Alignment: Overall Summary

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for Alignment to the CCSSM. In Gateway 1, the materials meet expectations for focus and coherence, and in Gateway 2, the materials meet expectations for rigor and practice-content connections.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
18
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Partially Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
17
24
27
23
24-27
Meets Expectations
18-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-17
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for focus and coherence. For focus, the materials assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. For coherence, each grade’s materials are coherent and consistent with the CCSSM.

Criterion 1a - 1b

Materials assess grade-level content and give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

6/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for focus as they assess grade-level content and provide all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

Indicator 1a

Materials assess the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for assessing grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. The curriculum is divided into seven units and each unit contains a Pre-Unit Assessment, Mid-Unit Assessment, and Post-Unit Assessment. Pre-Unit assessments may be used “before the start of a unit, either as part of class or for homework.” Mid-Unit assessments are “designed to assess students on content covered in approximately the first half of the unit” and may also be used as homework. Post-Unit assessments “are designed to assess students’ full range of understanding of content covered throughout the whole unit.” Examples of Post-Unit Assessments include: 

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 3 states, “Select the two equations that are correct. A. 2 × 9 = 18; B. 12 ÷ 2 = 10; C. 20 ÷ 5 = 4; D. 3 × 3 = 6.” (3.OA.7)

  • In Unit 4, Area, Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 2 states, “A patio is in the shape of a rectangle with a width of 8 feet and a length of 9 feet. What is the area, in square feet, of the patio?” (3.MD.7b)

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 5 states, “Sonia wants to put a fence around her rectangular backyard. Her backyard is 5 meters long and 6 meters wide.  What is the total length of fence, in meters, Sonia needs to place around the play area?” (3.MD.8)

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 6 states, “Angela and Jacob are learning about fractions. Jacob says that the fractions \frac{1}{4} and \frac{2}{3} are equivalent. Angela disagrees with him, so Jacob draws a picture to prove his point: Jacob is incorrect. Explain what is wrong with Jacob’s reasoning.” Two images are provided. One small rectangle is divided into two-thirds and a larger rectangle is divided into one-fourth. The two-thirds rectangle is placed above the one-fourth rectangle and appears to have the same amount shaded in. (3.NF.3d)

Indicator 1b

Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for giving all students extensive work with grade-level problems to meet the full intent of grade-level standards. The instructional materials provide extensive work in Grade 3 by providing Anchor Tasks, Problem Sets, Homework, and Target Tasks for each lesson. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 7, Anchor Tasks, Problem 1 engages students with extensive work in 3.OA.5 (apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide). It states, “1. Mr. Barron is working with a small group of students. He sets up their seats facing the whiteboard into two rows with three chairs in each row. a. Draw the seats in Mr. Barron’s room below, using squares to represent the seats. b. Write a multiplication equation that can be used to find the total number of seats Mr. Barron has in the room. c. Determine the total number of seats in Mr. Barron’s room. 2. Sometimes Mr. Barron wants to use chart paper on the side of his room, which you can see in the diagram above. Imagine students facing Mr. Barron at the chart paper. a. Write a multiplication equation that can be used to find the total number of seats Mr. Barron has in the room. b. Determine the total number of seats in Mr. Barron’s room. 3. What do you notice about #1 and #2? What do you wonder?” 

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 5, Problem Set, Problem 4 engages students with extensive work in 3.NF.1 (understand a fraction \frac{1}{b} as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction \frac{a}{b} as the quantity formed by a parts of size \frac{1}{b}). It states, “An artist plans a wall in a room. The wall is divided into 6 equal parts so that each part can be painted a different color. The artist starts painting the wall. The parts of the wall that look white are not painted yet.” Students read six statements and answer the following question, “Which statements about the wall are correct? Select the two correct statements. A. Each painted part is \frac{1}{4} of the whole; B. Each painted part is \frac{1}{6} of the whole wall; C. Each painted part is \frac{4}{4} of the whole wall; D. The fraction of the wall that is not yet painted is \frac{1}{6}; E. The fraction of the wall not yet painted is \frac{2}{4} F. The fraction of the wall not yet painted is \frac{2}{6}.” 

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 6, Anchor Task, Problem 2 engages students with extensive work for 3.MD.1 (tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram). It states, “a. Joey gets home at 3:25 p.m. It takes him 7 minutes to unpack and 18 minutes to have a snack before starting homework. What is the earliest time Joey can start his homework? b. Shane’s family wants to start eating dinner at 5:45 p.m. It takes Shane 15 minutes to set the table and 7 minutes to help put the food out. What time should Shane start his chores so that he’ll be ready to eat at 5:45 p.m.? c. Davis has 3 problems for math homework. He starts at 4:08 p.m. The first problem takes him 5 minutes, and the second takes him 6 minutes. If Davis finishes at 4:23 p.m., how long does it take him to solve the last problem?”

The instructional materials provide opportunities for all students to engage with the full intent of Grade 3 standards through a consistent lesson structure, including Anchor Tasks, Problems Sets, Homework Problems, and Target Tasks. Anchor Tasks include a connection to prior knowledge, multiple entry points to new learning, and guided instruction support. Problem Set Problems engage all students in practice that connects to the objective of each lesson. Target Task Problems can be used as formative assessment. Each unit is further divided into topics. The lessons within each topic build on each other, meeting the full intent of the standards. Examples of where the materials meet the full intent include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lessons 21-23 provide the opportunity for students to engage in with the full intent of 3.OA.9 (identify arithmetic patterns, including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table, and explain them using properties of operations). In Lesson 21, Target Task, Problem 1 states, “Look at the 4 and 8 rows in the multiplication table. What relationship do you see? Why does this relationship exist?” Problem 2 states, “Explain how the multiplication table shows the following relationship, 7 × 8 = (5 × 8) + (2 × 8).” In Lesson 22, Anchor Task, Problem 1 states, “Do you think there are more odd or even products on the multiplication chart? Why?” In Lesson 23, Anchor Tasks, Problem 2 states, “Find the next two numbers in the pattern below. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, _, _. Why do the values in the pattern alternate between even and odd?”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lessons1-4 provide the opportunity for students to engage with the full intent of 3.MD.5 (recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement) and 3.MD.6 (measure areas by counting unit squares). In Lesson 1, Problem Set, Problem 1 states, “Use triangle pattern blocks to cover each shape below. Draw lines to show where the triangles meet. Then, write how many triangle pattern blocks it takes to cover each shape.” In Lesson 2, Anchor Tasks, Problem 3 states, “Area can also be measured in square inches, also abbreviated “sq in.” a. Measure the length of the sides of one of the tiles given to you to verify that it is a square inch. b. Find the area, in square inches, of the following figures: c. Build a rectangle with an area of 15 square inches.” In Lesson 3, Homework, Problem 2 states, “Each ◻ is 1 square unit. What is the area of each of the following rectangles?” Four different rectangles are provided within a grid. 

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lessons 1-9, provide the opportunity for students to engage with the full intent of 3.NF.1 (understand a fraction \frac{1}{b} as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction \frac{a}{b} as the quantity formed by a parts of size \frac{1}{b}). In Lesson 1, Target Task, Problem 2 states, “Build a shape with pattern blocks whose fractional unit is fourths. Then trace the shape below.” In Lesson 3, Problem Set, Problem 3 states, “Leroy made a game board, shown below. Each small square of the game board has the same area. What fraction of the game board is shaded? A. \frac{1}{9}; B. \frac{1}{8}; C. \frac{1}{6}; D. \frac{1}{3}”  Lesson 9, Homework, “Draw a model that could represent \frac{3}{4} or \frac{3}{2}. Explain what the whole is for each fraction.”

Criterion 1c - 1g

Each grade’s materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for coherence. The materials: address the major clusters of the grade, have supporting content connected to major work, make connections between clusters and domains, and have content from prior and future grades connected to grade-level work.

Indicator 1c

When implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major clusters of each grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations that, when implemented as designed, the majority of the materials address the major work of the grade. The instructional materials devote at least 65 percent of instructional time to the major clusters of the grade: 

  • The approximate number of units devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 5 out of 7, approximately 71%.

  • The number of lessons devoted to major work of the grade (including supporting work connected to the major work) is 98 out of 133, approximately 74%. The total number of lessons includes 126 lessons plus 7 assessments for a total of 133 lessons. 

  • The number of days devoted to major work (including assessments, flex days, and supporting work connected to the major work), is 108 out of 145, approximately 74%. There are a total of 19 flex days and 15 of those days are included within units focused on major work, including assessments. By adding 15 flex days focused on major work to the 93 lessons devoted to major work, there is a total of 108 days devoted to major work.

  • The number of days devoted to major work (excluding flex days, while including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 98 out of 133, approximately 74%. While it is recommended that flex days be used to support major work of the grade within the program, there is no specific guidance for the use of these days.

A lesson-level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials as the lessons include major work, supporting work connected to major work, and the assessments embedded within each unit. As a result, approximately 74% of the instructional materials focus on major work of the grade.

Indicator 1d

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations that supporting work enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Materials are designed so supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. These connections are sometimes listed for teachers as “Foundational Standards'' on the lesson page. Examples of connections include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition and Subtraction, Lesson 10, Homework, Problem 1 connects the supporting work of 3.NBT.2 (fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction) to the major work of 3.OA.8 (solve two-step word problems using the four operations). It states, “Use the information in the tables to answer the questions below. a. Estimate the total number of hats sold by both stores. b. What is the actual number of hats sold by both stores? c. Estimate the total number of t-shirts sold by both stores. d. What is the actual number of t-shirts sold by both stores? e. Explain how estimating helps you check the reasonableness of your answers.” Relevant information in the table includes South Shore Target sold 36 T-Shirts and 32 Hats; Fenway Target sold 25 T-Shirts and 7 Hats.  

  • In Unit 5, Shapes & Their Perimeter, Lesson 14, Homework, Problem 2 connects the supporting work of 3.G.1 (understand that shapes in different categories may share attributes, and that the shared attributes can define a larger category) to the major work of 3.MD.5 (recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area measurement). It states, “Color tetrominoes on the grid below: a. To create a square with an area of 64 units. b. Create at least two different rectangles each with an area of 24 square units. You may use the same tetromino more than once.”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes & Their Perimeter, Lesson 3, Target Task, Problems 1 and 2 connect the supporting work of 3.MD.8 (solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters) to the major work of 3.OA.8 (solve two-step word problems using the four operations). Problem 1 states, “Alan’s rectangular swimming pool is 10 meters long and 16 meters wide. What is the perimeter?” Problem 2 states, “Lila has a pool with a different shape. a. What is the perimeter of Lila’s pool? b. Lila says her pool has a larger perimeter than Alan’s pool. Is she correct? Explain how you know.”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 1, Anchor Task, Problem 1 connects the supporting work of 3.G.2 (partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole) to the major work of 3.NF.1 (understand a fraction as \frac{1}{b}, as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned intob equal parts; understand a fraction \frac{a}{b} as the quantity formed by a parts of size \frac{1}{b}). It states, “George made his younger brother, Neil, hexagonal cookies to celebrate his 6th birthday. One of the cookies is shown below. a.Two of Neil’s friends want to share a cookie. They decide to split the cookie in the following way: Is this a fair share of the cookie? Why or why not? b. Neil and his friends Shantelle and Oscar want to share a cookie. They decide to split the cookie in the following way: Is this a fair share of the cookie? Why or why not? c. Four of Neil’s friends want to share a cookie. They decide to split the cookie in the following way: Is this a fair share of the cookie? Why or why not?” [Note: The hexagons are divided into some fair and some not fair partitions.]

Indicator 1e

Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for including problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade. Examples of connections from supporting work to supporting work and/or from major work to major work throughout the grade-level materials, when appropriate, include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 3, Target Task, Problem 2 connects the major work 3.OA.B to the major work of 3.OA.D as students apply properties of operations to solve two step word problems involving the four operations. It states, “Marcos solves 24 ÷ 6 + 2 = ____. He says it equals 6. Iris says it equals 3. Show how the position of parentheses in the equation can make both answers true.” 

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 7, Anchor Task, Problem 3 connects the major work 3.OA.A to the major work of 3.MD.C by using multiplication to solve the area. It states, “a. The area of the rectangle below is 42 square feet. Find the missing side length. b. Explain how you can use either multiplication or division to solve Part (a).” 

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 2, Problem Set, Problem 3 connects the supporting work of 3.MD.D to the supporting work of 3.G.A as students reason with shapes and their attributes as they recognize and solve for perimeter. It states, “Hugh and Daisy draw the shapes shown below. Measure and label the side lengths in centimeters. Whose shape has a greater perimeter? How do you know?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 5, Target Task connects the supporting work of 3.NBT.A to the supporting work of 3.MD.D as students fluently add numbers to find the perimeter of shapes. It states, “Marlene ropes off a square section of her yard where she plants grass. One side length of the square measures 9 yards. What is the total length of rope Marlene uses?”

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 9, Homework, Problem 7 connects the major work of 3.MD.A to the major work of 3.OA.D as students measure the mass of objects and solve two step word problems involving the four operations. It states, “Jennifer’s grandmother buys carrots at the farm stand, as shown below. She and her 3 grandchildren equally share the carrots. Jennifer uses 2 kilograms of her share of carrots to bake a carrot cake. How many kilograms of carrots does Jennifer have left?” The scale indicates the carrots weigh 28 kg.

Indicator 1f

Content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations that content from future grades is identified and related to grade-level work, and materials relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. 

Content from future grades is identified within materials and related to grade-level work. These references are consistently included within the Unit Summary. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition and Subtraction, Unit Summary states, “In Grade 4, students learn about multiplicative comparison; i.e.: a value being x times as many as another value. Thus, students’ understanding of the place value system is more precisely refined as “a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right” (4.NBT.1, emphasis added). “Further, students learn to round any multi-digit number to any place. They also use the standard algorithm to solve addition and subtraction problems to the new place values they encounter at this grade level, namely, to one million. Thus, while the majority of the content learned in this unit comes from an additional cluster, they are deeply important skills necessary to fully master the major work of the grade with 3.OA.8, as well as a foundation for rounding and the standard algorithms used to any place value learned in Grade 4 (4.NBT.1—4) and depended on for many grade levels after that.”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Unit Summary states, “In future grades, students will rely on the understanding of area to solve increasingly complex problems involving area, perimeter, surface area, and volume (4.MD.3, 5.MD.3—5, 6.G.1—4). Students will also use this understanding outside of their study of geometry, as multi-digit multiplication problems in Grade 4 (4.NBT.5), fraction multiplication in Grade 5 (5.NF.4), and even polynomial multiplication problems in Algebra (A.APR.1) rely on an area model.”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Unit Summary states, “Students will further deepen their understanding of these ideas in future grade levels. In Grade 4, students solve more complex word problems involving area and perimeter (4.MD.3), as well as classify shapes based on the presence of parallel and perpendicular shapes (4.G.2), which is very connected to their study of angles (4.MD.5—7). The beginning work on categorization in Grade 3 culminates in Grade 5, where students have a complete picture of the hierarchical nature of classifying shapes (5.G.3). In the middle grades and high school, increasingly complex problems rely on students’ deep understanding of attributes of shapes and how to measure them, threaded throughout this unit.”

  • In Unit 7 Measurement, Unit Summary states, “Students will rely on the work of this unit to convert from a larger unit to a smaller unit in Grade 4 (4.MD.1) and from a smaller unit to a larger one in Grade 5 (5.MD.1), as well as to solve multi-step word problems involving intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals (4.MD.2, 5.MD.1). Beyond the direct connections to Grade 5 Common Core State Standards, “measurement is central to mathematics, to other areas of mathematics (e.g., laying a sensory and conceptual foundation for arithmetic with fractions), to other subject matter domains, especially science, and to activities in everyday life. For these reasons, measurement is a core component of the mathematics curriculum” (GM Progression, p. 1).”

Materials relate grade-level concepts from Grade 3 explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. These references can be found within materials in the Unit Summary, within Lesson Tips for Teachers, and in the Foundational Skills information in each lesson. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Unit Summary states, “In Grade 2, students learned to count objects in arrays using repeated addition (2.OA.4) to gain a foundation to multiplication. They’ve also done extensive work on one- and two-step word problems involving addition and subtraction, having mastered all of the problem types that involve those operations (2.OA.1). Thus, students have developed a strong problem-solving disposition and have the foundational content necessary to launch right into multiplication and division in this unit. At the start of this unit, students gain an understanding of multiplication and division in the context of equal group and array problems in Topic A. To keep the focus on the conceptual understanding of multiplication and division (3.OA.1, 3.OA.2), Topic A does not discuss specific strategies to solve, and thus students may count all objects (a Level 1 strategy) or remember their skip-counting and repeated addition (Level 2 strategies) from Grade 2 to find the product. In Topics B and C, however, the focus turns to developing more efficient strategies for solving multiplication and division, including skip-counting and repeated addition (Level 2 strategies) as well as ‘just knowing’ the facts, which works toward the goal that ‘by the end of grade 3, [students] know from memory all products of two single-digit numbers and related division facts’ (3.OA.7).” 

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 5, Tips for Teachers states, “Today’s lesson is the first one where students will not be given concrete units in order to find the area of rectangles. Students may still want to draw individual units to find the area of rectangles, but hopefully most students are completing rows and columns instead. As the Progressions note, “less sophisticated activities of this sort were suggested for earlier grades so that Grade 3 students begin with some experience”, so development towards this row and column understanding should be fairly straightforward (GM Progression, p. 17).”

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 8, Foundational Standards lists 2.MD.A.1 (Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes) and 2.MD.B.6 (Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, …, and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram) as Foundational Standards for this lesson. 

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Unit Summary, “In Unit 6, students extend and deepen Grade 1 work with understanding halves and fourths/quarters (1.G.3) as well as Grade 2 practice with equal shares of halves, thirds, and fourths (2.G.3) to understanding fractions as equal partitions of a whole. Their knowledge becomes more formal as they work with area models and the number line.”

Indicator 1g

In order to foster coherence between grades, materials can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 foster coherence between grades, materials can be completed within a regular school year with little to no modification. According to the Pacing Guide, “The third-grade math curriculum was designed to be implemented over the course of a single school year. It includes seven units of study over 145 instructional days (including days for lessons, flex days, and unit assessments). We intentionally did not account for all 180 instructional days in order for teachers to fit in additional review or extension, teacher-created assessments, and school-based events. Each unit includes a specific number of lessons, a day for assessment, and a recommended number of flex days (see the table below). These flex days can be used at the teacher’s discretion, however, for units that include both major and supporting/  additional work, it is strongly recommended that the flex days be spent on content that aligns with the major work of the grade.”  

Included in the 145 days are: 

  • 126 lesson days 

  • 12 flex days 

  • 7 unit assessment days

There are seven units and, within those units, there are 12 to 28 lessons that contain a mixture of Anchor Tasks, Problem Set Problems, Homework Problems, and Target Tasks. The number of minutes needed to complete each lesson component are aligned to guidance in the Pacing Guide. Each 60 minute lesson is composed of:

  • 25 - 30 minutes Anchor Tasks

  • 15 - 20 minutes Problem Set

  • 5 - 10 minutes Target Task 

Additionally, the Pacing Guide notes, “it is recommended to also allocate 10 minutes for daily application and 15 minutes for daily fluency. These additional blocks are meant to provide sufficient time and practice for these aspects of rigor.”

Gateway Two

Rigor & the Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for rigor and balance and practice-content connections. The materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application. The materials make meaningful connections between the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Criterion 2a - 2d

Materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students’ conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications.

8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for rigor. The materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency, spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of mathematics, and do not always treat the three aspects of rigor together or separately.

Indicator 2a

Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts and provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout Grade 3. 

Materials develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade level. According to Course Summary, Learn More About Fishtank Math, Our Approach, “Procedural Fluency AND Conceptual Understanding: We believe that knowing ‘how’ to solve a problem is not enough; students must also know ‘why’ mathematical procedures and concepts exist.” Each lesson begins with Anchor Tasks and Guiding Questions, designed to highlight key learning aligned to the objective and to support the development of conceptual understanding through student discourse and reflection. This is followed by a Problem Set, Homework and Target Task. Examples include: 

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 8, Anchor Task, Problem 1, students use their ability to skip count and make connections to dividing. “Maureen says the skip-counting sequence ‘10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60’ to help her solve a problem. a. What multiplication problem might Maureen be trying to solve? How do you know? b. What if Maureen was solving a division problem? What problem might that have been?” Guiding Questions include, “How can I generalize Maureen’s strategy to use skip-counting to solve division problems? How will I know what to count by? When will I know where to stop? Where will I find my quotient?” This problem and the guiding questions help develop conceptual understanding of 3.OA.2 (Interpret whole number quotients of whole numbers).

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 8, Anchor Tasks, Problem 3 states, “Break 6 into smaller factors in the following expression and multiply the numbers in the order that makes sense to you. 6 × 8.” Guiding Questions include, “Could you break apart the other factor into smaller factors in this expression? What would you break it up into? Will you still get the same product?” This activity supports conceptual understanding of 3.OA.5 (Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide).

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 6, Anchor Task, Problem 2 states, “What are the length, width, and area of the rectangle below? How did you solve?” Guiding Questions include, “What are the side lengths of this rectangle? How do you know? What is the area of this rectangle? How do you know? Why don’t we need to draw the rows and columns to show individual square inches in the rectangle in order to find its area?” This problem shows opportunities for students to engage with teacher support and/or guidance while developing conceptual understanding of 3.MD.6 (Measure areas by counting unit squares [square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units]).

Materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade level. Problem Sets and Homework Problems can be completed independently during a lesson. Target Tasks, or end of lesson checks for understanding of key concepts, are designed for independent completion. Many of these problems provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 4, Problem Set, Problem 4 states, “Decompose the following array into arrays whose facts you can use to find the larger product.” This activity supports conceptual understanding of 3.OA.5 (Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide).

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 7, Target Task, Problem 1, students calculate the area of a rectangle in multiple ways. It states, “A rectangle has the measurements shown. Select the three ways to calculate the area of the rectangle in square inches. A. 3 × 3; B. 9 × 9; C. 3 × 9; D. 9 × 3; E. 3 + 3 + 3; F. 9 + 9 + 9.” Through this problem, students show their conceptual understanding of 3.MD.7 (Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition).  

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 14, Homework, Problem 5, students identify a fraction on a number line. It states, “Label the point where $$\frac{3}{5}$$ belongs on the number line. Be as exact as possible.” This problem shows concrete representation while developing conceptual understanding of 3.NF.1 (Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram).

Indicator 2b

Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation for procedural skill and fluency.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for developing procedural skills and fluency while providing opportunities for students to independently demonstrate procedural skills and fluency throughout the grade level. 

According to Teacher Tools, Math Teacher Tools, Procedural Skill and Fluency, “In our curriculum, lessons explicitly indicate when fluency or culminating standards are addressed. Anchor Problems and Tasks are designed to address both conceptual foundations of the skills as well as procedural execution. Problem Set sections for relevant standards include problems and resources that engage students in procedural practice and fluency development, as well as independent demonstration of fluency. Skills aligned to fluency standards also appear in other units after they are introduced in order to provide opportunities for continued practice, development, and demonstration.”

Opportunities to develop procedural skill and fluency with teacher support and/or guidance occurs in the Anchor Tasks, at the beginning of each lesson, and the Problem Sets, during a lesson. Additionally, Fluency Activities may be implemented with teacher support. Examples Include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition and Subtraction, Lesson 9, Anchor Task, Problem 2 states,  “Find the sum. Show or explain your work.a. 68 + 75 = __; b. 487 = ◻ - 513; c. 296 + 144 + 35 = __.” In addition to the problem, Guiding Questions include, “How can you solve using the place value chart? How can you solve using the standard algorithm? What is unique about the sum in Part (b)? How did you solve Part (b)? Why did you solve using addition even though it appears to be a subtraction problem? What was unique about the solution? For Part (c), when solving using the standard algorithm, how should we line up our numbers? Why do we line them up this way? Could you solve any of these tasks by converting them to an easier problem? If so, which one(s)?” The problems and Guiding Questions help develop student understanding of 3.NBT.2 (Fluently add and subtract within 1000).

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 6, Problem Set, Discussion of Problem Set states, “Why do you think it is that when you skip-count by twos you say all the even numbers? Is Rob’s reasoning correct in #11? Why is place value understanding helpful when multiplying by ten?” This activity provides an opportunity for students to develop 3.OA.7 (Fluently multiply and divide within 100).  

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 8, Anchor Task, Problem 2 states, “Each shape represents the unit fraction. Draw a picture representing a possible whole.” Guiding Questions for the teacher include, “The shape in Part (a) represents $$\frac{1}{3}$$. What might one whole look like? What does the numerator represent? What does the denominator represent? How can you use that to determine what the whole would look like? Is there more than one correct answer? Why can our whole resemble different shapes but still have the same unit fraction? Can we say that the wholes themselves are equal even if they have different shapes? Why?” The problem provides an opportunity for students to develop fluency of 3.NF.1 (Understand a fraction $$\frac{1}{b}$$ as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction $$\frac{a}{b}$$ as the quantity formed by a parts of size $$\frac{1}{b}$$).

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate procedural skills and fluency throughout the grade level. Problem Sets and Homework can be completed independently during a lesson. Target Tasks, or end of lesson checks for understanding, are designed for independent completion. Fluency Activities may be completed independently with partners. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 12, Fluency Activities state, “Get to 1,000: In this fluency activity, students build and add together multiple-digit numbers in hopes of getting as close to 1,000 as possible. This fluency activity should be completed as a partner game.” Additionally, “Hit the Target: In this fluency activity, students are given a three-digit Target Number. Students then randomly draw 8 digit cards, and decide where to place each digit card in a three-digit plus three-digit addition equation (or three-digit minus three-digit subtraction equation), with the option to discard two cards, in order to get a sum (or difference) as close to the Target Number as possible.This fluency activity should be completed in partners.” These activities provide an opportunity for students to independently demonstrate fluency of 3.NBT.2 (Adding and subtracting within 1,000 using the standard algorithm).

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 9, Fluency Activities state, “Bump: In this fluency activity, students multiply two single-digit numbers in hopes of bumping other players off the products of those numbers. The objective is to be the player to first use all 8 of one’s game makers.” Additionally, “Flash Cards: In this fluency activity, students practice recalling their multiplication facts with the factors written on one side of a flash card and the product on the other. This fluency activity should be completed as a whole class, in small groups, as a partner activity, or as an individual activity. (Card Set A).” These activities provide an opportunity for students to independently demonstrate fluency of 3.OA.7 (Fluently multiply and divide within 100).

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 15, Target Task states, “Hector solves 9 × 8 by finding (10×8) − (1 × 8). Gabriella solves 9 × 8 by finding (5 × 8) + (4 × 8). Who is correct, Hector, Gabriella, both of them, or neither of them? Show or explain your reasoning.” The problem allows students to independently demonstrate procedural skill and fluency of 3.OA.5 (Apply properties of strategies to multiply and divide).

Indicator 2c

Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics.

Materials include multiple routine and non-routine applications of the mathematics throughout the grade level. Anchor Tasks, at the beginning of each lesson, routinely include engaging single and multi-step application problems. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 9, Anchor Task, Problem 3, students engage in solving routine problems involving multiplication within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups (3.OA.3). The problem states, “Ms. Glynn decides to put her students into groups of 2 to work on a project together. She has 20 students in her class. How many groups of two did Ms. Glynn make?” Teachers are provided the following guiding questions, “What is happening in this situation? What can you draw to represent this situation? Is this situation about equal groups? How do you know? How does this relate to the other work we’ve done in this unit? What quantities and relationships do we know? What is the question asking you to find out? What equation can we use to represent the problem? Is there more than one equation we can use? How did you find the answer to the question? Did anyone find the answer differently?”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 8, Anchor Task, Problem 4, students engage in solving routine application problems involving area (3.MD.7). The problem states, “Amir is getting hardwood floors in his bedroom, which measures 8 feet by 9 feet. How many square feet of hardwood flooring will Amir need?  The area of Theo’s banner is 28 square feet. If the length of his banner measures 4 feet, how wide is his banner?” Teachers are provided the following guiding questions, “What is happening in this situation? What can you draw to represent this situation? What about the situation in Part (b) makes it difficult to draw accurately? What quantities and relationships do we know? What is the question asking you to find out? What equation can we use to represent each part of the problem? What letter should we use to represent the unknown? How did you find the answer to the question? Did anyone find the answer differently? Is your answer reasonable? How do you know?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 10, Anchor Task, Problem 1, students engage in solving non-routine application problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters (3.MD.8). The problem states, “Claudia’s bedroom is in the shape of a rectangle that is 8 feet long and 9 feet wide. Claudia’s mom needs to order new carpet for her room and is going to put baseboards around the border of her bedroom. 1. How much carpet should Claudia’s mom order? 2. How much baseboard should Claudia’s mom order?” Guiding Questions for teachers include, “What can you draw to help you solve this problem? How will you label your drawing? How will you find the amount of carpet Claudia’s mom needs based on your drawing? Write and solve an equation to represent this. How will you find the amount of baseboard Claudia’s mom needs based on your drawing? Write and solve an equation to represent this. Claudia’s sisters, Gillian and Felicia, have rooms that are the exact same size as Claudia’s. If their mom wanted to carpet and put in baseboards for all three of their rooms, how much of each material will she need? How did you solve?

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 12, Anchor Task, Problem 4, students engage in solving non-routine application problems, involving measuring and estimating liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l) (3.MD.2). The problem states, “Act 4 (the sequel): Raul has orange juice and milk to drink at breakfast. He drinks 237 mL of milk. He also drinks 60 mL less orange juice than milk. How much does Raul drink at breakfast, including milk and juice?” Guiding Questions for teachers include, “What is happening in this situation? What can you draw to represent this situation? What quantities and relationships do we know? What is the question asking you to find out? What equation can we use to represent each part of the problem? What letter should we use to represent the unknown?  How did you find the answer to the question? Did anyone find the answer differently? Is your answer reasonable? How do you know?” 

Materials provide opportunities within Problem Sets and Homework, and Daily Word Problems for students to independently demonstrate multiple routine and non-routine applications throughout the grade level. Target Tasks, or end of lesson checks for understanding, are designed for independent completion. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Homework, Problem 6, students independently solve non-routine two step word problems involving addition and subtraction (3.NBT.2). The problem states, “Third-grade students took a total of 1,000 pictures for the yearbook during the school year. Ted took 72 pictures. Mary took 48 pictures. a. What is the total number of pictures taken by the rest of the third-grade students during the school year? b. Ella took 8 more pictures than Ted took. How many more pictures did Ella take than Mary?”

  • In Unit 3 Multiplication and Division, Lesson 19, Target Task, students independently solve a routine two step word problem with multiple operations (3.OA.8). The problem states, “Solve. Explain why your answer is reasonable. Warren went swimming on Saturday and running on Sunday. Between these two activities, Warren spent 117 minutes exercising over the weekend. On Saturday, Warren swims laps in the pool for 45 minutes. On Sunday, he runs 8 miles. It takes him the same amount of time to run each mile. How long did it take Warren to run each mile?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 9, Homework, Problem 6, students independently engage in solving non-routine application problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters (3.MD.8). The problem states, “Imagine all of the rectangles you could build with a perimeter of 32 units. Which one do you think will have the greatest area? Why?” 

  • In Unit 7 Measurement, Lesson 9, Target Task, Problem 1, students independently solve a routine problem to measure and estimate liquids volumes and masses (3.MD.2). The problem states, “Mr. Smith, the principal, placed a bag of oranges on the scale as shown. Mr. Smith bought 60 bags of oranges for a school event. How many kilograms of oranges did he buy? A. 2 kilograms B. 62 kilograms C. 80 kilograms D. 120 kilograms.”

Indicator 2d

The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the three aspects of rigor within the grade.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations in that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the three aspects of rigor within the grade.

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout Grade 3. Examples where instructional materials attend to conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, or application include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division Part 1, Lesson 5, Anchor Task, Problem 3, students engage in solving non-routine application problems. The problem states, “Write a multiplication equation and a division equation to represent each of the following situations. a. Ross has 15 flowers that he wants to make into flower arrangements. Each flower arrangement will use 5 flowers. How many flower arrangements can he make? b. Heidi has 8 apps that she wants to place into rows of 4. How many apps will there be in each row?” (3.OA.3: Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.)

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 8, Anchor Task, Problem 2, students develop procedural skill and fluency as they solve multiplication sentences. The problem states, “Solve. a. 12 ÷ 2 = ____; b. ____ = 35 ÷ 5; c. 90 ÷ 10 = ___; d. ___ × 5 = 45; e. 2 × ___= 16.” The teacher asks, “How can you use skip-counting to solve Parts (a)–(c)? Parts (d) and (e) are unknown factor problems. How can I use skip-counting to solve? The completed equation for Part (e) is 2 × 8 = 16. How can I be sure that is correct if I don’t know how to skip-count by 8s?” (3.NBT.2: Fluently add and subtract within 1000.)

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 2, Problem Set, Problem 4, students develop conceptual understanding by using fraction strips to solve. The problem states, “Use your fraction strips as tools to help you solve. To make a garage for his toy truck, Zeno bends a rectangular piece of cardboard in half. He then bends each half in half again. a. What fraction of the original cardboard is each part? Draw and label the matching fraction strip below. b. Zeno bends a different piece of cardboard in thirds. He then bends each third in half again. Which of your faction strips best matches this story? Draw and label the matching fraction strip in the space below.” (3.NF.1: Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts.)

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students’ mathematical understanding of a single unit of study throughout the materials. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 14, Anchor Task, Problem 3, students develop conceptual understanding alongside application as they solve a real world problem involving addition and subtraction while using rounding strategies. The problem states, “Mrs. Ingall is going to a hockey game. She has $139 in her pocket and wants to take out more cash to be able to pay for everything at the game. She will have to pay $268 for the tickets, $18 for a cab ride to the game, and $55 for food and drinks while she’s there. Approximately how much money should Mrs. Ingall take out of the bank to cover her costs?” (3.OA.8: Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.)

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 10, Target Task, students develop conceptual understanding alongside procedural skill and fluency as they find the area using the distributive property. The task states, “Jason is a carpenter. He designed a door using equally sized squares of wood. He used two different types of wood as shown below. a. Which equation represents the total number of wood squares Jason needed to build the door? a. 4 × (5 + 7) = 4 + 5 + 7,  b. 4 × (5 + 7) = 4× 5 × 7, c. 4 (5 + 7) = (4 × 5) x (4 × 7), d. 4 (5 + 7) = (4 5) + (5 × 7). b. What is the area of Jason’s door? Show your work. c. Jason decides to change the dimensions of his door. He writes the equation (6 × 3) + (6 × 5) to represent the number of wood squares he will use for the new door. Draw Jason’s door in the grid below. Then, explain what each number in Jason’s equation represents.” (3.MD.7c: Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.) 

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 12, Problem Set, Problem 6, students develop all three aspects of rigor simultaneously, conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application, as they solve real world problems to find volume using strategies that involve the same unit. The problem states, “Tanner’s beaker has 45 milliliters of water in it at first. After each of his friends poured in 8 milliliters, the beaker contained 93 milliliters. How many friends poured water into Tanner’s beaker?” (3.MD.2: Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.)

Criterion 2e - 2i

Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

10/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for practice-content connections. The materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Indicator 2e

Materials support the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; and MP2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. MPs are explicitly identified for teachers within the Unit Summary and specific lessons (Criteria for Success, Tips for Teachers, or Anchor Task notes).

MP1 is identified and connected to grade-level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students make sense of problems and persevere in solving them as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 19, Homework, Problem 5, students “Assess the reasonableness of an answer (MP.1).” The problem states, “Sharon uses 72 centimeters of ribbon to wrap gifts. She uses 24 centimeters of her total ribbon to wrap a big gift. She uses the remaining ribbon for 6 small gifts. How much ribbon will she use for each small gift if she uses the same amount on each? Solve, then explain why your answer is reasonable.”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 2, Problem Set, Problem 7, students “Find the approximate area of various figures using concrete standard units, including figures with partial units.” The problem states, “The following shapes aren’t rectangles. Use your centimeter cubes to estimate their area to the nearest square centimeter.” Three non-rectangles are provided.

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 8, Target Task, with guidance from the teacher, students, “Determine the dimensions of all possible rectangles with a given area.” The problem states, “Chris is replacing the fence around his rectangular backyard. Chris’s drawing of the backyard is shown below. Chris measured two of the side lengths and labeled them in his drawing. How much fencing does he need to buy?” A backyard drawing is provided which is 10 yards by 15 yards. Guiding Questions include, “Since the question is asking about how much fencing is needed, what measurement is the problem asking for us to find? How do you know? Is it possible to find the perimeter of this rectangle with only two measurements? Why or why not? Based on what we know about rectangles, what are the missing side lengths? Write and solve an equation to find the perimeter of this shape given its side lengths. What are all the possible equations you could write? What is the perimeter of the yard? What unit should we use?”

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 4, Anchor Task, Problem 2, with guidance from the teacher, students “Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes...” The problem states, “Joe finishes his chores at 5:42 p.m. It took him 28 minutes to complete them. What time did he start doing his chores? Lucia’s math class started at 10:18 a.m. She worked for 33 minutes. What time was it when Lucia’s math class ended? Leslie starts reading at 11:27 a.m. She finishes reading at 11:54 a.m. How many minutes does she read?” Guiding Questions include, “Would you rather use a clock or a number line to solve each part? Why? What makes these problems more difficult than those in Anchor Task #1? Why? How and when can you still count up or back by fives and tens to solve? How are Parts (a)—(c) similar? How are they different?”

MP2 is identified and connected to grade-level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students reason abstractly and quantitatively as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 14, Problem Set, Problem 11, students “Write a word problem that can be solved with a given multiplication or division expression or equation (MP.2).” The problem states, “Mrs. Oro needs to buy 90 corn seeds. The Garden Center sells corn seeds in packs of 10 seeds each. a. Write a division equation showing how many packs of seeds Mrs. Oro should buy. b. Write a multiplication equation showing many packs of seeds Mrs. Oro should buy. c. How many packs of seeds should Mrs. Oro buy?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 3, Problem Set, Problem 4, students “Write an equation to represent the perimeter of a shape.” The problem states, “Michael and Jeffrey are trying to find the perimeter of the shape below. Michael says the expression that represents the perimeter is 9 + 9 + 11 + 11, but Jeffrey says the expression is (9 × 2) + (11 × 2). Who is correct? Explain.”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 3, Problem Set, Problem 7, students “Determine the unit fraction represented by an abstract description of a situation.” The problem states, “A circle is divided into parts. Each part is of the total area of the circle. Which sentence describes the circle? A. The circle has 1 small part and 3 large parts. B. The circle has 1 small part and 4 large parts. C. The circle has 4 parts that are each the same size. D. The circle has 5 parts that are each the same size.”

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 8, Anchor Task, Problem 2, with teacher support, students “Estimate the mass of an object when the measurement is not precise.” The problem states, “Estimate the mass of the following objects in grams or kilograms, depending on which is more appropriate. Then measure their actual mass using a scale. a. Pair of scissors; b. Thumbtack; c. Ruler; d.Textbook.” Guiding Questions include, “What do you estimate the mass of the pair of scissors to be? The ruler? Explain how you came up with those estimates. What is the actual mass of each object? Were our estimates reasonable? Why or why not? In Lesson 7 we decided that a thumbtack had a mass of about 1 gram and the textbook had a mass of about 1 kilogram. What is the actual mass of each object? Are they reasonable benchmarks for these measurements? Why or why not?”

Indicator 2f

Materials support the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. MP3 is explicitly identified for teachers within the unit summary or specific lessons (criteria for success, tips for teachers, or anchor problem notes) and students engage with the full intent of the MP through a variety of lesson problems and assessment items.

Students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others in connection to grade-level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 1, Anchor Task, Problem 1, students “Demonstrate and explain the commutativity of multiplication using models.” The problem states, “Katia and Gerard are stocking shelves at the grocery store. Katia stocks 3 shelves with 6 boxes of cereal on each shelf. Gerard stocks 6 shelves with 3 boxes of cereal on each shelf. Katia says they put the same number of cereal boxes on each shelf. Gerard says they didn’t, since they stocked a different number of boxes on each of a different number of shelves. Who do you agree with, Katia or Gerard? Explain.”  Guiding Questions include, “Do you agree with Katia or Gerard? Why? What could you have drawn to support your argument? Write an equation that represents your argument. Can you generalize this to more numbers? If you know the value of 8 fours, do you know the value of 4 eights? Why?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 11, Homework, Problem 6, students “Classify quadrilaterals according to their attributes’ like the presence of parallel sides, right angles, and side length; and justify those classifications.”  The problem states, “Byron drew the following shapes. a. Byron says that all of his shapes are rectangles because they all have four sides. Is he correct? Explain your thinking. Be sure to use specific vocabulary in your explanation. b. What name could be used to describe all of Byron’s shapes?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 12, Problem Set, students “Classify polygons according to their attributes, like number of sides and angles, and justify this classification.” The problem states, “Use the following shapes to answer the questions below. [11 different polygons provided for students, labeled A, C, I, J, K, N, P, R, S, W, U.] a. Some of the shapes above have attributes in common. Identify one attribute that at least three of the shapes share. Write down the attribute and the shapes that have this property. b. Do the same thing again, but this time, choose a different attribute. You may reuse any of the shapes from #1. c. Find and identify at least two other shapes above that share at least one attribute with the shape below. What attribute do they share? [Shape provided.] d. Compare Polygon S and Polygon N. What is the same? What is different? e. Jenny says, ‘Polygon P and Polygon I are both quadrilaterals!’ Is she correct? Why or why not? Are there other quadrilaterals she didn’t identify? f. ‘I have five equal sides and five equal angles. I have no right angles.’ Write the letter and the name of the polygon described above. Then, draw the same kind of polygon, but with no equal sides.”

Indicator 2g

Materials support the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Choose tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP4: Model with mathematics; and MP5: Use appropriate tools strategically, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. The MPs are explicitly identified for teachers within the unit summary or specific lessons (Criteria for Success, Tips for Teachers, or Anchor Tasks).

MP4: Model with mathematics, is identified and connected to grade-level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students are given many opportunities to solve real-world problems, identify important quantities to make sense of relationships, and represent them mathematically. They model with math as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Lesson 19, Target Task, students “Solve two-step word problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division (MP.4).” The task states, “Solve. Explain why your answer is reasonable. Warren went swimming on Saturday and running on Sunday. Between these two activities, Warren spent 117 minutes exercising over the weekend. On Saturday, Warren swims laps in the pool for 45 minutes. On Sunday, he runs 8 miles. It takes him the same amount of time to run each mile. How long did it take Warren to run each mile?”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 8, Target Task, Problem 1, students “Solve word problems that involve finding the area of a rectangle and the missing side length of a rectangle (MP.4). Solve word problems that involve finding the missing side length of a rectangle (MP.4).” The problem states, “Cara wants new carpeting for her bedroom. Her bedroom is an 8 foot by 6 foot rectangle. How much carpeting does she need to buy to cover her entire bedroom floor?” 

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 9, Anchor Tasks, Problem 4, students “Solve word problems involving masses given in the same unit (MP.4).” The problem states, “Act 4 (the sequel): a. Jessica puts 28 grams of pinto beans and 36 grams of rice into a pot to make rice and beans. What is the total mass of the rice and beans? b. Lindsey bought 845 grams of potatoes at the grocery store. She uses some of them to make mashed potatoes. She now has 392 grams of potatoes left. How many grams of potatoes did Lindsey use to make the mashed potatoes? c. Jerry buys 6 bags of groceries. Each bag has a mass of 4 kilograms. What is the total mass, in kilograms, of Jerry’s grocery bags?” Guiding Questions include, “What is happening in this situation? What can you draw to represent this situation? What quantities and relationships do we know? What is the question asking you to find out? What equation can we use to represent each part of the problem? What letter should we use to represent the unknown? How did you find the answer to the question? Did anyone find the answer differently? Is your answer reasonable? How do you know?”

MP5: Use appropriate tools strategically, is identified and connected to grade-level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have multiple opportunities throughout the materials, with support of the teacher or during independent practice, to identify and use a variety of tools or strategies that support their understanding of grade level math. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 26, Anchor Task, Problem 1, students “Understand the purpose of a picture graph as a way to represent a data set to be able to see trends and analyze it more easily (MP.5).” The problem states, “Determine the favorite season of your classmates. Record their answers in the following chart. [Chart Provided.] Now, record your classmates’ responses on the bar chart below.” Guiding Questions include, “How many ice cream cones will you draw to represent the number of students whose favorite season is winter? Spring? Summer? Fall? How many students were surveyed overall? How can you see that in the bar graph? Does it match what you recorded in your tally chart? Which season is the most people’s favorite? The least? How can you see that on the bar graph? What if more than 10 students responded with their favorite season as being any of them in particular? How could we modify the bar graph so that all of the responses could be recorded?”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 13, Homework, Problem 5, students “Find the area of a composite figure that must be decomposed into three or more rectangles with some missing side lengths by breaking it into as many rectangles as needed, finding any missing side lengths, finding the area of each rectangle given their respective side lengths, and adding those areas together (MP.5).”  The problem states, “Mr. and Mrs. Jackson are buying a new house. They are deciding between the two floor plans below. [House A and House B dimensions provided.] Which floor plan has the greater area? Show or explain how you found your answer.”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 1, Anchor Tasks, Problem 1, students “Use string or pipe cleaners to trace around the perimeter of shapes, then compare the lengths of strings/pipe cleaners to determine which shape has greater perimeter (MP.5).” The problem states, “Maureen wants to wrap ribbon around her clock and around her picture frame. Will she need more ribbon for her clock or her picture frame? Both are shown below.” Shapes included are a circular clock and a square picture frame. Guiding Questions include, “How can we compare which object will need more ribbon? What tools could we use to help us? The boundary around a shape is called its perimeter. Which shape has a greater perimeter, the clock or the picture frame? How do you know? How could you find the perimeter of any shape?”

Indicator 2h

Materials attend to the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP6: Attend to precision; and attend to the specialized language of mathematics, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. MP6 is explicitly identified for teachers within the unit summary or specific lessons (criteria for success, tips for teachers, or anchor problem notes), and students engage with the full intent of the MP through a variety of lesson problems and assessment items.

Students attend to precision in connection to grade-level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 26, Criteria for Success states, “Include all necessary labels in a drawn bar graph, including a title, category labels, and numerical labels (MP.6).” Homework, Problem 5, students include all necessary labels in a drawn bar graph, including a title, category labels, and numerical labels. The problem states, “The picture below shows the number of stamps five friends each have in their stamp collection. Use this data to complete the bar graph below. Remember to label all parts of your graph.”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 2, Criteria for Success states, “Understand that perimeter is measured in length units (centimeters, inches, etc.) (MP6).” Problem Set, Problem 1 states, “Find the perimeter, in centimeters, of each shape. Show and explain your work. What unit did you use to record the perimeters of the shapes in #1? Why?”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 27, Criteria for Success states, “Measure objects to the nearest quarter inch with a ruler whose 0 mark is not at its edge (MP.6). Problem Set, Problem 2, students attend to precision as they use a ruler and create a line plot partitioned into quarter inch segments. The problem states, “Use your ruler to measure the spoons below to the nearest 1/4 inch. Then, add the data to the table and create a line plot to show the length of all of the spoons. Remember to label all parts of your line plot.”

Students have frequent opportunities to attend to the specialized language of math in connection to grade-level content as they work with support of the teacher and independently throughout the units. The “Tips for Teachers” sections provide teachers with an understanding of grade-specific language and how to stress the specialized language during the lesson. Examples include:

  • Each Unit Overview provides a link to a Third Grade Vocabulary Glossary. The glossary contains a chart with the columns “Word” and “Definition.” Under the Definition column, is the mathematical definition and an example. For example, for area the definition reads, “The amount of two-dimensional space within a bounded region.” An example is included with a label that reads, “The figure above has an area of 5 square units.” 

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 6, Tips For Teachers state, “You’ll want to avoid using terms like ‘round up’ and ‘round down’, since these terms can be confusing for students. ‘Rounding up’ a number results in a change in the value of the place to which you’re rounding, where ‘rounding down’ does not. Often students will change the value mistakenly as a result.”

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 2, Tips For Teachers, “Students are not expected to use the terms ‘zero property’ or ‘identity property,’ but they are included in the objective so that teachers can understand this lesson’s connection to the topic. Teachers may choose to rewrite the objective to be more student-friendly if they use objectives in a student-facing way.”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 7, Tips For Teachers state, “Too often, when students are asked questions about what fraction is shaded, they are shown regions that are portioned into pieces of the same size and shape. The result is that students think that equal shares need to be the same shape, which is not the case. On the other hand, sometimes visuals do not show all of the partitions (Van de Walle, Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics, Grades 3–5, vol.2, p. 211). Thus, this lesson tries to address both of these potential misconceptions and deepen students’ conceptual understanding of fractions. Having students explain what it meant by ‘equal parts’ also provides opportunities for students to attend to precision (MP.6) (NF Progression, p. 7).”

Indicator 2i

Materials support the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to the grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of MP7: Look for and make use of structure; and MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, for students, in connection to grade-level content standards, as expected by the mathematical practice standards. MPs are explicitly identified for teachers within the unit summary or specific lessons (criteria for success, tips for teachers, or anchor problem notes).

MP7: Look for and make use of structure, is identified and connected to grade-level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have many opportunities throughout the units to look for, describe, and make use of patterns within problem-solving as they work with support of the teacher and independently. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 7, Criteria For Success states, “Know that when multiplying numbers, the order in which factors are multiplied doesn’t matter (MP.7).” Anchor Task, Problem 2 states, “Is the following statement true or false? Explain your answer. 4 × 5 = 5 × 4.”

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 23, Criteria for Success states, “Identify the rule of a growing number pattern. Use the rule of a growing number pattern to extend it to subsequent terms (MP.7). Use the rule of a growing number pattern to find its nth term (MP.7). Identify features of a number pattern that aren’t explicit in the rule itself (such as, in a pattern that starts with 2 and the rule is ‘add 4,’ all of the terms in the pattern are even) (MP.7).” Homework, Problem 4, students use the rule of a growing number pattern to extend it to subsequent terms. The problem states, “Marc-Anthony wrote the number pattern below. It increases by the same amount each time to get the next number. 15, 19, 23, ___, 31 a. What is the missing number in Marc-Anthony’s pattern? b. What is the rule for this pattern? c. What would the next three numbers in his pattern be?”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 4, Criteria For Success, “Understand that length and width are the measurements of two side lengths of a rectangle, understanding that opposite sides have the same length (MP.7).” In Problem Set, Problem 7 states, “How does knowing side lengths A and B help you find side lengths C and D on the rectangle below?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 14, Tips For Teachers state, “Problems such as finding all the possible different compositions of a set of shapes involve geometric problem solving and notions of congruence and symmetry (MP.7).” In Problem Set, Problem 2 states, “Use tetrominoes to create at least two rectangles, each with an area of 28 square units. Then color the grid below to show how you created your rectangles. You may use the same tetromino more than once. a. Write a number sentence to show the area of the rectangle above as the sum of the areas of the tetrominoes you used to make the rectangle. b. Write a number sentence to show the area of a rectangle above as the product of its side lengths.” 

MP8: Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning, is identified and connected to grade-level content, and there is intentional development of the MP to meet its full intent. Students have multiple opportunities throughout the materials, with support of the teacher or during independent practice, to use repeated reasoning in order to make generalizations and build a deeper understanding of grade level math concepts. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 1, Criteria For Success states, “Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning in finding unknown numbers on a number grid (MP.8).” Anchor Tasks, Problem 2 states, “Play Number Grid Tic-Tac-Toe. The rules are as follows: Instead of a usual Tic-Tac-Toe board, we’ll use an almost blank number chart (show students an example from the Problem Set). Player A fills in any square on the board with the correct number that should go in that square with their crayon/marker. The different colors will help you keep track of who wrote what since we won’t be using the system of Xs and Os anymore. Player B uses their crayon/marker to fill in any square on the hundreds chart. When one player gets four in a row vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, mark it with a line. Once a square is used for a four-in-a-row, it can’t be played again. Keep track of how many four-in-a-rows you have with a tally chart. Play until the board is filled up.” Guiding Questions include, “What are some strategies that you and your classmates used to fill in grids while playing? What pattern did we find in the counting sequence?”

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 22, Criteria for Success states, “1. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning in the multiplication table to deduce that an odd number times an odd number results in an odd product, an even number times an odd number results in an even product, and an even number times an odd number results in an even product (MP.8). 2. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning in the multiplication table to deduce that n×n is a sum of the first n odd numbers (e.g., 16 = 4 × 4 = 1 + 3 + 5 + 7) (MP.8). 3. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning to find other patterns in the multiplication table (MP.8).” Homework, Problem 1, students look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning to find other patterns in the multiplication table. The problem states, “Write the products into the chart as fast as you can. a. What numbers occur in the most places in the table? b. What numbers occur an odd number of times in your table? c. Shade the rows and columns with even factors. What do you notice about the factors and products that are left unshaded?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 9, Criteria for Success states, “Understand that given a particular perimeter, the most square-like rectangle will have the greatest area, and the most oblong rectangle will have the least area (MP.8).” In Problem Set, Problem 3,  students understand that given a particular perimeter, the most square-like rectangle will have the greatest area, and the most oblong rectangle will have the least area. The problem states, “Find a rectangle with the same perimeter but a smaller area from the rectangle below. Draw the new rectangle on the grid to the right. How did you find a rectangle with the same perimeter but a smaller area in #3? Did you think you’d need a longer and skinnier rectangle or a more square-like one? Why?”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 18, Criteria for Success states, “Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning to generalize that when the numerator can be evenly divided by the denominator in a fraction, the fraction is equivalent to the quotient of that division (MP.8).” Homework, Problem 3 states, “What pattern do you notice in each of the columns of the table above? Following the pattern, how many twelfths are equivalent to 2 wholes? 3 wholes? 4 wholes?”

Gateway Three

Usability

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Three Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for Usability: meet expectations for Teacher Supports (Criterion 1), meet expectations for Assessment (Criterion 2), and partially meet expectations for Student Supports (Criterion 3).

Criterion 3a - 3h

The program includes opportunities for teachers to effectively plan and utilize materials with integrity and to further develop their own understanding of the content.

8/9
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for Teacher Supports. The materials: provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for enacting the materials, include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series, provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies, and provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. The materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts, but do not contain adult-level explanations and examples and concepts beyond the current grade so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

Indicator 3a

Materials provide teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for providing teacher guidance with useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials, with specific attention to engaging students in order to guide their mathematical development.

Materials provide comprehensive guidance that will assist teachers in presenting the student and ancillary materials. Examples include:

  • In Teacher Tools, Math Teacher Tools, Preparing to Teach Fishtank Math, Preparing to Teach a Math Unit recommends seven steps for teachers to prepare to teach each unit as well as the questions teachers should ask themselves while preparing. For example step 1 states, “Read and annotate the Unit Summary-- Ask yourself: What content and strategies will students learn? What knowledge from previous grade levels will students bring to this unit? How does this unit connect to future units and/or grade levels?”

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Unit Summary provides an overview of content and expectations for the unit. Within Unit Prep, Intellectual Prep, there is Unit-Specific Intellectual Prep detailing the content for teachers. The materials state, “Read the article, Modeling with Mathematics by the Teaching Channel and watch the videos about Three-Act Tasks. Read the document “Situation Types for Operations in Word Problems” by Achieve the Core for multiplication and division. Identify the word problem types of any applicable assessment questions. (Optional) Read pp. 22–28 of the Operations and Algebraic Thinking (“OA”) Progressions document about Grade 3. Read the following table that includes models used throughout the unit.” Additionally, the Unit Summary contains Essential Understandings. It states, “In the United States, the convention for how to think of the equation 3 × 6 = ◻ is as 3 groups of 6 things each: 3 sixes (as opposed to 6 groups of 3). ‘But in other countries the equation 3 × 6 = □ means how many are 3 things taken 6 times (6 groups of 3 things each): six threes. Some students bring this interpretation of multiplication equations into the classroom. So it is useful to discuss the different interpretations and allow students to use whichever is used in their home’ (OA Progression, p. 25). The equation 20÷4=◻ can be interpreted in two ways: there are 20 objects to be partitioned into groups of 4 and we want to know how many groups we can make (the measurement model of division), or there are 20 objects to be partitioned into 4 groups and we want to know how many objects are in each group (the partitive model of division). Making sense of problems and persevering to solve them is an important practice when solving word problems. Keywords do not always indicate the correct operation. Multiplication problems can be solved using a variety of strategies of increasing complexity, including making and counting all of the quantities involved in a multiplication or division (Level 1 strategy), repeated counting on by a given number (Level 2), and using the properties of operations to compose and decompose unknown facts into known ones (Level 3).”  

Materials include sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions that are presented within the context of the specific learning objectives. Teacher Tools, Math Tools, Preparing to Teach Fishtank Math, Components of a Math Lesson, states, “Each math lesson on Fishtank consists of seven key components: Objective, Standards, Criteria for Success, Tips for Teachers, Anchor Tasks/Problems, Problem Set, and Target Task. Several components focus specifically on the content of the lesson, such as the Standards, Anchor Tasks/Problems, and Target Task, while other components, like the Tips for Teachers, serve to ensure teachers have the support and knowledge they need to successfully implement the content.” Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 8, Tips for Teachers provide context about representations when students add two numbers within 1,000. The materials state, “When discussing how to line up numbers in order to add or subtract them vertically, emphasize that units need to be lined up because one can only add or subtract like units (ones with ones and tens with tens), as opposed to saying that numbers need to be lined up from right to left. This is an important distinction since lining numbers up from right to left no longer works when students begin working with decimals (e.g., adding 6.4 and 2.08 would result in an incorrect sum if lined up from right to left).”

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 6, Anchor Tasks Problem 2 Notes provide teachers guidance about how to set students up to solve the problems. The materials state, “If students are not solid in their count-by for twos, fives, or tens, drawing a model of some sort may be helpful, such as equal groups, array, a number line, or a tape diagram. Both equal groups and arrays are still one-to-one models, so you may want to focus on those for the time being. Because an array is very organized, you may want to emphasize this model in particular. An example of an array for the twos count-by is shown below:” An image shows skip counting by 2’s.

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 4, Tips for Teachers include guidance to address common misconceptions as students work to find the perimeter of polygons. The materials state, “Perimeter problems for rectangles and parallelograms often give only the lengths of two adjacent sides or only show numbers for these sides in a drawing of the shape. The common error is to add just these two numbers. Having students first label the lengths of the other two sides as a reminder is helpful” (MD Progression, p. 16).”

Indicator 3b

Materials contain adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level/course-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for containing adult-level explanations and examples of the more complex grade-level concepts and concepts beyond the current course so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject. 

While adult-level explanations of concepts beyond the grade are not present, Tips for Teachers, within some lessons, can support teachers to develop a deeper understanding of course concepts. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 6, Tips for Teachers, contain adult-level explanations of complex grade level concepts. “You’ll want to avoid using terms like “round up” and “round down”, since these terms can be confusing for students. “Rounding up” a number results in a change in the value of the place to which you’re rounding, where “rounding down” does not. Often students will change the value mistakenly as a result. This objective is the last case for the types of rounding students will encounter in Grade 3. It is addressed last because “rounding to the unit represented by a place in the middle of a number may be more difficult for students (the surrounding digits are sometimes distracting)” (NBT Progressions, p. 12).”

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 17, Tips for Teachers, contain adult-level explanations of complex grade level concepts. “Make sure to be precise in language use when discussing how basic multiplication facts are related to multiplication by multiples of ten (e.g., how 24 is related to 240). Avoid saying “add a zero,” and instead discuss how the units shift. This serves two purposes: (1) it doesn’t conflate two operations, multiplication with addition, and (2) it is aligned to the work they’ll do in later grades of seeing how digits shift places when multiplying or dividing numbers by powers of ten, including decimals, where in fact “adding a zero” after a decimal point won’t change its value.”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 11, Tips for Teachers, contain adult-level explanations of complex grade level concepts. “Students have learned much of the vocabulary used in today’s lesson in prior grade levels, but not all. New vocabulary includes parallel, right angle, parallelogram, and quadrilateral. The term quadrilateral in particular provides “the raw material for thinking about the relationships between classes. For example, students can form larger, superordinate, categories, such as the class of all shapes with four sides, or quadrilaterals, and recognize that it includes other categories, such as squares, rectangles, rhombuses, parallelograms, and trapezoids. They also recognize that there are quadrilaterals that are not in any of those subcategories” (Geometry Progression, p. 13). “In the U.S., that the term ‘trapezoid’ may have two different meanings. In their study The Classification of Quadrilaterals (Information Age Publishing, 2008), Usiskin et al. call these the exclusive and inclusive definitions: T(E): a trapezoid is a quadrilateral with exactly one pair of parallel sides T(I): a trapezoid is a quadrilateral with at least one pair of parallel sides. These different meanings result in different classifications at the analytic level. According to T(E), a parallelogram is not a trapezoid; according to T(I), a parallelogram is a trapezoid. Both definitions are legitimate. However, Usiskin et al. conclude, ‘The preponderance of advantages to the inclusive definition of trapezoid has caused all the articles we could find on the subject, and most college-bound geometry books, to favor the inclusive definition.’” (Geometry Progression, p. 3). Thus, the inclusive definition is used below and throughout the curriculum.”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 23, Tips for Teachers, contain adult-level explanations of complex grade level concepts. “A number line is a very useful representation to compare fractions, i.e., “given two fractions—thus two points on the number line—the one to the left is said to be smaller and the one to the right is said to be larger” (NF Progression, p. 9). Thus, while Lessons 21 and 22 included tasks related to all models they’ve encountered throughout the unit, Lesson 23’s tasks include contexts or explicit referral to length models (namely, tape diagrams and number lines) in preparation for Lesson 24’s deeper analysis of the benefit of a number line to compare fractions.”

Indicator 3c

Materials include standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for including standards correlation information that explains the role of the standards in the context of the overall series.  

Correlation information is present for the mathematics standards addressed throughout the grade level/series and can be found in several places, including the course summary standards map, unit summary lesson map, and within each lesson. Examples include:

  • In 3rd Grade Math, Standards Map includes a table with each grade-level unit in columns and aligned grade-level standards in the rows. Teachers can easily identify a unit when each grade-level standard will be addressed. 

  • In 3rd Grade Math, Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson Map outlines lessons, aligned standards, and the objective for each lesson. This is present for all units and allows teachers to identify targeted standards for any lesson.

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and their Perimeter, Lesson 7, the Core Standard is identified as 3.MD.D.8. The Foundational Standard is identified as 3.OA.D.8. Lessons contain a consistent structure that includes an Objective, Common Core Standards, Criteria for Success, Tips for Teachers, Anchor Tasks, Problem Set & Homework, Target Task, and Additional Practice. This provides an additional place to reference standards, and language of the standard, within each lesson.

Each Unit Summary includes an overview of content standards addressed within the unit as well as a narrative outlining relevant prior and future content connections for teachers. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Unit Summary includes an overview of how the math of this unit builds from previous work in math. The materials state, “In Grade 2, students developed an understanding of the structure of the base-ten system as based in repeated bundling in groups of 10. With this deepened understanding of the place value system, Grade 2 students ‘add and subtract within 1000, with composing and decomposing, and they understand and explain the reasoning of the processes they use’ (NBT Progressions, p. 8). These processes and strategies include concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction (2.NBT.7). As such, at the end of Grade 2, students are able to add and subtract within 1,000 but often aren’t relying on the standard algorithm to solve.”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Unit Summary includes an overview of how the content in Grade 3 connects to mathematics students will learn in Grades 4 and 5. The materials state, “In future grades, students will rely on the understanding of area to solve increasingly complex problems involving area, perimeter, surface area, and volume (4.MD.3, 5.MD.3—5, 6.G.1—4). Students will also use this understanding outside of their study of geometry, as multi-digit multiplication problems in Grade 4 (4.NBT.5), fraction multiplication in Grade 5 (5.NF.4), and even polynomial multiplication problems in Algebra (A.APR.1) rely on an area model.”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Unit Summary includes an overview of the Math Practices that are connected to the content in the unit. The materials state, “This unit affords ample opportunity for students to engage with the Standards for Mathematical Practice. Students will develop an extensive toolbox of ways to model fractions, including area models, tape diagrams, and number lines (MP.5), choosing one model over another to represent a problem based on its inherent advantages and disadvantages. Students construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others as they explain why fractions are equivalent and justify their conclusions of a comparison with a visual fraction model (MP.3). They attend to precision as they come to more deeply understand what is meant by equal parts, and being sure to specify the whole when discussing equivalence and comparison (MP.6).”

Indicator 3d

Materials provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not provide strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement. While curriculum resources support teachers with planning, instruction, and analysis of student progress, there are no specific resources for parents or caregivers.

Indicator 3e

Materials provide explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for providing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies. This information can be found within Our Approach and Math Teacher Tools. Examples where materials explain the instructional approaches of the program include:

  • In Fishtank Mathematics, Our Approach, Guiding Principles include the mission of the program as well as a description of the core beliefs. The materials state, “Content-Rich Tasks, Practice and Feedback, Productive Struggle, Procedural Fluency Combined with Conceptual Understanding, and Communicating Mathematical Understanding.” Productive Struggle states, “We believe that students develop essential strategies for tackling complex problems, and build non-cognitive skills such as perseverance and resilience, through productive struggle. Productive struggle happens when students are asked to use multiple familiar concepts and procedures in unfamiliar applications, and the process for solving problems is not immediately apparent. Productive struggle can occur, and should occur, in multiple settings: whole class, peer-to-peer, and individual practice. Through instruction and high-quality tasks, students can develop a toolbox of strategies, such as annotating and drawing diagrams, to understand and attack complex problems. Through discussion, evaluation, and revision of problem-solving strategies and processes, students build interest, comfort, and confidence in mathematics.”

  • In Math Teacher Tools, Preparing To Teach Fishtank Math, Understanding the Components of a Fishtank Math Lesson helps to outline the purpose for each lesson component. The materials state, “Each Fishtank math lesson consists of seven key components, such as the Objective, Standards, Criteria for Success, Tips for Teachers, Anchor Tasks/Problems, Problem Set, the Target Task, among others. Some of these connect directly to the content of the lesson, while others, such as Tips for Teachers, serve to ensure teachers have the support and knowledge they need to successfully implement the content.” 

  • In Math Teacher Tools, Academic Discourse, Overview outlines the role discourse plays within Fishtank Math. The materials state, “Academic discourse is a key component of our mathematics curriculum. Academic discourse refers to any discussion or dialogue about an academic subject matter. During effective academic discourse, students are engaging in high-quality, productive, and authentic conversations with each other (not just the teacher) in order to build or clarify understanding of a topic.” Additional documents are provided titled, “Preparing for Academic Discourse, Tiers of Academic Discourse, and Strategies to Support Academic Discourse.” These guides further explain what a teacher can do to help students learn and communicate mathematical understanding through academic discourse.

While there are many research-based strategies cited and described within the Math Teacher Tools, they are not consistently referenced for teachers within specific lessons. Examples where materials include and describe research-based strategies:

  • In Math Teacher Tools, Procedural Skill and Fluency, Fluency Expectations by Grade states, “The language of the standards explicitly states where fluency is expected. The list below outlines these standards with the full standard language. In addition to the fluency standards, Model Content Frameworks, Mathematics Grades 3-11 from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) identify other standards that represent culminating masteries where attaining a level of fluency is important. These standards are also included below where applicable. 3rd Grade, 3.OA.7, 3.NBT.2, 3.OA.4, 3.NBT.1, 3.NBT.3, 3.NF.2, and 3.NF.3b-d, among others.”

  • In Math Teacher Tools, Academic Discourse, Tiers of Academic Discourse, Overview states, “These components are inspired by the book Classroom Discussions in Math: A Teacher’s Guide for Using Talk Moves to Support the Common Core and More. (Chapin, Suzanne H., Catherine O’Connor, and Nancy Canavan Anderson. Classroom Discussions in Math: A Teacher’s Guide for Using Talk Moves to Support the Common Core and More, 3rd edition. Math Solutions, 2013.)”

  • In Math Teacher Tools, Supporting English Learners, Scaffolds for English Learners, Overview states, “Scaffold categories and scaffolds adapted from ‘Essential Actions: A Handbook for Implementing WIDA’s Framework for English Language Development Standards,’ by Margo Gottlieb. © 2013 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium, p. 50. https://wida.wisc.edu/sites/default/files/resource/Essential-Actions-Handbook.pdf

  • In Math Teacher Tools, Assessments, Overview, Works Cited lists, “Wiliam, Dylan. 2011. Embedded formative assessment.” and “Principles to Action: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All. (2013). National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, p. 98.”

Indicator 3f

Materials provide a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities.

1/1
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for providing a comprehensive list of supplies needed to support instructional activities. The 3rd Grade Course Summary, Course Material Overview, Course Material List 3rd Grade Mathematics states, “The list below includes the materials used in the 3rd grade Fishtank Math course. The quantities reflect the approximate amount of each material that is needed for one class. For more detailed information about the materials, such as any specifications around sizes or colors, etc., refer to each specific unit.” The materials include information about supplies needed to support the instructional activities. Examples include:

  • Markers and crayons are used in Units 1 and 5, two different colors per student. In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 1, teachers are informed on both essential and optional materials needed for the unit. The materials state, “Optional: markers or crayons (2 of different colors per pair of students). Students could use pen and pencil instead.”

  • Square inch tiles are used in Units 4, 5, and 6, twenty-four per student. In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Lesson 8, Tips For Teachers states, “Students may benefit from using square tiles to find rectangles with an area of 12 square units. For this task, teachers and students may need square inch tiles (optional: see note above).”

  • String and/or pipe cleaners are used in Unit 3, two per student (or about 2 feet of string per student).

  • Pattern blocks are used in Units 4 and 6, six of each shape per student.

  • A pair of scissors is used in Units 4 and 7, one per student.

  • A balance scale is used in Unit 7, one per group of students. 

  • A 1 L beaker is used in Unit 7, one per group of students.

Indicator 3g

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Indicator 3h

This is not an assessed indicator in Mathematics.

Criterion 3i - 3l

The program includes a system of assessments identifying how materials provide tools, guidance, and support for teachers to collect, interpret, and act on data about student progress towards the standards.

9/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for Assessment. The materials include an assessment system that provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up, and the materials provide assessments that include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and practices. The materials partially include assessment information in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

Indicator 3i

Assessment information is included in the materials to indicate which standards are assessed.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for having assessment information included in the materials to indicate which standards and mathematical practices are assessed. 

While Pre-, Mid-, and Post-Unit Assessments within the program consistently and accurately reference grade-level content standards in Answer Keys or Assessment Analysis, Standards for Mathematical Practice are not identified. Post-Unit Assessment examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Expanded Assessment Package, Post-Unit Assessment Analysis denotes content standards addressed for each problem. Problem 2 is aligned to 3.OA.8 and states, “On the first day of their trip, the Knox family drove 368 miles. On the second day, they drove 447 miles. How many miles did the Knox family drive on the two days? A. 705, B. 715, C. 805, D. 815.”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeters, Unit Summary, Unit Assessment, Answer Key denotes standards addressed for each problem. Problem 6 is aligned to 3.G.1 and states, “In the space below, draw a quadrilateral that is not a parallelogram.” 

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Unit Assessment Answer Key includes a constructed response and 2-point rubric with the aligned grade-level standard. Problem 12 is aligned to 3.MD.4 and states, “Diondre is helping his art teacher, Mr. Jarrett, organize the materials in his closet. Mr. Jarrett asks Diondre to measure a bunch of square tiles to see if he can use them in a mosaic he is making. Diondre measures each one to the nearest quarter-inch and records the measurements in the table below. In the space below, create a line plot to show the data in the table above. Make sure your line plot is properly labeled.” An image of a table shows “Side lengths of Square Tiles”$$4\frac{1}{2}$$, $$4\frac{1}{4}$$, $$4\frac{1}{4}$$, $$4\frac{2}{4}$$, $$3\frac{3}{4}$$, $$4\frac{1}{2}$$, 5, and 4.

Indicator 3j

Assessment system provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students' learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for including an assessment system that provides multiple opportunities throughout the grade, course, and/or series to determine students’ learning and sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up. 

Each lesson provides a Target Task with a Mastery Response. According to the Math Teacher Tools, Assessment Overview, “Target Tasks offer opportunities for teachers to gather information about what students know and don’t know while they are still engaged in the content of the unit.” Each Pre-Unit Assessment provides an answer key and guide with a potential course of action to support teacher response to data. Each Mid-Unit Assessment provides an answer key and a 2-, 3-, or 4-point rubric. Each Post-Unit Assessment Analysis provides an answer key, potential rationales for incorrect answers, and a commentary to support analysis of student thinking. According to Math Teacher Tools, Assessment Resource Collection,“commentaries on each problem include clarity around student expectations, things to look for in student work, and examples of related problems elsewhere on the post-unit assessment to look at simultaneously.” Examples from the assessment system include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part I, Pre-Unit Assessment, Problem 2 states, “a. Draw an array with 8 objects where each row has 2 objects in it. b. How many rows are in your array?” Pre-Unit Assessment Analysis states, “Putting objects in arrays (Approaching 3.OA.2, 2.OA.4), As mentioned above, students used addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays and wrote equations to express the total as a sum of equal addends. Thus, this item extends that understanding to assess whether students are able to arrange a total number of objects in an array with rows of a certain size, analogous to a division situation involving equal groups with the number of equal groups unknown. Students may struggle with the language of rows and columns despite their introduction to these terms in 2nd grade. “Problems in terms of “rows” and “columns,” e.g., ‘“The apples in the grocery window are in 3 rows and 6 columns,” are difficult because of the distinction between the number of things in a row and the number of rows. There are 3 rows but the number of columns (6) tells how many are in each row. There are 6 columns but the number of rows (3) tells how many are in each column” (OA Progression, 24). Thus, this item uses just row language as will be the case when students first work with arrays in Lesson 2, but check to see whether students struggle even with that language, such as drawing an array with 2 rows instead of rows of 2. Students will rely on this understanding to make sense of multiplication and division situations involving arrays in this unit.” Potential Course of Action states, “If needed, this concept should be reviewed before students are introduced to unknown size of group or unknown number of groups problems in Lessons 3 and 4. For example, include a task similar to the one above as a warmup for Lesson 4, or an analogous problem with an unknown group size (e.g., asking students to construct an array with a certain number of rows) as a warmup for Lesson 3. You could also adapt Lesson 3 Anchor Task #2 Part (b) and/or Lesson 4 Anchor Task #2 Part (b), in which students solve unknown group size and unknown number of group problems involving arrays, respectively, to be more in-depth or allot more time for discussion.”

  • In Unit 3, Mid-Unit Assessment, Problem 6 states, “Joey decides to give away 48 pieces of Halloween candy. He distributes the candies equally to six friends. Each friend got 7 fewer pieces of candy than Joey kept for himself. How many pieces of candy did Joey keep?” Scoring guidance is provided on a 3-point rubric. It states, “3 Points - Student response demonstrates an exemplary understanding of the concepts in the task. The student correctly and completely answers all aspects of the prompt. 2 Points - Student response demonstrates a good understanding of the concepts in the task. The student arrived at an acceptable conclusion, showing evidence of understanding of the task, but some aspect of the response is flawed. 1 Point - Student response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the concepts in the task. The student arrived at an incomplete or incorrect conclusion, showing little evidence of understanding of the task, with most aspects of the task not completed correctly or containing significant errors or omissions. 0 points - Student response contains insufficient evidence of an understanding of the concepts in the task. Work may be incorrect, unrelated illogical, or a correct solution obtained by chance.”  

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Post-Unit Assessment Answer Key, Question 7, scoring guidance states, “A. 1 pt - correct answer of 26 feet, B. 2 pts - any of the following dimensions: 1 × 12, 2 × 11, 3 × 10, 4 × 9, or 5 × 8, as well as a valid explanation, e.g., “I knew the length and width has to add to 13 so that the perimeter was 26, so I thought of 10 and 3. I knew the area had to be different from 42, the area of the rug, so the length and width could be 10 feet by 3 feet. See 2-point rubric on last page. (3.MD.8).” It states, 2 points - Student response demonstrates an exemplary understanding of the concepts in the task. The student correctly and completely answers all aspects of the prompt. 1 point - Student response demonstrates a fair understanding of the concepts in the task. The student arrived at a partially acceptable conclusion, showing mixed evidence of understanding of the task, with some aspects of the task completed correctly, while others not. 0 points - Student response contains insufficient evidence of an understanding of the concepts in the task. Work may be incorrect, unrelated, illogical, or a correct solution obtained by chance.”

  • In Unit 6, Lesson 20, Target Task, Problem 2 states, “Solve. Then explain how you solved: \frac{3}{2}=$$\frac{\Box}{6}$$” The Mastery Response includes a sketched solution and, ‘I solved using the area models above. The second model is split into many more pieces, so it makes sense that we need more of them to be equivalent.’”

Indicator 3k

Assessments include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level/course-level standards and practices across the series.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for providing assessments that include opportunities for students to demonstrate the full intent of grade-level standards and practices across the series.

The Expanded Assessment Package includes the Pre-Unit, Mid-Unit, and Post-Unit Assessments. While content standards are consistently identified for teachers within Answer Keys for each assessment, practice standards are not identified for teachers or students. Pre-Unit items may be aligned to standards from previous grades. Mid-Unit and Post-Unit Assessments regularly demonstrate the full intent of grade-level content and practice standards through a variety of item types, including multiple choice, short answer, and constructed response. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 11, supports the full development of MP3 (Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others) as students work with multiplication and division. The materials state, “Part A - Fred has 36 stuffed animals that he will give to 4 different friends. He will give an equal number of stuffed animals to each friend. Fred uses the equation 36÷4=? to find how many stuffed animals he will give each friend. He thinks the ? equals 8. Explain why he is wrong. Part B - Find the correct answer using Fred’s equation. Part C - How would you use multiplication to find the number of stuffed animals Fred gives each friend?”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Mid-Unit Assessment, Problems 3-5 and Post-Unit Assessment, Problems 2, 3, 5, and 7, develop the full intent of standard 3.MD.7 (Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition). Mid-Unit Assessment, Problem 3 states, “Find the area of the figure below.” [A rectangle with dimensions 7 meters x 9 meters included.] Problem 4 states, “Which of the following figures has an area of 36 square units? Select the ​two​ correct answers.” [Four different figures on graph paper included.] Problem 5 states, “Kelsey buys a square-shaped dog bed that has a length of 3 feet. How much space will her dog have to sleep?” Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 2 states, “A patio is in the shape of a rectangle with a width of 8 feet and a length of 9 feet. What is the area, in square feet, of the patio?” Problem 3 states, “Tomas made a poster for his science project. The shaded part of the figure below shows the area of his poster. Which figure has the same area as the poster?” [Four quadrilateral figures, A-D with dimensions provided.] Problem 5 states, “The grid below shows a playground and a basketball court at a park. Part A - What is the area of the playground? Part B. What is the total area of both the playground and the basketball court? Part C - Fill in the blanks to show how the number sentence below can be used to find the total area of the playground and the basketball court. (4 × _) + (4 × _) = 4x(_ + _).” Problem 7 states, “A Gardener is drawing plans for a new yard. She creates the picture below to represent the size and shape of a new lawn. Part A. How can the gardener find the total area of the new lawn? Describe the process she can use with words or equations. Part B. What is the total area, in square feet, of the new lawn?”

  • In Unit 5, Shapes and Their Perimeter, Post-Unit Assessment, Problem 7, supports the full development of MP2 (Reason abstractly and quantitatively, as students solve problems involving perimeter and area). The materials state, “Ms. Shaw has a quilt that is in the shape of a rectangle. The quilt is 7 feet long and 6 feet wide, as shown. Part A - What is the perimeter, in feet, of Ms. Shaw’s quilt? Part B - Ms. Garcia also has a quilt in the shape of a rectangle. Ms. Garcia’s quilt has the same perimeter as Ms. Shaw’s quilt but has a different area. What could be the length and width, in feet, of Ms. Garcia’s quilt? Show or explain how you got your answer.”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Post-Unit Assessment, Problems 2, 6, 8, 9, and 11, develop the full intent of 3.NF.3 (Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size). Problem 2 states, “Write a fraction that is less than \frac{1}{3}using 1 as the numerator. Explain why the answer you chose is less than \frac{1}{3}.” Problem 6 states, “Angela and Jacob are learning about fractions. Jacob says that the fractions  $$\frac{1}{4}$$and \frac{2}{3} are equivalent. Angela disagrees with him, so Jacob draws a picture to prove his point: Jacob is incorrect. Explain what is wrong with Jacob’s reasoning.” Problem 11 states, “Which number goes in the box to make the comparison true? \frac{5}{8}>$$\frac{\Box}{8}$$ A. 3; B. 5; C. 7; D. 9.”

Indicator 3l

Assessments offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not provide assessments which offer accommodations that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills without changing the content of the assessment.

According to Math Teacher Tools, Assessment Resource Collection, “Each post-unit assessment includes approximately 6-12 problems for Grades 3-5 and 10-16 problems for Grades 6-8. It is recommended that teachers administer the post-unit assessment soon, if not immediately, after completion of the unit. The assessment is likely to take a full class period.” While all students take the assessment, there are no recommendations for potential student accommodations. 

Math Teacher Tools contain extensive information about strategies to utilize with sections, “Special Populations” and “Supporting English Learners.” One of many strategies includes, “Provide a prompt for students to respond to: Offering a scaffolded starting point for students to explain their thinking can be greatly beneficial to students who struggle in this area. This might look like providing sentence stems.”  

Additionally, in Teacher Tools, Math, Special Populations, Strategies For Supporting Special Populations, Memory, Lesson Level Adjustments states, “Provide tools: Consider allowing the use of tools like multiplication charts and calculators when appropriate. This would be especially appropriate if the skill to be introduced that day is not directly about assessing students’ understanding of math facts/arithmetic but this skill is an underlying skill preventing them from being successful that day.” This type of guidance is absent from actual assessments.

Criterion 3m - 3v

The program includes materials designed for each child’s regular and active participation in grade-level/grade-band/series content.

6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for Student Supports. The materials provide extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity and manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods. The materials partially provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics, and the materials partially provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level/series mathematics.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students in special populations to support their regular and active participation in learning grade-level mathematics. There are general strategies and supports included for teachers, but regular and active participation of special populations is not enhanced with specific recommendations linked to daily learning objectives, standards, and/or tasks within grade-level lessons.

Within Math Teacher Tools, there is a Special Populations folder that includes resources to support teachers. According to the materials, “In this Teacher Tool, we aim to provide teachers with resources to 1) broaden their own understanding of learning disabilities related to areas of cognitive functioning, 2) reflect on how the content or demands of a unit or lesson may require modifications or accommodations, and 3) identify and incorporate specific strategies meant to support students with learning disabilities.” There are many suggestions for supporting special populations within three categories in the Math Teacher Tools, “Areas of Cognitive Functioning, Protocols for Planning for Special Populations, and Strategies for Supporting Special Populations.'' For example, in Strategies for Supporting Special Populations, Conceptual Processing, Lesson Level Adjustments states, “Use manipulatives: Incorporate opportunities to use manipulatives that illuminate mathematical concepts in addition to those already included in the curriculum. Some excellent options that can be applied to elementary and middle/high school include base ten blocks, two-color counters, unit squares and unit cubes (such as centimeter cubes), fraction strips/tiles, and algebra tiles. With this strategy, ensure your manipulatives highlight the key concept and eliminate all other distractions. When introducing manipulatives, be sure to model how to use the materials correctly, what each represents, etc.”

Indicator 3n

Materials provide extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level/course-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for providing extensions and/or opportunities for students to engage with grade-level mathematics at higher levels of complexity.

There are no instances within the materials when advanced students have more assignments than their classmates, and there are opportunities where students can investigate grade-level mathematics at a higher level of complexity. Often, “Challenge” is written within a Problem Set or Anchor Task Guidance/Notes to identify these extensions. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 2, Problem Set, Problem 9 states, “CHALLENGE: Using the digits 1 through 9, at most one time each, fill in the blanks to make the following problem true. How many different sentences can you make? Sarah planted _ carrots in her garden. She planted them in rows. Each row had __ carrots.”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 8, Problem Set, Problem 7 states, “CHALLENGE: A larger square sticky note has an area of 36 square inches. What is the side length of the larger sticky note?”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 8, Anchor Task, Problem 3, Notes state, “This task is optional, as it goes beyond the scope of the standards. It will help prepare students for similar tasks on the number line, like Find \frac{2}{3} by Illustrative Mathematics that they will see in Lesson 14.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 provide varied approaches to learning tasks over time and variety in how students are expected to demonstrate their learning with opportunities for students to monitor their learning.

Students engage with problem-solving in a variety of ways within the Anchor Problems, Problem Sets, and Target Tasks and Academic Discourse is a key component for the program. According to Math Teacher Tools, “Academic discourse is necessary for students to develop the critical thinking skills needed to construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning and ideas of others (Standard for Mathematical Practice 3). Academic discourse pushes students toward deeper understanding of concepts and ideas, encourages logical reasoning and thinking, and requires students to reflect on their own thinking and understanding. It is also vital for developing academic language, vocabulary, and oral language and communication skills.” Examples of varied approaches include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition and Subtraction, Lesson 7, Anchor Task, Problem 1, students round multi-digit numbers and assess the reasonableness of their estimate. The materials state, “A pair of pants cost $52. Mrs. Ingall says the pants are about $50. Mr. Silver says they are about $100. Who is correct, Mr. Silver, Mrs. Ingall, both of them, or neither of them? Explain your answer.”

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 1, Anchor Task, Problem 1, students identify and create situations involving equal groups. Next, students describe these situations using the language and notation of multiplication using a picture. Teacher Notes inform teachers that, “Instead of presenting the pictures in the Anchor Task, you may want to do this with physical objects in your classroom, e.g., pencils in pencil boxes, books on shelves, etc. For this task, students will need counters.”  Problem 1 states, “Are these equal groups? How do you know?”

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 9, Target Task, students analyze and justify, “For his birthday, Kyle’s mom brought in cake to share with the class. When she picked up the two cake pans at the end of the day, shown below, she said, ‘Wow, your friends ate $$\frac{3}{4}$$ of the cake.’ Kyle said, ‘No Mom, we ate $$\frac{6}{4}$$ cakes.’ Who is right? Justify your answer.”

Each unit contains a Self-Assessment for students to monitor their own progress and reflect on what they have learned throughout a unit. Each self-reflection builds metacognitive skills as “students assess their own understanding of the skill mentioned in each statement on a scale from 1 to 5. Then, based on those responses, they describe the areas in which they feel most confident, the least confident, and the tools and resources they can use to improve in those areas of least confidence.” For example: 

  • In Unit 4, Area, Unit Summary, Student Self-Assessment provides students with the “I Can” statements that relates to the Common Core State Standards and a response scale of 1-Not Yet, 2, 3-Sometimes, 4, 5-All the Time. The materials state, “I can explain what attribute of a figure area measures. (3.MD.C.5) I can explain what units are used to measure area (3.MD.C.5.A) I can cover a flat figure with unit squares without gaps or overlaps to measure its area. (3.MD.C.5.B) I can find the area of objects by counting unit squares. (3.MD.C.6) I can explain the relationship between area and the operations of multiplication and addition. (3.MD.C.7) I can explain why multiplying the side lengths of a rectangle will give me the same areas as it would if I covered it with unit squares. (3.MD.C.7.A) I can find the area of a rectangle in the context of problems by multiplying the side lengths. (3.MD.C.7.B) I can explain why the area of a rectangle is the same as the sum of the areas of that same rectangle that has been broken into two parts. (3.MD.C.7.C) I can find the area of a at gure made up of rectangles by breaking it into rectangles, nding their area, and adding the areas together. (3.MD.C.7.D) Reflection: I feel most confident in my ability to: I feel least confident in my ability to: Things I can do to improve in areas where I feel less confident include:.” 

Indicator 3p

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 provide some opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

While suggested grouping strategies within lessons are not consistently present or specific to the needs of particular students, there is some general grouping guidance within Fluency Activities. The Procedural Skill and Fluency, Fluency Activities state, “The fluency activities are designed to be facilitated as a whole class, though suggestions for how to make each activity adaptable for centers, independent or partner work, and/or asynchronous practice are included in their descriptions.” Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 7, Fluency Activities, Bump states, “In this fluency activity, students multiply two single-digit numbers in hopes of bumping other players off the products of those numbers. The objective is to be the player to first use all 8 of one’s game markers. This fluency activity should be played in partners.”  

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 4, Fluency Activities, Count Em Up states, “In this fluency activity, students count unit squares to find the area of a flat figure (3.MD.C.6) or unit cubes to find the volume of a solid figure (5.MD.C.4). This fluency activity should be completed as a whole class or in a small group with a teacher.”  

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 1, Fluency Activities, Clothesline Math states, “In this fluency activity, a clothesline is used as a number line for a variety of activities. This fluency activity can be completed as a whole class or in a small group with the teacher. It can also be adapted for students to play independently or in partners by providing them with a smaller clothesline (such as a line drawn on a sheet of paper) and a list of numbers to place on it.”

Indicator 3q

Materials provide strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 partially meet expectations for providing strategies and supports for students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English to regularly participate in learning grade-level mathematics.

While there are resources within Math Teacher Tools, Supporting English Learners, that provide teachers with strategies and supports to help English Learners meet grade-level mathematics, these strategies and supports are not consistently embedded within lessons. The materials state, “Our core content provides a solid foundation for prompting English language development, but English learners need additional scaffolds and supports in order to develop English proficiency as they build their content knowledge. In this resource we have outlined the process our teachers use to internalize units and lessons to support the needs of English learners, as well as three major strategies that can help support English learners in all classrooms (scaffolds, oral language protocols, and graphic organizers). We have also included suggestions for how to use these strategies to provide both light and heavy support to English learners. We believe the decision of which supports are needed is best made by teachers, who know their students English proficiency levels best. Since each state uses different scales of measurement to determine students’ level of language proficiency, teachers should refer to these scales to determine if a student needs light or heavy support. For example, at Match we use the WIDA ELD levels; students who are levels 3-6 most often benefit from light supports, while students who are levels 1-3 benefit from heavy support.” Regular and active participation of students who read, write, and/or speak in a language other than English is not consistently supported because specific recommendations are not connected to daily learning objectives, standards, and/or tasks within grade-level lessons. Examples of strategies from Math Teacher Tools include:

  • In Teacher Tools, Supporting English Learners, Scaffolds for English Learners Overview states, “English learners should be interacting with the same complex tasks as the rest of the class. The job of the teacher is to ensure that the proper scaffolds are in place to make sure that English learners can access the complex tasks. Scaffolds should provide additional supports while maintaining the rigor of the core task, not simplify or modify the core task. Scaffolds should be determined by the student’s English Language level and the task. We recommend the following types of scaffolds; sensory, graphic, interactive, and noticing cognates to help support English learners. For example, a sensory scaffold may be Videos, Films and Audio. For lighter EL support: Show a short clip of an idea or concept to preview background information necessary to access a task. (For example, prior to learning about probability simulations, watch examples of simulations in action.) For heavier EL support: Show a short clip of an idea or concept to pre-teach key vocabulary prior to teaching a lesson. Video could be English or students’ home language.”

  • In Teacher Tools, Math, Supporting English Learners, Oral Language Protocols state, “There are adjusting oral language protocols for both light English Learner support and heavy English Learner support. For the light English Learner support: Provide sentence frames for students to use. Include sentence frames that require students to use a variety of sentence structures. Provide lists of key academic vocabulary to use when discussing a particular topic. Introduce and preview vocabulary words using the 7-step lesson sequence. Include visuals and gestures with all vocabulary words. Assign specific group roles to ensure equitable participation (timekeeper, notetaker, facilitator, etc.). To provide heavy English Learner support: Provide sentence frames for students to use. Sentence frames may be a variety of sentence structures. Strategically group students with others who speak the same home language. Allow students to complete the assignment in either English or in their home language. Provide students with answers (either on the back of the task, or in another location in the room) to allow partners to check if their partner has the correct answer. Provide more think time to allow students to build an effective argument. For oral turn and talk questions, give students a written version of the question to reference.” There are suggested oral language protocols that include: Turn and Talk, Simultaneous Round Table, Rally Coach, Talking Chips, Numbered Heads Together, and Take a Stand.

  • In Teacher Tools, Supporting English Learners, Planning for English Learners, Overview states, “Teachers need a deep understanding of the language and content demands and goals of a unit in order to create a strategic plan for how to support students, especially English learners, over the course of the unit. We encourage all teachers working with English learners to use the following process to prepare to teach each unit. We acknowledge that this work takes time, but we believe it is necessary in order to best meet the diverse needs of students. The steps for INTELLECTUALLY PREPARING A UNIT are Step One: Unpack the Unit, Step Two: Set a Vision for Mastery, Step Three: Plan for Assessment and Mastery, Step Four: Take Ownership.We believe that teacher intellectual preparation, specifically internalizing daily lesson plans, is a key component of student learning and growth. Teachers need to deeply know the content and create a plan for how to support students, especially English learners, to ensure mastery. Teachers know the needs of the students in their classroom better than anyone else, therefore, they should also make decisions about where to scaffold or include additional supports for English learners. We encourage all teachers working with English learners to use the following process to prepare to teach a lesson. Step One: Determine a Vision for Mastery and Step Two: Build the Lesson.”

Indicator 3r

Materials provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 provide a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics. 

While images are not used within materials, there are names that could represent a variety of cultures and problems include reference to specific roles, instead of pronouns that reference a specific gender identity. Lessons also include a variety of problem contexts to interest students of various demographic and personal characteristics. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 5, Additional Practice, Word Problem Practice, students solve word problems using the strategy additive compare with difference unknown. The materials state, “Kora read 50 pages in her book last night. Masha read 23 pages in her book last night. How many more pages did Kora read than Masha?” 

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Post Unit Assessment, Problem 8 states, “Select the two stories that can describe the expression 6 × 3. A. Kate collects baseball cards. Each page in her collection holds 18 baseball cards. She has 6 pages in her collection. How many baseball cards does she have in her collection? B. Joe has 3 boxes of model airplanes. Each box holds 6 model airplanes. How many model airplanes does Joe have in the 3 boxes? C. Brad will cook breakfast, lunch, and dinner for his family for 9 days. How many meals will he cook? D. Peggy is the line leader for her class this week on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. She will lead her class line 6 times each day. How many times in all will Peggy lead her class line on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday? E. Carrie, Gina, and Tom each have 18 pennies. How many pennies do these 3 have in all?” 

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 6, Anchor Tasks 1, students solve word problems that involve elapsed time in minutes. The materials state, “The third-grade teachers left school on Friday to go to a movie together. The movie’s start time is 3:00 p.m. Here is what Google Maps told them they should do to get downtown: Will they make it in time to see the movie? Show or explain your work.” Students are provided an image of Google Maps with specific information related to time and places.

  • Other names that could represent a variety of cultures are represented in the materials, i.e., Ahmed, Jahfree, Margo, Yasmine, Cesar, and Molly.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student home language to facilitate learning.

Although the Math Teacher Tools, Oral Language Protocols provide general guidance for supporting students’ native language, there are no specific suggestions for teachers to facilitate daily learning that builds on a student’s multilingualism as an asset. Oral Language Protocols suggests, “When picking a protocol for partner work or small group work, it is important to think through how English learners will be grouped and what role they will play in a particular group. Depending on the demands of the task and situation, students can be grouped with native and proficient English speakers, other ELs, or by home language. English learners should interact with a variety of different speakers in a variety of situations.” Teacher materials do not provide guidance on how to garner information that will aid in learning, including the family’s preferred language of communication, schooling experiences in other languages, literacy abilities in other languages, and previous exposure to academic everyday English.

Indicator 3t

Materials provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not provide guidance to encourage teachers to draw upon student cultural and social backgrounds to facilitate learning.

While About Us, Approach, Culturally Relevant, provides a general overview of the cultural relevance within program components, materials do not embed guidance for teachers to amplify students’ diverse linguistic, cultural, and/or social backgrounds to facilitate learning. The materials state, “We are committed to developing curriculum that resonates with a diversity of students’ lived experiences. Our curriculum is reflective of diverse cultures, races and ethnicities and is designed to spark students’ interest and stimulate deep thinking. We are thoughtful and deliberate in selecting high-quality texts and materials that reflect the diversity of our country.” While some diversity in names or problem contexts are present within materials, specific guidance to connect the mathematical goals with students’ funds of knowledge in a way that makes learning relevant or motivating for students, is absent.

Indicator 3u

Materials provide supports for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not provide support for different reading levels to ensure accessibility for students.

While the Math Teacher Tools, Special Populations, Supporting Special Populations, Language section notes some general recommendations for supporting language and scaffolding vocabulary, there is nothing specific about reading levels. Guidance includes, “Implement group reading strategies: Call on students throughout the class to read problems aloud, allowing students who might struggle in this area to listen and focus on comprehension. Proactively mark-up these text: To ensure students are spending time on the thinking and learning of the fundamental math concept of the day, consider pre-annotating the text provided to students or providing definitions for words within the text that might be a barrier for students comprehending the text.” Within the Anchor Tasks Notes or Tips for Teachers, there are some suggestions to scaffold vocabulary or concepts to support access to the mathematics, but these do not directly address different student reading levels. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 8, Anchor Tasks, Problem 3 Notes state, “This word problem should not be difficult for students to interpret, as it’s the expectation that students master all forms of addition and subtraction word problems in Grade 2 (see OA Progression, Table 2, p. 9). They haven’t solved word problems with values this large before, however. Thus, they may not actually need to draw or use a tape diagram to solve, and you may focus the discussion more on the computation than the interpretation, depending on how students seem to do with it.”

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division Part 1, Lesson 14, Anchor Tasks, Problem 1, Notes state, “Part (b) is difficult because it would seem it can be solved using division. But, the problem doesn’t actually say that Helen spent the same amount of money for each of her grandchildren. You could encourage students to change the wording in some way to fix for this, then discuss the use of division to solve the edited problem, including the tape diagram that would correspond with it.”

  • In Unit 4, Area, Lesson 1, Discussion of Problem Set states, “What new math vocabulary did we use today to communicate precisely about the amount of space taken up by a shape?”

Indicator 3v

Manipulatives, both virtual and physical, are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 meet expectations for providing manipulatives, both virtual and physical, that are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

The materials provide suggestions and/or links for virtual and physical manipulatives that support the understanding of grade-level concepts. Manipulatives are accurate representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods. Examples include: 

  • In Unit 1, Place Value, Rounding, Addition, and Subtraction, Lesson 1, Anchor Tasks, Problem 2 uses a Tic-Tac-Toe Board as number grids, allowing students to work with place value understanding. 

  • In Unit 3, Multiplication and Division, Part 2, Lesson 21, Anchor Tasks, Problem 1 uses a Multiplication Chart to teach students how to identify patterns in a multiplication table. The materials state, “You could discuss all of the patterns as a whole class and have them write down their observations at the end of the discussion, or you could explore just one of these relationships as a whole class (the fives, for example) and then have students notice patterns a bit more independently on the Problem Set and Homework.”

  • In Unit 7, Measurement, Lesson 7, Anchor Tasks, Problem 2 uses a Balance Scale to help students develop benchmarks in 1 kilogram and 1 gram from objects they weigh. The materials state, “For this task, students will need a thumbtack, a copy of textbook, a pair of scissors, a ruler, counters or other nonstandard unit used to measure mass, and a balance scale per group.”

Criterion 3w - 3z

The program includes a visual design that is engaging and references or integrates digital technology, when applicable, with guidance for teachers.

0/0
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 integrate some technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level standards, and the materials have a visual design that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. The materials do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, and the materials do not provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

Indicator 3w

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 integrate some technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the grade-level/series standards, when applicable.

While technology integration is limited, teachers and students have access to external technology tools and virtual manipulatives, like GeoGebra, Desmos, or other resources, as appropriate. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Multiplication and Division, Part 1, Lesson 2, Tips for Teachers, Tic-Tac-Toe Array from Building Conceptual Understanding and Fluency Through Games, students have opportunities to use the applet to create and use arrays to show multiplication. 

  • In Unit 6, Fractions, Lesson 25, Open Middle, How Many Numbers are There, students use an Open Middle applet to understand fractions as a number.

Indicator 3x

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other, when applicable.

Indicator 3y

The visual design (whether in print or digital) supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 provide a visual design (whether in print or digital) that supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject, and is neither distracting nor chaotic.

There is a consistent design within units and lessons that supports learning on the digital platform.

  • Each lesson follows a common format with the following components: Common Core Standards, Criteria for Success, Tips for Teachers, Anchor Tasks, Problem Set & Homework, Target Task, and Additional Practice. The layout for each lesson is user-friendly as each component is included in order from top to bottom on the page. 

  • The font size, amount of directions, and language in student materials is appropriate. 

  • The digital format is easy to navigate and engaging. There is ample space in the Problem Sets, Homework, and Assessments for students to capture calculations and write answers. Teachers can pre-select material from suggested sources and print for students, making it easier to navigate pages.

While the visual layout is appealing, there are spelling and/or grammatical errors within the materials.

Indicator 3z

Materials provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Fishtank Plus Math Grade 3 do not provide teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning, when applicable.

While teacher implementation guidance is included for Anchor Tasks, Notes, Problem Sets, and Homework, there is no embedded technology, so teacher guidance for it is not necessary.

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Report Published Date: 2021/08/18

Report Edition: 2021

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Math K-8 Review Tool

The K-8 review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations