Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Alignment to NGSS, Gateways 1 and 2. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. The materials include three-dimensional learning opportunities but miss opportunities for student sensemaking with the three dimensions. Three-dimensional objectives are consistently present at the unit level, but not at the lesson level. The summative assessments do not consistently measure the three dimensions for their respective objectives. The formative assessments are not consistently three dimensional, nor do they provide guidance to support the instructional process. Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations. Phenomena and problems are not present in this grade level of the materials.

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Designed for NGSS

0
14
24
28
2
24-28
Meets Expectations
15-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-14
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Coherence and Scope

0
16
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
17-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-16
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
30
50
59
N/A
50-59
Meets Expectations
31-49
Partially Meets Expectations
0-30
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Designed for NGSS

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations and Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations.

Criterion 1a - 1c

Materials are designed for three-dimensional learning and assessment.
2/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Criterion 1a-1c: Three-Dimensional Learning. The materials include integration of the three dimensions in one learning opportunity per learning sequence for nearly all learning sequences. While the three dimensions are consistently integrated in most learning sequences, the materials miss the opportunity to engage students in sensemaking with the three dimensions across the learning sequence. The materials consistently provide three-dimensional learning objectives at the lesson level, but do not formatively assess them and do not provide teacher guidance to support the instructional process. The materials do not consistently provide three-dimensional learning objectives at the lesson level and do not provide teacher guidance to support the instructional process. Three-dimensional objectives are present at the unit level but the corresponding summative assessments are not consistently three-dimensional and do not address all of the three dimensions of the objectives.

Indicator 1a

Materials are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) into student learning.
0/0

Indicator 1a.i

Materials consistently integrate the three dimensions in student learning opportunities.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet expectations that they are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) into student learning opportunities. Within the six learning sequences in Grade 2, the sequences include at least one lesson where all three dimensions are integrated. Most often, the three dimensions are integrated within the Think Like a Scientist or Think Like an Engineer lessons; students engage in a learning opportunity with the DCI and SEP then look at their learning through the lens of the CCC. In the Investigate lessons, students engage in a hands-on activity. Typically, these lessons include two dimensions and occasionally all three dimensions. Several lessons within the lesson sequence only connect to the DCI. Five of the six lesson sequences have at least one example of a three dimensional lesson within a lesson sequence, and this is an Earth Science lesson sequence. This lesson sequence is a smaller chunk of lessons and does not include any lessons that have all three dimensions.

Examples of learning opportunities within a learning sequence that integrate all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, Lesson 3: Think Like a Scientist: Plan and Investigate, students conduct an investigation to determine whether plants need water to grow. Students set up an investigation in which some plants have water and some plants do not. Students record their observations; after seven days, students compare their predictions to the results and compare the plants that were watered versus those that weren’t (SEP-INV-P4). Students explore patterns that they noticed as a result of the investigation; they determine what caused the patterns to emerge (CCC-CE-P2). Students then conclude that plants need water to grow (DCI-LS2.A-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 2: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, Lesson 15: Investigate: How Desert Plants Survive, students investigate the waxy covering on a plant and how it protects plants. Students investigate how desert plant leaves help them survive in the desert  (DCI-LS2.A-P1) and learn about what plants need to survive. Students discuss patterns of the needs of plants that live in places with varying amounts of rainfall (CCC-PAT-P1). Students create a model of a waxy leaf by covering it with wax paper to develop a model to observe (SEP-MOD-E4). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 2: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, Lesson 16: Think Like a Scientist: Make Observations, students learn about different habitats on Earth and which animals live in each one. Students look at photos of animals and their habitats, as well as maps of the Earth to identify which animals live in different habitats (DCI-LS4.D-P1). Students track observations of patterns they identify about the animals and the habitats (CCC-PAT-P1, SEP-INV-P4). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson Sequence 1, Lesson 8: Investigate: Erosion, students investigate what happens during erosion and how water can cause erosion. Students observe what happens to soil when water is poured over it and how it erodes (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). Students create a model to show what happens to soil when water is poured on it. After the investigation, the students make connections between the model they observed and the natural world (SEP-MOD-P3). Students are then consider if they noticed any patterns, especially thinking about what they may have observed in the natural world (CCC-PAT-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson Sequence 1, Lesson 11: Think Like a Scientist: Plan and Investigate, students plan and conduct an investigation to observe and classify objects based on their properties. Students determine how they want to sort the objects and which properties they plan to observe (DCI-PS1.A-P1). Students observe objects based on agreed-upon properties and record observations and answer questions (SEP-INV-P2). Students look for patterns in their results (CCC-PAT-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson Sequence 2, Lesson 14: Think Like a Scientist, students look at different objects to see how a bigger object can be made of smaller objects. They also look at an object to see if they could use the smaller pieces to build something else (DCI-PS1.A-P3). Students use different objects that they can take apart and put together to see how smaller parts can make up bigger objects. They make observations to help them collect evidence based on ideas (SEP-CEDS-P1). The students discuss how the smaller objects are the parts of the bigger object and that objects can change shape (CCC-EM-P1). 

Example of a learning sequence that does not integrate all three dimensions within a learning opportunity:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson Sequence 2, Lessons 10-19, students build on what they have learned about fast and slow changes to the land, looking at how water can quickly change the land through a flooding or slowly change the land by moving soil. None of the lessons within this lesson sequence provide opportunity for three-dimensional learning. Students read and watch videos about rivers, lakes, ponds, and oceans and changes in the surface of the earth (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, DCI-ESS2.C-P1). Students build a model early in the Think Like a Scientist lesson where they replicate the landforms they see in the pictures.

Indicator 1a.ii

Materials consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions.  Across this grade, the materials are not designed for SEPs and CCCs to meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions.

Of the six units, one lesson sequence engages students in sensemaking with all three dimensions and one lesson sequence engages students in two-dimensional sensemaking. 

Most lesson sequences begin with students learning about the DCI. This is typically followed by an Investigate or Think Like a Scientist lesson, where students confirm what they have already learned about the DCI. While these lessons may include opportunities for students to engage with all three dimensions, they do not consistently present opportunities for students to use the SEP or CCC for sensemaking. Additionally, multiple Think Like a Scientist and Think Like an Engineer lessons focus on learning a specific SEP or CCC, rather than using the SEP or CCC to make sense of the DCI.

Examples of lesson sequences where SEPs or CCCs do not meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, students conduct an investigation to confirm that plants need water to grow. Students set up an investigation in which some plants have water and some plants do not. Students record their observations. After seven days, students compare their predictions to the results and compare the plants that were watered versus those that were not (SEP-INV-P4). Students use this information to confirm what they learned in previous lessons: plants need water to grow (DCI-LS2.A-P1). Although there is a discussion of patterns, students do not use the CCC to make meaning of the SEP or DCI. While all three dimensions are present, students only confirm information that was already provided; there is a missed opportunity for students to use the investigation or CCC to make sense of the DCI.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson Sequence 2, students examine and compare solutions to prevent flooding or changes caused by wind and water. Students read and watch videos to learn where rivers, lakes, ponds, and oceans exist, and how they can change the surface of the Earth (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, DCI-ESS2.C-P1). In Lesson 17, students build a model where they replicate the landforms they see in the pictures. They answer questions that relate their models to the shape of the land (DCI-ESS2.B-P1). The model helps students confirm content information they have already learned. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson Sequence 1, students learn that matter can be described and classified (DCI-PS1.A-P1). Students then determine criteria for observing properties of objects and sorting the objects by those properties. Students record their observations and answer questions (SEP-INV-P2). Although there is a discussion of patterns, students do not use the CCC to make meaning of the SEP or DCI; the investigation confirms what students already learned: matter can be described and classified.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson Sequence 2, students learn that some changes caused by heating or cooling can be reversed and some cannot. In Lesson 15, students learn that when water freezes, it changes to ice. Students then confirm this by watching a timelapse video of water freezing and also putting water into a freezer. Students then learn that heat can melt the ice into liquid water. They confirm this by watching ice melt. Students then learn that when some matter changes through heat or cooling, the changes are not always reversible, such as when eggs or muffins cook. To conclude this lesson sequence, students observe images of three items (ice, pancakes, and popcorn) being heated and construct an argument whether changes to these three items can be reversed (SEP-ARG-P6). Students use information from prior lessons to support their argument. While students use evidence from their observations, their arguments support what they previously learned: some changes are reversible and some are not. 

Example of a lesson sequence where SEPs or CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson Sequence 1, students view and compare fast and slow changes to the Earth’s surface. Students read text, watch videos, and listen to a teacher’s explanation on how the earth changes (DCI-ESS1.C-P1). In Lesson 8, students develop a model of erosion (SEP-MOD-P3) and compare their models to photographs in the books or in their neighborhood (SEP-MOD-P2). Students use the model to make sense of how erosion can change the earth.

Examples of lesson sequence where SEPs and CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 2: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, students learn about different habitats on Earth and which animals live in each habitat. Students look at photos of animals and their habitats, as well as maps of the earth to identify which animals live in different habitats (DCI-LS4.D-P1). Students track observations of patterns they identify about the animals and the habitats (CCC-PAT-P1, SEP-INV-P4). Students deepen their understanding of this concept by investigating the information on their own and with a partner.

Indicator 1b

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.

Most lessons have one or more objectives; while each of these objectives may include one or two dimensions, the objectives are not individually three dimensional.Formative assessment opportunities include the Wrap it Up questions at the end of every lesson; the rubrics that are included with the Investigate, Think Like a Scientist, and Think Like an Engineer lessons; Checkpoint Quizzes; and some of the Elaborate sections within the lesson. The Wrap it Up questions often assess the one dimension included in the learning objective. The Checkpoint quizzes assess several lessons and connect to the DCIs from those lessons but rarely assess the SEP or CCCs from within the lesson. The Think Like a Scientist, Think Like an Engineer, and the Investigate lessons include a rubric and Wrap it Up questions. The Wrap it Up questions typically assess the DCI but rarely assess the SEP or CCC. In some instances, the rubrics use the exact language from the Performance Expectation and provide three-dimensional assessment. 

The materials miss opportunities to provide guidance to teachers for using the formative assessment data to support the instructional process or provide next steps to take if a student is demonstrating little or no understanding of the content. The rubrics ask teachers to consider some important ideas; however, they do not provide teachers with a high quality student answer. The sample student responses in the Wrap it Up questions often only address the DCI of the lessons.  

Examples of lessons that do not have three-dimensional objectives, the formative assessment task(s) do not assess student knowledge of all (three) dimensions in the learning objective, and do not provide guidance to support the instructional process.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science Lesson 5: Animals Pollinate Flowers, there is one learning objective: “explain how plants depend on animals for pollination.” The objective is not three dimensional. The formative assessments include two Wrap it Up questions that ask students why pollination is important to plants and to identify ways that animals move pollen from flower to flower. The formative assessment task is not three dimensional but it does assess the learning objectives. There is no support for teachers to guide their instructional process in response to formative assessment. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, STEM Engineering Project: Design a Light Catcher, there are four learning objectives: “define the engineering problem they need to solve,” “design and build a tool that reflects light onto a plant,” “test the tool and analyze their results to determine if it solves the problem,” and “use the results of their tests and ideas from their classmates to improve their design.” The objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessments include student and teacher rubrics, answers to investigation questions, and student observations of the plant with a light catcher and one without a light catcher. These assessments are not three dimensional but do assess the objectives. The teacher materials do not provide information about follow-up actions with the assessment data. There are, however, instructions to use the student and teacher rubrics to guide assessment of the students’ work. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson 8: Animals Spread Seeds, there is one learning objective: “describe how animals help move a plant’s seeds.” The objective is not three dimensional. The formative assessment includes the two Wrap it Up questions that ask students to describe ways seeds move to new places and answer how the burrs got on the cow’s head. This assessment is not three dimensional; students only identify that seeds are carried by animals but it does not assess a CCC or SEP. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson 9: Think Like a Scientist: Develop a Model, there are two learning objectives: “observe and recognize that plants depend on water and sunlight” and “predict and investigate the growth of plants when the amount of sunlight is altered.” The objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessments include three Wrap it Up questions and rubric.  The learning objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessment tasks include recordings of observations of how seeds move, students and teacher rubrics, and student answers to the Wrap it Up questions. These questions ask what each object in the investigation represents, how they ensured their tests were fair, and the importance of fair tests.  These assessments are not three dimensional. Students identify that objects in the investigation represented animal fur and seeds (SEP-MOD-P4) and learn about conducting fair tests (SEP-INV- E1). The teacher materials do not provide information about follow-up actions with the assessment data. There are, however, instructions to use the student and teacher rubrics to guide the teacher’s assessment of the students’ work. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson 3: Weather and Erosion, there are two learning objectives: “explain how wind and water can change the shape of the land” and “recognize that some events happen very quickly and others occur very slowly.” These objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessment includes the Wrap it Up questions at the end of the lesson.  Students are asked to identify causes of erosion and why weathering needs to occur before erosion can occur (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). The learning objectives are partially assessed by these questions. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson 8: Investigate Erosion, there are two learning objectives: “observe how water can change the shape of the land quickly” and “devise a way to slow or prevent erosion of soil.” These objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessment tasks include student and teacher rubrics and the Wrap it Up questions at the end of the lesson. The Wrap it Up questions ask students to observe and describe how water affects the first hill of soil, how water affects the second hill of soil, and then to compare how the two models show the patterns in nature of weathering or erosion (DCI-ESS2.A-P1, DCI-ESS2.C-P1, SEP-INV-P4). The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lessons 10-11: Think Like and Engineer Case Study: Protecting New Orleans, there are two learning objectives: “identify a problem caused by an earth event that happens quickly” and “identify the solution to a problem caused by water changing the shape of the land.” These objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessment includes the Wrap it Up question at the end of the lesson. This question asks how water causes fast changes that affect a city and how a levee can help control flooding (DCI-ESS2.A.P1). The formative assessment questions assess the learning objectives from the lesson, however, the assessment is not three dimensional. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson 17: Think Like a Scientist: Make a Model, there are two learning objectives: “develop a model to represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area” and “explain how their models help them understand how land is shaped.” These objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessment tasks in this lesson include the student and teacher rubrics and the Wrap it Up questions at the end of the lesson. The Wrap it Up questions ask students how drawing their design helps build the model and to determine how much their model looks like the land and water features in the provided pictures. The learning objectives are partially measured by students designing and building a model (SEP-MOD-P3) and in sharing and comparing their model to the land and water features in pictures (SEP-MOD-P2, DCI-ESS2.B-P1). The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson 5: Properties, there is one learning objective: “recognize that matter can be described and classified by its properties.” This objective is not three dimensional. The formative assessment includes the Wrap it Up questions at the end of the lesson that ask students to define a property and answer the reason a shape is a property (DCI-PS1.A-P1, DCI-PS1.A-P2). The questions do not fully assess student understanding of the learning objective. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson 8: Hard and Soft, there are two learning objectives: “describe objects as hard or soft” and “sort objects by their properties.” The objectives are not three-dimensional. The formative assessment includes the Wrap it Up questions at the end of the lesson that ask students to describe the properties of objects that are hard and to identify objects in their home that they want to be soft (DCI-PS1.A-P1, DCI-PS1.A-P2). These questions assess the first objective and the elaborate activity assesses the second objective. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson 9: Bend and Stretch, there is one learning objective: “recognize bending and stretching as characteristics of flexibility, which is a property of materials.” This objective is not three dimensional. The formative assessments include the Elaborate and Wrap it Up questions. The Elaborate question asks students to manipulate materials and describe them by their properties. The Wrap it Up questions ask students what it means to be flexible and whether paper is flexible )SEP-INV-P4, DCI-PS1.A-P1, DCI-PS1.A-P2.) The learning objectives are measured in the assessments, however, they are not three dimensional. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, STEM Space Station Project: Design Flavor Cubes, there are five learning objectives: “define the engineering problem they need to solve,” “carry out tests to identify the properties of the different fruits and vegetables that can be used to flavor water,” “analyze data from the tests to compare the strengths and weaknesses of the different flavorings,” “communicate the results of the tests to the class,” and “use the results of the tests and feedback from other students to design a refined product.” These objectives are not three dimensional. The formative assessment tasks include the student and teacher rubrics and the Wrap it Up questions at the end of the lesson. The questions ask students to identify the senses they use to observe the properties of your flavorings and to identify the fruit or vegetable that makes the best flavoring. The rubric and questions are not three dimensional and do not assess all parts of the learning objectives. The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

Examples of lessons that have three-dimensional objectives, the formative assessment task(s) assess student knowledge of all three dimensions in the learning objective, but  do not provide guidance to support the instructional process.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson 2: Investigation Plants and Light, there are two learning objectives: “observe and recognize that plants depend on water and sunlight” and “predict and investigate the growth of plants when the amount of sunlight is altered.” While individually, each objective is not three dimensional, they build towards three-dimensional understanding. The formative assessments include three Wrap it Up questions and rubric. Students answer questions about what they kept the same for both plants, what they changed between the two plants, and how their predictions compared to their observations. The rubric measures whether students can explain the purpose of the investigation, describe the features of the investigation plan, demonstrate understanding of how to measure plant growth, identify evidence to collect, demonstrate how to use evidence to answer the investigation question, work collaboratively to collect, and record data on the amount of plant growth with and without light (SEP-INV-P2), and answer whether plants need light to grow (DCI-LS2.A.-P1, CCC-CE-P1). The teacher materials provide no guidance for modifying instruction if students do not meet the objective for this lesson. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson 3: Think Like a Scientist: Plan and Investigate, there are two learning objectives: “plan and conduct an investigation to determine whether plants need water to grow.” and “use evidence from an investigation to explain what happens if plants do not get water” The objectives are three dimensional. The formative assessments include students completing a table of observations of plant growth with water and without water over a week, student and teacher rubrics, and answers to the Wrap it Up questions about variables. The assessments are three dimensional; students identify different variables in the investigation and identify cause and effect patterns between water and plant growth (DCI-LS2.A-P1, CCC-CE-P2, SEP-INV-P2). The teacher materials do not provide information about what to do with the assessment data. There are, however, instructions to use the student and teacher rubrics to guide the assessment of the students’ work.

Indicator 1c

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials. Each unit consists of one or two lesson sequences that include bundles of performance expectations (PEs) as the objectives for each; therefore, all units had three-dimensional learning objectives.

The summative assessments for each unit include a Unit Test, Unit Performance Task, and an ExamView Test Bank of questions. The Unit Test includes questions in the ExamView Test Bank and typically assesses the DCIs embedded within the objectives (PEs). In some multiple choice questions, students use an image or diagram to respond to questions, but no questions within the Unit Test or ExamView bank were three dimensional and SEPs and CCCs were not typically assessed. Other question types include fill-in-the-blank and matching questions; however, these also assessed only the targeted DCIs and often focused on vocabulary. Constructed response questions provide limited opportunities to assess two dimensions within the objectives. However, because teachers have the flexibility of selecting the items, not all students may answer the same questions.

The Unit Performance Task provides opportunities to assess student understanding and use of SEP and/or CCC elements; however, typically only one SEP and/or CCC per unit is assessed, missing opportunities to assess each element within the unit objectives. In addition, the unit assessments do not fully assess the ETS performance expectations, when present.

Examples of units that have three-dimensional objectives; the summative assessment tasks do not assess student knowledge of all (three) dimensions in the learning objectives.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, the objectives for this unit include four performance expectations: 2-LS2-1, 2-LS2-2, K-2-ETS1-2, and K-2-ETS1-3. The objectives for this unit are three dimensional. The unit objectives are partially assessed. The Unit Test includes multiple choice and constructed responses. Throughout the Unit Test and the Performance Task, students show understanding that plants need water and light to grow (DCI-LS2.A-P1) and draw models to show how plants depend on animals to spread their seeds and pollinate (DCI-LS2.A-P2, ETS1.B-P1). Multiple CCC, DCI, and SEP elements within the unit objectives are not assessed.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 2: Life Science, the objectives for this unit include one performance expectation: 2-LS4-1. The objectives for this unit are three dimensional. The unit objectives are partially assessed. These objectives are partially assessed by the unit summative assessments. The Unit Test includes 13 multiple choice and constructed response questions that assess student understanding of the different kinds of living things in any area, and that they exist in different places on land and in water (DCI-LS4.D-P1). The Unit Performance Task includes five questions that also assess this DCI. In the Performance Task, students draw pictures and answer questions about organisms that live in a habitat. These questions miss the opportunities for students to collect data and use that data to make comparisons (SEP-INV-P4). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, the objectives for this unit include five performance expectations: 2-ESS1-1, 2-ESS2-1, 2-ESS2-2, 2-ESS2-3, and K-2-ETS1-3. The objectives for this unit are three dimensional. The unit objectives are partially assessed. The Unit Test includes 16 multiple choice and constructed response questions. Students show understanding of how wind and water can change the land (DCI-ESS2.A-P1), where water can be found (DCI-ESS2.C-P1), how to use a map to show the location of different water sources (DCI-ESS2.B-P1, SEP-MOD-P3) and explain how plants and animals can change their environment (DCI-ESS2.E-P1). Students design a test to determine which plant can best stop erosion (DCI-ESS2.A-P1, SEP-CEDS-P3). The Unit Performance Task asks students to find evidence of weathering and erosion and draw a model of it. Then they make a model using provided materials that demonstrate weathering, erosion, and how wind and water change the land (DCI-ESS2.B-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Multiple elements within the unit objectives are not assessed.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, the objectives for this unit include four performance expectations: 2-PS1-1, 2-PS1-2, 2-PS1-3, and 2-PS1-4. The objectives for this unit are three dimensional. The unit objectives are partially assessed. The Unit Test includes 12 multiple choice and constructed response questions. Students are assessed on their understanding of temperature, ways to heat or cool food, and reversible changes after heating or cooling foods (DCI-PS1.B-P1). Students also identify and compare properties of objects and materials, how they are suited for different purposes, and how small parts can be arranged differently (DCI-PS1.A-P2, DCI-PS1.A-P3). Students analyze provided information and construct an argument using evidence to support their claim (SEP-ARG-P6). Students then apply their understanding of properties of materials to determine the best materials for building a birdhouse (DCI-PS1.A-P2, SEP-CEDS-P3). The Unit Performance Task has two parts. Part one asks students to sort a list of materials between solid and liquid. Then, they justify their choices. Part two asks students to sort a variety of items into properties of their choice. Then they sort the same items in a different way. Multiple elements within the unit objectives are not assessed.

Criterion 1d - 1i

Materials leverage science phenomena and engineering problems in the context of driving learning and student performance.
0/12
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Criterion 1d-1i: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning. The materials do not include phenomena or problems.

Indicator 1d

Phenomena and/or problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs). The materials present no problems for students to solve nor do they present phenomena for students to explain.

The materials include four units: two Life Science units and one Earth and one Physical Science unit. Each unit includes between 18-20 lessons, including several DCI or content-focused lessons, Investigate lessons, and Think Like an Engineer or Think Like a Scientist lessons.

Indicator 1e

Phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible. There are no problems or phenomena presented in Grade 2.

Indicator 1f

Phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions.
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions.

Across the grade, students do not figure out phenomena or solve problems in any of the 60 lessons. Instead, these lessons focus on having students explain the concept or idea, build vocabulary, and/or answer a topical question.

Examples of lessons that do not use phenomena and/or problems to drive student learning:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson 1: What Plants Need, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the question, “What do plants need?” Students look at a picture of plants in a rainforest and discuss what they need. Students read text to learn that plants need water and light (DCI-LS2.A-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson 3: Think Like a Scientist: Plan and Investigate, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the topic that plants need light to grow. Students plant two plants, placing one in a sunny place and the other in a dark place. Students collect data on the growth of the plant over several days. Students share their information and discuss why plants grow better in one environment, concluding that plants depend on water and light to grow (SEP-INV-P2, DCI-LS2.A-P1).   

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson 8: Investigate: Erosion, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the concept of erosion. Students observe a photograph of beach or soil erosion and discuss their ideas of the causes. They read text and use that information to discuss how to keep soil from eroding before confirming their learning through a hands-on task. Students learn how to measure water and how to observe and record their observations. Students build a model of two hills, which they use to observe and compare effects of erosion (SEP-MOD-P3, DCI-ESS2.C-M5). Students discuss their observations, patterns of erosion (CCC-PAT-P1), and how their models compare to erosion in the real world. 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson 9: Think Like a Scientist: Make Observations,  the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the concept that processes change the shape of land. Students observe photographs of landscapes and man-made structures before they read about and discuss events and processes that change the shape of the land. Students learn that things can change quickly or over long periods of time. Students analyze the pictures then complete a chart to describe whether a change happens quickly or takes a long time (DCI-ESS1.C-P1). Students use books or the internet to research other changes then determine whether the changes observed in the photographs (SEP-INV-P4) happen quickly or slowly (CCC-SC-P2). Students use their notes and drawings to share with the class their conclusions to explain the natural world as presented in the photos.

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson 12-13: Think Like an Engineer: Compare, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the concept that wind and water changes land. Students engage in a hands-on activity to observe which materials absorb more water. Students then learn how wind and water can affect land and how humans try to change those effects. Students read about multiple solutions designed to prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land. Students discuss run-off and pollution and the possible problems they can cause. Through discussion, students compare different solutions (SEP-CEDS-P3), discussing how these changes can happen quickly or slowly (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, CCC-SC-P2). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson 1: Matter, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the topic of matter. Students look at several different objects and then read text about matter, followed by a class discussion. Students discuss what they observed and learned about matter (DCI-PS1.A-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson 4: Investigate Solids and Liquids, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the topic of liquids and solids. Students pour water in different shaped containers to see if it takes the shape of the containers. Students do the same with marbles to see if they take the shape of the container. Students discuss their observations and conclude that liquids take the shape of their container but solids do not (DCI-PS1.A-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science, Lesson 5: Properties, the lesson is not driven by a phenomenon or problem; instead, the focus of the learning is on the topic of properties of materials. Students look at different leaves and describe them. Students read text to learn about properties of objects and materials and how the different properties can be used to describe things (DCI-PS1.A-P1).

Indicator 1g

Materials are designed to include both phenomena and problems.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 are designed for students to solve problems in 0% (0/60) of the lessons/activities. Throughout the materials 0% (0/60) of the lessons focus on explaining phenomena. The materials include four units: Life (two units), Earth, and Physical Science.

Indicator 1h

Materials intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems. In Grade 2 there are no phenomena or problems.

Indicator 1i

Materials embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions. Phenomena and problems are missing from this grade and do not drive learning of individual lessons, activities, or across multiple lessons in a lesson sequence or across the unit. 

The materials consist of four content-focused units, which are further organized into one or two lesson sequences, resulting in six lesson sequences across the grade. While some units included an image or picture that could be referenced throughout the unit, this helped connect learning but did not drive the learning. Instead, each lesson sequence focuses on learning a specific science concept or topic. 

Examples of lesson sequences where student learning is not driven by a phenomenon or problem across multiple lessons, but the materials engage students with all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Unit 1: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, a phenomenon or problem does not drive the learning across multiple lessons; instead, this lesson sequence focuses on how plant needs are met, including pollination by bees. Students also read text to learn how bees pollinate plants. Students investigate that plants need water; they test what happens when some plants have water and some plants do not. Students record their observations.  After seven days, students compare their predictions to the results and compare the plants that were watered versus those that were not (SEP-INV-P4). Students explore patterns that they noticed as a result of the investigation. They determine the causes of the patterns’ emergements (CCC-CE-P2). Students then conclude that plants need water to grow (DCI-LS2.A-P1). In the STEM lesson, students draw a design for a light catcher and test their design (DCI-ETS1.B-P1, DCI-LS2.A-P1). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 2: Life Science, Lesson Sequence 1, a phenomenon or problem does not drive the learning across multiple lessons; instead, this lesson sequence focuses on the concept of biodiversity (DCI-LS4.D-P1). Each of the nine lessons in this sequence focuses on a  particular habitat, such as wetlands or the coast and the diversity of organisms within that habitat. In Lesson 15 students investigate the waxy covering on a plant and how it protects plants. Students investigate how desert plant leaves help them survive in the desert  (DCI-LS2.A-P1) and learn about plants’ needs to survive. Students discuss patterns of the needs of plants that live in places with varying amounts of rainfall (CCC-PAT-P1). Students create a model of a waxy leaf by covering it with wax paper to develop a model to observe (SEP-MOD-E4). In Lesson 16, students look at photos of animals, their habitats, and maps of the Earth to identify which animals live in different habitats (DCI-LS4.D-P1). Students track observations of patterns they identify about the animals and the habitats (CCC-PAT-P1, SEP-INV-P4). 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson Sequence 1, a phenomenon or problem does not drive the learning across multiple lessons; instead, this lesson sequence focuses on the concept of processes that change the Earth (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, DCI-ESS2.A-P1). Each of the nine lessons focus on examples of an earth process, such as volcanoes or weathering. In Lesson 8, observe what happens to soil when water is poured over it and how it erodes (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). Students create a model to show what happens to soil when water is poured on it, and after the investigation, the students make connections between the model they observed and the natural world (SEP-MOD-P3). Students then consider if they noticed any patterns, especially thinking about what they may have observed in the natural world (CCC-PAT-P1). In the Think Like a Scientist lesson, the students look at pictures of the earth and determine if the changes are fast or slow changes and what evidence they notice (SEP-CEDS-P1).The class discusses stability and change as it relates to changes in the earth and whether they are fast or slow changes (CCC-SC-P2).

  • In Grade 2, Unit 4: Physical Science Lesson Sequence 2, a phenomenon or problem does not drive the learning across multiple lessons; instead, this lesson sequence focuses on two topics: different objects can be made up of the same pieces and changes occur from heating and cooling. These topics connect the learning across several lessons within the sequence. Students watch videos and look at pictures to discuss that objects may be broken into smaller pieces or put together to create larger objects, or change shape (CCC-EM-P1, DCI-PS1.A-P3). Students observe water freezing to become ice and taking the shape of the container. Students observe ice melting into liquid water (DCI-PS1.B-P1). As students conduct multiple hands on sorting activities and investigations, they develop an understanding that that matter can present itself in different forms (SEP-CEDS-P1), and that different materials have different characteristics that are better suited for different purposes.

Examples of lesson sequences where student learning is not driven by a phenomenon or problem across multiple lessons and the materials do not engage students with all three dimensions: 

  • In Grade 2, Unit 3: Earth Science, Lesson Sequence 2, a phenomenon or problem does not drive the learning across multiple lessons; instead, this lesson sequence focuses on the topic of preventing wind or water from changing land. In this lesson sequence students learn about flooding and how water moves on land. Students watch videos, look at pictures, then engage in a hands-on activity to confirm how water and wind can change the shape of land; the class discusses different solutions to combat these effects (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). Students learn about glaciers and their effects on earth (CCC-CE-E1).

Gateway Two

Coherence and Scope

Not Rated

Criterion 2a - 2g

Materials are coherent in design, scientifically accurate, and support grade-level and grade-band endpoints of all three dimensions.

Indicator 2a

Materials are designed for students to build and connect their knowledge and use of the three dimensions across the series.
N/A

Indicator 2a.i

Students understand how the materials connect the dimensions from unit to unit.
N/A

Indicator 2a.ii

Materials have an intentional sequence where student tasks increase in sophistication.
N/A

Indicator 2b

Materials present Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) in a way that is scientifically accurate.*
N/A

Indicator 2c

Materials do not inappropriately include scientific content and ideas outside of the grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.*
N/A

Indicator 2d

Materials incorporate all grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 2d.i

Physical Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.ii

Life Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iii

Earth and Space Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iv

Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
N/A

Indicator 2e

Materials incorporate all grade-band Science and Engineering Practices.
N/A

Indicator 2e.i

Materials incorporate grade-level appropriate SEPs within each grade.
N/A

Indicator 2e.ii

Materials incorporate all SEPs across the grade band.
N/A

Indicator 2f

Materials incorporate all grade-band Crosscutting Concepts.
N/A

Indicator 2f.i

Materials incorporate grade-level appropriate CCCs within each grade.
N/A

Indicator 2f.ii

Materials incorporate all CCCs across the grade band.
N/A

Indicator 2g

Materials incorporate NGSS Connections to Nature of Science and Engineering
N/A

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3d

Materials are designed to support teachers not only in using the materials, but also in understanding the expectations of the standards.

Indicator 3a

Materials include background information to help teachers support students in using the three dimensions to explain phenomena and solve problems (also see indicators 3b and 3l).
N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials provide guidance that supports teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences to engage students in figuring out phenomena and solving problems.
N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials contain teacher guidance with sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3e - 3k

Materials are designed to support all students in learning.

Indicator 3e

Materials are designed to leverage diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students.
N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide appropriate support, accommodations, and/or modifications for numerous special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning science and engineering.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials provide multiple access points for students at varying ability levels and backgrounds to make sense of phenomena and design solutions to problems.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials include opportunities for students to share their thinking and apply their understanding in a variety of ways.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials include a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3k

Materials are made accessible to students by providing appropriate supports for different reading levels.
N/A

Criterion 3l - 3s

Materials are designed to be usable and also to support teachers in using the materials and understanding how the materials are designed.

Indicator 3l

The teacher materials provide a rationale for how units across the series are intentionally sequenced to build coherence and student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to NGSS.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts and Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3n.i

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts Common Core State Standards.
N/A

Indicator 3n.ii

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3o

Resources (whether in print or digital) are clear and free of errors.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials include a comprehensive list of materials needed.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials embed clear science safety guidelines for teacher and students across the instructional materials.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials designated for each grade level are feasible and flexible for one school year.
N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials contain strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers about the science program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3t - 3y

Materials are designed to assess students and support the interpretation of the assessment results.

Indicator 3t

Assessments include a variety of modalities and measures.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Assessments offer ways for individual student progress to be measured over time.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities and guidance for oral and/or written peer and teacher feedback and self reflection, allowing students to monitor and move their own learning.
N/A

Indicator 3w

Tools are provided for scoring assessment items (e.g., sample student responses, rubrics, scoring guidelines, and open-ended feedback).
N/A

Indicator 3x

Guidance is provided for interpreting the range of student understanding (e.g., determining what high and low scores mean for students) for relevant Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 3y

Assessments are accessible to diverse learners regardless of gender identification, language, learning exceptionality, race/ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.
N/A

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Materials are designed to include and support the use of digital technologies.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials are web based and compatible with multiple internet browsers. In addition, materials are “platform neutral,” are compatible with multiple operating systems and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess three-dimensional learning using digital technology.
N/A

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be customized for individual learners, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g., websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate digital technology and interactive tools (data collection tools, simulations, modeling), when appropriate, in ways that support student engagement in the three dimensions of science.
N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/04/15

Report Edition: 2019

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Exploring Science 2: Student Book 9781337911658
Exploring Science 2: Teacher's Edition 9781337915632

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Science K-5 Review Tool

The science review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflects the importance of alignment to the standards then considers other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For science, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Three-Dimensional Learning

  • Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning

  • Coherence and Full Scope of the Three Dimensions

  • Design to Facilitate Teacher Learning

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

To best read our reports we recommend utilizing the Codes for NGSS Elements document that provides the code and description of elements cited as evidence in each report.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations