Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet expectations of alignment. The Grade 1 instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 1. Texts are worthy of students' time and attention. Materials support students building their ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The materials support students' literacy development with foundational skills. The instructional materials for Grade 1 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Materials partially meet the criteria that texts are organized to support students' building knowledge of different topics, and there is support for students to engage with and grow their academic vocabulary over the course of the school year. Materials meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts and partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. Materials meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Materials provide procedures and support for daily independent reading, primarily found in the Making Meaning component.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
53
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the expectations for text quality and alignment to the standards. The instructional materials meet expectations that texts that are appropriately complex, providing opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. The materials partially meet the criteria that materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills. The materials address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
17/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading, consider a range of student interests, and meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Materials meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Materials partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text-complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading. Materials provide numerous opportunities for students to engage with a range and volume of texts (through listening and reading) in order to achieve grade-level reading proficiency. In both the Making Meaning and Being a Writer, students are introduced to new texts and a variety of disciplines and genres.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared-reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) being of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading/listening, and consider a range of student interests.

A majority of the texts in each of the three components of this program are written by well-known authors, some of whom have won awards for their writing. These anchor texts contain engaging content for students and are worthy of careful listening and discussion. Texts throughout the school year are well-crafted, rich in language, provide opportunities for both academic and content language, have rich characters, and are artistically and visually appealing to engage and hold student interest.

The Making Meaning component contains the read-aloud texts, many of them being well-known texts published by renowned authors. Some of these include:

  • McDuff and the Baby by Rosemary Wells (Unit 2, Week 2): This text describes how life changes after a baby arrives in the main character’s family. The text will be relatable to Grade 1 students.
  • Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes (Unit 2, Week 3): This noted author writes this published story about friendship. The main character Chrysanthemum thinks her name is perfect until she gets teased about it. This text includes rich characters, and Grade 1 students will relate to the story.
  • An Extraordinary Egg by Leo Lionni (Unit 5, Week 1): This is a fable about friendship and loyalty. This text includes rich vocabulary.
  • The Bumblebee Queen by April Pulley Sayre (Unit 5, Week 3): This published informational text is full of information about a North American bumblebee queen. The text contains rich content and academic vocabulary.
  • Dinosaur Babies by Lucille Recht Penner (Unit 6, Week 3): This first introduction to dinosaurs is an informational text about the life cycle of the dinosaur. The text will engage Grade 1 students, and it includes content-rich vocabulary.
  • Throw Your Tooth on the Roof by Shelby Beeler (Unit 8, Week 1): This informational text introduces the students to other cultures and their traditions of losing a tooth. This text is worthy of students’ time and attention.

In the Being a Writer component many well-known, published texts are used as anchor texts for students. Some of the these are as follows:

  • All by Myself by Mercer Mayer (Unit 1, Week 3): The familiar character, Little Critter, outlines all the things he can do by himself. This text will engage Grade 1 students.
  • Chinatown by William Low (Unit 2, Week 2): This story is about a boy and his grandmother who take a walk each day through Chinatown. The text includes new vocabulary and will interest students in learning about other cultures.
  • Growing Vegetable Soup by Lois Ehlert (Unit 2, Week 4): A child and father grow a bountiful vegetable garden and enjoy its tasty results. This text includes visually appealing illustrations.
  • Wait and See by Robert Munsch (Unit 3, Week 3): Munsch, a well-respected children’s author, wrote this funny story in which Olivia wishes for crazy things on her birthday. This text uses humor to engage students.
  • The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (Unit 4, Week 1): This Caldecott Winner is about a little boy named Peter who wakes up to find that through the night it has snowed. This text includes artistically and visually appealing illustrations that will engage students.
  • Reading Makes you Feel Good by Todd Parr (Unit 7, Week 1): The author shares his opinions on why reading makes you feel good. Students will relate to the story.

In Being a Reader, the shared texts are publishable. Some of these titles are as follows:

  • Over in the Meadow: A Counting Rhyme By Louise Voce (Week 5): This text is a traditional counting rhyme where baby animals play with their mothers in a meadow. This text includes a rhyme scheme that will engage and interest Grade 1 students.
  • This Little Chick by John Lawrence (Week 7): This text is about a tiny chick that roams a farm to meet the other animals living there. This text includes new information for students about farm animals and will be of high interest to students.
  • When Winter Comes by Nancy Van Laan (Week 12): This published informational text helps students understand what happens in the plant life cycle during the winter months. This text includes academic and content vocabulary.
  • Beetle Bop by Denise Fleming (Week 15): This informational text is about all the different types of beetles, and the text will be of high interest to students. The text contains content-rich vocabulary.


Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet requirements for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The materials include a mix of literary and informational text types across all three components. There is both classic and contemporary literature, and the informational texts include a range of subjects. Each component includes a mix of literary and informational texts.

In the Making Meaning component, students hear both types of texts, and the genres within the text types vary as well. Some examples of this include:

Literary

  • It’s Mine! by Leo Lionni (Unit 1, Week 4)
  • Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes (Unit 2, Week 3)
  • Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats (Unit 3, Week 3)
  • An Extraordinary Egg by Leo Lionni (Unit 5, Week 1)

Informational

  • People in my Neighborhood by Shelly Lyons (Unit 1, Week 3)
  • George Washington and the General’s Dog by Frank Murphy (Week 5, Unit 2)
  • Using Your Senses by Rebecca Rissman (Unit 6, Week 1)
  • Throw Your Tooth on the Roof by Selby B. Beller (Unit 8, Week 1)

The texts in the Being a Writer section are used as model texts, and there is an even distribution of text types. Examples of these texts include:

Literary

  • When I Grow Up by Peter Horn (Unit 1, Week 4)
  • The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats (Unit 4, Week 1)

Informational

  • Meet my Neighbor the Dentist by Marc Crabtree (Unit 5, Week 1)
  • Fire Trucks by Valerie Bodden (Unit 5, Week 1)

The texts in Being a Reader are used as either small-group texts or shared-reading texts. The small- group texts can be used in Kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2 and depend on the students’ reading levels. Some examples of the texts are as follows:

Literary

  • “Kitty Caught a Caterpillar” by Jack Prelutsky (Week 6)
  • Listen to The Rain by bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault (Week 21)

Informational

  • This is the Way we go to School: A Book About Children Around the World by Edith Baer (Week 1)
  • Bugs for Lunch by Margery Faklam (Week 26)


Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

The majority of the texts in the materials are at the appropriate complexity level for a read-aloud in Grade 1.

Examples of texts that are at the appropriate level of complexity include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, students hear McDuff and the Baby, which has a Lexile of AD600L. The use of illustrations in this text supports and assists the reader in understanding the complex features in the text. The theme is moderately complex as it is clear, but the underlying message is somewhat subtle.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students hear the text, Chrysanthemum, which has a Lexile of 570. However, the text is moderately complex with complex vocabulary such as dreadful, scarcely, and begrudging as well as more than one level of meaning.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, students hear The Extraordinary Egg, which has a Lexile of 620. The language features and knowledge demands of this text are very complex.
  • In Unit 8, Week 1, students hear the text Throw Your Tooth on the Roof, which has a Lexile of AD540L. While the purpose and conventionality are only slightly complex, the language features and knowledge demands are more complex, as students are introduced to many different countries and their respective traditions for what they do with their lost teeth.


Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence in grade-level skills. (Leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels.)

The materials for Grade 1 provide some opportunities for students’ literacy skills (comprehension) to grow throughout the year. The comprehension strategies increase in complexity as the units progress. In the Being a Reader component, shared reading begins with a read aloud and a simple discussion in which students make text-to-self connections. As the year progresses, students are reading the text themselves in small groups and discussing characters. The same is true for the Making Meaning component. In the earlier units, the teacher provides the prompt and/or models for students, and later in the year students are required to complete and share a diagram with very little support. Texts are repeatedly read and comprehension questions' complexity increases. However, the organization/placement of texts in general do not promote students encountering opportunities for building grade-level skills as outlined by the standards themselves. Texts are organized thematically without a focus on building knowledge. There is a focus on a progressions of stand-alone skills.

The materials in Grade 1 increase in complexity to support students’ growth towards grade-level skills and independence. However, the texts themselves are not always organized in a way that increases students' comprehension skills. Making Meaning, students begin the year in Unit 1 making text-to-self connections and answering questions about the story. In Unit 3, students are retelling and making text-to-text connections. In Unit 6, students begin making connections to what they already know. In Unit 8, students are introduced to text features, and students have to use all of the strategies learned throughout the year. The support provided by the teacher also decreases as the tasks increase. For example, in Unit 2, students read and discuss Matthew and Tilly. The students have a discussion with partners about friendship, answering the question: “What do you think Matthew and Tilly learn about friendship in this story?” In Unit 4, students are continuing to learn comprehension strategies. When reading Sheep Out to Eat, students draw and write what they visualized in their journal. This task is completed after the teacher has modeled the task. As the year continues, the tasks become more complex and include less teacher support. In Unit 8, students read Velociraptor. Using information from the text, students draw a velociraptor, label its parts, and share the information with classmates.

Students engage in shared reading in Being a Reader, which also increases in complexity through the year. In Week 1, students hear the text This is the Way We go to School: A Book About Children Around the World and then have a discussion about the ways the children in the book go to school. For example, in Week 4, students engage in the shared reading of “Hippopotamus Stew.” On the first day, the students hear the teacher read the text: the first time is just to get the gist of the story, and the second time is to stop and explain unknown words. On the second day, the teacher rereads the poems, the students chorally read the story, and then the students reread the poem line by line, making sure it makes sense. On day 3, students chorally read the poem again and then are asked, “What is happening in this part of the poem?” on the first four lines of the poem. In Week 15, students echo read the story Beetle Bop. By Week 25, small groups of students chorally read parts of the story. Students spend several days on the shared reading texts.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text-complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The Grade 1 materials do not include a complete text-complexity analysis for the texts that accompany the lessons in Making Meaning, Being A Reader, or Being a Writer. There is a general rationale explaining the purpose of whole-class shared reads and small group texts. In Making Meaning, a comprehension focus, a text summary, and a social development focus is provided. There is a list of all the texts and a short description of each. In the Being a Reader section, there are Lexile levels provided for the Small Group Reading sets of books, but no qualitative analysis is provided.

For the Making Meaning component, a short rationale, including the genre of texts by grade level and a listing of the trade books with a short summary are provided by the publisher. Qualitative analysis was not provided.

  • In Unit 2, Week 3, students hear Chrysanthemum, and the synopsis states, “In this fiction story, Chrysanthemum loves her name until the first day of school, when other students begin teasing her. But thanks to a teacher who has an equally memorable name, Chrysanthemum and her classmates realize that being unique can be wonderful.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, the teacher reads aloud Curious George Goes Camping by Margaret Rey and H. A. Ray. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “A funny monkey creates some chaos on a camping trip, but he redeems himself in the end.” Students are tasked with listening to the text, answering questions to understand key details and retelling the sequence of events in a story.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, the Teacher’s Manual includes the following explanation to students for the use of the text Sleep Well: Why You Need to Rest for the read-aloud strategy lesson: “Explain that this nonfiction book gives information about sleep and why it is important to sleep well.”
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, the teacher reads aloud Chameleons Are Cool by Martin Jenkins. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “This book tells what chameleons look like, why they change color, and how they move, see, hunt, and eat.” Students are tasked with listening to the text, using wonder to help them understand a nonfiction book, and identify what they learned from the book.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, with the text, An Elephant Grows Up, the Teacher’s Manual includes the following synopsis: “This book tells the story of a baby elephant and her brother growing up in Africa.”

For the Being a Reader component, the texts include a general rationale, including a list of the texts with a short description. Qualitative analysis of texts was not evident.

  • In Week 2, the teacher reads aloud the song “Willaby Wallaby Woo” by Dennis Lee. The publisher provides a synopsis of the song, “This playful song is a starting point for rhyming nonsense words with children’s names.”
  • In Week 5, the teacher reads aloud Over the Meadow: A Counting Rhyme by Louise Voce. The publisher provides a synopsis of the big book, “In this traditional counting rhyme, animal babies play with their mothers in a meadow.”
  • In Week 7, the following synopsis is provided for This Little Chick: “A tiny chick that ventures around the farm to meet new playmates.”
  • In Week 8, the teacher reads aloud The Busy Little Squirrel by Nancy Tafuri. The publisher provides a synopsis of the big book, “A squirrel turns down his friends’ invitation to play as he prepares for winter.”
  • In Week 11, the teacher reads aloud the poem “Listen” by Margaret Hillert. The publisher provides a synopsis of the poem, “This poem describes some of the wounds of winter.”
  • In Week 14, the teacher reads aloud Up, Down, and Around by Katherine Ayres. The publisher provides a synopsis of the big book, “This rhythmic text describes how foods grow in the garden.”
  • In Week 16, the teacher reads aloud the poem “Kick a Little Stone” by Dorothy Aldis. The publisher provides a synopsis of the poem, “This poem tells about kicking a stone on a sunny day.”
  • In Week 25, students read The Napping House. The rationale for using the text is: “This week the students make predictions about the story The Napping House as they listen to it for the first time. Later, they work on retelling the story by discussing the beginning, middle, and end of the story.”
  • In Week 30, no specific anchor texts are provided. Students engage in conversation about books they have read this year. Students are encouraged to reread familiar titles and the procedure for “revisiting big books” is introduced in the last week of instruction. The teacher is encouraged to revisit Appendix C “Texts in the Program” which lists all of the big books that have been introduced during Shared Reading for the year. Students revisit big books for all 3 days of instruction.
  • The texts for Small Group Reading include information from texts such as in Set 3, where the text Make Plum Jam is to be used to make inferences and make text-to-self connections. Beginning in Set 6, a quantitative analysis is provided. For example, in Set 12, the quantitative analysis is that all the texts are Lexile level of 450 to 780, Fountas and Pinnell Level O, and DRA level 34.

For the Being a Writer component, there is a list of trade books provided by the publisher, but no rationale for why the texts were used. Each lesson has a writing focus and a social development focus.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud the big book Farmer Duck by Helen Oxenbury. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “A lazy farmer stays in bed while a dutiful duck does all the hard work.”
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, the teacher reads aloud the book Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale by Mo Willems. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “Trixie, Daddy, and Knuffle Bunny take a trip to the neighborhood laundromat, where a minor crisis ensues.”
  • In Unit 3, Week 3, the teacher reads aloud the book Wait and See by Robert Munsch. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “Olivia’s wacky birthday wishes all come true.”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, the teacher reads aloud the book The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats and Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes. The publisher provides a synopsis of The Snowy Day, “Peter explores the magic of a snowy day.” The publisher also provides a synopsis of Chrysanthemum, “Chrysanthemum thinks her name is perfect--until she gets teased about it.”
  • in Unit 5, Lesson 3, the story is called Fire Trucks. The Teacher’s Manual contains reasoning for the selected text: students hear and discuss a nonfiction book; students write books about objects; students write opening and closing sentences; students proofread for punctuation and spelling; students make book covers; and students share their books from the author’s chair.
  • In Unit 6, Week 4, the teacher reads aloud poems from Honey, I Love and Other Love Poems by Eloise Greenfield. Other poems titled “Ears Hear” by Lucia and James L. Hymes, Jr., “Our Washing Machine” by Patricia Hubbell, “Showers” by Marchette Chute, “To Walk in Warm Rain” by David McCord, and “The March Wind” by Anonymous are also utilized for instruction. The publisher provides a synopsis of the poetry book, “Everyday life is described poetically through a child’s eyes in this book of poems.”
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, the teacher reads aloud the book Reading Makes You Feel Good by Todd Parr. The publisher provides a synopsis of the book, “In this author’s opinion, reading makes you feel good.”

An additional resource, Lexile Overview: Read-aloud Texts and Small-group Reading Texts, is available from the publisher. This resource includes a Lexile overview as information on genres, format, Lexile levels, and Fountas and Pinnell levels. The document states that qualitative measures were used in choosing texts but does not provide qualitative analysis.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Materials provide numerous opportunities for students to engage with (through listening and reading) a range and volume of texts in order to achieve grade-level reading proficiency. In every component of the program (Being a Reader, Making Meaning, and Being a Writer), students are introduced to new texts and a variety of disciplines and genres. The texts are shared with students through read alouds, shared reading, independent reading, and small-group reading instruction. Students are given ample opportunity to listen to and read a range and volume of texts to promote grade-level proficiency. Students are also given opportunities to reread previously read text for different purposes. Students are consistently exposed to a variety of text.

In the Making Meaning module, students listen to read alouds on various topics and genres such as literary, poetry, expository and narrative informational. Read alouds are found on all instructional days except “Independent Strategy Practice” days. On those days students practice the skills they have learned in their own texts.

Students engage in both Small Group Reading and shared reading in the Being a Reader component. For example:

  • Students engage in Small Group Reading four days a week in the Being a Reader module. This begins in Week 5. In Set 10, students use the graphic novel “Bink and Gollie.” On the first day of instruction, the students follow along as the teacher reads. On the second day the teacher introduces and reads the next part of the story to the children. On the third day, the children engage in choral reading. On the fourth day, the teacher reads some of the book, and the students read some of the book. On the fifth day, the students discuss the book and engage in echo reading. On the final day, the students read the text in pairs.
  • Students also participate in whole-class shared reading in the Being a Reader module. In Week 1, Day 1, students read the story “This is the Way we go to School,” a book about children around the world, which is a informational text. In Week 7, students read “The Little Chick Aloud.” On the first day, students read the text with the teacher and answer questions. On the second day, the students chorally read the text and then answer questions in regards to the foundational skills. In Week 15, students practice reading the book “Beetle Bop” and practice fluency by engaging in echo reading. Students also practice their reading in the Being a Reader component by rereading poetry such as in Week 29 when students revisit “Mice,” "Caterpillars,” and “Secret Song." They chorally read the poems and discuss the questions. They also read the poems with a partner.

In the Being a Writer module, students listen to various read alouds for ideas and as models for writing.

Students also engage in independent reading. Book bags are introduced in Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, and students begin self-selecting books to read each day.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
14/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly. There are some sequences of high-quality, text-dependent/specific questions, activities, and tasks that scaffold students’ understanding of a text that build to a culminating task. Throughout the school year and each lesson, the application of speaking and listening instruction is frequently applied in each program component. Students engage in Turn and Talks, Think-Pair-Shares, and whole-group discussions. Materials meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g., multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate. Throughout the course of the school year, students engage with multiple genres and modes of writing in both Making Meaning and Being a Writer. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level. Students are continuously asked to support analyses and claims with clear information and evidence during discussion. Materials meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Within the Making Meaning component of the series, students answer text-based questions. Students are required to review their reading in order to answer questions relating to the text. In the Writing about Reading section, students are asked to respond about what they learned from the text.

In the Making Meaning component, the stories in each unit have some text-based questions.

  • In Unit 2, students listen to Matthew and Tilly, and students are asked, “What happened to Matthew and Tilly?”
  • In Unit 2, students listen to McDuff and the Baby by Rosemary Wells and answer questions such as, “What part of McDuff and the Baby surprised you?”
  • In Unit 4, students listen to the story The Snowy Day and then engage in a discussion where they answer questions such as, “What are some of the things Peter does in the snow?” and “Why do you think Peter put the snowball in his pocket?”
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 2, students hear the story An Extraordinary Egg and then engage in a discussion about: “Why do you think the alligator saves Jessica?” and “Why do you think the frogs call the alligator a chicken?"
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 1, students listen to the text Big Blue Whales and have to answer the question, “What does a blue whale do to eat whole swarms of krill?”

In the Writing about Reading component, which is a component of Making Meaning, students write about a text using evidence.

  • In Unit 3, after listening to George Goes Camping, students answer: “What is your favorite part of Curious George Goes Camping?”
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 3, students write some ways they think the books are alike and different after hearing An Ocean of Animals and Big Blue Whale.
  • In Unit 8, Week 2, Day 3, students write some ways that they think the books Dinosaur Babies and Velociraptor are similar and different.

In the Being a Reader component, students answer text-based questions.

  • In Week 4, Day 3 of shared reading, students read the poem "Hippopotamus Stew" and then discuss what they remember about the poem and what is happening at certain parts of the poem.
  • In Week 7, students participate in the shared reading of This Little Chick and answer: “What happens in this story?” “What do you think the little chick is telling his mother on these pages (pages 24-25)?” and “Why do you think that?”


Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

In the three components of this series, Making Meaning, Being a Reader, and Being a Writer, there is inconsistency in regards to a culminating task that integrates skills based on a high-quality sequence of text-based questions. The tasks that are identified aren’t culminating, but rather activities to support text. Within each Unit there are a number of weeks of instruction. Each week remains secular and concludes with an activity that may or may not directly correlate to the skill of the week. The one thing that remains the same for the week is the text selection. In addition, the tasks that could potentially be identified as somewhat of a culminating activity are lacking the rigor and objective correlation that is typical with culminating activities from other curriculums.

  • In Making Meaning, there is a ‘Write about Reading’ section that allows the student to write about the text after going through whole group discussion questions.
  • In Being a Writer, the students go through the writing process but do not build to a culminating task that demonstrates understanding of texts.
  • The Being a Reader component does not provide text-based writing or a culminating task since these tasks require students to write about their own topics. While there are daily formative assessments such as one-on-one reading conferences, these do not build to a culminating task.

Beginning in Unit 2 of Making Meaning, students have opportunities to write about what they read in the Writing about Reading sections. Students have opportunities to write their opinion of a book, make a connection to it, or respond to the book in other ways; however, these activities are optional and can be done at the end of the lesson or at another time. Again, these activities are inconsistent. Some tasks integrate skills to demonstrate understanding, others do not. For example:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students hear the story, Matthew and Tilly. Prior to writing, students discuss what they remember about the book and how it reminds them of their own lives. The writing prompt is for students to write that connection. This is not a culminating activity requiring a sequential activities building up to a final project.
  • In Unit 3, Week 3 students participate in a read aloud of Peter’s Chair focusing on retelling on day 1. On day 2, students practice retelling the events of the story orally. They then draw and write one thing that happened in the story. While the activities build upon each other, the depth of the activities and the conclusion of the lesson on day 2 do not provide a strong culminating activity as the concept was retelling and students were only required to write about one thing that happened in the story at the end of the week.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1 students are introduced to the concept of wondering thru modeling by the teacher using An Extraordinary Egg as the mentor text. On day 3, students write about their favorite part of the text and if time permits, share their text aloud. As an extension, students may research the author
  • In Unit 7, Week 1 & 2 students have to compare independently An Ocean of Animals by Janine Scott and Big Blue Whale by Nicola Davies. The questions and discussion in Week 1 and the Reading Journal entry about An Ocean of Animals, along with the questions and discussion in Week 2 over Big Blue Whale, help prepare them for this task.

In Being a Writer, activities and tasks are also inconsistent. While some activities integrate skills to demonstrate understanding, many activities do not. For example:

  • In Unit 1, students use prompts to begin writing.
  • In Unit 2, students generate writing ideas from their own lives and begin writing sentences without the aid of sentence starters.
  • In Unit 4, students explore personal narratives by writing true stories in their own lives and learning that every story has a beginning, middle, and end.
  • In Unit 5, students progress to writing more and begin exploring non-fiction writing as they engage in writing about themselves, the class, and a place in school, among other topics; however, there is no culminating task after students complete the units.


Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small-group, peer-to-peer, whole-class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials in Grade 1 provide opportunities for students to share their thinking about texts in each lesson. The questions within the Making Meaning component are generally text-based and require the students to either remember what has been learned in the lesson or to look back to determine the information. Students engage in "Turn to Your Partner" and "Think-Pair-Share" cooperative structures, and guidance and modeling are provided for these. Video clips and prompts within the teaching materials are provided to support teachers. The Making Meaning component has a Vocabulary Teaching Guide that utilizes the vocabulary words from the stories the students have been hearing. The guide provides multiple opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions across the whole year's scope of instructional materials

In the beginning of each Making Meaning unit, students are paired with a new partner. Students are provided direct instruction and opportunities to practice "Turn to Your Partner" and "Think-Pair-Share"before using them when discussing a text.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students are introduced to the "Turn to Your Partner Strategy." Direct instruction is provided, and students discuss the question: “What do you think you were like when your were little?”
  • In Unit 4, Week 1, students are introduced to "Think-Pair-Share." Direct instruction is provided, and students practice with the question, “What can you do to be a good partner?”

Students are provided opportunities to use these two structures after hearing the texts.

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, students are asked to turn to their partners to discuss what they remember about When I Was Little on Day 2.
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, after hearing McDuff and the Baby, students are prompted to discuss with their partner the problems McDuff has and how McDuff feels about the baby at the end of the story.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, Day 2, students are asked ”What did you learn about the twilight zone?” Students discuss with their partner.

The vocabulary program includes 30 weeks of new words and review words. The students first hear the word in the Read Aloud, and then in the second week students engage in learning the words with direct vocabulary instruction. Students are taught words and then provided practice using review words. The emphasis is on one new vocabulary word within the read aloud. For example, students hear the text, Matthew and Tilly in Unit 2, Week 1 of Making Meaning. The key word is rescue, and the teacher first explains the word and then points to the picture in the text. The teacher then tells the students to imagine rescuing a baby bird.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Students are provided with a variety of opportunities to discuss with a partner their understanding of texts read aloud to them or about the shared-writing projects they are completing. They are given multiple opportunities to listen and discuss with peers what they are reading, writing, and listening to, as well as with the whole class. Follow-up questions and supports for speaking and listening are found throughout materials. There are times throughout the year where the teacher is explicitly told to model proper speaking and listening, and students discuss what they see and hear.

In the Making Meaning component of the materials, students are given multiple opportunities to turn to a partner to discuss what they read, supporting both their listening and speaking. Examples include:

  • In Unit 3, Week 1, after listening to Curious George Goes Camping, students retell the story with a partner and discuss what happens to Curious George when he goes on his camping trip.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students hear the story Angelina and Henry and then turn to their partners to discuss: "What was Angelina’s and Henry’s problem in the story?" and "How is their problem solved?" Students are encouraged to listen carefully to their partner, because they are expected to share what their partner said in the whole group setting.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1 Day 3, students read Using Your Senses and work in pairs to answer" "What did you learn about how people see?" and "What did you learn about the sense of hearing?”
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students listen to and discuss the text An Ocean of Animals. Students work with a partner to discuss what they wonder about animals that live in the ocean and what they learned that surprised them.
  • In Unit 8, Week 4, Day 1, after hearing An Elephant Grows Up, students meet with a partner to discuss the part of the story they visualized and share what they saw in their mind.

In the Being a Writer component of the materials, students are asked questions after listening to the story. Examples include:

  • In Unit 2, Week 2, Day 1, students listen to Chinatown and then discuss what makes Chinatown a special place. In addition, students have opportunities to share what they write.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 3, students read a partner’s writing and then participate in a group discussion on what they learned from the partner’s story.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students write an opinion piece about their favorite type of book and are invited to share what they wrote with the class. Students also share their stories with a partner.

In the Being a Reader component of the materials, students are regularly required to speak and listen about the shared reading. Students have opportunities to demonstrate listening carefully as well as reflect on what they did to do be a good listener.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing), and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The materials in Grade 1 offer a mix of on-demand and process writing as well as short, focused projects that incorporate digital resources. Some activities take the students through the writing process, while others offer on-demand writing, when students respond to a prompt, typically in response to the read aloud. There are opportunities for students to revise and edit as well. Students are involved in guided- and shared-writing activities before writing independently.

Students are frequently given opportunities for on-demand writing in the Making Meaning component of the progress as students often write about the stories they hear. Students are given a reading response journal that they use for their writing. For example in Unit 4, Week 2, Day 3, students write about their visualized drawings of “The Balloon Man.” Similarly in Week 5, students visualize from The Snowy Day and draw and write in their response journals about a part of the story they visualized clearly. In Unit 6 of Making Meaning, students write about a favorite sense by first listening to the story and then reflecting on what they learned. There are also shared-writing opportunities. For example in Unit 3, Week 1, students participate in a shared-writing experience of writing about a fun time they had. in Unit 7, Week 1, students, as a class, write a poem on chart paper about food. The students have to work together to include an option, varieties of the food, and a reason for eating it.

There are also opportunities for students to engage in process writing. There are opportunities for students to go back and revise their work beginning in Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3, when students add details to their illustrations or writing. In another example, students begin rereading their stories and adding details in Unit 1, Week 3, when they write about their family members. In Making Meaning, Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, students use the text Sleep Well: Why You Need to Rest to first write about a time they had trouble falling asleep, then on Day 3 they are expected to continue writing by turning what they read and heard about the book into an opinion piece on why we need sleep. In Unit 8, Week 4, Day 2, there is an extension activity where students conduct a mini-research project with a partner.

Technology is included in the writing lessons. In the Being a Writer Component, there are a variety of opportunities for students to use digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. There is an digital storytelling tool introduced in Unit 1, Week 4, Day 3 that gives students an opportunity to create digital stories by uploading pictures and recording a narration to go with them. By Unit 3, Week 4, Day 3, students are collaborating to create a digital storybook. Each student takes a turn recording his/her portion of the story, and the stories can be shared online, emailed to parents, or stored for others to view. There is also a blog option available where students can post their writing about reading on a blog, and families have the opportunity to comment.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year-long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The Being a Writer component of this series gives students an opportunity to write narrative, expository, and opinion pieces. There are a variety of prompts, models, anchor pieces, and supports throughout the year, and students have an opportunity to learn, practice, and apply different genres/modes/types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. In addition, students have additional opportunities for writing in the Making Meaning component.

In Being a Writer, narrative writing is found in Units 1- 4. Students create their own stories in Unit 2 and are given sentence starters. This type of writing and the scaffolds continue into Unit 2. In addition to the Being a Writer component, there are opportunities for narrative writing in Making Meaning such as in Unit 1, Week 4, Day 2, when students write and illustrate stories about what they want to be when they grow up.

Unit 5 of Being a Writer covers expository writing. For example in Unit 5, Week 2, students write about their partners. They first interview their partner, write facts, and learn how to write an introductory sentence. Then they interview and write even more facts about their partner the next day and learn how to write a closing sentence. Students also engage in expository writing in Making Meaning. For example, in Unit 4, Week 1, Day 3, students write about pictures they drew while visualizing the poem, “The Balloon Man.”

In Being a Writer Unit 7, students learn about opinion writing. Students learn what an opinion is. Then they form their own opinions about topics and write pieces in which they clearly state their opinions in opening sentences, provide reasons that support their opinions, and write closing sentences. Specifically, in Week 1, students write opinion pieces about foods they think are the best and the worst. In Week 2, they explore writing longer pieces by writing opinions about activities at school and outside of school that make them feel good. In Making Meaning, students have regular writing in response to a text. For example, in Unit 7, Week 4, Day 3, students write an opinion about which type of book they like better, fiction or nonfiction.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

Evidence-based writing is included in some of the modules of this curriculum. There are opportunities for this type of writing however, it is inconsistent, and there are opportunities for students to engage in writing about a text without having heard the text or understood the text. In the “Write about Reading” activities, students have to refer back to the text that was read aloud. Students are given journals that allow them to write about the texts they hear. In the Writing about Reading section, students are given opportunities to write about the text.

Evidence-based writing is found in both Being a Writer and Making Meaning sections, though the majority of the opportunities are found in Making Meaning. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1 of Being a Writer, students are given an opportunity for evidence-based writing Students are asked to write opinions about the story Farmer Duck and how they think he helped with the writing.
  • In Unit 3, Day 1, students write their own opinions about Wait and See and illustrate the parts of the book they wrote about.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2 of Making Meaning, students are asked to write about their favorite part of the story Curious George.
  • In Unit 4, Week 3, Day 4 of Being a Writer, students begin writing a book review of a book they read.
  • Unit 7, Week 1, Day 2 (Making Meaning)-Students write a text-to-text connection for A Baby Duck Story and A Baby Penguin Story by Martha E. H. Rustad. Students are asked, “What did you learn about penguin chicks in this book? What did you learn about ducklings in this book?” Later in the lesson, each student writes a few sentences about what he/she learned from the books.
  • In Unit 7, Week 4, Day 3, students write in their journals about the read aloud book Birds. They are asked to include the title, what the book is about, one thing they learned from the book, and one thing they wonder about the book.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Day 3, students write about the text they are reading in their journal and describe the text features that they noticed. In Unit 8, Week 4, Day 3, students write about something that they learned from a text feature in the book or something that they learned from another part of the book.

Not all writing opportunities require evidence from the text. For example:

  • In Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1- Students listen to Beardream by Will Hobbs. Students write their own endings for Beardream. Students are provided with 20-25 minutes of silent writing time to complete this task.
  • In Unit 6 Week 2 Day 3, students listen to the story Sleep Well, Why You Need to Rest. Students then pair-share whether sleeping is important to them. Materials state, “Have students write their own opinions about whether sleep is important to them and explain why.”


Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for the Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Language standards are addressed throughout lessons within Being a Reader, Being a Writer, and Vocabulary Teacher Guide (Making Meaning). The instructional strategies of the lessons include teacher modeling, Think-Pair-Share, and Turn to Your Partner. Students are supported in their acquisition of grade-level grammar and convention standards through teacher questioning and the students having opportunities to speak with a partner before recording their responses. Students use Handwriting Notebooks to record their handwriting lessons. Students also are presented with visual materials to help aid in language and convention standards acquisition such as sentence strips, note cards, and vocabulary picture cards.

Materials include explicit instruction of all grammar and conventions standards for the grade level, and instruction is provided in increasingly sophisticated contexts. Examples include:

Students have the opportunity in Being a Reader with weekly handwriting instruction to practice printing capital and lowercase letters. Students also have the chance to practice printing letters during independent work time. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Handwriting, Week 6, Day 1, students practice forming lowercase letters c, o, s. “Have the students stay in their seats. Tell the students that today they will learn to form the lowercase letters c, o, and s. Write each letter where everyone can see it, and say the name of the letter as you write it. Explain that first the students will learn to write the letters on the wipe-off boards, and then they will practice forming the letters in their Handwriting Notebooks.”

Students have the opportunity to use common, proper, and possessive nouns. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skill Practice, Lesson 1, students are instructed to circle who the sentence is about. Later on in the lesson students are given a picture of a playground and sentences about the playground; students must then circle the noun in each sentence.
  • In the Skill Practice in Being a Writer, Lesson 14, students are given sentences such as “The boy washes the (cat’s, cats) dish.” and are asked to choose the correct form of the noun to complete the sentence.
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 3, student write about a fun time they have had. They are encouraged to use proper nouns for people and places. Teachers are to check to see if they are capitalizing the proper nouns. The teacher asks “Who used a capital letter to begin names in their story? Tell us about a name you capitalized.”

Students have the opportunity to use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Independent Work, Week 7, students work independently on sentence frames matching the sentence structure from the shared reading of The Little Chick, adding animals and their actions. “Provide blank index cards and markers for the students to write additional animals and actions for the pocket chart sentences. Have the students use the pointer with the pocket chart to read the new sentences during independent reading.”
  • In Being a Writer, Skill Practice, Lesson 3, students practice identifying nouns and verbs in sentences. Students are given sentences such as “The teacher_ work hard.” and are instructed to add –s or –es to complete the sentence.
  • In Being a Writer, Skill Practice, Lesson 5, students are provided sentences such as “Pig (like, likes) corn.” and are instructed to circle the correct form of the verb to complete the sentence.

Students have the opportunity to use personal, possessive and indefinite pronouns. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 2, Week 3, Day 2, the teacher models writing from the writing/drawing chart from Day 1. When modeling, the teacher points out when a personal pronoun has been used to replace a noun.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 14, students have the opportunity to practice adding an apostrophe to nouns to make the nouns possessive. “How should we say this sentence to show that this new bike belongs to Ana?” Students practice adding ‘s to words to make them possessive. To review, the teacher asks, “When can you use an apostrophe and s in your writing?”

Students have the opportunity to use verbs to convey a sense of past, present and future. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 6, Week 1, Day 4, the teacher reads aloud Hide and Seek Shadow. Together with the students they list any movement words on the movement words chart. The teacher points out how walked and danced are in the text and that they end in -ed which tells us they happened in the past.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 9, students have the opportunity to practice using verbs in the past tense. “What would we do to the verb if we wanted to show that the action has already happened?” Students practice circling the correct tense of the verb in sentences.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 10, students have the opportunity to practice using verbs in the future tense. “If we wanted to show that the action would happen later, what would we do?” Students are provided a picture and then instructed to write three sentences about what the people in the picture will do in the future.

Students have the opportunity to use frequently-occurring adjectives. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 15, students are given sentences such as, “Ann puts on a fuzzy scarf.” Students are asked to circle the adjective in the sentence. Students are also asked to draw a picture and write down two adjectives describing their picture.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 18, students must complete a story by selecting from a set of adjectives that are provided.
  • In Being a Reader, Week 21, Day 3, students have whole group practice with adjectives. After reading a poem about the earth, the teacher asks students, “What is another word you could use to describe the grasses?” The teacher then substitutes in new adjectives to describe the grass, mountains, oceans and deserts in the poem.

Students have the opportunity to use frequently-occurring conjunctions. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 29, students are provided sentences such as “Ling rides a pony (and, or, but) brushes a cow.” Students also practice rewriting sets of two sentences using and, or, but. For example: “Nate plays a game. He wins a prize.”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 30, students continue to practice writing compound sentences and have the opportunity to create some of their own. “What are two things you do to get ready for bed? Write a compound sentence about them.”

Students have the opportunity to use determiners. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 16, students are given determiners such as a, an, the and must draw a line to the noun that would follow: wings, beak, eye.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 24, students practice using the words this, these, that and those in sentences. For example, “(This, These) giraffe takes peanuts from my hand.”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 26, students continue to practice filling in the missing pieces of sentences using determiners. “Put a blanket over (this, these) two chairs.”

Students have the opportunity to use frequently-occurring prepositions. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 17, students must read a sentence and circle the preposition. For example, students circle the preposition in the following sentence: “We go to the hat store.”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 18, students are provided a chart with verbs, prepositions, and nouns and must then use the words to write command sentences.
  • In the Being a Writer, Unit 4, Week 1, Day 4, the class completes a whole-group writing activity focused on writing the beginning, middle, and end of a story. The teacher is instructed to point out any prepositions that are being used in the story.

Students have the opportunity to produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 19, students are provided the words I, We and You and must use these words to complete sentences such as “___ am the leader.” “___ are too loud!”
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 29, students are provided two sentences that they must combine to make a compound sentence, “The fair is almost over. The children are not tired.” Students are also instructed to “Write a compound sentence that tells about something fun that you did.”
  • In the Being a Writer, Unit 1, Week 5, Day 1, students complete a guided-writing practice lesson where they must practice completing the prompt “My Friend and I Like to….” Students complete a similar activity in Unit 1, Week 2, Day 1, when they practice writing sentences using the prompt “I help when I….”

Students have the opportunity to capitalize dates and names of people. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 3, the teacher models writing a sentence. They use the students’ ideas to add to the story. As they do, they point out that they are capitalizing the names of people, places, or things.
  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 27, the teacher asks the students to write their names on a sheet of paper, and then hold up the sheets so everyone can see them. Ask: "What do notice about the first letter in your name?” Have students draw a picture about their birthday. Have them write their birthdate down, practicing using capital letters and commas in the date.

Students have the opportunity to use end punctuation for sentences. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Handwriting, students practice ending punctuation (! and ?). “Explain that students will practice forming punctuation marks and writing sentences with ending punctuation. Write the sentences they will practice where everyone can see them: I saw a lost dog! Did a cat run? I was glad. Model using two fingers to make a space before you write each word, and point out the ending punctuation in each sentence. Read the sentences aloud, and then have the students read them.”

Students have the opportunity to use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Skills Practice, Lesson 27, students draw a picture about their birthday. Students write their birthdate, practicing using capital letters and commas in the date.

Students have the opportunity to use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently-occurring irregular words. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 7, Week 1, Day 4, students have the opportunity to check their spelling in their writing piece. Students should reread their writing and check to make sure they have spelled all words from the word wall correctly. “If they have misspelled a word, have them erase (or cross out) the word and rewrite it correctly.” The teacher asks students, “What words from the word wall did you find in your writing today?” Have two or three volunteers share their words with the class.

Students have the opportunity to spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 2, Week 4, Day 2, students work on writing stories. “Encourage the students to listen for sounds to help them think about the spelling of unfamiliar words in their writing today. Also remind them to use the word wall to help them with their spelling.“

Students have the opportunity to determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 1 reading and content, choosing from an array of strategies. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 8, Day 2 of The Polar Bear Son, students use sentences from the text and work with partners to determine the meaning of the word, faithful. “Have the students turn to page 36 of The Polar Bear Son and follow along as you read it aloud. Ask: 'What does it mean to be faithful? What does Kunikdjuaq do to be faithful? Turn to your partner.' Have a few students share their thinking. Encourage them to refer to the text to support their thinking."

Students have the opportunity to, with guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 27, Day 2, students work to sort words from the shared- reading story. “Remove the posted word cards and put them back in the pocket chart in any order. Tell the students that there is often more than one way to sort a set of words. Explain that paying attention to the way words are spelled, how they sound, or what they mean can help the students notice different ways to group some of the words together. Ask: What are some words in this list that you could group together? Why would you group those words together?”

Students have the opportunity to use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently-occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 21, Day 3, students work with the teacher to generate words that describe common words. “What is another word you could use to describe the grasses? Have a volunteer share. As the student shares, write his idea on an index card and place it over the word green to cover it in the pocket chart. Repeat this procedure to have the students generate new words to describe the mountains, oceans, and deserts. As the students share, write their ideas on individual index cards and place them in the appropriate places in the pocket chart.”

Materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in and out of context. For example:

  • In Being a Writer, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, students contribute to a shared story. As the teacher adds sentences from students the teacher is directed to: “Use the students’ suggestions to add to the story. As you write, point out that you are capitalizing the names of people, places, or things (proper nouns).”
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 5, Week 2, Day 3, during Proofreading and Publishing, the teacher has students review and revise their own writing. The teacher asks some of the following questions and pauses for students to revise their writing: “Did you use a capital letter at the beginning of each sentence? If not, erase or cross out the incorrect letters and write capital letters. Did you use a period or exclamation point at the end of each sentence? If not, write in periods or exclamation points where they belong.”


Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks that directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context. The materials meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2). The materials meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks. The lessons within Being a Reader and Making Meaning are structured to provide students will application of foundational skills and provide additional support for teachers to guide students towards mastery of foundational skills. The materials meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills. The materials provide high quality lessons in foundational skills throughout the school year.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Foundational skills are presented to address phonics and word recognition. Phonological awareness is taught explicitly in the Shared Reading lessons in the Being a Reader Teacher Manual. In addition, foundational skills and differentiated instruction that includes phonics and decoding are incorporated in the Small-group Reading sets of the Being a Reader materials. These skills are taught in a logical progression that increases in difficulty throughout the year.

Students have frequent opportunities to learn and understand phonemes (e.g. distinguish long and short vowels, blend sounds, pronounce vowels in single-syllable words, and segment single-syllable words). For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 1, Day 1, students learn the long a sound. “Explain that you will say the sounds in a wod, and then the students will put the sounds together to make the word. Model, using the word lane.”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 3, Day 2, students practice sorting words into two categories of long and short /u/. “Take the sorting guide from your own bag of words. Point to the words cut and cube on the sorting guide, and read the words aloud. Explain that the students will match the sounds in these words (in this case, the middle sounds /ŭ/ and /ū/).”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 4, Day 1, “Have the students blend each of the words that follow after you say the phonemes, using continuous blending. Clap softly as you say each sound. Then brush your hands past each other as the students say the word.” Words blended included: pile, games, late, hole, shines, bone.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g. spelling-sound correspondences of digraphs, decode one-syllable words, know final-e and long vowels, syllable and vowel relationship). For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 5, Week 2, Day 2, students learn to break a VCCV word into two syllables and then put together the words. For example, the materials state: “Write the word mistake on your wipe-off board. Point out the vowel-consonant-consonant-vowel pattern. Review that when two or more consonants come between two vowels, the students will break the word between the consonants. Break mistake by drawing a dot between the s and the t. Point out that the second syllable, take has a long vowel sound. Point to each syllable and read it; then read the whole word as you sweep under it.”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 7, Day 1, students practice clapping words and determining if the words are one or two syllables. The rule that each syllable must have a vowel sound is reviewed. “Identifying Spoken Syllables: Remind the students that they have been listening for and counting sounds in words. Tell them that today, they will listen for and count a different kind of word part that is called a syllable. Explain that some words are made up of one part, or syllable, and that a syllable has one vowel sound. Tell the students to listen as you say some words with one syllable. Then clap once as you say each of the following words: sit, skate, teach. Explain that some words are made up of two parts, or two syllables. Tell the students to listen as you say some words with two syllables. Then clap twice as you say each of the following words: sitting, skated, teacher.”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 5, Week 14, Day 1, students are introduced to digraphs ce, cy, ci and practice writing and identifying the sounds within a given set of words before reading the decodable readers. “Introduce the Spelling-Sounds ce, ci, cy /s/. Write the words can, come, and cot on your wipe-off board and have the students read the words. Underline all instances of the letter c.”

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonological awareness instruction to build toward application. For example:

  • Grade 1 students learn phonological awareness in small-group reading for emerging readers. Students learn oral blending, oral segmenting, identifying beginning sounds, identifying middle sounds, identifying endings sounds, blending onsets and rimes, identifying and producing rhymes, identifying syllables, dropping first sound, dropping initial blend, and dropping last sound.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Sets 1-4, students begin with phonological awareness oral blending activities where they practice blending and segmenting words. “Phonological Awareness: Oral Blending Have the students blend each of the words that follow after you say the phonemes, using continuous blending. Clap softly as you say each sound. Then brush your hands past each other as the students say the word. /păăt/ pat, /pŏŏt/ pot, /tăăp/ tap, /pĭĭnn/ pin, /păăd/ pad, /pěěnn/ pen.”

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. For example:

  • Through Word Study, Grade 1 students learn short vowels, long vowels with final e, complex vowels, r-controlled vowels, inflectional endings, alphabetizing, consonant l-e syllables, open and closed syllables, syllabication strategies, prefixes, suffixes, and compound words.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Sets 1-4, “Phonological Awareness: Oral Segmenting Explain to the students that in this activity they will segment words. Explain that when they segment, you will say a word, and then they will say the sounds they hear in the word. Model how to segment a word, using the word fan. Say the word normally: fan; then say it again, drawing out the sounds: /ff/ /ăă/ /nn/. Finally, say each individual sound: /f/ /ă/ /n/. Clap softly as you say each sound. Tell the students that you clapped three times as you said the sounds, so there are three sounds in the word.”


Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for the Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Throughout the Being a Reader guided lessons were taught to students that focused on print concepts. Whenever a new story was shared text features such as the title, author and illustrator were discussed. Students have the opportunity to go more in-depth in discussion about text features such as illustrations and punctuation. In Making Meaning, Unit 8 students learn a broad range of text features and comprehension strategies.

Materials include frequent, adequate lessons and tasks/questions about the organization of print concepts (e.g. recognize features of a sentence). For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group Set 3, Week 1, Day 3 of Being a Reader Guided Spelling, students answer the follow question: “What’s special about the first word she if you are not sure how to spell it?”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 3, Week 5, Day 3 Guided Spelling, students contribute to the following question: “What mark do we need at the end of a sentence?”

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g. main idea and details, sequence of events, problem and solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). For example:

  • In Making Meaning, Unit 3, Week 1, through retelling, Grade 1 students learn to sequence narrative stories. Students hear a model retelling of Curious George Goes Camping. After viewing more illustrations, students start to retell more of the story. In Week 2, students retell the sequence of events of Angelina and Henry.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 3, Week 2, students compare and contrast the adventures of the characters in Curious George Goes Camping and Angelina and Henry. “How are the camping trips of Angelina and Henry and Curious George alike? Turn to your partner. How are their camping trips different?”

Materials include frequent and adequate lessons and activities about text features (e.g. title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). For example:

  • In Making Meaning, Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, students learn how to explore the table of contents of Sleep Well. “Show page 3 of Sleep Well, where the table of contents appears. Explain that this page is called the table of contents and that a table of contents appears at the beginning of many nonfiction books.”
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 7, Week 1, Day 1, students help explore the table of contents. “Show the table of contents on page 3 of An Ocean of Animals. Remind the students that a table of contents lists the different chapters, or sections, of a book, and the page on which each chapter begins.” Students use the listed off chapters to think about what they will learn about ocean animals when they listen to the book read aloud.
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 8, the focus is using text features. In Week 1, students learn labels and diagrams. In Week 2, students learn captions and glossaries. In Week 3, students learn how to use chapter titles, “fun facts” sections, and “to learn more” sections.


Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Students have multiple opportunities over the course of the year to read emergent texts within Being a Reader: Independent Work, Shared Reading, Small Group Reading, and Making Meaning. The instructional core materials provide opportunities for students to practice automaticity and accuracy of grade level decodable words through choral reading, echo reading, sound sorts, and the sound cards. Students also have multiple opportunities to practice high-frequency words from shared reading and small group reading with the strategy focus or read, write, and reread. Independent reading is a part of every Making Meaning lesson that provides opportunity for students to practice reading independently from their book bags.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. For example:

  • In Making Meaning, students practice reading independently daily at their appropriate reading levels. “INDEPENDENT READING IN GRADE 1: During Individualized Daily Reading in Grade 1, the students spend up to 15 minutes a day reading books independently at their appropriate reading levels. An IDR section appears at the end of each lesson. IDR can follow the day’s lesson, or you can schedule it during another time of the school day.”
  • In Making Meaning, Unit 6, Week 3, Day 1, students have individualized daily reading time. Students select books from their book bags to read for 15 minutes. Students are given the purpose to making connects between the books and their own lives. The teacher confers with students do this time, and the teacher records observations of the students’ reading in the IDR Conference Notes.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 4, Day 2, students read A Cold Ride. Before reading students, discuss the following question: “What do you think might happen in this story?”

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and decodable words. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 2, Day 1, students revisit texts and echo read Up, Down, and Around. “Remind them that you will slide the pointer under the words to help them read the words smoothly and in a way that is easy to understand.” Next students chorally read Up, Down, and Around. “When the class is finished reading share some of your observations about how the students did with following the pointer and reading the words smoothly and in a way that was easy to understand during echo and choral reading.”
  • In Being a Reader, Week 3, Day 2, students practice echo reading and choral reading of the shared story to practice oral reading skills. “Chorally Read Flower Garden. Tell the students that now they will chorally read the same pages of the book they just echo read. Review that choral reading is when the class reads the same words aloud together at the same time.”
  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 28, Day 2, students read parts of a book, One Duck Stuck, in a small group. The class chorally reads the beginning of the story and then small groups of students read aloud a part of the book.

Materials support reading of texts with attention to reading strategies such as rereading, self-correction, and the use of context clues. For example:

  • In Making Meaning, Unit 4, Week 1, Day 1, students learn about self monitoring through a teacher model. Students then practice self monitoring during independent reading. “Read Independently and Self-monitor. Have the students get their book bags and begin reading quietly to themselves. After 5 minutes, signal for their attention and read the questions on the chart aloud. Pause after each question to give the students time to think. Remind them that if they do not understand what they have read, they should go back and reread.”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 8, Day 2, “Explain that it is important for readers to remember enough information to be able to understand and talk about what they have read. Tell the students that when readers discover that they do not remember enough of what they have read, they go back and reread more carefully.” The teacher then models self-correcting.

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 2, Day 1, student practice reading two high-frequency words: woman, women. The teacher shows students the word cards for the two words. Then the teacher uses the words in sentences: “The principal of our school is a woman. Some teachers are women and some are men.” The students read the words and spell the words twice. Then the students read it a third time.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 5, students are taught the following high frequency words: was, after, work, head, read, never, ever, only, give, live, walk, talk, because, children, even, picture, move, great, though, once, enough, watch, been, few, kind, find, mind.


Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

In Grade 1, during the Being a Reader, Small Group Reading portion of the program, students are introduced to spelling-sound correspondence, students read decodable words with the spelling-sound correspondence being taught and then practice applying the phonic skill to spell the word and read it within text. The students are also introduced to irregularly spelled words. They practice reading the words in isolation and within context.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g. spelling-sound correspondences of digraphs, decode one-syllable words, syllable and vowel relationship, decode two-syllable words, read words with inflectional endings) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 9, Day 1, students practice identifying sounds and rhyming words in the poem, “Kitty Caught a Caterpillar.” The teacher states, “Do you hear any words in this line that start with the same sound? What are they?”
  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 16, Day 2, the class applies the counting of syllables to the poem, “Kick a Little Stone.” “Clap on the syllables of the words as you read. Then have the students say the same line, clapping on the syllables in the words as they read. Tell the students that next you will point to each word in the line and ask how many syllables it has. You will mark a dot under each one-syllable word and circle each two-syllable word.”
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group Reading Set 5, Week 2, Day 1, students work with breaking apart a two syllable (VCCV) word. “Introduce Breaking a VCCV Word. Remind the students that they have been reading two-syllable words by first reading each syllable alone and then reading the whole word. Tell the students that today they will learn how to break words into two parts or syllables. Explain that learning how to break a word into parts will help them read long words on their own.”

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 5, Week 2, Day 2, students are introduced to the high-frequency word work. The students are shown the high-frequency word card for read (/rēd/) and read (/rĕd/). Teacher explains that in the text students will need to try the word both ways to see which way makes sense. The students will read the word both ways, spell it and read it again both ways. The word card for ‘read (/rēd/) and read (/rĕd/)’ will be added to the Review Deck of High Frequency Words. Later in the lesson, the students read Ann’s Book Club. Prior to reading the book, the students are asked to locate the high frequency word ‘read (/rēd/) and read (/rĕd/)’ in the text.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 5, Week 7, Day 2, students read Ball Games. This text contains a high-frequency word, even, that is studied in the small group time.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 27, Day 3, students sort words from the text, A Pig is Big. “Have the students chorally read the words as you point under each one. Then one word at a time, have the students say the word, clap on the syllables, and tell how many syllables are in the word.” Later in the lesson, students discuss other ways to sort the words. “What are some words in this list that you could group together? Why would you group those words together?”
  • In Being a Writer, Unit 2, Week 3, Day 1, students learn about approximate spellings by writing a shared story about a family member. “As you write, engage the students in thinking about how to spell one or two unfamiliar words by asking the following questions. Write the letters as the students suggest them.”


Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center of Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

The lessons within Being a Reader and Making Meaning are structured to provide students with application of foundational skills and provide additional support for teachers to guide students towards mastery of foundational skills. Through the small group reading portion, teachers are provided with lessons for differentiation of foundational skills. A Grade 1 teacher has access to sets 3-5 which come with assessments. As the students progress to sets 6-8, teachers have access to assessments. Materials provide formative and summative assessments the materials and placement test for teachers to know where to start students in small group reading sets.

The SIPPS Extension level is identified as developmentally appropriate for Grade 1. There are assessments in SIPPS Extension level for foundational skills such as SIPPS Assessment, which is used to group students for SIPPS. There are mastery tests and instructional self-checks. A teacher can monitor students fluency using Fluency Practice/Individualized Daily Reading.

Assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, the teacher observes students reading using an Individual Reading Observation. These notes occur every other week in sets 3-5 and once or twice during each three-day sequence of lessons in Sets 6-12. The teacher documents if the student can read high-frequency words, decodable words, and polysyllabic words. The student is assessed as they self-monitor, and students are assessed for fluency.
  • Mastery Tests for Small-group Reading Sets 1-5. A Mastery Test Assessment Note occurs once every four weeks in Small-group Reading Sets 1-5. This test assesses how well individual students are learning the spelling-sounds, phonics patterns, and high-frequency words taught in Small-group Reading Sets 1-5. For example, in Mastery Test 3 students are assessed on their knowledge of spelling-sounds: c, ck, k, b, p, l, g and high-frequency words: saw, they, was, little, put, what, do and like. There are not assessments for sets 6-8.
  • In Being a Writer, there are weekly Class Assessment Records that are used to assess the class progress in specific skills. For example, In Being a Writer, In Unit 1, in Week 2, Day 2 the Class Assessment Record includes the question: Can they spell some words conventionally? If not, do they approximate spelling using letter-sound relationships?

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. For example:

  • Grade 1 teachers are directed to use the same Small Group placement test for Kindergarten for placing students in Sets 1-5.
  • Being a Reader Assessment Resource page xi states that after students have progressed through Small Group Reading Sets 1-5, it is recommended that teachers use an assessment such as the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System, the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) or the Teachers College Reading & Writing Projects Running Records Assessment to identify students’ reading level for Small-group Reading Sets 6-12.
  • In SIPPS Extension, there is a K-3 Placement Assessment which screens letter names, phonics, and sight words. There are also mastery texts in SIPPS Extension.

Materials partially support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. For example:

  • The same types of Whole Group Assessments that were provided in Kindergarten are also provided in Grade 1. For example, in Week 18 of the Teacher’s Assessment Manual, the teacher marks either: All or most students, about half of the students or only a few students. In response to the following questions about handwriting: “Are the students using the correct stroke sequences to form the letters? Do they form letters that are appropriately sized? Do they leave spaces between the words? Are they gripping their pencils in a standard way?” Teachers are then provided with a list of suggestions at the bottom of the page to help students who are struggling.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group Reading, Set 5, Day 3, the teacher’s manual includes Teacher Notes to support teachers if the student has trouble keeping track of the sentence. It suggests that teachers might support them with a visual aid, drawing three boxes side by side on the wipe-off board and pointing to each box in succession as the students says the sentence.
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group Reading, Set 7, Day 3, the lesson for Chameleon! is focused on fluency. If students are struggling, teachers are directed to, “Support any student who struggles to read fluently by echo reading or choral reading part of Chameleon! with him or her.”
  • The Individual Reading Observation for Small-group Reading includes the following suggestions for supporting readers:
    • If the student struggles with a word for more than a few seconds, read the word for the student.
    • If the student struggles to read a particular type of word (e.g., high-frequency words, polysyllabic words, words with inflectional endings), you may want to address this during an individual conference at another time.
    • If the student incorrectly reads a word and does not self-correct, ask the student to reread the sentence.
    • If the student incorrectly reads a sentence or a passage aloud and does not recognize the error, you may want to stop the student and ask, “Does that make sense?” You may need to paraphrase what was read aloud. Encourage the student to go back and reread.
    • If the student struggles to reads fluently, you may want to address this during a Small-group Reading lesson on fluency or during an individual conference.
  • On page 187 of the Assessment Resources Book, there is a section titled Interpreting the Assessment Results that provides information on what to do if students do not pass the Mastery Test with an 80% or higher score. Teachers are directed to repeat instruction and to follow the reteaching instructions in the corresponding Mastery Test Assessment Note in the Small-group Teacher’s Manual.
  • In SIPPS Extension, if many students do not pass the mastery test, the teacher is directed to reteach the previous lessons. If only a few students are not passing the mastery test, the direction to the teacher is to provide extra practice for those students.


Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.

The materials provide high quality lessons in foundational skills throughout the school year. This is done through Being a Reader, and Making Meaning. The materials provide teachers with opportunities for differentiation through small group reading sets. The Being a Reader Teacher’s Manual also provides ideas for supporting ELL students, ideas to support students who were struggling with concepts and at times ideas for some extension activities that went along with the Shared Read Alouds. Skills are also repeated numerous times throughout the school year to help students build mastery and independence in foundational skills.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Sets 1-5, phonological awareness, spelling-sounds, high-frequency words, guided spelling, and reading decodable text are included. (Foundational Skills Instruction Scope and Sequence for Small-group Reading Sets 1-5). For example, in Set 5 foundational skills instruction includes the following: dropping the first sound, dropping initial consonant blend, dropping last sound, high-frequency words (after, work, head, read, never, ever, only, give, live, walk, talk, because, children, even, picture, move, great, though, once, enough, watch, been, few, kind, find, mind), guided spelling of cvc words that contain the spelling-sounds taught and the reading of controlled-vocabulary texts.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. For example:

  • Each lesson has a Teacher Note column/sidebar that provides guidance for teachers to help scaffold the lessons for the students. For example, in Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 4, Week 7, Day 2, the teacher is provided with additional guidance for decoding support. “Decoding Support- Support struggling students by covering the ending and having the students read the base word alone. Then uncover the ending and have them read the entire word. Another option is to write just the base word, have the students read that, add the ending, and have the students read the inflected word.”
  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 6, Day 1, while playing a game in pairs the teacher is instructed to, “Observe partners as they play. Support any students who struggle by having them say and clap on the syllables in their names with you.”
  • In Being a Reader, Shared Reading, Week 8, Day 3, teachers are provided with extension ideas for the story The Busy Little Squirrel. These ideas include performing a play of The Busy Little Squirrel and Creating a Class Book for the story. Teacher instructions are provided for each activity.

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. For example:

  • In Being a Reader, Small-group Reading Sets 1-5, students have the opportunity to continue to practice skills taught in the previous set.
    • In Set 3, students are taught spelling-sounds wh /wh/, ng /ng/, -ing /ing/, _ed /t/, /d/, /ed/, qu /khw/, sn /sn/, st /st/, fl /fl/, fr /fr/, _s /s/ /z/, gr /gr/, dr /dr/, pl /pl/, sm /sm/, sp /sp/, cl /kl/, sk /sk/, sl /sl/. In Set 4 the students participate in guide spelling of words that contain these spelling-sounds (slide, plume, smiled, hiked, , stones, shaking, shining, plan, hiding, formed)
  • In Being a Reader, Small-group Reading Sets 1-5, students have the opportunity to continue to practice skills taught in the previous set.
    • In Set 4, students are taught spelling-sounds long a, i, e, o, u with v_e, ee and ea, r-controlled vowels -er, -ir, -ur, ar, or . In Set 5 the students participate in guide spelling of words that contain these spelling-sounds (safe, read, team, place, fort, after, sport, forget, barnyard, stir)
  • In Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 3, Week 2 Day 1, the inflectional Ending -ed /t/ /d/ /əd/ is introduced. “Tell the students that today they will learn the word ending e-d. Explain that when e-d is added to an action word, it shows that the action happened in the past. Write the following pairs of words on your wipe-off board: drop/dropped, tag/tagged, lift/lifted.” The teachers then goes over with students the different sounds -ed can make at the end of a word. This skills is repeated again and taken a step further in Being a Reader, Small Group, Set 5 Week 10, when students work on changing __y to i with -ed. Students practice changing the y to i and adding ed, for the following words: dry, spy, tally, try, carry.


Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the expectations of the Gateway 2. Materials partially meet the criteria that texts are organized to support students' building knowledge of different topics, and there is support for students to engage with and grow their academic vocabulary over the course of the school year. Materials partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts and partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. Materials meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year. Materials provide procedures and support for daily independent reading, primarily found in the Making Meaning component.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students' knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

Within the units of Making Meaning the instructional materials are organized around literary and informational texts and the teaching of reading comprehension strategies. Texts are not consistently organized by topic and students have limited opportunities to build knowledge and vocabulary about topics consistently. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, the title of the unit is The Reading Community: Fiction and Narrative Nonfiction. Students listen to Quick as a Cricket by Audrey Wood, When I was Little: A Four-Year-Old’s Memoir of Her Youth by Jamie Lee Curtis, People in My Neighborhood and Places in My Neighborhood by Shelly Lyons, and It’s Mine! by Leo Lionni. Students focus on the skills making text text-to-self connections, answering questions to understand key details in a story and in nonfiction texts, and discussing the story’s message. The texts with which students engage are not organized with instruction to build knowledge; to provide this opportunity, the teacher will have to create other instructional opportunities and/or supplement with other texts.
  • In Unit 4, the title of the unit is Visualizing: Poetry and Fiction. Students listen to “School Bus” and “Sliding Board” from Did You See What I Saw? Poems about School by Kay Winters, “The Balloon Man” by Dorothy Aldis, In the Tall, Tall Grass by Denise Fleming, Sheep Out to Eat by Nancy Shaw, and The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats. Students focus on the skills of visualizing to make sense of text, informally use schema and make inferences as they visualize.
  • In Unit 6, the title of the unit is Making Connections: Expository Nonfiction. Students listen to Using Your Senses by Rebecca Rissman, Sleep Well: Why You Need to Rest by Kathy Feeney, “How to Catch Your ZZZs” from KidsHealth.org, and Dinosaur Babies by Lucille Recht Penner. Students focus on the skills of exploring the difference between fiction and nonfiction, use schema to help understand nonfiction, make text-to-self connections, identify what they learn from a nonfiction book, and retell key details from the book.
  • In Unit 7, the title of the unit is Wondering: Expository Nonfiction. Students listen to An Ocean of Animals by Janine Scott, Big Blue Whale by Nicola Davies, Chameleons Are Cool by Martin Jenkins, and Birds: Winged and Feathered Animals by Suzanne Slade. Students focus on the skills of using wondering to help them understand a nonfiction book, identify what they learn from the book, and explore text features of expository nonfiction. Students may glean some knowledge about animals through this unit, as the texts are tangentially related by the global topic of “animals”; however, the instructional focus is not necessarily about understanding connections among the specifics to build knowledge on a topic.
  • In Unit 8, the title of the unit is Using Text Features: Expository Nonfiction. Students listen to Throw Your Tooth on the Roof by Selby B. Beeler, Velociraptor by Kate Riggs, A Day in the Life of a Garbage Collector by Nate LeBoutiller, and An Elephant Grows Up by Anastasia Suen. Students focus on the skills of using wondering to help understand an expository nonfiction book, visualize to make sense of a book, identify what they learn from a book, and use text features to better understand information in the book. Students engaging with these texts will not have the opportunity to build knowledge on a topic during this unit without supplemental texts provided beyond the core work.

In Being a Writer, the units are focused on the writing process and writing genres. Some texts are organized around a topic. In the Writing Community, students hear texts about growing up. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Week 3, students hear about the things Little Critter can do by himself in All by Myself.
  • In Week 4, students hear about the things Sebastian the turtle wants to be when he grows up in When I Grow Up.
  • In Week 5, students hear about a boy’s perception of turning six-years-old in When I Was Five.

Though these texts are somewhat connected, they do not work together to build knowledge of a topic.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

The materials do not contain a set of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics. The majority of questions asked are ones that require the student to think critically about the text and how it applies to their life and/or surroundings. The questions do not become more complex as the year goes on. However, within a short unit (2-3 days worth of lessons) there was minimal evidence to show an expansion of knowledge. The concepts that are covered are big picture concepts such as inferencing/wondering, key ideas, but the curriculum lacks more detailed concepts such as looking at the craft, structure, or the why behind the text. The majority of the questions ask students about the key ideas and details. While there are some questions about analyzing craft, language, or structure, these are not frequent. The majority of the questions remain the same complexity throughout the year.

In Unit 2, Week 2, Making Meaning, the teacher reads aloud McDuff and the Baby and stops at certain points to ask, “What happens when the baby arrives?” and “What happens at the end of the story?” At the end of day 2, the teacher asks, “When have you felt like McDuff?” While the unit focuses on comprehension/understanding, there was no focus on craft, structure, or vocabulary minus the first day where the suggested vocabulary list is printed.

In Unit 6, Week 2, Making Meaning, After reading the book Sleep Well, the teacher prompts students to think, pair, share with the question, “What did you learn from walking and talking in your sleep?” Shortly after the teacher prompts, “When have you not gotten enough sleep? How did it feel?” At the end of the week, the questions remain standard and basic with the teacher asking questions about the text How to Catch Your ZZZ’s by inquiring, “What does the article tell us to do to sleep at night?”

In Unit 8, Week 3, Making Meaning, the teacher introduces A Day in the Life of a Garbage Collector. After the story the teacher asks, “What did you learn about how Rick starts his day?” Questions are prompted in between with the last question, “What are some things you are still wondering about garbage collectors?” The skill for this unit is using text features to understand non-fiction text. The week 3 unit is wondering which is not an identifiable non-fiction text feature.

The majority of the questions in all three components are about key ideas and details. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Making Meaning, for example, students are asked what they think Leo Lionni is trying to tell them in the fable, It’s Mine, in Unit 1, Week 4, Day 2.
  • In Unit 2, Week, Day 2, students are asked what problem McDuff has after hearing McDuff and the Baby.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, Day 1, students are asked what they have learned about bumblebee queens after listening to The Bumblebee Queen.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 3, students are asked what they learned about how people see and hear after listening to Using Your Senses.

These types of questions occur in the Being a Reader component as well. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, after hearing Farmer Duck, students are asked what the animals are doing to help one another.
  • In Week 4, Day 1, students are asked "What is the poem about?" after hearing Hippopotamus Stew. In Being a Writer, the majority of questions are also about key ideas and details.

There are few questions about craft and structure. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 2 of Making Meaning, when students are asked what they picture in the tall, tall grass when listening to the poem "In The Tall, Tall Grass."
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Making Meaning, students are asked how nonfiction books are different from fiction books, but students do not necessarily need specific texts to answer this type of question; therefore, students are not asked to analyze the structure.

Other questions about this are found in Being a Writer, but are similar in nature and do not require students to analyze the craft or structure. There are no questions asking students who is telling the story at various points in a text except in Unit 6, Week 2, Day 4 of Being a Writer.

Integration of knowledge occurs in only a few Writing about Reading sections of Making Meaning:

  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 3 students are asked what information from an article on Kidshealth.org is similar to the text, Sleep Well: Why You need to Rest.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 3, students are asked to write about how An Ocean of Animals and Big Blue Whales are similar and different.

Questions about analyzing words and phrases are focus on visualizing. For example, in Making Making, Unit 4, Week 1, Day 3, students are asked how they pictured the balloon man in their mind.

In The Being a Reader section, questions about vocabulary and word choice focus on the meaning of a word instead of how and why an author uses a word or how to define an unknown word using the text:

  • In Week 11 students listen to the poem “Sliding Board” and learn about the word, gliding, through a game.
  • In Week 28, students listen to the book A Day in the Life of a Garbage Collector and discuss how some words have different meanings such as the word, contents.


Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

In the Grade 1 materials, text-dependent questions are included in the materials; however, there is inconsistency with the questions requiring students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Within Making Meaning students often have to retell what they heard; however, it is inconsistent with the amount of analysis required of first grade students in this component. In Being a Reader & Being a Writer, there are less text-dependent questions that help integrate the knowledge that students have learned. Majority of questions in these components are retell and opinions.

In almost every lesson in Making Meaning, there are retell questions that do not require analysis of the text or integration of ideas:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, students read Matthew and Tilly and are first asked retell questions such as what happened to Matthew and Tilly and what happens at the end of the story.
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, when reading Chrysanthemum, students on the first day are asked, “What has happened to Chrysanthemum?”, “What happens that makes Chrysanthemum feel happy about her name again?” and “What happened at the musical?”.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, students hear Big Blue Whale and are asked, “How do blue whales take care of their babies?”.
  • In Unit 6, Week 1, students listen to the story Using Your Senses and are asked what they learned about how people see and touch, which is not requiring an integration of ideas.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, students read Big Blue Whale, and are asked what does a blue whale do to eat whole swarms of krill which does not require analysis. In Unit 8, Week 2, students listen to Velociraptor and are asked, “How did velociraptors catch their prey”? Which does not require analysis.

In some lessons, however, it does require the students to integrate the ideas in order to analyze the text. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, after a series of questions, on the second day, students are asked, “What do you think Matthew and Tilly learn about friendship in the story?”
  • In Unit 2, Week 3, when on the second day of Chrysanthemum, the students are asked, “What do you think Chrysanthemum learns in this story?”

Very few examples are found of integrating ideas across texts. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 3, when students are asked how an article on sleep is related to the text called Sleep Well: Why You Need to Rest.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 3, students are asked to write about how An Ocean of Animals and Big Blue Whales are similar and different.

In Being a Writer, much of the questioning is recall or opinions about the story. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 1, students hear the story Things I Like and are asked, “What does the chimpanzee in the story like to do?” which does not require analyze or an integration of ideas.
  • In Unit 1, Week 2, after hearing Farmer Duck, students are first asked, “What did you like about this story?” They are then asked the following recall question: “What are the animals doing to help one another?”

In Being a Reader, most of the questions provided are recall questions. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Week 4, students participate in the shared reading of the poem “Hippopotamus Stew” and are only asked “What is this poem about?” on Day 1 and “What do you remember about this poem” on Day 2 & Day 3.
  • In Week 28, students participate in the shared reading of One Duck Story: A Mucky Ducky Counting Book. On Day 1 students are asked, “What happens in this story,” and on day 2 and 3, students are asked, “What do you remember about this book?”


Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

The Grade 1 materials lack culminating tasks in which students show mastery of multiple standards and skills. There are opportunities though such as “Writing about Reading” activities, journal entries, and writing pieces for students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic or a skill. These tasks provide students an opportunity to demonstrate comprehension and knowledge within a lesson and questions asked of students during the read aloud help the students to complete most of these tasks. However, the tasks that are required could be equivalent to an informal check for understanding or small assignment and no supporting materials are included in terms of exemplars, only a checklist is provided for assessment/feedback purposes. Writing opportunities are available in the Writing About Reading portion of Making Meaning at different points throughout the curriculum, but they are option and not required. According to the Publisher, “In both Making Meaning and Being a Writer, Writing About Reading activities provide multiple opportunities to analyze a single text in response to a sequence of questions presented by the teacher, and then write a response to the literature using text evidence to support opinions or conclusions.”

In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, Making Meaning, the teacher introduces the book Matthew and Tilly through a read aloud. The teacher engages students in a whole group discussion by asking, “What happens in this story? Why do Matthew and Tilly stop playing together in the middle of the story? What happens at the end of the story?” On day 2, students are invited to make personal questions after re-reading the story prompted by, “How does what happened to Matthew and Tilly remind you of your own life?” Students can also write about what they remembered from the book and how it relates to their own lives. The curriculum then advises the teacher to have students share out and then at the end the teacher is to model her ow think aloud and writing about connections from Matthew and Tilly.

Students have some opportunities throughout the modules to respond to literature and use the skills they have learned; however, these tasks usually are about a single text or skill and not the culmination of learning involving multiple standards. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 1, Week 2, Being a Writer: Students hear the story Farmer Duck and then write their opinion about the story and illustrate a part of the story. On the second day of this lesson, the students write and illustrate stories about helping, but this is not text based or connected to earlier lessons since students are writing personal stories about helping.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, Day 2, Making Meaning: Students listen to Curious George Goes Camping and after discussing the story, students write about their favorite part of the story in the “Writing about Reading” activity.
  • In Unit 4, Weeks 3 - 4, Being a Writer: Students have been writing personal narratives and students spend two weeks, picking one narrative and taking it through the writing process.
  • In Unit 4, Week 4, Day 2, Making Meaning: After listening to The Snowy Day, students draw what they pictured the snowy day to look like, but this activity is done without a discussion about what they visualized.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, Being a Writer: Students listen to the story Bee and discuss how the story is different from the story Chrysanthemum, but then the activity is to freely write in their notebook a topic of their choosing.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 1, Making Meaning: Students listen to the teacher read aloud part of An Extraordinary Egg. The teacher stops at targeted points to ask, “What are you wondering? Turn to your partner.” On day 2, students participate in re-telling parts of An Extraordinary Egg and listen to as the teacher reads aloud the last part of the book. The teacher facilitates a discussion, “Why do you think the alligator saves Jessica? Why do you think the frogs call the alligator a chicken?” Writing About Reading is an optional activity on day 3 where students write about their favorite part. While this week does contain many literacy components, the rigor is lacking in terms of expectations. No culminating tasks were evident.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, Being a Writer, Students hear the story I Love School and as a follow up to the previous week’s lesson on opinion writing and throughout the read aloud, discuss the children’s opinions of school in the story. Students then independently write about the most fun activity they have done this year, which gives students the opportunity to write, reflect, and share, but does not specify skills nor gives students the ability to apply what they are learning.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, Day 1, The teacher introduces the book Dinosaur Babies through a read aloud. The teacher engages whole group discussion, “What other animals do you know of that come from eggs? Turn to your partner.” The teacher also opens up the conversation, “What is something you know about dinosaurs that isn’t in the book so far? Where did you learn that?” Day 2, students listen to the rest of Dinosaur Babies and orally make connections other baby animals. As part of independent work for the day, students complete a journal entry about a book they are reading and making a connection to their own life, another book they have read, or information they already know.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, Day 1, Being a Writer: After hearing Reading Makes you Feel Good, students write a letter to the author of the story, giving an opinion about the book. They have been writing short opinion pieces, prior to this lesson.


Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Tier 2 vocabulary words and concept words are highlighted for each Read Aloud lesson. Students are provided with explicit vocabulary instruction. Words are first introduced in context. Then students are provided a student-friendly definition of the word and examples of the way it is used. Students engage actively with the word in meaningful ways when they first encounter it, such as by applying it to their own experiences. Students practice using the word through engaging activities. Students are provided with multiple exposures to the word over an extended period of time. Teachers teach strategies that students can use to learn words independently, such as recognizing synonyms, antonyms, and words with multiple meanings, and using context to determine word meanings.

In Grade 1, students are provided with a systematic approach to vocabulary. In the Making Meaning component, most lessons within each unit contain a list of "suggested vocabulary" as well as vocabulary specifically for English language learners. In addition, there are 30 weeks of explicit vocabulary instruction found in the Vocabulary Teaching Guide that include words found in or related to the read-aloud texts. During the three days of vocabulary instruction, students are reintroduced to words learned in the read aloud and new words that are essential for understanding the texts. There are four words per week, and the students use these words in a variety of ways, making real-life connections and discussing them with partners and as a whole class. Within this vocabulary instruction there is guidance for ongoing review for students to review and practice words that have been previously learned. These explicit vocabulary lessons are taught one week after students hear the read aloud. The words are then reviewed in future vocabulary lessons for multiple exposures.

During the read aloud in Making Meaning, suggested vocabulary words are given. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, the suggested vocabulary words for Matthew and Tilly are sidewalk games, rescued, crabbiness, and picky. The direction is for teachers to stop, quickly explain the word using a provided kid-friendly definition, reread the sentence, and then continue reading the story.
  • In Unit 5, Week 1, the suggested vocabulary words for An Extraordinary Egg are pebble, island, wonder, were never impressed, mound, triumphantly, astonished, amazement, and commotion. Student-friendly definitions are given for each of these words in the Vocabulary Teaching Guide.

The Vocabulary Teaching Guide provides explicit instruction one week after students hear the read aloud. The students are already exposed to these words from the "suggested vocabulary" list in the Making Meaning component as students are listening to the read alouds. In the Vocabulary Teaching Guide, students are exposed to a wide range of activities and word-learning strategies:

  • In Week 5, students review the word, stomp, and talk about the different meanings of the word.
  • In Week 16, the words taught are hero, track, persevere, and respect. During this week a vocabulary assessment is given.
  • In Week 20, and the words for review are astonished, cooperate, dart, explain, and mutter. To review and practice, students participate in the activity "Tell me a Story" where students are told the first part of a story that includes a review vocabulary word, and then students need to create the end of the story with a review word. An all-inclusive list of the words and their student-friendly definitions are found at the back of the Vocabulary Teaching Guide.
  • In Week 25, students learn the word migrate. The teacher teaches the students about context clues and then has the students look at the sentence in the read aloud to determine the meaning of the word. Students also review words that have been previously taught and practice them as part of the vocabulary Instruction.

Concept words are taught in addition to words found in the read aloud. Concept words are words that represent a concept or idea that is important to the story. Sometimes, these concept words are included in order to introduce or review an important word-learning strategy such as learning antonyms.

Teacher guidance and support includes both print and digital components, including interactive whiteboard activities, assessment forms, reproducible word cards, family letters and other reproducibles, and professional development media.

Indicator 2f

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan to support students’ increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students’ writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

The Grade 1 program includes 28 weeks of instruction within eight units in Being a Writer. The lessons focus on grammar and usage and are reinforced through the Skill Practice Teaching Guide. Students are formally taught to proofread and edit for spelling and conventions. Student writing is assessed using observations (conferences) and writing samples. Students write a variety of genres including fiction, nonfiction, poetry, opinion writing, and expository writing in the Making Meaning module.

In the Being a Writer component, in addition to writing lessons, there is a Skill Practice Teaching Guide included to assist teachers in teaching weekly grammar and conventions skills. The new writing skill taught in first grade is how to analyze writing for a specific purpose. The remaining skills are skills that build off of kindergarten skills. The units include free-writing time as well as focused process writing. For example, students are asked to write about an imaginary class pet in Unit 3, Week 2, Day 3. Then, students are given time to write independently about a topic of their choice while the teacher confers with individual students. In addition, there are several open days in the program that allow for similar free-writes such as in Unit 5, Week 1, Day 4, when students can choose to continue working on an on-demand writing topic or a topic of their choice.

Each Unit in Being a Writer spans the course of several days:

  • In Unit 1, Week 5, students listen to When I Was Five. On the first day, in a guided writing session, students practice writing “My friend and I like to...” sentences. On Day 2, the teacher models writing and illustrating a "My Friend" story, and then students independently write their own. On Day 3, students share their story, and on Day 4, students free write.
  • In Unit 2, Week 5, students listen to Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale and write a shared story on the first day. On the second day, students write about things that make them sad or mad, and on Day 3, students add speech bubbles to their shared story after exploring them in the read aloud. On Day 4, students share their stories.
  • In Unit 3, Week 2, students contribute to a shared story and write an independent story about a fantasy field trip, which does not incorporate the use of a text. In Unit 4, Week 3, students listen to Down the Road and begin writing an autobiography with a beginning, middle, and end. Students revise on Day 2 and 3 and share on Day 4.
  • In Unit 5, Week 3, students listen to Fire Trucks and free write on Day One on a topic of their choosing. In that week’s lessons, students focus on proofreading for punctuation and spelling, as well as revising to add more details.
  • In Unit 6, Week 3, students listen to the poem “Sleeping Bag,” participate in a shared writing of a poem about a stapler, and then try writing their own poem independently. The same occurs on Day 2 and on Day 3, students publish a poem for the class book.
  • In Unit 7, Week 2, students listen to Reading Makes you Feel Good, and students learn how to write an opinion piece and practice on their own after watching the teacher model the process. Throughout the Being a Writer component, some of the writing tasks are connected to texts and topics, while others can be completed independently of the texts.

In Making Meaning, students use text to write expository pieces. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 6, Week 1, Day 2, students listen to Using Your Senses and are asked to write about their favorite sense, telling about a time when they used this sense.
  • In Unit 7, Week 3, Day 2, students write some ways they think the books An Ocean of Animals and Big Blue Whale are alike and different.


Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

The majority of the shared research and writing projects in Grade 1 are shared writing projects. They also provide opportunities for short, skill-building projects throughout the year.

In the document "CCC Grade 1 CCSS Correlations," the standards W.1.7 and W.1. 8 are listed as being in the following lessons of Being a Writer:

  • In Unit 5, Week 1, Day 4, students take an observation walk around the school. As a class, they discuss facts about the place they visited. In pairs, students agree upon and write four facts about the place they visited.
  • In Unit 7, Week 1, students have an optional Open Day activity where they write a shared poem that expresses an opinion.
  • In Unit 5, Week 2, Day 1 and 2, students generate a list of interview questions as a class and interview a partner to garner research. On Day 2, students write about their partner, which delves into focused, shared research.

There are numerous opportunities within the units for students to share information and participate in shared writings:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 2, after listening to I Love Animals, students write a shared story about an animal they love.
  • In Week 2, Day 1, after listening to Chinatown, students generate a list of special places and then write a shared story about a special place before writing one independently on Day 2.
  • In Unit 3, Week 1, students write a shared story about a fun activity before writing their own story independently.
  • In Unit 6, Week 2, Day 1, students participate in a shared poem in the format of "Ears Hear," adding objects/animals and the sounds that they make.


Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Center for Collaborative Classroom Grade 1 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The Making Meaning component of the program provides procedures and supports for independent reading throughout the program. Independent Daily Reading (IDR) is included in all lessons, and gives the students opportunities to practice the reading skills they have learned, build stamina, and foster a love of reading. By the end of first grade, students should be reading 20 minutes. Reading conferences with the teacher help to hold the students accountable for their reading, as well as give the teacher an opportunity to assess the student’s individual reading progress. There is a proposed schedule for independent reading. There is a tracking system to track independent reading as well. A Family Letter is included at the end of each unit to highlight the skills that have been taught and to give information on how families can support each child’s reading life at home.

In Grade 1, Independent Daily Reading begins in Unit 1, Week, 2. Students spend up to 15 minutes a day reading books on their own independent reading level. In Unit 1, students learn the procedure for IDR, learn different ways to read a book, and read teacher selected texts. In Unit 2, students begin selecting books on their reading levels. Conferring begins informally in Unit 2, with the teacher and student discussing their reading lives. Formal conferring and discussions about the books they are reading begins in Unit 3, with checklists (IDR Conference Notes) and supports (Resource Sheet for IDR Conferences) for the teacher to monitor student progress. In Unit 4, students learn strategies for monitoring their comprehension and begin writing in their Reading Journals.

The Family Letter at the end of each unit describes the skills that the students have been working on during the unit and includes what the families can do to help support their child’s growth. For example, in Unit 1, the suggestions in the Family Letter include making weekly trips to the local library to borrow books, setting aside a time to read together each day, discussing how the books they are reading remind them of their own lives or of other books, and modeling good listening by paying attention to their child when they discuss the books they are reading.

Specific lessons are planned each day to help students focus their independent reading. Examples include but are not limited to the following:

  • In Unit 2, Week 1, Day 1, book bags are introduced, and students begin self-selecting books to read each day.
  • In Unit 4, Week 2, Day 2, students read independently for up to 15 minutes and self monitor as they read.
  • In Unit 8, Week 3, Day 1, students read independently for 15 - 20 minutes and share something that they wondered while reading.

The Small Group reading strand of Being a Reader provides targeted, differentiated-reading instruction that is appropriate for readers at their individual reading levels. Students are grouped with others at a similar stage of development and then matched with texts at the appropriate level. The Small Group Reading Sets allow students to move at their own pace in their reading development.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 05/15/2019

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Jellies: The Life of Jellyfish 978-0-7613-1485-1 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
CCC Collaborative Literacy Being a Writer Second Edition Digital Teacher's Manual Set 978-1-61003-398-5 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2014
Ann?s Book Club 978-1-61003-651-1 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Scout?s Puppies 978-1-61003-659-7 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
CCC Collaborative Literacy Making Meaning Third Edition Student Response Book 978-1-61003-707-5 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2015
CCC Collaborative Literacy Making Meaning Digital Teacher's Manual Set 978-1-61003-773-0 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2015
Being a Reader Assessment Resource Book 978-1-61003-826-3 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
CCC Collaborative Literacy Being a Reader Digital Teacher's Manual Set 978-1-61003-841-6 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2016
CCC Collaborative Literacy Digital Assessment Resource Book 978-1-68246-251-5 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2016
Kipper?s A to Z 978-1-68246-313-0 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Learning Letter Names (Letter Cards) 978-1-68246-315-4 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Learning Letter Names (Capital and Lowercase Letter Cards) 978-1-68246-316-1 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Learning Letter Names (Letter Cards) 978-1-68246-317-8 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Learning Letter Names (Capital and Lowercase Letter Cards) 978-1-68246-318-5 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Being a Reader: Learning Letter Names Teacher?s Manual 978-1-68246-319-2 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Being a Reader Small-group Teacher's Manual Set 7A 978-1-68246-339-0 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Being a Reader Small-group Teacher's Manual Set 8A 978-1-68246-340-6 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017
Being a Reader Small-group Teacher's Manual Set 6A 978-1-68246-341-3 Center for the Collaborative Classroom 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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