Grade 5 materials include some teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year-long vocabulary development component and there is some attention paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words. There is limited attention paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words. The materials provide suggested activities with vocabulary instruction, but there is no explicit instruction of academic vocabulary and its usage after being introduced. Vocabulary instruction is included in the Word Study program and selected vocabulary is included in the lesson goals for Interactive Read-Alouds, Book Club selections, and Reading Minilessons. In Reading Minilessons, words are identified as being academic vocabulary that students need to understand but there is no protocol or guidance for how to teach the words nor are definitions included for the words that students encounter in texts. In Book Clubs and Interactive Read-Alouds, vocabulary words are not identified prior to the lesson but are included in teacher-led discussion questions to understand the text. Tier 2 and Tier 3 words are not identified. 

Materials provide some teacher guidance outlining a cohesive year-long vocabulary development component. Examples include:

  • In the Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study Guide, a plan for word meaning/vocabulary is included for grades PreK-8 that includes lessons related to figurative language, concept words, combined, and created words. These lessons do not provide support for growing students’ knowledge and application of academic vocabulary. 

  • In the Word Study Lessons: Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Book, teacher guidance states: “Lessons should be conversational. In most lessons, it is appropriate for students to derive the principle through inquiry and example, and you can state it at the end of the lesson and again at the end of the share time. Be sure to say the principle the same way each time. Your tone will be that of I’m going to show you something interesting about how words work or What do you notice about these words? Invite students to make connections to their names and words they know. Invite them to contribute further examples, and recognize their thinking even if the examples don’t quite fit.”

Vocabulary is not repeated in contexts (before texts, in texts) and across multiple texts. Examples include:

  • In the Classroom System Guide, Phonics and Words Study, the teacher guidance states: “Students learn to solve words ‘on the run’ while reading for meaning and writing to communicate. As teachers work alongside readers and writers, they demonstrate effective behaviors, draw attention to important information, and prompt students to use their knowledge.” Teacher guidance recommends balancing explicit teaching of vocabulary and implicit teaching embedded in the processes of reading and writing. There is no specific information given in this guidance on how to teach effective behaviors or how students use their knowledge.

  • In Reading Minilessons, some academic vocabulary is repeated in multiple lessons, such as author, illustrator, craft, and style. There is no context provided for these words nor a protocol for teaching the vocabulary to students.

Limited attention is paid to vocabulary essential to understanding the text and to high-value academic words (e.g., words that might appear in other contexts/content areas). Examples include:

  • The Classroom System Guide does not include a plan for the instruction of Tier 2 and Tier 3 academic vocabulary words in context during reading and associated activities to help students build their knowledge in this area. 

  • In the Reading Minilessons, specific academic language and/or important vocabulary is identified for teachers. There is no specific protocol provided for introducing these words to students nor any support for students who may struggle to understand the words. 

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Literary Language, students listen to If You’re Not from the Prairie by David Bouchard and answer the following questions: “Reread page 6. If you’re from Canada as this author is, the word dugout means a pond built to hold water in times of drought. What did you think of when you first heard that word? Reread the middle stanza on page 16. Who is familiar with the word roughhouse? What does it mean to you?”

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Caring for Our World, students listen to One Well by Rochelle Strauss and answer the following questions: “Reread page 8. The heading on this page is ‘Recycling Water in the Well.’ What would you say the author means by ‘recycling’ in this case? How is it different from something like recycling plastic?”

  • In the Interactive Read-Aloud, Text Set: Illustrator Study: Duncan Tonatiuh, students listen to Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras by Duncan Tonatiuh and answer the following questions: “Reread the first sentence on page 20. Why did the author use the word surely? What does it tell you? Reread page 22. Look at the hats on page 22 and 23. What do you think flamboyant means? What makes an outfit ‘pretentious’?”

Criterion 1n - 1p

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

4/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials contain limited explicit instruction of phonics, word recognition, and word analysis consistently over the course of the year. Assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year; however, assessments do not clearly inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students progress toward mastery, and many assessments are optional.

Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeated teacher modeling of all grade-level phonics standards. However, materials recommend that foundational skills lessons occur for 10 minutes each day, which may not provide sufficient time for students to receive explicit instruction to work towards mastery of newly learned foundational skills. Lessons provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern.

While some Guided Reading lessons include fluency, there is no guarantee that all students will have an opportunity to receive these lessons since they are not a part of core instruction. A fluency rubric is included, but there is not sufficient support for the use of the rubric, nor is there support for instructional adjustments to help students progress toward mastery of fluency. There is no evidence of students receiving instruction on using self-correction while reading.

Indicator 1n

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level foundational skills by providing explicit instruction in phonics, word analysis, and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.

2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1n.

The materials include four lessons on reading multisyllabic words out of context. There is evidence of some instruction in letter-sound correspondences. Generally, in these lessons, the teacher writes words on a board and asks students what they notice. All tasks and questions are not sequenced to the application of grade-level work. Several optional assessments are provided in the BAS2 Kit, along with assessments for books at Levels L-Z. There is no guidance provided about determining which assessments to use or when to use them. In addition, running records are suggested at the end of each guided reading lesson, but there is no guidance about how often running records should be completed. 

Materials contain limited explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Spelling Patterns, Lesson 1, page 98, the teacher writes the words exam, program, format, and muskrat on the whiteboard. The students read the words and clarify the meaning of any words that students may not know. The teacher asks students what they notice. The teacher does this same process for phonogram words that end in e. 

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Spelling Patterns 1-4, pages 97-112, these four lessons focus on reading multisyllabic words using syllable patterns, short vowel phonograms, long vowel phonograms, and other vowel phonograms to read words out of context. 

    • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Word Meaning Vocabulary, Card 26, the students read, sort, and define words based on the roots pel (to drive), gress (step), and pod (foot).

Assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year; however, assessments do not clearly inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students progress toward mastery, and many assessments are optional. Examples include, but are not limited to the following:

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Online Resources, BAS2, 3rd Edition, Optional Assessments, there are several optional assessments provided in Fluency and Phrasing, Phonics and Word Analysis, Vocabulary, and Vocabulary in Context. There is only one assessment specifically geared toward Grade 5, The Grade 5 Word Features Test. There are scoring criteria for each optional assessment. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Online Resources, BAS2, 3rd Edition, Recording Forms, an assessment form for each of two books beginning at Level L and continuing until Level Z. There is one fiction and one nonfiction book at each level. The recording form includes oral reading, fluency, comprehension questions, and an optional writing prompt. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Online Resources, Guided Reading Collection Guide, Grade 5, page 20, on the back of the guided reading lesson plans, there is an assessment section that suggests that teachers refer to the corresponding level in the Literacy Continuum and make notes of the behaviors and understandings the readers in the group control or need to control. Teachers should note what students have learned to control or what they need to learn how to control. In addition, this section also advises teachers to use the Recording Form to take a running record. After coding the reading, teachers are to select an immediate teaching point. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Letter-Sound Relationships, Assessment A, students read and categorize consonant letters with two or more different sounds at the end of the word. The teacher guidance instructs teachers to notice students’ ability to read these types of words and note how quickly they read them. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Word Meaning/Vocabulary, Lesson 3, page 157, the teacher writes a homophone on the board and asks students to read it. Students identify the homophone and spell it. Then students use the homophones in sentences. 

Indicator 1o

Materials include opportunities for students to practice and apply grade-level phonics, word analysis, and word recognition skills.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1o. 

The materials provide some opportunities over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice and apply word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. After teaching minilessons about solving words from The Reading Minilessons Guide Book, teachers are provided with guiding questions when listening to students talk about their reading. Students use foundational skills to read longer words, including recognizing familiar phonograms in multisyllable words. The materials include goals that are listed for Shared Reading cards related to foundational skills, but there are no tasks or questions that provide opportunities for students to access different foundational skills within the anchor text and supporting texts.

Limited opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected tasks. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Spelling and Word Study Guide, Grade 5, Letter-Sound Relationships, Lesson 2, in the “Apply” section, students read each word out loud and then put them in a pile based on the sound in the middle consonant or consonant digraph (c, g, ch, or th).

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Word Structure, Lesson 14, students play a game where they place cards face down. They turn over two cards. If a word root matches a noun with that word root, such as seg and cut, which matches, segment, the player must describe how the word root’s meaning relates to the noun. The player then keeps the card. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Word Solving Actions 1, the teacher writes multisyllabic words on the board, and students read the words with the teacher. The teacher asks students to find the word part they already know (i.e., ‘pop’ in “population”). Students share what they are learning about using known parts to read a word. Students read multisyllable words from a list and underline the parts they know to help them read the whole word.

  • In Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Vocabulary Lessons, Grade 5, Spelling Patterns 1, the teacher writes the following words on the board, exam, program, format, muskrat. The teacher asks students what they notice about the words. Students are guided to notice the phonograms at the ends of the words and to underline them. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, The Reading Minilessons Book, Section 3, Umbrella 1-Solving Multisyllable Words RML 5, the teacher demonstrates covering the prefix or suffix in a word and then taking apart the base word first to read a multisyllabic word. The teacher invites students to take apart words by removing the prefix or the suffix. 

Materials do not include tasks and questions that provide opportunities for students to access different foundational skills within the anchor text and supporting texts. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, The Reading Minilessons Book, while reading the book Giant Squid, students talk about words they don’t know based on parts of the word they know, such as flightless.

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Guided Reading, Grade 5, On the Foul Line, Level T, Phonics/Word Work, after reading the text, the students are guided to recognize and use root words to determine the meaning of words. They use the root word mem to determine the meaning of memorial, memorize, and memento. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Guided Reading, Tire Pressure, Level U, Phonics/Word Work, after reading the text, the students break apart three- to four-syllable words to read the word. They use the words absolutely, bickered, and sabotage to practice identifying and breaking apart the word into its syllables. 

Indicator 1p

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in order to read with purpose and understanding.

1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for Indicator 1p.

The materials include three reading minilessons focused on maintaining fluency, though there are no lessons that include successive readings. Additionally, the minilessons lack explicit instruction in accuracy, rate, and expression. While some Guided Reading lessons include fluency, there is no guarantee that all students will have an opportunity to receive these lessons since they are not a part of core instruction. There is a fluency rubric teachers can use when students are reading; however, the materials do not include guidance for how often teachers should use this rubric. In addition, when using the BAS2, it states to assess fluency. Neither the rubric nor the BAS2 assessment provides teachers with instructional adjustments to help students progress toward mastery of fluency. There is no evidence of students receiving instruction on using self-correction while reading. 

Limited opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.

    • In Fountas & Pinnell, The Reading Minilessons, Grade 5, page 527, the teacher completes a minilesson to have the students read with expression, rhythm, and correct speed. In the “Summarize and Apply” part of the lesson, the teacher tells students they can read and change their voices to make their reading sound more smooth and interesting. 

    • In Fountas & Pinnell, Independent Reading, Grade 5, Bud, Not Buddy, this text is one of the texts students can choose to read independently and has conferring prompts for teachers to discuss the text with the students to check for understanding.

Materials do not support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.

    • In Fountas & Pinnell, Reading Minilessons Book, Grade 5, page 239, students read the poem “Cricket Speaks,” and the teacher reminds students to pause when reading the poem. 

    • In Fountas & Pinnell, Word Study Lessons, Grade 5, Section 3, Umbrella 4, RML 2, pages 526-527, the teacher reads a page from a book and tells students to “listen to my voice and notice how it changes as I read this page.” The teacher reads another page and students read it again together with the teacher to make their voices sound like the teacher’s voice. The teacher and students create a chart to describe how to make their reading sound smooth and interesting. In pairs, students then read a few sentences or pages to practice fluency. 

Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

    • No evidence found

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with limited information of students’ current fluency skills and provide teachers with limited instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency. Evidence includes but is not limited to the following:

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Online Resources, BAS2, Optional Assessments, Assessing Fluency and Phrasing, a Six Dimensions Fluency Rubric is provided for teachers to assess students as they read a Benchmark Assessment book or another appropriate book. Teachers score the students on phrasing, pausing, stress, intonation, rate, and integration on a four-point scale for each to determine how much, if any, teaching on fluency is necessary. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Online Resources, BAS2, Canyon Mystery, Recording Sheet, page 4, after taking a running record of a section of this book, the teacher calculates the accuracy rate, records the number of self-corrections, and rates the student’s fluency on a four-point scale. There is a section for calculating the reading rate, though this is marked optional. 

  • In Fountas & Pinnell, Benchmark Assessment System 2, Levels L-Z, allows teachers to give a running record to determine students’ fluency, including rate and accuracy, and what level they are reading. 

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Not Rated

Criterion 2a - 2f

Materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a cohesive topic(s)/theme(s) to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

N/A

Indicator 2b

Materials require students to analyze the key ideas, details, craft, and structure within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high quality questions and tasks.

N/A

Indicator 2c

Materials require students to analyze the integration of knowledge within individual texts as well as across multiple texts using coherently sequenced, high quality text-specific and/or text-dependent questions and tasks.

N/A

Indicator 2d

Culminating tasks require students to demonstrate their knowledge of a unit's topic(s)/theme(s) through integrated literacy skills (e.g., a combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

N/A

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to achieve grade-level writing proficiency by the end of the school year.

N/A

Indicator 2f

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

N/A

Criterion 2g - 2h

Materials promote mastery of grade-level standards by the end of the year.

Indicator 2g

Materials spend the majority of instructional time on content that falls within grade-level aligned instruction, practice, and assessments.

N/A

Indicator 2h

Materials regularly and systematically balance time and resources required for following the suggested implementation, as well as information for alternative implementations that maintain alignment and intent of the standards.

N/A

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their literacy development.

N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

N/A

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

N/A

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

N/A

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

N/A

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

N/A

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

N/A

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to work with grade-level content and to meet or exceed grade-level standards that will support their regular and active participation in learning English language arts and literacy.

N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials regularly provide extensions to engage with literacy content and concepts at greater depth for students who read, write, speak, and/or listen above grade level.

N/A

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for for students to monitor their learning.

N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to meet or exceed grade-level standards to regularly participate in learning English language arts and literacy.

N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

N/A

Indicator 3u

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Indicator 3v

This is not an assessed indicator in ELA.

N/A

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology (when applicable) with guidance for teachers.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

N/A

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

N/A

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

N/A

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/11/09

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Word Study System, Grade 5 978‑0‑325‑04803‑1 Heinemann 2019
The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum, Expanded Edition 978‑0‑325‑06078‑1 Heinemann 2016
Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Second Edition 978‑0‑325‑08684‑2 Heinemann 2016
The Reading Minilessons Book: Your Every Day Guide for Literacy Teaching, Grade 5 978‑0‑325‑09866‑1 Heinemann 2019
The FPC Grade 5 System Guide 978‑0‑325‑11192‑6 Heinemann 2019
Guided Reading Collection, Grade 5 978‑0‑325‑11211‑4 Heinemann 2019
Interactive Read-Aloud Collection, Grade 5 978‑0‑325‑11214‑5 Heinemann 2019
Independent Reading Collection, Grade 5 978‑0‑325‑11216‑9 Heinemann 2019
Book Clubs Collection, Grade 5 978‑0‑325‑11219‑0 Heinemann 2019

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA 3-8 Review Tool

The ELA review criteria identifies the indicators for high quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations