Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for alignment to the Mathematics Florida Standards (MAFS). ​The instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1, focus and coherence, by focusing on the major work of the grade and being coherent and consistent with the Standards.  The instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 2, rigor and balance and practice-content connections, by reflecting the balances in the Standards and helping students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations by giving appropriate attention to the three aspects of rigor and meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Cluster Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).


See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
17
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
36
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for Gateway 1, focus and coherence. The instructional materials meet the expectations for focusing on the major work of the grade, and they also meet expectations for being coherent and consistent with the standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for not assessing topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced. The materials assess grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet the expectations for assessing grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. In instances where there are above grade-level questions, the material could easily be omitted or modified by the teacher. Probability, statistical distributions, similarities, transformations, and congruence do not appear in the assessments.

The series is divided into topics, and each topic has a Topic Assessment that can be administered online and/or paper and pencil formats. In addition, there is a Topic Performance Task for each topic. Additional assessments include a readiness assessment found in Topic 1, four cumulative/benchmark assessments, and a cumulative end of year assessment. Assessments can be found in the Assessment Resource book in print or online. The materials also include an ExamView Test Generator that is able to be used.

Examples of assessments containing grade-level content questions include the following:

  • In Topic 1, Performance Task, students compare numbers and write numbers in expanded form. (4.NBT.1.2)
  • In Topic 2, Topic Assessment, Question 2, students find “3,000-2,450.” (4.NBT.2.4)
  • Topic 6, Topic Assessment, Question 10, “Sabrina jogged 54 laps around the football field. Harry ran 9 laps. How many times as many laps did Sabrina run than Harry?” (4.OA.1.2)
  • Topics 1-4, Cumulative/Benchmark Assessment, Question 14, “Which of the following shows how to find 4 x 567? Which property was used?” The solution makes use of parentheses so that students would add before multiplying. (4.NBT.2)

Questions that are above grade level could be omitted or modified. For example, there are two items in the Topic 12 Topic Assessment that align to 5.NBT.2.7, adding and subtracting decimals:

  • Question 3 states, “Jackson spends $12.85 on a book, $5.89 for lunch, and $2.35 for a magazine. How much money did he spend in all?” (5.NBT.2.7)
  • Question 5 states, “Maria takes the money shown to the art supply store. Part A) Does Maria have enough money for all three items? Explain.” (Adding and subtracting decimals aligns to 5.NBT.2.7.)

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for students and teachers using the materials as designed devoting the large majority of class time to the major work of the grade. The instructional materials devote at least 65 percent of instructional time to the major clusters of the grade.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade.

  • The approximate number of topics devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 12 out of 16, which is approximately 75 percent.
  • The number of lessons devoted to major work of the grade (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 91 out of 104, which is approximately 88 percent
  • The number of days devoted to major work (including assessments and supporting work connected to the major work) is 121 out of 144, which is approximately 84 percent.

A lesson-level analysis is most representative of the instructional materials as the lessons include major work, supporting work connected to major work, and the assessments embedded within each topic. As a result, approximately 88 percent of the instructional materials focus on major work of the grade.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for being coherent and consistent with the standards. The instructional materials have supporting content that engages students in the major work of the grade and content designated for one grade level that is viable for one school year. The instructional materials are also consistent with the progressions in the standards and foster coherence through connections at a single grade.

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations that supporting work enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Supporting standards are used to support major work of the grade and often appear in lessons with connections to the major work of the grade.

Throughout the series, supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. The following are examples of the connections between supporting work and major work in the materials:

  • In Lesson 7-2, students identify factors (cluster 4.OA.2.4.a) using place-value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic. (cluster 4.NBT.2.5)
  • In Lessons 11-1 and 11-3, students make line plots (4.MD.2.4) while adding and subtracting fractions. (4.NF.1.2 and 4.NF.2.3.d)
  • In Lessons 13-4 and 13-5, students convert within metric measurements (4.MD.1.1) and solve multi-step word problems that involve operations with whole numbers. (4.MD.1.2, 4.OA.1.3, and 4.NF.3.7)
  • In Lesson 15-2, students work with angles and unit angles (4.MD.3.5.a) to find the measure of an angle that turns through a fraction of a circle. (4.NF.1.1 and 4.NF.2.3.b)

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet the expectations for the amount of content designated for one grade level being viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.

The suggested amount of time and expectations for teachers and students of the materials are viable for one school year as written and would not require significant modifications. As designed, the instructional materials can be completed in 144 days.

  • There are 104 content-focused lessons designed for 45 to 75 minutes including differentiation.
  • There are eight 3-Act Math Lessons, which are one day each.
  • There is a Topic Review and Assessment for each of the 16 Topics, two days per Topic (32 days).

There are also additional resources containing more lessons to be used after the last Topic, including Math Diagnosis and Intervention System, Florida Standards Practice, and 10 Step-Up Lessons.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet the expectation for being consistent with the progressions in the standards. Content from prior grades is identified or connected to grade-level work, and students are given extensive work with grade-level problems.

Overall, the materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the CCSSM. Typically, material related to prior and future grades is clearly identified or related to grade-level work. In the Teacher’s Edition Program Overview, all grade-level standards are present as noted in the section, "Correlation to Florida Grade 4 Standards."

The Teacher’s Edition contains a Topic Overview Coherence: Look Back, and a Lesson Overview Coherence: Look Back, which identify connections to content taught earlier in the grade and/or in previous grades, indicating the relevant topics and/or lessons. In the Topic Overview: Look Ahead, and the Lesson Overview: Look Ahead, include connections to content taught later in the grade and/or in future grades, topics, or lessons. Though explicit connections are made to prior and future work, standards are not listed in either the “Look Back” or “Look Ahead,” and the connections are written as general statements from the standards.

For example, the Teacher’s Edition, Topic 4 Overview, Math Background: Coherence includes:

  • Look Back: “In Multiplication in Grade 3 Topics 1, 2, 3, and 5, students learned about multiplication and developed fluency with the basic multiplication facts. In Topic 10, students used place-value patterns to multiply and earlier in Grade 4, Topic 3, students used arrays, area models, the Distributive Property, and partial products to multiply.”
  • Topic 4 includes: “ Estimation: In Lesson 4-3, students use rounding to estimate products. They use estimation to check the reasonableness of their answers in the remainder of the topic. Models and Distributive Property: Students use arrays, area models, and the Distributive Property throughout the topic as they use partial products to find the product of two 2-digit numbers."
  • Look Ahead: “Later in Grade 4, students will use their understanding of multiplication and their skill in multiplying as they use patterns, models, and partial quotients to divide by 1-digit numbers. Estimation: In Lesson 4-3, students use rounding to estimate products. They use estimation to check the reasonableness of their answers in the remainder of the topic.

The instructional materials give extensive work with grade-level problems. All Topics begin with an optional, on grade-level project, and every other Topic incorporates on grade-level 3-Act Math tasks. During the Solve and Share, Visual Learning Bridge, and Convince Me, students explore ways to solve problems using multiple representations and prompts to reason and explain their thinking. The Guided Practice allows students to solve problems and check for understanding before moving on to Independent Practice. The Independent Practice provides students the opportunity to work with problems in a variety of formats to integrate and extend concepts and skills. The Problem Solving section provides additional practice problems for each of the lessons. For example, Student Edition, Lesson 13-6, “The area of a tabletop is 18 square feet. The perimeter of the same table is 18 feet. What are the dimensions of the tabletop?” (4.MD1.3)

There is support in the Quick Checks for each lesson to assign additional problems to students, including, Intervention Activity, Reteach to Build Understanding, Build Mathematical Literacy, Enrichment, Activity Centers, or Additional Practice (with leveled-assignment choices provided).

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations that materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the standards.

Examples of learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings include:

  • In Lesson 1-2, the lesson objective states, “Recognize the relationship between adjacent digits in a multi-digit number,” which is shaped by 4.NBT.1, “Generalize place-value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.”
  • In Lesson 4-6, the lesson objective states, “Use place value and partial products to calculate products of 2-digit by 2-digit multiplication problems,” which is shaped by 4.NBT.2, “Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.”
  • In Lesson 8-3, the lesson objective states, “Use multiplication to find equivalent fractions," which is shaped by 4.NF.1, “Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.”

Materials include problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.

  • Lesson 6-3, 4.OA.1 connects to 4.NBT.2 when students multiply whole numbers to solve multi-step word problems.
  • Lesson 8-4, 4.NF.1 connects to 4.OA.1 when students use division to find equivalent fractions.
  • Lesson 14-1, 4.OA.3 connects with 4.NBT.2 when students create and extend number sequences based on a rule.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for Gateway 2, rigor and balance and practice-content connections. The instructional materials meet expectations for reflecting the balances in the standards and helping students meet the standards’ rigorous expectations by giving appropriate attention to the three aspects of rigor, and they meet expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs).

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for reflecting the balances in the standards and helping students meet the standards’ rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students’ conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications. The instructional materials also do not always treat the aspects of rigor separately or together.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations that the materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings.

The structure of the lessons includes several opportunities to develop conceptual understanding.

  • In the Teacher’s Edition, every Topic begins with Math Background: Rigor, where conceptual understanding for the topic is outlined.
  • Lessons are introduced with a video, Visual Learning Animation Plus, at PearsonRealize.com; these often build conceptual understanding.
  • Links within the digital program to outside resources, such as Virtual Nerd, include videos for students that introduce concepts.
  • In the student practice problems, the section Do You Understand reviews conceptual understanding.

Materials include problems and questions that develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade level and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate conceptual understanding independently throughout the grade.

  • The Topic 6 Overview, Rigor: Conceptual Understanding states, “Comparison Problems. In Lessons 6-1 and 6-2, students’ understanding of multiplicative comparison goes beyond the basic situation where the product is unknown. They also learn about multiplicative comparison situations in which the lesser quantity is unknown or the 'times as many' number is unknown. In these two latter types of multiplicative comparison situations, division is the operation used for finding the answer.”
  • The Lesson 7-1 Visual Learning Animation Plus states, “How Can You Use Arrays to Find the Factor Pairs of a Number?” The scenario begins by having students work with the music director to find the best way to arrange the chairs for a performance. Students use grids to show all the ways the chairs can be arranged.
  • The Lesson 8-5 Lesson Overview, Conceptual Understanding states,Students extend their understanding of comparing fractions to include those with unlike numerators and denominators.” Students are provided opportunities to explain and use benchmarks, area models, and number lines to compare fractions.

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for attending to those standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.

Examples of the the instructional materials developing procedural skills and fluencies throughout the grade level include:

  • Procedural skills and fluencies integrate with conceptual understanding and the work students completed with operations from prior grades. Opportunities to practice procedural skills are found throughout practice problem sets that follow the units and include opportunities to use fluencies in the context of solving problems.
  • The Teacher Edition Program Overview articulates, “Steps to Fluency Success.” The six steps are: Step 1: Fluency Development with Understanding, Step 2: Ongoing Assessment of Fluency Subskills, Step 3: Fluency Intervention, Step 4: Practice on Fluency Subskills, Step 5: Fluency Maintenance, and Step 6: Summative Fluency Assessment. Fluency Expectations for Grades K-5 are also listed. The Teacher Edition Topic Overview explains the six steps and foundations for fluency. In each Topic Overview, Math Background: Rigor, there is a section explaining how the material builds Procedural Skill and Fluency. The Topic 11 Overview, Procedural Skill and Fluency identifies the procedural skill for creating line plots and identifying data points on a line plot.
  • Within each lesson, the Visual Learning Bridge integrates conceptual understanding with procedural skills. Additional Fluency and Practice pages are in the Teacher Edition and Ancillary Books as well as online with the Practice Buddy Additional Practice. The online component also contains a game center where students continue to develop procedural skills and fluencies. Each topic ends with Fluency Practice/Assessment Worksheets.

The instructional materials provide opportunities to demonstrate procedural skill and fluency independently throughout the grade level.

  • In Lesson 2-3, Independent Practice, students find the sum to addition problems such as 389 + 461.
  • In Lesson 2-6, Independent Practice, students find differences of greater numbers using the standard algorithm.
  • In Lesson 12-4, Independent Practice, students add fractions such as $$\frac{28}{10}$$ + $$\frac{72}{10}$$ + $$\frac{84}{100}$$ .
  • In Lesson 15-5, Independent Practice, Problem 6 states, “Use the angle measures you know to write an equation to find the angle measure of angle EGH. What kind of angle is EGH?” Students develop fluency in adding multi-digit numbers.

The instructional materials provide regular opportunities for students to attend to Standard 4.NBT.2.4, adding and subtracting multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics. Engaging applications include single and multi-step problems, routine and non-routine, presented in a context in which the mathematics is applied.

Work with applications of mathematics occurs throughout the materials. In each Topic Overview, Math Background: Rigor explains how the materials utilize applications. For example, the Topic 5 Overview, Math Background: Rigor, Applications states, “Throughout Topic 5, there are real-world problems involving division of whole numbers.”

Following the Topic Overview, the Topic Opener includes an enVision STEM Project where application activities are provided and can be revisited throughout the topic. In each topic, Pick A Project allows students to explore areas of interests and to complete projects that apply the mathematics of the topic. Every other topic contains 3-Act Math where students engage in mathematical modeling.

At the end of each topic, the Performance Task provides opportunities for students to apply the content of the topic. Additional application tasks are in Additional Practice pages in the Teacher Edition, Ancillary Books, and online.

Examples of opportunities for students to engage in routine and non-routine application of mathematical skills independently and to demonstrate the use of mathematics flexibly in a variety of contexts include:

  • In Lesson 15-6, Problem Solving Performance Task, students solve real-world problems involving angles. The problem shows a picture of a mural that needs to be painted and the angles where certain items should appear in the painting. Students find the angle measures so that the mural meets specifications.
  • In Lesson 2-6, Problem Solving, Question 19, “On Monday, from the peak of Mount Kilimanjaro, a group of mountain climbers descended 3,499 feet. On Tuesday, they descended another 5,262 feet. How many feet did the mountain climbers descend after 2 days? How many more feet do they have to descend to reach the bottom?”
  • In Lesson 10-4, Problem Solving, Question 11, students find the difference in lengths of times for a boat trip that takes 2$$\frac{2}{4}$$ hours and a canoe trip that takes 3$$\frac{1}{4}$$ hours.
  • In Lesson 9-8, Problem Solving, Question 24 states, “Joe biked 1$$\frac{9}{12}$$ miles from home to the lake, then went some miles around the lake, and then back home. Joe biked a total of 4$$\frac{9}{12}$$ miles. How many miles did Joe bike around the lake?”
  • In Lesson 10-4 Problem Solving Performance Task, students answer questions about the amount of paint they would need to mix in order to have different amounts of orange paint for different projects. The task involves mixing red and yellow paints to make orange paint ($$\frac{5}{8}$$ gallon of red paint and $$\frac{3}{8}$$ gallon of yellow paint are need to make the correct shade of orange).
  • In Topic 10 Performance Task, students multiply whole numbers by fractions to determine how long it will take certain people to paint their portion of the mural.
  • In Lesson 10-3, Problem Solving, Question 20, “It takes Mario ¼ hour to mow Mr. Harris’ lawn. It takes him 3 times as long to mow Mrs. Carter’s lawn. How long does it take Mario to mow Mrs. Carter’s lawn? Write your answer as a fraction of an hour, then as minutes.”

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. The instructional materials address specific aspects of rigor, and the materials integrate aspects of rigor.

Each lesson contains opportunities for students to build conceptual understanding, procedural skills, and fluency, and to apply their learning in real-world problems. During Solve and Share and Guided Practice, students explore alternative solution pathways to master procedural fluency and develop conceptual understanding. During Independent Practice, students apply the content in real world applications and use procedural skills and/or conceptual understanding to solve problems with multiple solutions and explain/compare their solutions.

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout the program materials.

  • In Topic 1, students develop conceptual understanding of place value by using place value charts, place value blocks, and number lines to develop understanding of the structure of our number system by writing numbers in base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Students develop their conceptual understanding when they transition to working with whole number place value to comparing and rounding whole numbers in relationship to their place value.
  • In Lesson 6-2, students develop procedural skill when writing and solving equations involving multiplicative comparison.
  • In Lesson 1-5, students apply knowledge of place value to solve problems related to land areas that are 10 times greater than Georgia.

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students’ mathematical understanding of a single topic/unit of study throughout the materials.

  • In Lesson 3-1, Question 15, students develop conceptual understanding of the operations, work on procedural fluency skills, and apply their understanding by multiplying products and finding the difference between the products. “How much money did they save on two children’s tickets for Plan C instead of buying separate tickets for Plan A and Plan B?” Students must find two products before calculating how much money was saved.
  • In Lesson 1-3, students apply their procedural skills to problems with various constraints and use their conceptual understanding of place value to compare whole numbers and explain how their solutions represent the given situation. Students are shown models of place value charts, drawings, inequality symbols, and lining up numbers vertically based on place value.

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
9/10
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs). The MPs are identified and used to enrich mathematics content, and the instructional materials support the standards’ emphasis on mathematical reasoning.

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations that the Standards for Mathematical Practice (MPs) are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout the grade level.

Examples of the MPs being identified at the lesson and topic level include:

  • In Topic 1, Topic Overview states, “Students persevere as they try to understand problems involving place value, plan how to solve them, and consider whether their answers make sense.” (MP.1.1)
  • In Lesson 3-1, MP.7.1 is identified: “Students use basic facts and patterns to multiply a one-digit number by a multiple of 10, 100, or 1,000.”
  • In Topic 5, Topic Overview identifies MP.6.1: “Students attend to precision when they use symbols, numbers, or drawings to solve problems involving division of whole numbers.”

The MPs are used to enrich the mathematical content and are not treated separately. MPs are highlighted and discussed throughout the lesson narratives, and along with the lessons, the MPs are evident in the the 3-Act Math Tasks that are included in every other chapter. The MPs are listed in the student materials, and the Math Practice Handbook is available online for teachers to make available to students.

  • In Topic 5, 3-Act Math task, MP.4.1 is identified and linked to additional MPs: “As students carry out mathematical modeling, they will also engage in sense-making (MP.1.1), abstract and quantitative reasoning (MP.2.1), and mathematical communication and argumentation (MP.3.1). In testing and validating their models, students look for patterns in the structure of their models." (MP.7.1, MP.8.1)
  • In Lesson 15-3, Problem Solving, Problem 14, MP.5.1 Use Appropriate Tools: “What is the measure of the angle of the yellow hexagon pattern block?” The Guidance for the Teacher states: “Have students put three pattern-block hexagons together so that there is no space between the figures. How many angles make up the center of the figure? How can this help you find the measure of one angle?”
  • In Lesson 9-8, Problem 25, Reasoning, identifies MP.2.1: “The bus took 4$$\frac{3}{5}$$ hours to get from Jim’s home station to Portland and 3$$\frac{4}{5}$$ hours to get from Portland to Seattle. How long did the bus take to get from Jim’s home station to Seattle? Teacher guidance includes: “Students can use a bar diagram to decide what computation is needed to solve this problem. They also may want to write an equation to show how quantities are related in the problem.”
  • In Lesson 11-1, MP.4.1 is identified: “Students consider how the data shown in a line plot models the real-world data that it represents”

The MPs are identified within a lesson in the Lesson Overview, and lesson narratives highlight when an MP is particularly important for a concept or when a task may exemplify the identified Practice. The lessons that end each Topic specifically focus on at least one MP. For example:

  • In Lesson 7-4, MP.2.1 is identified. “Students will use abstract reasoning when connecting factors of a number to the possible number of rectangular arrays that can be made to represent that number.”
  • In Lesson 9-10, MP.4.1 is identified. “All of the problems in this lesson elicit the use of multiple mathematical practices. For example, making sense of problems and persevering are required to solve all problems. Any mathematical practices that come into play in the work on this lesson should be made explicit. However, the classroom conversation should focus on the meaning and use the Thinking Habits shown on the Solve and Share task for mathematical modeling.”
  • In Lesson 6-6, Guided Practice, the teaching notes identify MP.1.1. “Listen and look for these behaviors as evidence that students are exhibiting proficiency with this practice. Give a good explanation of the problem, thinking about a plan before jumping into the solution, think of similar problems, try special cases, or use a simpler form of the problem. If needed, organize data or use representations to help make sense of the problem, identify likely strategies for solving the problem, pause when solving problems to make sure that the work being done makes sense, make sure the answer makes sense before stopping work, do not give up when stuck, and look for alternative ways to solve the problem when stuck."

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 partially meet expectations for carefully attending to the full meaning of each practice standard.

The materials do not attend to the full meaning of MP.4.1 and MP.5.1. The MPs are discussed in both the topic and lesson narratives, as appropriate, when they relate to the overall work.

Examples of the materials attending to the full meaning of MPs include:

  • MP.1.1: In Topic 5, 3-Act Math, students watch a short video about a person opening bulk packages of crackers and giving 3 individual packs to a student. After the video students have a brief discussion about what they noticed about the video. Then the teacher poses the question, “How much would snacks for the entire grade cost?” Students have to make sense of the information they are given in order to solve the problem and then persevere in order to find the answer.
  • MP.2.1: In Lesson 3-7, students explain why the answers to each part of the problem on the top of the page are reasonable. To be able to explain reasonableness of numbers, students must think abstractly and also know whether numbers are reasonable in the context of the problem.
  • MP.6.1: In Lesson 5-8, students use calculations or drawings to solve a real-world problem using division. Students are provided a table and a story. “She packs the same number of T-shirts into 3 bins. How many T-shirts does Sara pack in each bin? She packs shorts into 2 bins with the same number in each bin. How many pairs of shorts does Sara pack in each bin?”
  • MP.7.1: In Lesson 2-1, students use the structure of the place value system and properties of addition and subtraction to add and subtract whole numbers with regrouping. Students break apart a number to make ten.
  • MP.8.1: In Lesson 1-2, Page 10 states, “Generalize: Students will generalize that adjacent place values always have a value ten times greater as you move from left to right in a number.” During this lesson, students use place value blocks to help them analyze the relationship and reinforce how place value positions are related.

Examples of the materials not attending to the full meaning of MP.4.1 and MP.5.1 include:

  • MP.4.1: Lesson 3-4 Model with Math states, "Last year, Anthony’s grandmother gave him 33 silver coins and 16 gold coins to start a coin collection. Now Anthony has 6 times as many coins in his collection. How many coins does Anthony have in his collection? Complete the bar diagram to show your work.” By giving students the representation to use, the full intent of the MP is not met.
  • MP.5.1: Lesson 3-5, Solve and Share states, “The horseshoe pit below has an area of 228 square feet. The length of one part of the pit was erased by mistake. What is the length of the missing section, x? Solve any way you choose. Explain how you found the answer.” There is an added note to the students that also says, “You can use appropriate tools. How can you use place-value blocks or drawings to solve this problem? Show you work in the space above!”

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

Student materials consistently prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others. The Solve and Share Activities, Visual Learning Bridge Problems, Problem Sets, 3-Act Math, Problem Solving: Critique Reasoning problems, and Assessments provide opportunities throughout the year for students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others.

Examples of the instructional materials supporting students to analyze the arguments of others include:

  • In Lesson 2-2, Problem Solving, Question 16: “Elle says, when rounding to the nearest thousand, 928,674 rounds to 930,000. Do you agree? Explain.”
  • In Lesson 3-6, Problem Solving, Question 14 directs students to “Critique Reasoning: Quinn used compensation to find the product of 4 x 307.  First, she found 4 x 300 = 1200. Then she adjusted the product by subtracting 4 groups of 7 to get her final answer of 1,172.  Explain Quinn’s mistake and find the correct answer.”
  • In Topic 3, Topic Assessment, Question 17A:, “Mr. Luca would like to purchase a digital keyboard for each of his 3 nieces and 1 nephew. The keyboard costs $105. Mr. Luca thinks the total cost should be about $200. Is this amount reasonable? Explain.”
  • In Lesson 13-4, Problem Solving, Question 12 directs students to  “Critique Reasoning: Milo thinks 8 hours is greater than 520 minutes. Is Milo correct? Remember 1 hour is equal to 60 minutes.”

Examples of the instructional materials prompting students to construct viable arguments include:

  • Lesson 1-5, Independent Practice, Question 5: “Construct a math argument that explains why Gerald did not write the population of his city correctly;” Question 6: “Correct Gerald’s argument. Explain how to compare the populations of Gerald's and Emily’s cities.”
  • In Lesson 2-4, Visual Learning Bridge, Convince Me!, students use mathematical understanding and procedural fluency to construct an argument of how the standard algorithm can be used to regroup more than 10 tens. “When using the standard algorithm to add 24,595 + 19,255, how do you regroup 1 ten + 9 tens + 5 tens?”
  • In Lesson 8-7, Solve and Share Activity, students construct a mathematical argument to compare fractions. “Sherry and Karl both started their hike with a small bottle filled with water. Tia started her hike with a larger bottle that was $$\frac{1}{2}$$ full. At the end of the hike, Sherry and Tia’s bottles were each half filled with water. Karl’s bottle was $$\frac{1}{3}$$ filled with water. Who has the most water left? Construct a math argument to support your answer.”

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for assisting teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

Teacher materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and/or analyzing the arguments of others throughout the program. Many of the activities are designed for students to work with partners or small groups where they collaborate and explain their reasoning to each other.

  • In Lesson 1-4, Critique Reasoning (in the margin), the materials provide questions for teachers that pertain to how answers could be different when numbers are rounded to different places.
  • In Lesson 2-2, Construct Arguments (in the margin), the materials provide questions for teachers that pertain to which of the two versions of the problem on the page results in the correct answer.
  • In Lesson 2-6, “After Whole Class” provides teachers opportunities to engage students in analyzing the work of others: “Discuss Solution Strategies and Key Ideas: Based on your observations, choose which solutions to have students share and in what order. Focus on how students subtract. Some students may break the numbers apart and others may use the standard algorithm. If needed, show and discuss the provided student work at the right.” There are also prompting questions to support teachers if they have the students analyze the provided student work.
  • In Lesson 5-4, Critique Reasoning (in the margin) provides teachers with questions that pertain to why a calculation where the remainder is greater than the divisor is incorrect.
  • In Lesson 13-4, “After Whole Class” provides teachers with opportunities to engage students in analyzing the work of others: “Discuss Solution Strategies and Key Ideas: Based on your observations, choose which solutions to have students share and in what order. Focus on how students determined and described the relationship between the two measurements. If needed, show and discuss the provided student work at the right.” There are also questions to support teachers as they have the students analyze the provided student work.

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for explicitly attending to the specialized language of mathematics.

The materials provide explicit instruction in how to communicate mathematical thinking using words, diagrams, and symbols. The materials use precise and accurate terminology and definitions when describing mathematics and support students in using them.

  • The Grade 4 Glossary is located in the Teacher Edition Program Overview, and the Glossary is also present at the back of Volume 1 of the Student Edition.
  • Lesson-specific vocabulary can be found at the beginning of each lesson, under the Lesson Overview, with words highlighted in yellow used within the lesson, and a vocabulary review is provided at the end of each topic.
  • There is a bilingual animated glossary available online that uses motion and sound to build understanding of math vocabulary and an online vocabulary game in the game center.
  • Both the topic and the lesson narratives contain specific guidance for the teacher to support students to communicate mathematically. Within the lesson narratives, new terms are highlighted in yellow and explained as related to the context of the material.
  • The Teacher Edition Program Overview, “Building Mathematical Literacy,” outlines the many ways the materials address mathematics vocabulary, including: My Word Cards, Vocabulary Activities at the Beginning of Each Topic, Vocabulary Reteach to Build Understanding, Vocabulary and Writing in Lessons (where new words introduced in a lesson are highlighted in yellow in the Visual Learning Bridge and lesson practice includes questions to reinforce understanding of the vocabulary used), Vocabulary Review at the back of each topic, an Animated Glossary where students can hear the word and the definition, and Vocabulary Games Online. There is also Build Mathematical Literacy within each Topic Overview that outlines support for English Language Learners, Mathematics Vocabulary, and Math and Reading within the topic.
  • In the Topic Planner, there is a vocabulary column that lists the words addressed within each lesson in the topic. For example, Lesson 10-1 lists the following word: unit fraction. These same words are listed in the Lesson Overview.
  • Lesson 1-1 introduces numbers through one million and expanded form. Within the Visual Learning Bridge, students write numbers in expanded form. The definition of expanded form is developed as students write a number in expanded form to show the sum of each digit. For example, “Each digit in 356,039 is written in its place on the chart. Expanded form shows the sum of the values of each digit.” Within the Guided Practice Activity, students write numbers in expanded form, and during further practice, there are discussion questions for the teacher to help solidify the concept of expanded form. “What is the same about the three expanded form equations that are shown? How is the first equation different from the other two? What is another way you could write 21,125 in expanded form?”
  • In Lesson 7-4, students interpret prime and composite numbers. Students use the context to build proper mathematical vocabulary.
  • Lesson 14-1 introduces the mathematical idea of a rule to students. The Visual Learning Bridge provides definitions and models/diagrams using this new vocabulary. Within the Guided Practice Section, students are provided questions within the context of the lesson to answer using vocabulary. For example, Question 17 states, “Vocabulary Define rule. Create a number pattern using the rule, “Subtract 7.” A sample answer is provided to support teachers using precise vocabulary language and definitions with students.

No examples of incorrect use of vocabulary, symbols, or numbers were found within the materials.

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for being well-designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The instructional materials include an underlying design that distinguishes between problems and exercises, assignments that are not haphazard with exercises given in intentional sequences, variety in what students are asked to produce, and manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations that the underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises for each lesson. It is clear when the students are solving problems to learn and when they are completing exercises to apply what they have learned.

Lessons include Solve & Share, Look Back, Visual Learning Bridge, Convince Me!, Guided Practice, Independent Practice, Problem Solving, and Assessment Practice. Additional Practice is in a separate section of the instructional materials, distinguishing between problems students complete and exercises in the lessons. The Solve and Share section serves either to connect prior learning or to engage students with a problem in which new math ideas are embedded. Students learn and practice new mathematics in Guided Practice.

In the Independent Practice and Problem Solving sections, students have opportunities to build on their understanding of the new concept. Each activity lesson ends with an Assessment Practice in which students have opportunities to apply what they have learned from the activities in the lesson and can be used to help differentiate instruction.

Additional Practice problems are consistently found in the Additional Practice Workbook that accompanies each lesson. These sets of problems include problems that support students in developing mastery of the current lesson and topic concepts.

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for not being haphazard; exercises are given in intentional sequences.

Overall, activities within lessons within the topics are intentionally sequenced, so students have the opportunity to develop understanding leading to mastery of the content. The structure of a lesson provides students with the opportunity to activate prior learning and to build procedural skill and fluency. Students also engage with multiple activities that are sequenced from concrete to abstract and increase in complexity. Lessons close with Problem Solving, which typically has students apply learning from the lesson, and Assessment Practice, which is typically two questions aligned to the daily lesson objective.

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for having variety in what students are asked to produce.

The instructional materials prompt students to produce written answers and solutions within Solve & Share, Guided Practice, Independent Practice, Problem Solving, and 3-Act Math, and students produce oral arguments and explanations through discussions that occur in whole group, small group, or partner settings. Students also produce written critiques of fictional students’ work that include models, drawings, and calculation.

In the materials, students use a digital platform (Visual Learning Animation Plus and Practice Buddy) and paper-pencil activities to conduct and present their work. The materials prompt students to use appropriate mathematical language in their written and oral responses, and students use various mathematical representations frequently in their work, even though the representation is often provided for students.

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for having manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

The series includes a variety of virtual manipulatives and integrates hands-on activities that allow the use of physical manipulatives. For example:

  • Manipulatives and other mathematical representations are aligned consistently to the expectations and concepts in the standards. The majority of manipulatives used are measurement and geometry tools that are commonly accessible.  In Lesson 2-3, students use place-value blocks to explore adding whole numbers. In Lesson 15-4, students use protractors to measure angles and find a unit angle. Animated versions of the task are also provided as an option.
  • The materials have manipulatives embedded within the Visual Learning Bridge, Visual Learning Bridge Animation, and Independent Practice activities to represent ideas and build conceptual understanding. For example, in Lesson 1-2, students use place-value blocks to analyze the relationships between 1, 10, and 100 to find how many bottle caps are present.

Examples of manipulatives for Grade 4 include:

  • Two-colored counters, two-color square counters, number lines, place-value blocks, place-value charts, blank clock face, money, pattern blocks, circle fraction models, decimal models, and fraction strips.
  • Geometry toolkits containing tracing paper, centimeter, ¼ inch and 1-inch grid paper, colored pencils, scissors, index card, centimeter ruler, inch ruler, yardstick, meter stick, and protractors.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

​The visual design in enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 is not distracting or chaotic and supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

  • The printed and digital lesson materials for teachers follow a consistent format for each lesson. Lessons include sidebar links so teachers can find specific parts of the lesson in the digital format. The materials provide labels for specific parts of the lesson. Text boxes with Supports for English Language Learners are placed within the activity they support and are specific to the activity. Topic overviews follow a consistent format. The format of course overviews, topic, and individual lessons are also consistent across the Grade 4 materials.
  • Student print and digital materials also follow a consistent format. Tasks within a lesson are numbered to match the teacher guidance. The print and visuals on the materials are clear without any distracting visuals.
  • Student practice problem pages generally include enough space for students to write their answers and demonstrate their thinking. Each lesson and topic has a consistent layout for the teacher and student.

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the CCSSM. The instructional materials include: quality questions to support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences, a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials, a teacher edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons, and explanations of the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet the expectations for supporting teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students’ mathematical development.

Each lesson contains a narrative for the teacher that includes Lesson Overviews, suggested questions for discussion, and guiding questions designed to increase classroom discourse, support the teacher in knowing what to look for, and ensure understanding of the concepts. For example, in Lesson 3-7 Visual Learning Bridge and Classroom Conversation, the following questions are included: “Look at the cost of paint in the table. What does ‘$1,450 per coat’ mean? How is an area model like the Distributive Property?” In Lesson 9-3 Solve & Share, the following questions are included: "How can you use the fraction strips or a number line to represent $$\frac{2}{5}$$ and $$\frac{1}{5}$$? How can you use your representation to add the fractions?” In Lesson 8-5 Solve & Share, the following questions are included: "Do you need to find exactly how many stickers Derek has? How does a number line help you round numbers?”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet the expectations for containing a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials also include teacher guidance on the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

  • Each Topic has a Topic Planner that gives an overview of every lesson, the Objective of the lesson, Essential Understanding, Vocabulary, Materials needed, Technology and Activity Centers, along with the CCSSM.
  • The Topic Planner also includes Lesson Resources such as the Digital Student Edition, Additional Practice Workbook, Print material available, as well as what can be found in the Digital Lesson Courseware and Lesson Support for Teachers.
  • Each lesson opens with a Lesson Overview including an Objective and an Essential Understanding, “I can” learning target statements written in student language, CCSSM that are either being “built upon” or “addressed” for the lesson, Cross-Cluster Connections, the aspect(s) of rigor addressed, support for English Language Learners, and any possible Daily Review pages with Today’s Challenge to be implemented. Within the lesson, technology resources or places to print PDF work pages are embedded.
  • Lessons include detailed guidance for teachers for the Warm-Up, Activities, and the Lesson Synthesis.
  • Each lesson activity contains an overview, guidance for teachers and student-facing materials, anticipated misconceptions, extensions, differentiation support based on formative assessments called Quick Checks, and opportunities for further practice in the online materials. Guiding questions and additional supports for students are included within the lessons.
  • The teacher materials that correspond to the student lessons provide annotations and suggestions on how to present the content within the lesson structure: Step 1 (Engage and Explore), Step 2 (Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate), and Step 3 (Assess and Differentiate). A Launch section follows which explains how to set up the activity and what to tell students. During the Visual Learning Bridge in Step 2, there are supporting questions and narratives for students.
  • The materials are available in both print and digital forms. There are additional online resources that support the material. These opportunities are noted within the lessons. For example, each lesson has an Interactive Practice Buddy that is noted in Step 2 and Step 3, as well as Another Look Videos found in Step 3.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 partially meet expectations that materials contain adult-level explanations so that teachers can improve their own knowledge.

The Teacher Edition Program Overview includes resources to help teachers understand the mathematical content within each Topic and Lesson. The program Overview includes the overarching philosophy of the program, a user’s guide, and a content guide. Each Topic has a Professional Development Video that presents full adult-level explanations of the mathematics concepts in the lessons. The Professional Development Video includes examples that are clearly explained. There is also a Math Background for each Topic and Lesson that identifies the connections between previous grade, grade level, and future-grade mathematics. However, these do not support teachers to understand the underlying mathematical progressions.

The Assessment Source Book, Teacher Edition, and Mathematical Practices and Problem Solving Handbooks provide answers and sample answers to problems and exercises presented to students; however, there are no adult-level explanations to build understanding of the mathematics in the tasks.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for explaining the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

The Teacher Edition explains how mathematical concepts are built from previous grade levels or topics and lessons as well as how the grade-level concepts fit into future grade-level work.

For example, in Topic 10, the Overview of Math Background: Coherence states that the work in this topic relates to meaning of fractions, simple equivalent fractions, and time from Grade 3; equivalent fractions and fraction addition/subtraction earlier in Grade 4; and fractions in data and measurement later in Grade 4, and fraction computation in Grade 5.

There is also an individual coherence section within each lesson has the sections Look Back, This Lesson, Look Ahead, and Cross-Cluster Connections (where applicable).

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 provide a list of concepts in the Teacher Edition that cross-references the standards addressed and provides an estimated instructional time for each unit and lesson.

  • The Teacher Edition Program Overview provides a visual showing the number of lessons per topic by domains.
  • The Teacher Edition Program Overview provides a Pacing Guide showing how many total days by topic the material will take, as well as support on what might take additional time which states, “Each Core lesson, including differentiation, takes 45-75 minutes. The pacing guide above allows for additional time to be spent on the following resources during topics and/or at the end of the year (resources are then listed).”

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

Family Materials for each topic include a Home-School Connection letter to family and caregivers on what their student will be learning over the course of the topic. The Family Materials provide an overview of what the student will be learning in accessible language. For example, in Topic 4, the Home-School Connection letter states, “Dear Family, Your child is learning how to multiply 2-digit numbers by 2-digit numbers. Some of the strategies he or she is learning to use include arrays and partial products. Below are examples for 13 x 25." (Two strategies are then shown.) In addition to the explanation of the current concepts and big ideas from the unit, there are diagrams and problems/tasks for families to discuss and solve.

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 contain explanations of the program's instructional approaches and the identification of research-based strategies.

The materials draw on research to explain and contextualize instructional routines and lesson activities. The Teacher Edition Program Overview contains specifics about the instructional approach. For example:

  • Program Goals and Organization in two sections: Section 1: Efficacy Research and Section, and Section 2: Research Principles for Teaching with Understanding. The Efficacy Research sections states, “First, the development of enVision Florida Mathematics started with a curriculum that research has shown to be highly effective.” The Research Principles for Teaching with Understanding states, “The second reason we can promise success is that the enVision Florida Mathematics fully embraces time-proven research principles for teaching mathematics with understanding. One understands an idea in mathematics when one can connect that idea to previously-learned ideas (Hiebert et al., 1997). So, understanding is based on making connections, and enVision Florida Mathematics was developed on this principle.”
  • The organization and reasoning for the structure is articulated, “Our goal was to build a curriculum that achieves focus and coherence in a way that is best for developing deep understanding of the mathematical content.” More information is provided on the reasoning why the structure was chosen as well.

In the Teacher Edition Program Overview, all of the Instructional Routines are fully explained.

  • The Step 1 Problem-Based Learning statement says, “Introduce concepts and procedures with a problem-solving experience (with more information to follow).” The Step 2 Visual Learning statement says, “Make the important mathematics explicit with enhanced direct instruction connected to Step 1 (with more information to follow).”
  • The program components are sorted by their purpose: Develop, Assess, Differentiate, Review, and Other.
  • Support for how to use a lesson and each instructional routine within each lesson is provided. Tips are provided for teachers in addition to the descriptions. The 5Es of instruction are showcased. For example, “Solve & Share begins the lesson by engaging students with a problem in which new math ideas are embedded.”
  • The Problem Solving lessons are explained: “Throughout enVision Florida Mathematics, the eight math practices are infused in lessons. Each Problem Solving lesson gives special focus to one of the eight math practices. Features of these lessons include the following: Solve and Share, Visual Learning Bridge, Convince Me!, Guided Practice, Independent Practice, Performance Task, and Additional Practice.” All of these have additional descriptions for each to explain the instructional routine further.
  • The material's Pick a Project part is explained.
  • The 3-Act Math tasks are outlined.

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
9/10
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for offering teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the CCSSM. The instructional materials provide strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge, strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions, opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills, and assessments that clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.

  • In the Online Teacher Edition, Program Overview, Assessment Resources provides information about the use of assessments to gather information about student’s prior knowledge.
  • Each grade level includes a Grade Level Readiness assessment that is to be given at the start of the year. This Readiness Test can be printed or distributed digitally. In this assessment, prerequisite skills from the prior grade necessary for understanding the grade-level mathematics are assessed.
  • The Daily Review is designed to engage students in thinking about the upcoming lesson and/or to revisit previous grades' concepts or skills.
  • Prior knowledge is gathered about students through Review What You Know assessments found in the Topic Opener. Each assessment has an Item Analysis for Diagnosis and Intervention. In these assessments, prerequisite skills necessary for understanding the topics in the unit are assessed and aligned to standards so the teacher can re-teach if needed.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.

Lessons include Error Intervention that identifies where students may make a mistake or have misconceptions. There are questions for the teacher to ask along with what to assign for reteaching the concept or skill. For example, in Lesson 12-2, the Error Intervention gives the following guidance: “If students are having trouble identifying the decimal, then ask, 'How many spaces are between 0 and 1? [10] Each tick mark represents what part of a whole unit? [one tenth] How many spaces are between 0 and point E? [6].'”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.

The lesson structure, consisting of Solve & Share, Visual Learning Bridge, Guided Practice, Independent Practice, Problem Solving, and Assessment Practice, provides students with opportunities to connect prior knowledge to new learning, engage with content, and synthesize their learning. Throughout the lesson, students have opportunities to work independently, with partners and in groups, where review, practice, and feedback are embedded into the instructional routine. In addition, Practice problems for each lesson activity reinforce learning concepts and skills and enable students to engage with the content and receive timely feedback. Discussion prompts in the Teacher Edition provide opportunities for students to engage in timely discussion on the mathematics of the lesson.

Each Topic includes a “Review what you know/Concept and Skills Review” that includes a Vocabulary review and Practice problems. This section includes review and practice on concepts that are related to the new Topic.

The Cumulative/Benchmark Assessments found at the end of Topics 4, 8, 12 and 16 provide review of prior topics as an assessment. Students can take the assessment online, with differentiated intervention automatically assigned to students based on their scores.

Different games online at Pearson Realize support students in practice and review of procedural skills and fluency.

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
0/0

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized.

Assessments are located in a separate book or the online portion of the program and can be accessed at any time. For each topic there is a Practice Assessment, an End-Unit Assessment, and a Performance task. Assessments in the Teacher Edition provide a scoring guide and standards alignment for each question.

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 partially meet expectations that assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

  • There are “scoring guidelines” to assist the teacher in interpreting student performance; however, these are provided in an answer key or in sample student answers.
  • There is no rubric to interpret student-written responses.
  • Topic Readiness and End of Topic Assessments have Item Analysis for Diagnosis and Intervention, which include standards being assessed and depth of knowledge levels.
  • Assessments can be taken online where they are automatically scored, and students are assigned appropriate practice/enrichment/remediation based on their results.
  • Teachers interpret the results on their own and determine materials for follow-up when students take print assessments.
  • Teachers are prompted to complete observations and portfolios.

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials for enVision Florida Mathematics Grades 4 do not include opportunities for students to monitor their own progress. There are no specific materials for students that will encourage them to monitor their own progress.

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
12/12
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for supporting teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades. The instructional materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners and strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners. The materials embed tasks with multiple entry points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations, and they provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth. The instructional materials also suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations and provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.

The materials include a detailed Scope and Sequence of the course, including pacing. The Topic Overview in the Teacher Edition includes Coherence which enhances scaffolding instruction by identifying prerequisite skills that students should have. Each lesson is designed with a Daily Review and a Solve and Share Activity that reviews prior knowledge and/or prepares all students for the activities that follow.

In lessons, there are the following explicit instructional supports for sequencing and scaffolding: the Lesson Overview, questions and extensions for the Solve & Share, Prevent Misconceptions in Visual Learning Bridge, Revisit the Essential Question in Convince Me!, Error Intervention during Guided Practice, and item-related support during Independent Practice and Problem Solving. This information assists a teacher in making the content accessible to all learners.

Lesson narratives often include guidance on where to focus questions in all lesson activities, sample student work, and guidance on what to look for. Optional activities are often included in Step 3 (Assess and Differentiate) that can be used for additional practice or support before moving on to the next activity or lesson.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.

The lesson structure of Step 1 (Problem-Based Learning), Step 2 (Visual Learning), and Step 3 (Assess and Differentiate) includes guidance for the teacher on the mathematics of the lesson, possible misconceptions, and specific strategies to address the needs of a range of learners. Embedded supports include:

  • The Additional Practice Materials include a lesson for each topic that includes specific questions for the leveled assignment for all learning ranges. These three levels of problems are I (Intervention), O (On-Level), and A (Advanced) and include verbal, visual, and symbolic representations.
  • There are Response to Intervention strategies in each lesson. These sections give teachers “look fors” and suggestions to address the needs of students who are struggling. Questions for the teacher to ask are also included.
  • Each lesson has at least one Additional Example. These help students extend their understanding of the concept being taught. It includes an extra problem for the teacher to use.
  • Each lesson has Differentiated Interventions for a wide range of learners, which include Reteach to Build Understanding (provides scaffolding to reteach) and Enrichment (extends concepts from the lesson).

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for embedding tasks with multiple entry­ points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.

Solve & Share, Visual Learning Bridge, Guided and Independent Practice, and Quick Check/Assessment Practice provide opportunities for students to apply mathematics from multiple entry points. Though there may be times when the material asks a student to use a specific strategy, there are still questions within the same lesson that allow for students to use a variety of strategies.

The lesson and task narratives provided for teachers offer possible solution paths and presentation strategies from various levels. For example:

  • In Lesson 1-4 Solve & Share, students use number sense and rounding to list numbers that round to 300. Students may represent this scenario any way they choose allowing for all students to participate in the task while also focusing instruction on the mathematical concept of multiplication using factors.
  • In Lesson 2-5 Convince Me!, students determine how many regroupings are needed when subtracting a three-digit number. Students can represent this in different ways, by using a standard algorithm, using tens and ones, or other strategies. The teacher is encouraged to look for multiple strategies as students use structure.
  • In Lesson 4-1, Question 26, students use place value or properties to show ways to multiply multi-digit numbers. Multiple strategies can be provided as this question is considered a quick-check question for prescribing differentiation.
  • In Lesson 5-5, students solve a word problem by drawing a picture or using counters in any way they’d like. The teacher is encouraged to look for multiple solution paths, and examples of different solution paths or student explanations for counting methods are provided to help the teacher anticipate student solution strategies.

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for suggesting support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics.

The ELL Design is highlighted in the Teacher Edition Program Overview \and describes support based on the student’s level of language proficiency: emerging, expanding, or bridging, as identified in the WIDA (World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment) assessment. An ELL Toolkit provides additional support for English Language Learners.

Two ELL suggestions are provided for every lesson, one in Solve and Share and another in Visual Learning Bridge. Also, Visual Learning support is embedded in every lesson to support ELL learners. Examples include:

  • In Lesson 4-6 includes English Language Learners' Tips for Emerging: “Ask students to compare the meanings of substitute players and regular players;” Developing: “Ask students to compare the number of players on a soccer team they might have been on to those on a professional team. Have them explain why having a different number of players might change the problem on this page;” and Bridging: “Ask students to describe to another student a problem of their own that is similar to the problem on this page.”
  • In each topic opener, there is information provided to include specific ELL supports as needed. For example, in Topic 6, the materials provide ELL support using Visual Learning through the program, ELL instruction in lessons, a Multilingual Handbook, and an ELL Toolkit.
  • Visual learning infused throughout the program provides support for English Language Learners. This includes Visual Learning Animation Plus online, Visual Learning Bridge for each lesson, and the Animated Glossary. These use motion and sound to reduce language barriers. Questions are read aloud, visual models are provided, and motion and sound definitions of mathematical terms are provided.
  • The Multilingual Handbook is included with a Mathematics Glossary in multiple languages.
  • An English Language Learners Toolkit is a resource that provides professional development and resources for supporting English Language Learners.
  • For Visual Learning in Lesson Practice, Pictures With a Purpose appear in Lesson Practice to provide information that is related to math concepts or real world problems to support student understanding.

Support for other special populations noted in the Teacher Edition Program Overview include:

  • Resources and a key are provided on for Ongoing Intervention (during a lesson), Strategic Information (at the end of the lesson), and Intensive Intervention (as needed anytime).
  • The Math Diagnosis and Intervention System (MDIS) supports teachers in diagnosing students needs and providing more effective instruction for on- or below-grade-level students. Diagnosis, Intervention Lessons, and Teacher Support is provided through teachers' notes to conduct a short lesson where vocabulary, concept development, and practice can be supported.
  • Online Auto Design Differentiation is included, and the supports within this part of the program include: Differentiation After a Lesson (based on an Online Quick Check where the Interactive Practice Buddy can be utilized), Differentiation after a Topic (based on the online topic assessments where Visual Learning Animations Plus are then assigned), and Differentiation after a Group of Topics (based on the online cumulative benchmark assessments where students can then receive remediation or enrichment). The teacher can track progress using Assignment Reports and analyzing Usage Data.

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth. All students complete the same lessons and activities; however, there are some optional lessons and activities that a teacher may choose to implement with students.

Opportunities to engage in the content at a greater depth include:

  • Extensions found at the end of every Solve and Share.
  • Higher Order Thinking items within the Independent Practice and Problem Solving section.
  • Enrichment pages as a result of the Quick Checks in every lesson.
  • Opportunities to engage in STEM activities during the activity centers.
  • Noted Advanced problems to complete during the Additional Practice portions of each lesson.
  • Differentiation after a Group of Topics based on the online cumulative benchmark assessments where students can then receive enrichment.

It should be noted that there is no guidance for teachers on engaging advanced students in these activities.

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 meet expectations for providing a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

  • The lessons contain tasks including various demographic and personal characteristics. All names and wording are chosen with diversity in mind, and the materials do not contain gender biases.
  • The Grade 4 materials include a set number of names used throughout the problems and examples (e.g., Jessie, Salvatore, Clara, Liza, Delbert, Ramon, Li, Yolanda, Hakeem, Jerome, Chico, and June). These names are presented repeatedly and in a way that does not stereotype characters by gender, race, or ethnicity.
  • Characters are often presented in pairs with different solution strategies. There is not a pattern in one character using more/less sophisticated strategies.
  • When multiple characters are involved in a scenario they are often doing similar tasks or jobs in ways that do not express gender, race, or ethnic bias. For example, in Lesson 3-1, Question 13, “Ted, Jason, and Angelina are raising money for a local shelter. Ted raised $30, Jason raised $90. Angelina needs to raise the remaining amount to reach the goal of $200.” There is no differentiation of what roles the characters take that suggests a gender, racial, or ethnic bias.

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies. The materials include teacher-led instruction that present limited options for whole-group, small-group, partner, and/or individual work. When suggestions are made for students to work in small groups, there are no specific roles suggested for group members, but teachers are given suggestions and questions to ask to move learning forward. Teachers are directed to “support productive struggle, observe, and if needed, ask guiding questions that elicit thinking.”

The Visual Learning Bridge Animation Plus focuses on independent work while the Pick a Project and the 3-Act Math sections have opportunities to work together in small groups or partners.

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.

The Teacher Edition Program Overview includes Supporting English Language Learners, which contains ELL Instruction and Visual Learning. The Teacher Edition Program Overview states: “Levels of English language proficiency are indicated, and they align with the following level identified in WIDA (World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment): Entering, Emerging, Developing, Expanding, and Bridging.”

English Language Learners' support for each lesson is provided for the teacher throughout lessons to provide scaffolding for reading, as well as differentiated support based on student language proficiency levels (emerging, expanding, or bridging). The Home-School Connection letters for each Topic are available in both English and Spanish. There is also an English Language Learners Toolkit available that consists of many Professional Development Articles and Graphic Organizers. A few of the examples of the Professional Development Articles that can help teachers support ELL learners include: English Language Learners in the Math Classroom, Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners, Welcoming Newcomers to the Mainstream Classroom, Multilingual Thinking Words, and Teaching Math to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students.

Criterion 3z - 3ad

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

​​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4: integrate technology in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices; are web-­based and compatible with multiple internet browsers; include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology; can be easily customized for individual learners; and include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 integrate technology including interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the MPs.

Teachers and students have access to tools and virtual manipulatives within a given activity or task, when appropriate. Pearson Realize provides additional components online such as games, practice, instructional videos, links to other websites, differentiation, etc. In the print Teacher Edition, there are statements in each lesson that there are more resources available online. However, the resources are not detailed, and teachers using print materials may miss them. For example, in Step 3, Assess and Differentiate, many lessons include opportunities to use the Math Tools found in the Technology Center. These embedded opportunities allow students to become more familiar with the tools available to them, so they can begin making strategic decisions about which tools to use. (MP.5.1)

There are several parts of the program that support students attending to precision.

  • The Animated Glossary embedded in the program helps students internalize what the key concepts mean and, when applicable, visual models are provided.
  • The Problem-Based Learning activity provides repeated opportunities for students to use precise language to explain their solutions.
  • In Convince Me!, students revisit key terms or concepts and provide explicit explanations. (MP.6.1)

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 are print and web-based (print resources are available online as Interactive Student Edition Pages, Teacher Edition eText Pages, or PDF files at PearsonRealize.com) and compatible with multiple internet browsers.

  • The materials are platform-neutral (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, etc.)
  • Materials are compatible with various devices including iPads, laptops, Chromebooks, and other devices that connect to the internet with an applicable browser.

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.

  • enVision Florida Mathematics provides online assessments and data at PearsonRealize.com. The online assessments are in ExamView. Teachers can assign and score material and analyze assessment data through dashboards.
  • There are online fluency games and games using procedural skills to solve problems.
  • Virtual Nerd offers tutorials on procedural skills, but there are no assessments or opportunities to practice the procedural skills with the tutorials.
  • The Skill and Remediation activities in the Topic Readiness online assessment tab include tutorials and opportunities for students to practice procedural skills using technology. There is a Remediation button to see online activities.

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
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Indicator Rating Details

i. ​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students. Teachers can select and assign individual practice items for student remediation based on the Topic Readiness assessment. Teachers can create and assign classes online for students through the Accessible Student Edition. Closed Captioning is included in STEM and 3-Act Math videos.

ii. The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 can be easily customized for local use. There are digital materials that provide the same lessons to draw from on a topic as the print materials. Teachers can create and upload files, attach links, and attach documents from Google Drive that can be assigned to students. Teachers can also create assessments using a bank of items or using self-written questions that can also be assigned to students.

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

​The instructional materials reviewed for enVision Florida Mathematics Grade 4 incorporate technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other. There is “Discuss” for assigning discussion prompts or "Classes" to attach files for students.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Tue Jan 15 00:00:00 UTC 2019

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Teacher Edition - Grade 4, Volume 1 9780134910581 Pearson 2020
Teacher Edition - Grade 4, Volume 2 9780134910642 Pearson 2020
Student Edition - Grade 4, Volume 1 9780134910710 Pearson 2020
Student Edition - Grade 4, Volume 2 9780134910789 Pearson 2020
Teacher Resource Master - Grade 4, Volume 1 9780134910840 Pearson 2020
Teacher Resource Master - Grade 4, Volume 2 9780134910918 Pearson 2020
Assessment Sourcebook - Grade 4 9780134910987 Pearson 2020
Additional Practice Workbook - Grade 4 9780134912240 Pearson 2020
Teacher Edition Program Overview, Grade 4 9780134922300 Pearson 2020

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Math K-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The K-8 review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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