Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations for Alignment to NGSS, Gateways 1 and 2. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. While the learning sequences incorporate the three dimensions in a few lessons, the materials do not consistently integrate them into three-dimensional learning opportunities for students. Only a few opportunities for student sensemaking occur with the three dimensions; student sensemaking is consistently two-dimensional with SEPs and DCIs. The summative assessments are not consistently three dimensional and do not consistently measure the three dimensions for the topic-level objectives (PEs). The lesson level objectives are also not three-dimensional. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations. Phenomena are not present and therefore are not able to be connected to DCIs, presented to students as directly as possible, nor drive learning and use of the three dimensions within or across lessons. Two problems are present at the topic-level that elicit but do not leverage student prior knowledge. One of those two problems does connect to grade-level DCIs. Neither problem drives learning and use of the three dimensions within or across lessons.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Designed for NGSS

0
14
24
28
4
24-28
Meets Expectations
15-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-14
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Coherence and Scope

0
16
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
17-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-16
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
30
50
59
N/A
50-59
Meets Expectations
31-49
Partially Meets Expectations
0-30
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Designed for NGSS

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations for Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS. Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations.

Criterion 1a - 1c

Materials are designed for three-dimensional learning and assessment.
2/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations for Criterion 1a-1c: Three-Dimensional Learning. The materials do not consistently include integration of the three dimensions in at least one learning opportunity per learning sequence. However, nearly all learning sequences are meaningfully designed for student opportunity to engage in sensemaking with the SEPs and DCIs, but only few learning sequences include the CCCs in sensemaking opportunities with the other dimensions. The materials do not provide three-dimensional learning objectives at the lesson level and the respective assessments are not consistently three dimensional. The materials provide three-dimensional objectives (PEs) at the topic level, but summative tasks do not measure student achievement of all learning objectives (PEs) or their associated elements, and few summative assessment tasks are three dimensional in design.

Indicator 1a

Materials are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) into student learning.
0/0

Indicator 1a.i

Materials consistently integrate the three dimensions in student learning opportunities.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations that they are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEPs), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs) into student learning opportunities. Kindergarten materials are organized into four segments, with one to two topics per segment and two to four learning sequences or lessons per topic, totaling 16 lessons. Each lesson consists of four sections: Engage, Explore, Explain and Elaborate, and Evaluate. Of the 16 lessons or learning sequences, few integrate all three dimensions within a single learning opportunity in the lesson. When present, the integrated opportunities are typically found in the Explain and Elaborate section. A few lessons include the three dimensions across the learning sequence but did not integrate them within a learning opportunity. The remainder of the lessons were two-dimensional, consistently incorporating SEPs with DCIs.

Examples where the materials do not incorporate all three dimensions into a learning sequence:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Lesson 1: The Sun, students describe the sun and investigate how sunlight warms earth’s surface. Students observe what happens to an ice cube when it is placed in the sun compared to when it is placed in the shade. Students record observations and compare the data about the rate of melting ice cubes in the sunlight and in the shade (SEP-DATA-P1). Students read text to find out more information about how the sun provides light and heat (DCI-PS3.B-P1). Finally, students are shown parts of a doghouse and asked to draw how the parts can be put together to make the doghouse and describe what each part would do (e.g., protect what is inside from the heat or cold). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of the sun.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 1: Different Kinds of Weather, students observe and investigate different kinds of weather. Students use shaving cream and food coloring to model the relationship between condensation and rain (SEP-MOD-P3). Then they learn about the different kinds of weather (DCI-ESS2.D-P1) from pictures and text (SEP-INFO-P1). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of different kinds of weather.

Examples where the materials incorporate all three dimensions into a learning sequence but do not integrate within a learning opportunity:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Needs of Plants, students learn what plants need to survive. In the Explore section, students plan and carry out an investigation with a carnation (SEP-INV-P2) to investigate how a plant absorbs water and how the water moves through the plant. They draw and record their observations over three days (SEP-DATA-P1), then describe how water moves in a plant. In the Explain and Elaborate section, students read text and look at pictures to learn how plants need sun, air, and water (DCI-LS1.C-P1, DCI-LS2.A-P1). The teacher materials then include guidance to have students explore patterns in terms of the things all plants need (CCC-PAT-P1). While all three dimensions were present in this lesson, they were not integrated within a learning opportunity.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 3: Needs of People, students learn what people need to survive. In the Explore section, students match clothing with scenes based on personal experiences. They tell a partner about types of clothing for different seasons and how clothing gives you something you need (DCI-LS1.C-P1, DCI-LS1.A-P1). The teacher materials suggest ways to make connections to clothing in sports and to patterns in the clothes people wear in different weather and seasons. Then, in the Explain and Elaborate section, students read text and watch a video to determine that humans are animals and therefore need the same things to survive as other animals (SEP-INFO-P1). Students then look for patterns in the behavior of how humans and other animals meet their needs (CCC-PAT-P1). While all three dimensions were present in this lesson, they were not integrated within a learning opportunity.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 2: Plants and Animals Change the Environment, Explore, students learn that plants and animals change their environment. Students use objects to represent acorns and seeds and use sand to model ways that squirrels change the land (SEP-MOD-P3, DCI-ESS2.E-P1). Students describe what happens to the sand and explain how burying nuts is evidence that a squirrel changes its environment (SEP-CEDS-P1). In the Explain and Elaborate section, students explore the concept of systems as they discover how plants and animals live and work together to change the environment (CCC-SYS-P2). While all three dimensions were present in this lesson, they were not integrated within a learning opportunity.

Examples where the materials integrate all three dimensions into a learning opportunity within a learning sequence:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 2: Change in Movement, Explain and Elaborate, students read and discuss text (SEP-INFO-P1) about the different ways objects move and the speed at which objects move (DCI-PS2.A-P2). Students complete a digital activity and view a video about pushes and pulls. Students discuss that a push or a pull causes the change in motion and how fast or slowly the object moves is the effect (CCC-CE-P2).

Indicator 1a.ii

Materials consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that they consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions. In nearly all of the 16 lessons, SEPs meaningfully support student sensemaking with a DCI. In three lessons, the materials contain three-dimensional sensemaking where both a CCC and a SEP are used to help students make sense with the DCI.

Examples of learning sequence where SEPs or CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 2: Needs of Animals, students make sense of the concept that all animals need similar things to live. Students explore the needs of koi and apply this to all fish to make sense of what all animals need to live (DCI-LS1.C-P1). In the Interactivity, students look at a picture and label where a prairie dog would find food, water, air, and shelter. They also look at a picture of a raccoon in a tree and identify what need is being met (SEP-INFO-P3). Teachers are asked to point out to students that koi fish need food, water, and air to live. Then students are asked if they think other fish need the same thing. There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of animal needs.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 3: People Change the Environment, students make sense of ways people can change the environment. Students create a model to show how the land can be changed taking into account that people change the land where they live (SEP-MOD-P3, DCI-ESS3.A-P1). Students make a model of a trail to show how people can make changes to the environment. There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of changes people make to their environment.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Lesson 2: Sunlight and Earth’s Surface, students explore how the sun heats the earth by testing how different objects heat up in sunlight. Students make initial observations of objects placed in sunlight then observe them again after one and two hours, recording their observations (SEP-INV-P2). Students use the results from their investigation to conclude that the sun warms all the objects (DCI-PS3.B-P1). There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of how the sun heats the earth.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 3: Seasons, students think about seasons then identify the type of weather that happens in different times of the year (DCI-ESS2.D-P1). Students draw and describe a season before reading about seasons and looking at pictures of a tree during each season (SEP-INFO-P1). Students choose a season, draw a scene that shows the leaves on the tree during the selected season, and tell a partner about the weather of that season. The information students obtain through text and pictures help students make sense of weather that occurs during each season (SEP-INFO-E4, DCI-ESS2.D-P1). There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of the different seasons.

Examples of learning sequence where SEPs and CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 1: Where Plants and Animals Live, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of the different places where plants and animals live. Students make a model of plants and animals that live near them and add the details as accurately as possible to include the environment where the animal lives (DCI-LS4.D-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Students read about and discuss the needs of plants and animals in terms of how the places that animals and plants live help them survive. After the reading, students are asked what happens when a tree falls in the forest and answer the question, "Do you think different animals might use the tree as shelter. Why or why not?" Discussing what would happen to the animals that live in the tree (CCC-CE-P2) helps students understand that shelter is needed by living things and that a fallen tree can be a shelter for other types of living things.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 1: Pushes and Pulls, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of the ways objects move. Students consider what happens when a ball is kicked (pushed) or when a suitcase is being towed behind (pulled) (DCI-PS2.A-P2, CCC-CE-P2). Students act out the concepts of push and pull in the classroom as they choose objects, such as a chair, to demonstrate pushes and pulls (DCI-PS2.A-P2). The teacher reads aloud as students investigate pushing and pulling objects in the classroom. Students then use an arrow to label a photograph push or pull. The students further their understanding by designing and making a sail that would catch more wind (DCI-ETS1.C-P1). Students explain after reading the text what push and pull means and the directions objects can move (SEP-INFO-P3). Students compare sails to make sense of how the shape of one sail might be the cause of one vehicle moving faster and/or farther than the other because one sail is getting more of a push by the wind (DCI-PS2.A-P2, CCC-CE-P1).

Indicator 1b

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.

Across the materials, lesson objectives are not three-dimensional, and, as a result, assessment tasks do not consistently reveal student knowledge and use of the three dimensions to support the targeted three-dimensional learning objectives. While the objectives often build towards the performance task for the topic, they do not represent three-dimensional learning targets for the lessons. The majority of the assessment tasks address the objectives and assess the DCIs, and at times the SEPs.

Formative assessments are frequent and are spread across each lesson. However, most tasks do not include support for teachers to adjust instruction based on student responses to formative assessments. The majority of the Teacher Edition formative assessment questions are discussion-based and no directions are provided to support the teacher in eliciting ideas from each student or adjusting instruction based on student responses.

The discussion-based questions do not elicit individual student understanding. The Student Edition Check Points, Interactivities, and Online Quizzes are taken individually. Interactivities frequently only assess the DCIs. The online quizzes are all multiple choice. The uInvestigate Labs are at the beginning of each lesson, before any reading or investigations, and do not measure any lesson learning. While information gained from the labs could provide formative data to inform instructional next steps, the teacher materials do not include support for using this data or adjusting instruction.

Examples of lessons that do not have a three-dimensional objective, the formative assessment tasks partially assess student knowledge of all three dimensions, and the materials do not provide guidance to support the instructional process:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Needs of Plants, the lesson objective is “Students will recognize what plants need to survive.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective, although it builds towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. In the uInvestigate Lab, students are asked about a plant’s needs (DCI-LS2.A-P1). The first three questions ask students to make a plan and to predict what will happen as they observe a flower receiving water. The final question directs students to analyze their recorded observations and tell how the water moves through the flower (SEP-DATA-P3). Then, after the reading in the Explore, the teacher asks students to describe what it means for a plant to survive, to predict what would happen if a plant did not receive water, and to explain why a plant does not look healthy (DCI-LS1.C-P1). These questions assess the lesson objective. In the Interactivity, students identify what a plant looks like that has its needs met (DCI-LS2.A-P1). At the end of the lesson, students take an Online Quiz and are asked two questions about patterns and two questions about what plants need for survival (DCI-LS1.C-P1). Students are shown pictures of plants to determine which one had its needs met (DCI-LS1.C-P1). These tasks assess the objective, but are not three-dimensional and do not offer guidance for the instructional process.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 1: Where Plants and Animals Live, the lesson objective is “Students will observe different places where animals live.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective. In the uInvestigate Lab, students are asked to think of a plant and animal that lives near them, draw a picture of those plants and animals, and explain to a partner why the drawing is a good model of where plants and animals live (SEP-MOD-P3). Then, after the reading in the Explore, the teacher asks students to list what plants and animals need to live (DCI-LS1.C-P1). Students predict what might happen if animals did not have a shelter (SEP-INV-P6) and compare the bird shelter in the text with bird shelters they have seen (SEP-INV-P4). This is followed by a Check Point in which students look at a sequence of birds building a nest and record the correct order to the sequence. This task does not assess the lesson objective. There is a second set of scaffolded questions where students are asked what a forest is. They predict where a deer would most likely live, a forest or the plains, and why (DCI-ESS3.A-P1). Students then compare the two different habitats. In the Interactivity, students are given a list of plants and animals and when they click on them they read a description of how they survive in a desert environment. Students then explain what helps a cactus live in the desert (DCI-ESS3.A-P1). Finally, in the Online Quiz, there are four questions all about animals and their habitats, specifically about the sheltering needs of different animals. These formative assessment tasks assess the lesson objective but do not reveal student knowledge in all dimensions. The materials do not provide teacher guidance for adjusting instruction based on student responses.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3: Topic 3, Lesson 1: The Sun, the lesson objective is “Describe the sun.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective. In the uInvestigate Lab, students put ice cubes in a plastic cup in both the shade and sun. They observe and record their observations. They then explain what they learned about the sun from their observations (SEP-INV-P4). After reading the text, “The Sun and the Earth,” students are asked two questions: “What does the sun give the Earth?” and “What would the Earth be like if there was no sun?” (DCI PS3.B-P1). While these questions address a DCI, they do not address the lesson objective. The Interactivity shows an animation of the sun moving across the sky from the morning to night. Then students are asked, “When is the sun highest?” At the end of the lesson, students are asked three multiple-choice questions in the Online Quiz. The first one asks what does the sun provide to the Earth (DCI-PS3.B-P1). The other two ask questions about the relative size and relative distance. These questions assess the lesson objective. The materials in this lesson do not provide teacher guidance for adjusting instruction based on student responses to these questions.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 1: Pushes and Pulls, the lesson objective is “Observe how objects move.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective, although it builds towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. After reading the text, students answer three questions as a formative assessment and complete a Check Point activity. All refer to a photo of two children pushing and pulling another child on a sled. Students locate the part of the photo that shows a pull and push (DCI-PS2.A-P2, SEP-INFO-P2). Students then explain what they see in the picture using the terms pushing, pulling, and cause. Then students tell how the motion of the sled would change if the child who is pushing the sled stopped (DCI-PS2.A-P2, SEP-INFO-P2). In addition, students underline the words that make an object move in the text. In the Online Quiz, students are asked four questions. In the first and the third, students look at pictures and identify the motion of an object and whether it is being pushed or pulled (DCI-PS2.A-P2). The fourth question asks students to identify both a push and a pull as ways to move an object (DCI-PS2.A-P2). While the objective is not three-dimensional, these tasks measure the lesson objective and assess all three dimensions.

Indicator 1c

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials. The materials provide three-dimensional learning objectives for the topic level in the form of performance expectations (PEs), but summative tasks measure student achievement of only some learning objectives (PEs) or their associated elements, and few summative assessment tasks are three-dimensional in design.

There are three assessments at each topic level: Evidence-Based Assessment, uDemonstrate Lab, and the Online Topic Test. The Evidence-Based Assessment is typically four to six questions, the uDemonstrate Lab is a performance-based assessment, and the online assessment is mainly presented as a multiple-choice exam. There are two assessments at the segment level: the California Performance-Based Assessment and the Summative Benchmark Assessment which consists of multiple-choice questions. The assessments most often address the DCIs. The SEPs are occasionally assessed independently or in combination with the DCI. The CCCs are generally not assessed on any of the three assessments.

Examples where objectives are three-dimensional, but summative assessment tasks do not fully assess the three-dimensional learning objectives and are not three-dimensional in design:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1: Needs of Living Things, the objectives include two performance expectations: K-LS1-1 and K-ESS3-1. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. The topic includes a four-question Evidence-Based Assessment, a four-question uDemonstrate Lab, and a ten-question Online Topic Test. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, students observe and interpret data in a chart about the food an animal eats (SEP-DATA-P3), but do not address the needs of plants or why plants and animals need food. Therefore these questions only partially assess the DCI (DCI-LS1.C-P1). The chart is only necessary to answer the last question. There is no evidence of the CCC being assessed. In the uDemonstrate Lab, teachers provide books about different kinds of pets. Students use books to find information about the pets’ needs. Students complete a chart based on information found in the books. The chart and book address that animals need food, water, shelter, and space. Students also compare the data to other students and discuss the similarities and differences in the food (SEP-DATA-P3). While students are asked “What pattern do you see for the pets you studied?” the expected answer is that all animals need food, water, and shelter to survive (DCI-LS1.C-P1). This does not assess student understanding that patterns can be observed and used as evidence to describe phenomena. In the Online Topic Test, students answer 10 multiple choice questions that assess only DCIs. Four of the questions assess one of the DCIs from the two performance expectations (DCI-LS1.C-P1). The following elements from the PEs are not assessed in any of the summative assessments: CCC-PAT-P1, CCC-CE-P2, SEP-MOD-P3, DCI-ESS3.A-P1, and CCC-SYS-P2.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2: Plants and Animals Change their Environment, the objectives include two performance expectations: K-ESS2-2 and K-ESS3-1. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. There is a six-question California Performance-Based Assessment and a ten-question Summative Benchmark Assessment. In the California Performance-Based Assessment, students read a scenario about how the needs of plants and animals are related to where they live. Students are asked to make a claim about the relationship between plants and animals in the forest. Students go back into the passage and find evidence to support their claim. Then students are asked how a model can show the relationships between plants and animals in an environment. Students draw a model of a place in nature where both plants and animals live and choose a plant and animal from the model to identify something it needs to represent relationships in the natural world (SEP-MOD-P3, DCI-ESS3.A-P1). While question six tells students that systems have parts that work together, students are only assessed on whether they can identify parts of their drawings (plants and animals) that work together. Many of the questions are about interdependence and none of the questions are about the idea associated with K-ESS2-2, that organisms change their environment. Only two questions assess a DCI (DCI-ESS3.A-P1) and one question assesses an SEP (SEP-MOD-P3). Four questions do not assess any dimensions and CCCs are not assessed at all. In the Benchmark Assessment, students are shown a picture of a desert environment and asked which animal cannot live here (DCI-ESS3.A-P1). Students are shown a chart titled “Weather in a Desert” and asked what the chart shows. Students then are shown a picture of the desert with text that says “Coyotes Hunt Mice in the Desert.” They are shown data that shares where coyotes have found mice and then asked what the title of the chart should be. Next students are shown a picture and asked to identify the correct definition of an environment. Students identify the forest environment and are then shown a picture and asked how people have changed the environment (DCI-ESS2.E-P1). Then students are shown a picture and asked which animal has built a shelter in the environment (DCI-ESS2.E-P1). Students are told people want to build houses and asked what will animals do and what will happen to the trees (DCI-ESS2.E-P1). Then students are shown a picture of a littered beach and asked what caused it. Finally, students are shown a picture of recycling and asked how people have helped the environment (DCI-ESS3.C-P1). Five of the questions do not assess any dimensions. Five questions assess the DCIs found in the PEs for this segment. The following elements from the PEs are not assessed in any of the summative assessments: SEP-ARG-P6 and CCC-SYS-P2.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3: Sunlight, the topic level objectives include two performance expectations: K-PS3-1 and K-PS3-2. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. The topic includes a four-question Evidence-Based Assessment, a performance-based uDemonstrate Lab, and a ten-question Online Topic Test. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, students read a description of dogs being hot in the sun. The materials state, “How can Zac keep the dogs cool on a sunny day?” Students then answer three questions where they are shown two drawings of doghouses and circle the one that will “work best.” Then students check boxes to show the two tasks Zac is trying to do (i.e., give dogs a shady place and keep the dogs cool). Both houses show a roof covering, and students do not justify their answer, so this question does not clearly elicit student understanding that the Sun warms the Earth's surface. Finally, students circle to show the coolest part of one of the suggested dog houses (DCI-PS3.B-P1). In the uDemonstrate Lab, students perform a temperature experiment and place thermometers in the shade and in the sun and record their temperatures (SEP-INV-P4). Students use the thermometer to reveal if the air is warmer or cooler in the sun versus the shade, record what they observed (DCI-PS3.B-P1), and write evidence to support their observations of the Sun heating the Earth. The Online Test is a 10-question test with multiple-choice, drop-down, drag-and-drop, and short-answer questions. Five questions assess a DCI and one assesses an SEP. First, students choose two ways the sun changes the beach (DCI-PS3.B-P1). Students then write to say how you could build a cool area at the beach using sticks, rocks, and a towel in order to block the sunlight from the Earth (SEP-CEDS-P2, DCI-PS3.B-P1). Students drag words to say that areas are cooler under a table and warmer in the sun (DCI-PS3.B-P1). Students drag words that describe the Sun into a box including that it “warm’s Earth’s land” (DCI-PS3.B-P1) and click to choose which option would best help cool a deck and why (DCI-PS3.B-P1). Finally, students click to choose which part of the playground will be the coolest (DCI-PS3.B-P1). One CCC (CCC-CE-P2) from the PEs is not assessed in any of the summative assessments.

Criterion 1d - 1i

Materials leverage science phenomena and engineering problems in the context of driving learning and student performance.
2/12
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations for Criterion 1d-1i: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning. The materials include phenomena in 0% of the topics and problems in 40% of topics. Since phenomena are not present, there is no opportunity for phenomena to connect to DCIs. Only one of two problems present connects to the grade-level appropriate DCIs and both problems present are presented to students directly as possible. The materials also elicit but do not leverage student prior knowledge and experience related to the problems present. The materials do not include phenomena and problems that drive student learning and use of the three dimensions within and across individual lessons. Across the grade, a concept or a question is used to frame learning across multiple lessons in the topic, rather than a driving phenomenon or problem.

Indicator 1d

Phenomena and/or problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations that phenomena and problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs). Across the grade, the materials consist of four segments, with each segment containing one to two topics. Each topic includes two to four lessons and activities. The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. The two problems identified in the Kindergarten materials are located in the Quest PBLs. One of these problems is connected to DCIs associated with the grade-level performance expectations.

While the materials include sections that label an Anchoring Phenomenon and Investigative Phenomenon, students do not figure out or explain a phenomenon; rather, these sections contain questions to help build an understanding of the question that center around a DCI or content learning. Because students do not figure out phenomena, the materials present no opportunities to connect a DCI to a phenomenon.

Examples of a problem connected to DCIs associated with the grade-level performance expectations:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Quest PBL: Wind Makes it Go, the challenge is to find the best shape for a sail that will make a sail car go fast in a big wind. Students draw a sail and explain why they think the sail shape is best. Students choose a material to make their sail, draw the sail car, and describe how the sail will push the car. They then build the sail car prototype and it in the wind. Finally, they evaluate their design, explaining what worked, what did not work, and how they will improve their design. Students refine and test their new prototype, again evaluating what would make it go faster. Across the Quest PBL, students can complete their designing using trial and error, but the materials include questions or prompts that require students to connect their sail design to the idea of pushes and pulls (DCI-PS2.A-P1). For example, “Tell how the sail will push the car.”

Example of a problem not connected to a DCI associated with the grade-level performance expectations:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Quest PBL: Keep it Cool, the challenge is to design a doghouse that protects dogs from the weather. As students begin their designs, they are asked to use tools and materials to design and build a structure (model) that will reduce the warming effect of sunlight on an area. While this connects to the grade-level idea that the sunlight warms the earth (DCI-PS3.B-P1). Students are provided this information, do not need to apply this understanding to complete the design challenge, and are not asked to explain how their structure reduces the warming effect of the sun. To solve this challenge, students test different materials to learn that different materials are suited to different purposes, based on the properties of the materials (DCI-PS1.A-P2). One of the properties students test is how much light can pass through the different materials. Materials that block more light provide more shade (DCI-PS4.B-P2) and will keep the structure cooler. Both of these physical science DCIs connect to performance expectations outside of the grade level.

Indicator 1e

Phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible.

There are four instructional segments in Kindergarten, each comprised of one to two topics with a total of five topics altogether. The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. Within the Quest PBLs for this grade level, two problems or design challenges that students solve are presented as directly as possible.

Examples of problems presented as directly as possible:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Quest PBL: Keep It Cool, the challenge is to design a doghouse that protects dogs from the weather. This challenge is presented through a letter from Henry the architect, asking students to help choose the right materials and tools to design and build a doghouse, “a structure that protects dogs from the weather.” Three photographs of shaded structures are included for students to view. Students also watch a video that shares how architects use different materials to keep structures cool from the heat of the sun including that some materials block sunlight. After the video, students can use an Interactivity of sliding an awning to see how it can make shade. This presentation provides a direct and practical way for students to understand what they are trying to design.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Quest PBL: Wind Makes it Go, the challenge is to find the best shape for a sail that will make a sail car go fast in a big wind. This challenge is presented through a letter from Ms. Alvarez, a sail designer, asking for help to find the best shape for a sail for a sail car to go fast in the wind. Students look at pictures of three different shaped sails and watch a narrated animation that explains and shows that wind moves sailboats and describes how sail designers consider what materials to use. This presentation provides a direct and practical way for students to understand what they are trying to design.

Indicator 1f

Phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions. Across the grade, the materials do not use phenomena or problems to drive student learning within individual lessons. Frequently, the learning objective focuses on the learning of a DCI or associated element, resulting in a missed opportunity for students to use the three dimensions as they work towards explaining phenomena or solving problems.

There are two identified problems in the Quest PBL in Topic 3 and Topic 5. These problems do not drive the learning throughout the lessons. When these problems drive learning of individual Quest Check-Ins, key elements of all three dimensions are not incorporated, and most often exclude the CCC within a lesson. This represents a missed opportunity for students to engage with all three dimensions to make sense of a problem.

Examples where individual lessons or activities are not driven by phenomena and/or problems, and do not engage students with all three dimensions:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 2: Needs of Animals, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn that all animals need food in order to live and grow (DCI-LS1.C-P1). Students build a model of an animal’s foot and explain how the animal uses its feet where they live (SEP-MOD-P3). Students then read information and use this information to help answer the questions of what fish need to survive (SEP-INFO-P1). The Interactivity and video also address what animals need to survive (DCI-LS1.C-P1).
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 3: People Change the Environment, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn how people change the environment (DCI-ESS3.C-P1, DCI-ESS3.A-P1). Students discuss ways humans change the environment (DCI-ESS3.A-P1) and create a model to show how people can change the environment (SEP-MOD-P3). Students identify ways to stop hurting land, air, soil, and water (DCI-ESS3.C-P1) and make a model of a trail to show changes people can make to the environment (SEP-MOD-P3).
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Lesson 2: Sunlight and the Earth’s Surface, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn that the earth’s surface is affected by the sun. Students plan and conduct an investigation to determine which objects change in the sun (DCI-PS3.B-P1, SEP-INV-P1), read text, and fill in a chart about the warming of the sun (SEP-INFO-E1, DCI-PS3.B-P1). Students determine which roof material will keep the inside of a doghouse cooler (SEP-CEDS-P2), build the doghouse, state which materials they used, and explain why and how they might improve their design. While students engage in a design challenge during this lesson, it does not drive the learning of this lesson and students do not use all three dimensions to solve this design challenge.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 2: Changes in Movement, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn about changes in motion. Students pretend to be a marble on a marble ramp and physically represent that movement. Students are provided with new materials, think about how they could move each object, and then test their ideas (SEP-INV-P4). Students move the objects in a different way and then describe how each object moves (DCI-PS2.A-P1). Students choose materials for a sail car and develop a model by drawing their sail car (SEP-MOD-P4) and then predict how their car will move in the wind (SEP-INV-P6). Students test their cars and explain what worked, what did not work, and how they would revise their sail. While students engage in a design challenge during this lesson, it does not drive the learning of this lesson and students do not use all three dimensions to solve this design challenge.

Examples of lessons or activities that are not driven by a phenomenon or problem but incorporate elements of all three dimensions:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Needs of Living Things, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn that plants need sunlight, water, and air to survive. Students read about what plants need to survive (DCI-LS1.C-P1, DCI-LS2.A-P1, SEP-INFO-P1) and circle text that indicates what plants need. The materials include teacher guidance to have students explore patterns in terms of the things all plants need (CCC-PAT-P1). Students plan and carry out an investigation with a carnation and collect and record data as they observe how water moves through carnations (SEP-INV-P2, SEP-DATA-P2).
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 4: People can Protect the Environment, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn about human impacts on the environment (DCI-ESS3.C-P1). In this lesson, students describe ways to help the environment; make something new from something old; and read text, look at images, and draw pictures of ways to positively impact earth (DCI-ESS3.C-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). Students make a sign that will help save a trail (based on pictures of trails that have damage) and are asked to explain how their sign will help the trail. Students then use an image of a landfill to identify actions people can do to reduce the amount of trash that goes into landfills (CCC-CE-P2).

Indicator 1g

Materials are designed to include both phenomena and problems.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten are designed for students to solve problems in 40% (2/5) of the topics. Throughout the materials, 0% (0/5) of the topics focus on explaining phenomena.

There are four Instructional Segments in Kindergarten, each comprised of one to two topics with a total of five topics altogether. Each topic consists of two to four lessons, uConnect labs, uInvestigate labs, and uDemonstrate labs, a Career Connection page, and Quest Problem Based Learning (PBL). The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. Within the grade level, 40% (2/5) of the topics present problems or design challenges that students solve. These are found in Quest PBL sections of the materials.

Each Instructional Segment begins with a section labeled as an Anchoring Phenomenon, which provides a focus question for the segment. For example, Instructional Segment 3 provides the question, “How do scientists talk about the weather?” as the Anchoring Phenomenon. Each topic within a segment provides a question labeled as an Investigative Phenomenon; these questions help build an understanding of the segment-level question. The topic within Segment 3 labels the question, “How does the weather change?” as the Investigative Phenomenon. Each of the six lessons within this topic focuses on smaller questions to help students answer the topic-level question. The learning at each of these levels focuses on answering a lesson-, topic-, or segment-level question centered around a DCI or content learning, resulting in missed opportunities for students to explain phenomena that they observe. As a result, students do not figure out phenomena in this grade level.

Examples of problems in the series:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Quest PBL: Keep it Cool, the challenge is to design a doghouse that protects dogs from the weather. Students test three potential materials for a roof to determine which keeps the inside of a structure cooler or warmer before designing and building a doghouse. Students compare their design solutions and then identify how they could make improvements to their designs.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Quest PBL: Wind Makes it Go, the challenge is to find the best shape for a sail that will make a sail car go fast in a big wind. Students draw a sail and explain why they think the sail shape is best. Students choose a material to make their sail, draw the sail car, and describe how the sail will push the car. They then build the sail car prototype and it in the wind. Finally, they evaluate their design, explaining what worked, what did not work, and how they will improve their design. Students refine and test their new prototype, again evaluating what would make it go faster.

Indicator 1h

Materials intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet expectations that they intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems. The materials elicit students’ prior knowledge in the lessons or activities with the two problems located in the Quest PBLs, but do not leverage prior knowledge. Students discuss and share prior knowledge, but the materials do not provide guidance or support for students to leverage this knowledge and experience as they design solutions.

Examples where materials elicit but do not leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to problems:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3, Quest PBL: Keep It Cool, the challenge is to design a doghouse that protects dogs from the weather. Teachers ask students how they keep cool in the summer. This elicits student knowledge of ways people can keep cool. The materials do not provide teacher guidance for leveraging students’ ideas as a means for solving the challenge. Later, the materials provide examples to help focus students on different shade structures that keep plants and animals cool.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5, Quest PBL: Wind Makes it Go, the challenge is to find the best shape for a sail that will make a sail car go fast in a big wind. To elicit students’ ideas, students are asked, “How can we use wind to push or pull objects?” Additionally, teachers ask students to share their experiences on a sailboat or watching a sailboat from the shore. Teachers are further encouraged to find a video of a sailboat and discuss the motion of the boat and the causes of its change in motion. This elicits student knowledge and experiences related to this challenge, but the materials do not provide teacher guidance for leveraging students’ ideas as a means of solving the challenge.

Indicator 1i

Materials embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Kindergarten do not meet expectations that they embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions. Across the grade, a concept or a question is used to frame learning across multiple lessons in the topic, rather than a driving phenomenon or problem.

Within the five topics in the grade, there are two problems in the Quest PBLs. The two Quest PBLs provide multimodal opportunities for students to engage in developing, evaluating, and revising their thinking as they solve the design challenge. There are few opportunities for students to develop, evaluate, and revise their thinking outside of the Quest PBLs.

While the design challenges in the Quest PBL provide opportunities for students to apply the learning from the lesson and connect across multiple lessons in the topic, they do not drive the learning of the lesson or the topic. Students do not consistently engage in all three dimensions to solve these problems or design challenges.

Examples of topics that do not use phenomena or problems to drive student learning across multiple lessons:

  • In Kindergarten, Segment 1, Topic 1: Needs of Living Things, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the question, “What do living things need from their environment?” In a series of three lessons, students engage in various learning activities that are focused on the needs of living things. Each of the three lessons, along with the California Spotlight, build upon one another in order to help students make sense of and gain an understanding of the question. In Lesson 1, students plan and carry out an investigation with a carnation and they collect data to determine how water moves through carnation (SEP-INV-P2, SEP-DATA-P1). After this investigation, students learn about how plants need sun, air, and water through reading text and looking at pictures (DCI-LS1.C-P1, DCI-LS2.A-P1). The teacher materials then include guidance to have students explore patterns in terms of the things all plants need (CCC-PAT-P1). In Lesson 2, students make a model of the feet of an animal to determine how the structure of feet helps the animal meet its needs (SEP-MOD-P3). Students discover that all animals need food in order to live and grow (DCI-LS1.C-P1). In Lesson 3, students match clothing with scenes based on personal experiences. They tell a partner about types of clothing for different seasons and how clothing gives you something you need (DCI-LS1.C-P1, DCI-LS1.A-P1). The teacher materials suggest ways to make connections to clothing in sports and to patterns in the clothes people wear in different weather and seasons. Then students read the text and watch a video to determine that humans are animals and therefore need the same things to survive as animals (SEP-INFO-P1). Students look for patterns in the behavior of how humans and other animals meet their needs (CCC-PAT-P1). In the California Spotlight, students observe plants and animals in the Klamath River, record their observations, and then explain how the plants and animals meet their needs and find patterns to generalize what animals and plants need (SEP-DATA-P3, SEP-DATA-P2, SEP-CEDS-P1, DCI-LS1.C-P1). While not driven by a problem or phenomena, this topic engages students in the three dimensions to answer the driving question.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 2, Topic 2: Environments, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, it is driven by the question, “How do plants and animals change their environment?” Students begin with a lab where they plant radishes. Over two weeks students observe and record how the radishes are changing their soil environment (SEP-INV-P2, DCI-ESS2.E-P1). In Lesson 1, students make a model of plants and animals that live near them and include the environment where the animal lives (DCI-LS4.D-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Students read about different resources that organisms need and how different environments provide those resources. In Lesson 2, students look at pictures to identify different ways that plants and animals change their environments (DCI-ESS2.E-P1). In Lesson 3, students learn about different ways people change the environment and model how creating and using a nature trail changes the environment (SEP-MOD-P3, DCI-ESS3.A-P1). In Lesson 4, students explore different ways to reduce or recycle materials to reduce their impact on the environment through reading text (DCI-ESS3.C-P1). The topic ends with a performance-based assessment in which students observe worms for two weeks and determine how the worms change the soil of their environment (SEP-INV-P2, SEP-DATA-P1, DCI-ESS2.E-P1).
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 4: Earth’s Weather, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, it is driven by the question, “How Does the Weather Change?” Students learn about temperature, wind, and precipitation and that weather has patterns that can be used to make predictions. Students also make connections between weather and seasons. In Lesson 1, students use shaving cream and food coloring to model the relationship between condensation and rain (SEP-MOD-P3). They learn about the different kinds of weather (DCI-ESS2.D-P1) from pictures and text (SEP-INFO-P1) and match pictures to weather words. In Lesson 2, students make a rain collector, read text about weather and patterns, and predict the weather for different times of the year (DCI-ESS2.D-P1, CCC-PAT-P1, CCC-PAT-E2). In Lesson 3, students read about seasons and look at pictures of a tree during each season (DCI-ESS2.D-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). In the Quest Check-In, students choose a season and draw a scene of that season including the leaves on the tree to match that season. While not driven by a problem or phenomena, this topic engages students in the three dimensions to answer the driving question.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 3, Topic 3: Sunlight, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the broad topic of sunlight. Students design a solution for keeping a dog cool by designing a doghouse. In Lesson 1, observe what happens to an ice cube when it is placed in the sun compared to when it is placed in the shade (DCI-PS3.B-P1). Then students are shown parts of a doghouse and asked to draw how the parts can be put together to make the doghouse, describing what each part would do (i.e., protect what’s inside from the heat or cold). In Lesson 2, students investigate which roof material will keep the inside of the doghouse cooler (SEP-CEDS-P2), build the doghouse, state which materials they used, and explain possible improvements to their design. Instructors are prompted to remind students they can learn from their mistakes and when one roof material does not get the solution they want, they can change their models to use a different material. While students engage with a problem in this topic and have multimodal opportunities to develop and revise their thinking related to this problem, the problem does not drive learning across multiple lessons.
  • In Kindergarten, Segment 4, Topic 5: Pushes and Pulls, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, the learning is driven by the question, “How Can We Push and Pull Objects?” Prior to the first lesson in the topic, students choose objects, move them, and then document how the objects move (DCI-PS2.A-P1). In Lesson 1, students find ways to move objects and describe that movement with terms such as pushes and pulls (DCI-PS2.A-P1). They design a sail for a sail car and test their sails. Students compare sails to determine how the shape of one sail might cause one vehicle to move faster and/or farther than the other, explaining that one sail is getting more of a push by the wind (DCI-PS2.A-P2, CCC-CE-P1). In Lesson 2, students demonstrate how a marble would go down a ramp. Students make a maze, test and make changes to it, and then share what part of the maze did not work and how they might fix it. Finally, students choose materials for their sail car, develop a model by drawing their sail car (SEP-MOD-P4), and then predict how their car will move in the wind (SEP-INV-P6). Students test their cars and explain what worked, what did not work, and how they would revise their sail. While students engage with a problem in this topic and have multimodal opportunities to develop and revise their thinking related to this problem, the problem does not drive learning across multiple lessons.

Gateway Two

Coherence and Scope

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Two Details
Materials were not reviewed for Gateway Two because materials did not meet or partially meet expectations for Gateway One

Criterion 2a - 2g

Materials are coherent in design, scientifically accurate, and support grade-level and grade-band endpoints of all three dimensions.

Indicator 2a

Materials are designed for students to build and connect their knowledge and use of the three dimensions across the series.
N/A

Indicator 2a.i

Students understand how the materials connect the dimensions from unit to unit.
N/A

Indicator 2a.ii

Materials have an intentional sequence where student tasks increase in sophistication.
N/A

Indicator 2b

Materials present Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) in a way that is scientifically accurate.*
N/A

Indicator 2c

Materials do not inappropriately include scientific content and ideas outside of the grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.*
N/A

Indicator 2d

Materials incorporate all grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 2d.i

Physical Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.ii

Life Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iii

Earth and Space Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iv

Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
N/A

Indicator 2e

Materials incorporate all grade-band Science and Engineering Practices.
N/A

Indicator 2e.i

Materials incorporate grade-level appropriate SEPs within each grade.
N/A

Indicator 2e.ii

Materials incorporate all SEPs across the grade band.
N/A

Indicator 2f

Materials incorporate all grade-band Crosscutting Concepts.
N/A

Indicator 2g

Materials incorporate NGSS Connections to Nature of Science and Engineering
N/A

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3d

Materials are designed to support teachers not only in using the materials, but also in understanding the expectations of the standards.

Indicator 3a

Materials include background information to help teachers support students in using the three dimensions to explain phenomena and solve problems (also see indicators 3b and 3l).
N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials provide guidance that supports teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences to engage students in figuring out phenomena and solving problems.
N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials contain teacher guidance with sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3e - 3k

Materials are designed to support all students in learning.

Indicator 3e

Materials are designed to leverage diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students.
N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide appropriate support, accommodations, and/or modifications for numerous special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning science and engineering.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials provide multiple access points for students at varying ability levels and backgrounds to make sense of phenomena and design solutions to problems.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials include opportunities for students to share their thinking and apply their understanding in a variety of ways.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials include a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3k

Materials are made accessible to students by providing appropriate supports for different reading levels.
N/A

Criterion 3l - 3s

Materials are designed to be usable and also to support teachers in using the materials and understanding how the materials are designed.

Indicator 3l

The teacher materials provide a rationale for how units across the series are intentionally sequenced to build coherence and student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to NGSS.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts and Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3n.i

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts Common Core State Standards.
N/A

Indicator 3n.ii

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3o

Resources (whether in print or digital) are clear and free of errors.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials include a comprehensive list of materials needed.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials embed clear science safety guidelines for teacher and students across the instructional materials.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials designated for each grade level are feasible and flexible for one school year.
N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials contain strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers about the science program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3t - 3y

Materials are designed to assess students and support the interpretation of the assessment results.

Indicator 3t

Assessments include a variety of modalities and measures.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Assessments offer ways for individual student progress to be measured over time.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities and guidance for oral and/or written peer and teacher feedback and self reflection, allowing students to monitor and move their own learning.
N/A

Indicator 3w

Tools are provided for scoring assessment items (e.g., sample student responses, rubrics, scoring guidelines, and open-ended feedback).
N/A

Indicator 3x

Guidance is provided for interpreting the range of student understanding (e.g., determining what high and low scores mean for students) for relevant Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 3y

Assessments are accessible to diverse learners regardless of gender identification, language, learning exceptionality, race/ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.
N/A

Criterion 3z - 3ad

Materials are designed to include and support the use of digital technologies.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate digital technology and interactive tools (data collection tools, simulations, modeling), when appropriate, in ways that support student engagement in the three dimensions of science.
N/A

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials are web based and compatible with multiple internet browsers. In addition, materials are “platform neutral,” are compatible with multiple operating systems and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess three-dimensional learning using digital technology.
N/A

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be customized for individual learners, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g., websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A
abc123

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 12/15/2020

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
ELVSCI20 CA SGMNTS DCW 1YR LIC GR. K 0134926307 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 1 SE GK 0134980034 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 2 SE GK 0134980042 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 3 SE GK 0134980050 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 4 SE GK 0134980069 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW TE GR. K 0134980301 2020

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 2 of our review tools. Learn more.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

Science K-5 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The science review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflects the importance of alignment to the standards then considers other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For science, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Three-Dimensional Learning
  • Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning
  • Coherence and Full Scope of the Three Dimensions
  • Design to Facilitate Teacher Learning
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

To best read our reports we recommend utilizing the Codes for NGSS Elements document that provides the code and description of elements cited as evidence in each report.

 

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

X