Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Second Grade do not meet expectations for Alignment to NGSS, Gateways 1 and 2. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. While the learning sequences incorporate the three dimensions in a few lessons, the materials do not consistently integrate them into three-dimensional learning opportunities for students. Only a few opportunities for student sensemaking occur with the three dimensions; student sensemaking is consistently two-dimensional with SEPs and DCIs. The summative assessments are not consistently three dimensional and do not consistently measure the three dimensions for the topic-level objectives (PEs). The lesson level objectives are also not three-dimensional. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations. Phenomena are not present and therefore are not able to be connected to DCIs, presented to students as directly as possible, nor drive learning and use of the three dimensions within or across lessons. One problem is present at the topic-level that connects to grade-level DCIs, is not presented as directly as possible, and elicits but does not leverage student prior knowledge. The problem does not drive learning and use of the three dimensions within or across lessons.

See Rating Scale Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Designed for NGSS

0
14
24
28
2
24-28
Meets Expectations
15-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-14
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Coherence and Scope

0
16
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
17-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-16
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
30
50
59
N/A
50-59
Meets Expectations
31-49
Partially Meets Expectations
0-30
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Designed for NGSS

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS. Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations.

Criterion 1a - 1c

Materials are designed for three-dimensional learning and assessment.
2/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Criterion 1a-1c: Three-Dimensional Learning. The materials do not consistently include integration of the three dimensions in at least one learning opportunity per learning sequence. However, nearly all learning sequences are meaningfully designed for student opportunity to engage in sensemaking with the SEPs and DCIs, but only a few learning sequences include the CCCs in sensemaking opportunities with the other dimensions. The materials do not provide three-dimensional learning objectives at the lesson level and the respective assessments are not consistently three-dimensional. The materials provide three-dimensional objectives at the topic level, but summative tasks do not measure student achievement of all learning objectives (PEs) or their associated elements, and few summative assessment tasks are three-dimensional in design.

Indicator 1a

Materials are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) into student learning.
0/0

Indicator 1a.i

Materials consistently integrate the three dimensions in student learning opportunities.
0/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEPs), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs) into student learning opportunities. Grade 2 materials are organized into four segments, with one to two topics per segment and two to four learning sequences or lessons per topic, totaling 17 lessons. Each lesson consists of four sections: Engage, Explore, Explain and Elaborate, and Evaluate. Of the 17 lessons or learning sequences, few integrate all three dimensions within a single learning opportunity in the lesson. When present, the integrated opportunities are typically found in the Explain and Elaborate section. A few lessons include the three dimensions across the learning sequence but did not integrate them within a learning opportunity. The remainder of the lessons were two-dimensional, consistently incorporating SEPs with DCIs.

Examples where the materials do not incorporate all three dimensions into a learning sequence:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 3: Use Solids and Liquids, students investigate how different properties of solids and liquids make them useful. Students observe 10 blocks to determine if they will fit in a container. They make a prediction, test their prediction, collect data, and compare the outcomes to their predictions (SEP-DATA-P4). Students determine that the blocks are all solid and do not change their shape regardless of their container. Students answer the question, “How do you use shapes while building?” Students decide which blocks will be useful for building a house and identify the usefulness of other types of solids (DCI-PS1.A-P2, SEP-INV-P5). Students read text and look at pictures as they learn about the properties of matter and uses of liquids (DCI-PS1.A-P2, SEP-INV-P5). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of solids and liquids.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 3, Lesson 3: Matter Within Objects, students learn that smaller objects can be used to create a larger object and that different materials are better suited for different purposes. Students design solutions as they build a structure to solve a problem (SEP-CEDS-P2). They are asked if their solution solves the problem they identified and explain why or why not as they reflect on their solution. Then students consider how they might improve their design (SEP-INV-P5). Students read about how small parts can be assembled to make a model and then create a drawing of small parts to make a larger object (DCI-PS1.A-P3, SEP-MOD-P3). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of objects being made of smaller matter.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 1: Earth Changes Quickly, students learn ways in which the earth’s surface changes quickly. Students build models of volcanoes and explain how their model shows how a volcanic eruption can quickly change the surface of the earth (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Students read the text, watch a video, and complete an interactive experience where they observe and learn that volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, and landslides change the surface of the earth quickly (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). There are pictures of a crack in the pavement, dried lava on a road, and rocks from a steep incline covering a road. Students choose what event caused these quick changes to occur (SEP-INFO-P2). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of changes to the earth’s surface.

Examples where the materials incorporate all three dimensions into a learning sequence but do not integrate within a learning opportunity:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 6, Lesson 1: Identify Habitats, students learn that plants and animals live in habitats that meet their needs. In the Engage section, students engage with a picture of a habitat and act out an animal that may live in that habitat. In the Explore section, students use information from a provided sheet about grasslands to determine which animals live in that environment (SEP-DATA-P3). In the Explain and Elaborate section, students read and analyze pictures to learn that diverse habitats support different types of animals and how those animals have features that help them survive in a specific habitat (DCI-LS4.D-P1). Students evaluate what materials would work best to make a model to show how water interacts with waxy versus non-waxy plant leaves. Then, they use this information to infer how a waxy structure might help a plant thrive in certain types of habitats (CCC-SF-P1). While all three dimensions were present in this lesson, they were not integrated within a learning opportunity.use data to explore habitats and engage in

Examples where the materials integrate all three dimensions into a learning opportunity within a learning sequence:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 3: Map, Land, and Water, Explain and Elaborate, students explore different kinds of maps and read about the elements of a map (DCI-ESS2.B-P1). Students look at a map key and scale of a map and discuss ways they might use and find the map features (SEP-DATA-P2, DCI-ESS2.B-P1). Students use and learn about online maps. Students are introduced to scale, proportion, and quantity as they look at a map of a building. One of the features of this map is a scale. Students learn that a scale is a different unit of measure that is used to describe something. Students discuss the reason this particular scale was chosen. Students are prompted to think of another way they can compare the size of two different objects without using a measuring tool (CCC-SPQ-P1).
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 2: Animals Can Help Plants Reproduce, Engage, students use a photo of a cow with burrs attached to it as a springboard to draw a seed that might get attached to a person (SEP-INFO-P4, DCI-LS2.A-P2). Students then compare their drawings paying particular attention to the structures of the seeds (CCC-SF-P1).
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 6, Lesson 3: Living Things in Water Habitats, Explain and Elaborate, students identify the animals from pictures that can live in water habitats and explain why based on the structure of the different parts of the animals and the basic needs provided by the habitat (SEP-INFO-P3, DCI-ESS3.A-P1, and DCI-LS1.A-P1). They explain, based on the structure of the different parts of the animals and their needs, why the animal lives or does not live in the habitat (CCC-SF-P1).

Indicator 1a.ii

Materials consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet expectations that they consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions. In nearly all of the 17 lessons, SEPs meaningfully support student sensemaking with a DCI. In three lessons, the materials contain three-dimensional sensemaking where both a CCC and a SEP are used to help students make sense with the DCI.

Examples of learning sequence where SEPs or CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 3, Lesson 1: Observe Changes in Matter, students learn that some changes to matter are reversible and others are irreversible. They observe a photo of origami animals to learn that folding paper is a reversible change. Students describe the types of folds, then make their own changes to the paper then undo those changes. Students investigate how they can change the shape and color of clay (SEP-INV-P4) and determine which of those changes are reversible. Students use evidence from their investigation to explain that some changes they made could be undone, while others could not (DCI-PS1.B-P1, SEP-CEDS-P1). There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of changes in matter.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 1: Plant Needs, students develop an understanding that plants need water and light to grow and they use different parts to help them meet their needs. Students conduct an investigation using a celery stalk placed in water with food coloring over five days (DCI LS1.A-P1, SEP-DATA-P3). They record their observations on the movement of water through the stem and leaves of a plant (SEP-DATA-P1). Students read about plant parts and their functions and then use their data to answer, “How can you see parts of a plant work?” (SEP-DATA-P3, DCI-LS1.A-P1). Students then investigate what a plant needs to live (DCI-LS1.C-P1) by planning and designing a test to see whether plants need sunlight to grow. Students compare their plants to other students' plants. Students put one plant in the sun and one in the shade and provide water and limit water (SEP-INV-P2). They collect, compare, and analyze data (SEP-DATA-P3) to make sense of what plants need. There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of needs of plants.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 6, Lesson 2: Living Things in Land Habitats, students identify different land habitats, what lives there, and how the needs of the living things in a specific habitat are met. Students learn about the different types of plants and animals in different habitats (DCI-LS4.D-P1) as they read about forests, deserts, tundra, and grasslands. Students look at the pictures and describe how many different types of plants there are, how tall the plants are, and how the number of animals relates to the number of plants (SEP-INFO-P2) to determine which habitat has the most diversity. Students compare the number and kinds of living things in two different land habitats to learn more about the diversity of the habitats (SEP-MATH-P2, DCI-LS4.D-P1). There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of changes people make to their environment.

Examples of learning sequence where SEPs and CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Describe Earth’s Surface, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of maps including their representation of different landforms on earth’s surface. Students draw and label maps then discuss how maps help us get to and from places. Students map the shapes and kinds of land and water in areas (SEP-MOD-P2, DCI-ESS2.B-P1). Students select an area to draw on a map, then imagine flying in a plane above the area, considering features they would see, where each feature would be located, and other places or objects to include on the map as reference points. Students then make a map showing the positions of things compared to each other (CCC-SYS-P1, DCI-ESS2.B-P1).
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 1: Describe Matter, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of the difference between a liquid and a solid and the relationship between intended purpose of objects and object properties. Students observe, describe, sort, and collect evidence about matter. As students explore matter, they observe properties of objects and compare their similarities and differences (SEP-INV-P4). Students recall the differences between causes and effects and respond to the prompt, “A ball is being filled with air. Tell what you think the effect could be on the ball’s shape.” (CCC-CE-P2). Students make sense of the properties of a solid by exploring these causes and effects related to filling a ball with air and and figure out that all matter can be described by observable properties (DCI-PS1.A-P1). Students classify objects by solids and liquids and identify different properties of each. Then students ask questions about the usefulness of the objects they sorted by type of matter (DCI-PS1.A-P2, SEP-AQDP-P1) to better understand the relationship between properties and uses or purposes of objects.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 3, Lesson 2: Temperature and Matter, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of changes caused by heating or cooling and whether the changes are reversible. As students investigate, read, and consider ways temperature affects matter, they determine whether a change in matter can be caused by heating or cooling and whether the change is reversible or not. Students investigate how matter changes (DCI-PS1.B-P1) when it is heated or cooled (CCC-CE-P2). Students plan an investigation to both melt and cool crayons (SEP-INV-P2). Students create a chart to record first hand observations and use the chart to tell how the temperature changed each day (SEP-MATH-P2, SEP-DATA-P2). They also read to learn that some changes are reversible and others are not. Students explore the properties of different objects in different types of weather and determine which of these objects would be best for building bridges (DCI-PS1.A-P2). Students use evidence from the chart to support the claim they choose and to build an understanding that the best material for bridge building is one that can withstand the elements (SEP-ARG-P1).

Indicator 1b

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.

Across the materials, lesson objectives are not three-dimensional, and, as a result, assessment tasks do not consistently reveal student knowledge and use of the three dimensions to support the targeted three-dimensional learning objectives. While the objectives often build towards the performance task for the topic, they do not represent three-dimensional learning targets for the lessons. The majority of the assessment tasks address the objectives and assess the DCIs, and at times the SEPs.

Formative assessments are frequent and are spread across each lesson. However, most tasks do not include support for teachers to adjust instruction based on student responses to formative assessments. The majority of the Teacher Edition formative assessment questions are discussion-based and no directions are provided to support the teacher in eliciting ideas from each student or adjusting instruction based on student responses.

The discussion-based questions do not elicit individual student understanding. The Student Edition Check Points, Interactivities, and Online Quizzes are taken individually. Interactivities frequently only assess the DCIs. The online quizzes are all multiple choice. The uInvestigate Labs are at the beginning of each lesson, before any reading or investigations, and do not measure any lesson learning. While information gained from the labs could provide formative data to inform instructional next steps, the teacher materials do not include support for using this data or adjusting instruction.

Example of lessons that do not have a three-dimensional objectives, the formative assessment task(s) partially assess student knowledge of all dimensions in the learning objective:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Describe Earth’s Surface, the lesson objective is “Students will identify different landforms on Earth’s surface.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective. In the uInvestigate Lab, students draw and label a map of a place they like to go (DCI-ESS2.B-P1). They state what they learned about making a map. In the Interactivity, students look at pictures of five landforms and state if there are any near where they live. They drag and drop to match the name of a landmark to its picture. They say which landform would be best to grow crops. They draw landforms that are in their state and tell how they affect where people go and what they do. While this addresses the lesson objective, it is not assessing any of the three dimensions or part of the three-dimensional topic objective to which it is building. After the reading in the Explore section, the formative assessment questions ask about the similarities of a mountain and a hill and then for the definition of rich soil. The second set of questions asks, “Why is Mauna Loa considered taller than Mt. Everest?” and about similarities and differences between plateaus and canyons. These questions partially address the lesson objective in that they are about landforms. The materials do not provide teacher guidance for adjusting instruction based on student responses to these questions. The only guidance given is a remediation worksheet. Two of the questions in the Online Quiz assess the lesson objective but do not assess the performance expectation to which it is building. The first two questions ask, “What is Landform A?” and “Which landform is a mountain?” The last question asks about the characteristics of a landform. The materials do not provide teacher guidance for adjusting instruction based on student responses to formative assessments.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 6, Lesson 3: Living Things in Water Habitats, the lesson objective is “Students will identify where plants and animals live in water.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective. In the uInvestigate Lab, “How Do Plants Survive in Water,” students design and build a model of a water plant. They explain what parts of the plant need to live in the water and tell how to know. After the reading in the Explore section, the embedded formative assessment consisting of a set of scaffolded questions assess the learning objective. In the first question, students infer why coral stays attached (DCI-LS4.C-E1). In the second question, students hypothesize how the diversity of life changes in the deeper waters of the ocean (DCI-LS4.D-P1). There is one question that assesses the learning objective. In the Online Quiz, students match features of habitats with a particular water habitat and then compare two different habitats: marshes and swamps. The second question asks, "How is a marsh different from a swamp?” (DCI-LS4.D-P1), which is a third grade DCI. Next, students again compare two different water habitats: oceans and swamps and are asked which animal can live in an ocean habitat (DCI-LS4.C-E1). Only one of the questions in this quiz assesses the learning objective. The materials do not provide teacher guidance for adjusting instruction based on student responses.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2: Topic 2, Lesson 1: Describe Matter, the lesson objective is “Tell the difference between a solid or liquid.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective, although it builds towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. After reading, “Matter Everywhere,” students answer three formative assessment questions. First, students identify things in the room made of matter. Then, they give an example of matter that is all around but can not be seen. Finally, they explain how all objects are made of matter despite being different (DCI-PS1.A-P1). These questions do not address the lesson objective. There are four questions in the Online Quiz. The first displays four objects and students choose which one represents both a liquid or a solid (DCI-PS1.A-P1). The next three questions show the same picture of a glass of water and cubes of ice beside it. Students are asked how they are the same, different, and what would need to be done to the ice to change its state to water (DCI-PS1.A-P1).

Example of a lesson that does not have a three-dimensional objectives; the formative assessment tasks assess student knowledge of the learning objective and includes all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 1: Earth Changes Happen Quickly, the lesson objective is “Students will provide evidence that fast changes happen in the Earth.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective, although it builds towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. In the uInvestigate Lab, “How Do Volcanoes Change the Earth?,” students use a container, clay, glue, and newspaper to make a model of how the land could be changed by a volcano. Students are asked how the model showed changes to the earth (SEP-CEDS-P1). This does not assess the lesson objective. After the reading in the Explore section, the teacher uses formative assessment questions to ask students to respond to the effect of lava cooling and explain why lava is red. Finally, students explain why they think an erupting volcano is a quick change to the land (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, SEP-CEDS-P1). Two of these questions assess the lesson objective. In the Interactivity, students are shown seven slides. The first one shows photos of different quick changes to the earth. Then, students are shown photos and identify the correct quick changes to the land based on the evidence left behind. Students are then given the results, the landslide, and offered a list of potential causes and asked to drag and drop the response to the correct box (CCC-CE-P2). The Online Quiz first asks students to compare and contrast how earthquakes and volcanoes change the Earth quickly by filling out a Venn Diagram including identifying “fast changes to Earth’s surface” in the overlap (DCI-ESS1.C-P1). Although the objective is not three dimensional, the assessment tasks for this lesson collectively assess all three dimensions and the learning objective.

Indicator 1c

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials. The materials provide three-dimensional learning objectives for the topic level in the form of performance expectations (PEs), but summative tasks measure student achievement of only some learning objectives (PEs) or their associated elements, and few summative assessment tasks are three-dimensional in design.

There are three assessments at each topic level: Evidence-Based Assessment, uDemonstrate Lab, and the Online Topic Test. The Evidence-Based Assessment is typically four to six questions, the uDemonstrate Lab is a performance-based assessment, and the online assessment is mainly presented as a multiple-choice exam. There are two assessments at the segment level: the California Performance-Based Assessment and the Summative Benchmark Assessment which consists of multiple-choice questions. The assessments most often address the DCIs. The SEPs are occasionally assessed independently or in combination with the DCI. The CCCs are generally not assessed on any of the three assessments.

Examples where objectives are three-dimensional, but summative assessment tasks do not fully assess the three-dimensional learning objectives and are not three-dimensional in design:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 1, Topic 1: Earth’s Land and Water, the topic level objectives include four performance expectations: 2-ESS2-1, 2-ESS2-2, 2-ESS2-3, and K-2-ETS1-3. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. The topic includes a four-question Evidence-Based Assessment, a performance-based uDemonstrate Lab, and a six-question Online Test. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, students examine a three-dimensional map. There are four short-answer questions about the map. Three questions do not assess any elements in the objectives. The fourth assesses students’ understanding of the use of color on the maps to show different landforms (DCI-ESS2.B-P1). The uDemonstrate Lab consists of students being asked to draw a map of a playground or park near where they live (SEP-MOD-P3). Students are provided with a step by step procedure that instructs them to include any landforms and bodies of water (DCI-ESS2.B-P1). Then partners choose two points on the map and label them and write directions to have their partners follow the directions on the map. Then students evaluate how well the partner followed the map. Finally, students are asked how the map could be improved. No CCCs are assessed in this assessment. In the Online Test, the first question presents the scenario of all the Earth’s water being represented with four glasses of water and then students are to answer the question, “How many glasses of water should you use to model an ocean?,” which requires them to know an approximate percentage of the earth’s water that is in the ocean. The next three questions show images of objects and ask students to select which of the listed landforms the object is most shaped like or could be a model for it. The final two questions are, “What is the source of salt in the oceans?” and “What is another name for a stream?” One of these questions assesses a DCI, but the others do not assess the DCIs addressed in the PEs for this topic. The following elements from the targeted PEs are not assessed in the summative assessments: DCI-ESS2.A-P1, DCI-EST1.C-P1, CCC-PAT-C1, CCC-SC-P2, SEP-INFO-P3, SEP-DATA-P5, and SEP-CEDS-P3.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 3: Changing Matter, the topic level objectives include three performance expectations: 2-PS1-1, 2-PS1-3, and 2-PS1-4. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. The topic includes a four-question Evidence-Based Assessment, a performance-based uDemonstrate Lab, and an eight-question Online Test. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, there are two multiple-choice questions, one matching, and one short-answer. Students are presented with a scenario where Christopher and his family go on a picnic. The food and drinks are described in the scenario. Students are told fresh eggs have been hard-boiled and are asked to identify one of four choices as a true statement regarding the change and reversibility in the state to the eggs. This connects to the DCI, however it is not clear that students will know and make the connection to the fact that boiling an egg means heating. Students then match the picnic food to the type of change (i.e., heating, cooling, or changing shape) that occurred to prepare the food (DCI-PS1.B-P1). Next, students are asked which of four objects can be changed back to its original shape, however, the options are not focused on heating and cooling the objects, which is the focus of the DCI. Finally, students are asked to write directions on how to make a sandwich. In the uDemonstrate Lab, students identify a problem that can be solved by building a structure from a set of blocks and draw their new structure. Students then identify a second problem they want to solve using only the blocks from the first structure (DCI-PS1.A-P3) and draw a model of the new structure. Students are asked to explain how each structure solved a problem and to explain how they used the same materials to solve two problems (DCI-PS1.A-P3, SEP-CEDS-P2). While students develop a model in this assessment, the SEP (SEP-MOD-P3) is not targeted in the topic level PEs. In the Online Test, students look at a piece of wood and then look at a wooden spoon cut out and identify what has changed about the piece of wood. Then students are asked, “How can you change the eggs, butter, milk, sugar, and flour into a cake?” While there is a connection to heating (an idea in the DCI), it is not clear that students will know and make the connection to the fact that baking means heating. Students then identify which of the listed changes can be reversed (DCI-PS1.B-P1) and a change that cannot be reversed (DCI-PS1.A-P3). Next, students are asked if boiling eggs until hard-boiled is reversible (DCI-PS1.A-P3). Then, students look at a picture of a jigsaw puzzle and determine which properties the whole object shares with its parts (DCI-PS1.A-P1) and which objects were used to make a jigsaw puzzle (DCI-PS1.A-P2). Finally, students are shown pictures of Jacob's structure and told Mia wants to build the same structure as Jacob’s. Students determine if she can make it with the unused blocks. Two DCIs were assessed in this summative assessment. The following elements from the targeted PEs are not assessed in the summative assessments: SEP-INV-P2, CCC-PAT-P1, SEP-INV-E3, CCC-EM-P1, and CCC-CE-P2.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 3: Landscape Changes, the objectives include two performance expectations: 2-ESS1-1 and 2-ESS2-1. Not all of the dimensions addressed in these PEs are assessed. There is a six-question California Performance-Based Assessment and a nine-question summative Benchmark Assessment. In the California Performance-Based Assessment, students are told about the steps of water being cleaned in a water treatment plant. This is compared to a wetland cleaning water. The question is posed as to whether a screen is better at cleaning water versus just letting materials settle. First, students identify what problem is being tested. Then students draw a design of what they can use as a model to test the question. Students then plan and carry out an investigation and record data in a table. Students make a claim about which is better by circling a choice and use evidence to tell the strengths and weaknesses of each method (SEP-CEDS-P3). Students write to explain if their claim is supported by evidence. No DCIs or CCCs are assessed in this task. In the Benchmark Assessment, students answer nine online questions: multiple-choice, drag-and-drop, and short-answers. First, students choose how to move books to show fast changes to land. Students then choose two things that cause land to move quickly (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). Students choose a solution to soil erosion (DCI-ESS2.A-P1) and identify possible changes to the land from removing a dam (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). Students drag and drop options to sort out the good and bad effects of dam removal, choose one way to stop flooding when the dam is removed, and write to explain their choice. Students choose two ways soil can get moved on a trail (DCI-ESS2.A-P1) and choose the best solution to prevent trail erosion due to rain. Finally, students drag to sort examples into categories of deposition, erosion, and weathering. Four of the questions assess one DCI, however no CCCs or SEPs were assessed. The following elements from the targeted PEs are not assessed in the summative assessments: SEP-INV-E3, DCI-ESS1.C-P1, and CCC-SC-P2.

Criterion 1d - 1i

Materials leverage science phenomena and engineering problems in the context of driving learning and student performance.
0/12
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations for Criterion 1d-1i: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning. The materials include phenomena in 0% of topics and problems in 17% of topics. Since phenomena are not present and only one problem is present, there is a missed opportunity for them to connect to DCIs, to be presented directly as possible, and for the materials to elicit and leverage student prior knowledge and experience related to phenomena and problems. The materials do not include phenomena and problems that drive student learning and use of the three dimensions within and across individual lessons. Across the grade, a concept or a question is used to frame learning across multiple lessons in the topic, rather than a driving phenomenon or problem.

Indicator 1d

Phenomena and/or problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that phenomena and problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs). The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. The one problem identified in the Grade 2 materials is located in the Quest PBLs and is connected to a DCI associated with the grade-level performance expectations.

While the materials include sections that label an Anchoring Phenomenon and Investigative Phenomenon, students do not figure out or explain a phenomenon. Rather, these sections contain questions to help build an understanding of the question that center around a DCI or content learning. Because students do not figure out phenomena, the materials present no opportunities to connect a DCI to a phenomenon.

Example of a problem connected to a DCI associated with the grade-level performance expectations:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Quest PBL: Save the Town, the problem is that the ocean breaks down the land on the coast. Students draw a design on a map to communicate how people can protect a city from flooding. Students design and build a model to test how waves could affect a shoreline in a coastal town and change the shape of the land (DCI-ESS2.A-P1). They compare their solution with a partner’s solution and present their findings to the class, explaining how their design will prevent the ocean from breaking down the land on the coast and prevent the city from flooding.

Indicator 1e

Phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible.

There are four instructional segments in Grade 2, each comprised of one to two topics with a total of six topics altogether. The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. Within the Quest PBLs for this grade level, one problem that students solve is presented. However, it is not presented as directly as possible.

Example of the problem that is not presented as directly as possible:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Quest PBL: Save the Town, the problem is that the ocean breaks down the land on the coast. The problem is presented through a letter from an environmental engineer asking students to help the engineer stop the ocean from washing away the coastline to save a town. Students watch a video that addresses what environmental engineers do but this video does not directly address or show students the problem that they are trying to solve.

Indicator 1f

Phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions. Across the grade, the materials do not use phenomena or problems to drive student learning within individual lessons. Frequently, the learning objective focuses on the learning of a DCI or associated element, resulting in a missed opportunity for students to use the three dimensions as they work towards explaining phenomena or solving problems.

There is one identified problem in the Quest PBL in Topic 4. This problem does not drive the learning throughout the lessons, although it does drive learning of individual Quest Check-Ins. However, key elements of all three dimensions are not incorporated and most often exclude the CCC. This represents a missed opportunity for students to engage with all three dimensions to make sense of a problem.

Examples where individual lessons or activities are not driven by phenomena and/or problems, and do not engage students with all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 1: Earth Changes Quickly, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn about rapid changes to the earth (DCI-ESS1.C-P1). Students look at a picture of a volcano erupting before building a model to show how the land changes near the volcano. Students make a volcano out of modeling clay and squirt glue from the top of the volcano, recording their observations. Students use their observations to answer the question, “How did your model show changes to the Surface of the Earth?” Students explain that the model shows how the flowing lava cools and hardens, changing the shape of the volcano (SEP-CEDS-P1). Students then read about earthquakes, floods, and landslides. The text notes that each of these events is an example of quick changes of the earth. Students discuss the use of models when discussing the effects of earthquake damage. The Quest Check-In at the end of the lesson includes a problem of a city being flooded and students design a solution to protect the city (SEP-MOD-E4). While students engaged in a design challenge during this lesson, it did not drive the learning of this lesson and students did not use all three dimensions to solve this design challenge.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 6, Lesson 1: Identifying Habitats, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn that plants and animals get what they need from their habitats. Students select plants and animals that would have their needs met in a grassland habitat (DCI-LS4.D-P1) and explain why they made their selections. Students read about different kinds of habitats and how these habitats meet the needs of the plants and animals that live there. In the Interactivity, students identify how different parts of a beaver’s habitat meet its needs. Students spray water onto a paper model of two leaves, one covered with wax-paper and the other not. They analyze the results to decide what kind of habitat each leaf would need based on its ability to absorb water through its leaves (SEP-DATA-P3). Students apply learning from this lesson to make a plan to grow plants on Mars.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 4, Topic 6, Lesson 3: Living Things in Water Habitats, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn about different aquatic habitats and how those habitats support the diversity of life that lives there (DCI-LS4.D-P1). Students look at an illustration of a habitat that shows plants both above and below the water. Students look at the mangrove trees and describe how the roots are interacting with sand and water. Students draw a model of a plant that could meet its needs in that habitat (SEP-MOD-E4). Students read about different kinds of water habitats, the kinds of life these habitats support, and that whales have many structures in their bodies that help them to function in their habitat (CCC-SF-E2). Students view photographs, select an animal that does not belong in a water habitat, and explain their reasoning. Finally, students pick one of the habitats they have learned about and explain why the habitat is important, describe the features of the habitat, identify which living things need the habitat, and explain ways this habitat could be protected.

Examples of lessons or activities that are not driven by a phenomenon or problem but incorporate elements of all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Describe Earth’s Surface, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn about different landforms on earth’s surface. Students point to a place on a map or globe and identify if it is land (DCI-ESS2.B-P1) or water and if it is solid or liquid (DCI-PS1.A-P1). Students develop a map of their favorite place and to explain what they learned by drawing and labeling their map (SEP-MOD-P3, SEP-INFO-P4). Students draw lines on the map and discuss how maps help us get to and from places. Students obtain information about the different types of landforms and how they are formed from text and images (DCI-ESS2.B-P1, SEP-INFO-P1,) as they read and respond to the question boxes found within the text. One section of the text notes that earth’s surface can change slowly or rapidly (CCC-SC-P2).
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 2, Lesson 1: Describe Matter, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn the difference between a liquid and a solid. Students collect evidence about matter (DCI-PS1.A-P1) by observing and sorting objects. They explain their reasoning for their categories (SEP-INV-P4). Students read about matter, solids, and liquids and then explain how they know something is matter (DCI-PS1.A-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). As students read about liquids and solids, they identify cause and effect relationships, such as identifying the effect on a ball when it is filled with air (CCC-CE-P2). Students compare objects to determine whether they are solids or liquids, the properties of the objects, and how useful the object is as a building material (DCI-PS1.A-P1, DCI-PS1.A-P2).

Indicator 1g

Materials are designed to include both phenomena and problems.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 are designed for students to solve problems in 17% (1/6) of the topics. Throughout the materials, 0% (0/6) of the topics focus on explaining phenomena. There are four Instructional Segments in Grade 2, each comprised of one to two topics with a total of six topics altogether. Each topic consists of two to four lessons, uConnect labs, uInvestigate labs, and uDemonstrate labs, a Career Connection page, and Quest Problem Based Learning (PBL). The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. Within the grade level, 17% (1/6) of the topics present problems or design challenges that students solve; these are found in Quest PBL sections of the materials.

Each Instructional Segment begins with a section labeled as an Anchoring Phenomenon that provides a focus question for the segment. For example, Instructional Segment 3 provides the question, “Oh landscape, what’s your story?” as the Anchoring Phenomenon. Each topic within a segment provides a question labeled as an Investigative Phenomenon; these questions help build an understanding of the segment-level question. The topic within Segment 3 labels the question, “What can cause land to change?” as the Investigative Phenomenon. Each of the three lessons within this topic focuses on smaller questions to help students answer the topic-level question. The learning at each of these levels focuses on answering a lesson-, topic-, or segment-level question centered around a DCI or content learning, resulting in missed opportunities for students to explain phenomena that they observe. As a result, students do not figure out phenomena in this grade level.

Examples of problems in the series:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Quest PBL: Save the Town, the problem is that the ocean breaks down the land on the coast. Students draw a design on a map to communicate how people can protect a city from flooding. Students design and build a model to test how waves could affect a shoreline in a coastal town. Students design and test a way to protect the town from ocean waves. They compare their solution with a partner’s solution and present their findings to the class, explaining how their design will prevent the ocean from breaking down the land on the coast and prevent the city from flooding.

Indicator 1h

Materials intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems. The materials elicit students’ prior knowledge in the lessons or activities with the one problem located in the Quest PBL, but do not leverage prior knowledge. Students discuss and share prior knowledge, but the materials do not provide guidance or support for students to leverage this knowledge and experience as they design solutions.

Example where materials elicit but do not leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to problems:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4, Quest PBL: Save the Town, the problem is that the ocean breaks down the land on the coast. After watching a video describing how an environmental engineer uses knowledge of Earth’s processes, student ideas about what will happen to a sandcastle when it is hit by a wave are elicited. Teachers ask students to share examples of structures they have seen that have been built to hold back water or ground or block wind. Teachers lead a discussion on the effect of water on buildings and roads, and students discuss what they know about the California coastline. This elicits student knowledge and experiences related to this problem, but the materials do not provide teacher guidance for leveraging students’ ideas as a means of solving the problem.

Indicator 1i

Materials embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet expectations that they embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions. Across the grade, a concept or a question is used to frame learning across multiple lessons in the topic, rather than a driving phenomenon or problem.

Within the six topics in the grade, there is one problem in the Quest PBLs. The one Quest PBL provides multimodal opportunities for students to engage in developing, evaluating, and revising their thinking as they solve the design challenge. There are few opportunities for students to develop, evaluate, and revise their thinking outside of the Quest PBLs.

While the design challenge in the Quest PBL provides opportunities for students to apply the learning from the lesson and connect across multiple lessons in the topic, it does not drive the learning of the lesson or the topic. Students do not consistently engage in all three dimensions to solve the problems or design challenge.

Examples of topics that do not use phenomena or problems to drive student learning across multiple lessons:

  • In Grade 2, Segment 1, Topic 1: Earth’s Water and Land, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the question, “How can we use maps to find land and water?” Throughout the topic, students use maps to locate land and water. In Lesson 1, students draw and label a map and discuss how maps help us get to and from places (SEP-MOD-P2). Students use text and images to learn about the different types of landforms and how they are formed (SEP-INFO-P1, DCI-ESS2.A-P1). One section of the text notes that earth’s surface can change slowly or rapidly (CCC-SC-P2). In Lesson 2, students use a drawing of a river to determine the best place to cross. In Lesson 3, students use various maps to view different locations. Students explore using map keys and map scales (CCC-SPQ-P1).
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 2: Properties of Matter, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the question, “How can different materials be used?” This topic focuses on learning that matter can be compared, described, and used for different purposes. Students observe, measure, and determine which objects are bigger (SEP-INV-P4). In Lesson 1, students figure out the difference between six objects that include both solids and liquids. Students work in groups to classify the objects according to their properties of matter (DCI-PS1.A-P1, SEP-INV-P4). Students collect data based on properties of different objects (SEP-DATA-P2) and read about properties of matter. Then they decide which material would be a better building material (DCI-PS1.A-P2). Students read about cause and effect relationships related to liquids and solids. For example, students answer questions about the effect on a ball when it is filled with air (CCC-CE-P2). Students are encouraged to ask questions during the Quest PBL (SEP-AQDP-P1) to better understand the relationship between properties and uses or purposes of objects. Students design a nutcracker and share the design with their peers. After discussing it, students share how they might improve and revise their design. Students have the opportunity to revise their thinking as they design their nutcracker. In Lesson 2, students make a dam choosing which of the given materials they think would work best and test their dams to see if they hold water. Students compare their dam to others and determine what properties of matter make effective dams (DCI-PS1.A-P2). Students read about measuring properties and then fill out a chart with properties and how each one could be measured or tested. Lesson 3 begins with students predicting which blocks will fit in the package. Students then test their prediction, collect data, and compare the outcomes to their predictions (SEP-DATA-P4). Students observe matter, describe matter, sort matter, and collect evidence about matter. Students explore different properties of matter in investigations, visuals, and text.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 2, Topic 3: Changing Matter, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the question, “How do you change materials?” In Lesson 1, students use clay to investigate how they can change the shape and color of matter (SEP-INV-P4). Students use evidence from their investigation to explain that some of the changes they made could be undone, while others could not (DCI-PS1.B-P1, SEP-CEDS-P1). In Lesson 2, students investigate how matter changes (DCI-PS1.B-P1) when it is heated or cooled (CCC-CE-P2). Students plan an investigation to melt and cool crayons (SEP-INV-P2). Students create a chart to record observations and use the chart to describe the temperature change each day (SEP-MATH-P2, SEP-DATA-P2). In Lesson 3, students build a structure to solve something they think is a problem (SEP-CEDS-P2), explain how it solved the problem, and reflect on their solution and how they might improve their design (SEP-MOD-E5). Students read about how small parts can be assembled to make a model and then create a drawing of small parts to make a larger object (DCI-PS1.A-P3, SEP-MOD-P3). This topic engages students in the three dimensions.
  • In Grade 2, Segment 3, Topic 4: Earth’s Processes, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, the learning sequence is driven by the topic of earth’s surface changes. While there is a problem—preventing coastline erosion due to waves—that relates to the student learning on the topic of earth’s surface changes, the problem does not drive the learning across multiple lessons. Instead, students apply what they learned about erosion and human-built solutions as they design a solution to protect a coastal town. The Quest PBL introduces the problem of designing a way to protect a coast from the water. In Lesson 1, students build models of volcanoes and explain how their model shows how a volcanic eruption can quickly change the surface of the earth (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Students read text, watch a video, and complete an interactive experience where they observe and learn that volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, and landslides change the surface of the earth quickly (DCI-ESS1.C-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). During the Quest PBL at the end of the lesson, students are shown a map of a city with a river and then draw how to protect the city from flooding. In Lesson 2, students make models of mountains to test how animals and weather conditions, such as rain or wind, affect the shape of the mountain (SEP-MOD-P3). Students read about earth movement, mountains, erosion, and deposition. Students compare earthquakes and erosion. The teacher materials provide guidance to help students consider the stability and change of earth’s surface (CCC-SC-P1). At the end of the lesson, students return to the Quest PBL and design a model to show how the ocean waves affect the shore. In Lesson 3, students test how plants protect soil from wind. Students read text about changes to the land and water made by people; these changes include dams to prevent floods and dikes to hold back ocean water. In the Quest PBL at the end of this lesson, students draw a solution to protect a shoreline from ocean waves. While students engage with a problem in this topic and have multimodal opportunities to develop and revise their thinking related to this problem, the problem does not drive learning across multiple lessons.

Gateway Two

Coherence and Scope

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Two Details
Materials were not reviewed for Gateway Two because materials did not meet or partially meet expectations for Gateway One

Criterion 2a - 2g

Materials are coherent in design, scientifically accurate, and support grade-level and grade-band endpoints of all three dimensions.

Indicator 2a

Materials are designed for students to build and connect their knowledge and use of the three dimensions across the series.
N/A

Indicator 2a.i

Students understand how the materials connect the dimensions from unit to unit.
N/A

Indicator 2a.ii

Materials have an intentional sequence where student tasks increase in sophistication.
N/A

Indicator 2b

Materials present Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) in a way that is scientifically accurate.*
N/A

Indicator 2c

Materials do not inappropriately include scientific content and ideas outside of the grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.*
N/A

Indicator 2d

Materials incorporate all grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 2d.i

Physical Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.ii

Life Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iii

Earth and Space Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iv

Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
N/A

Indicator 2e

Materials incorporate all grade-band Science and Engineering Practices.
N/A

Indicator 2e.i

Materials incorporate grade-level appropriate SEPs within each grade.
N/A

Indicator 2e.ii

Materials incorporate all SEPs across the grade band.
N/A

Indicator 2f

Materials incorporate all grade-band Crosscutting Concepts.
N/A

Indicator 2g

Materials incorporate NGSS Connections to Nature of Science and Engineering
N/A

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3d

Materials are designed to support teachers not only in using the materials, but also in understanding the expectations of the standards.

Indicator 3a

Materials include background information to help teachers support students in using the three dimensions to explain phenomena and solve problems (also see indicators 3b and 3l).
N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials provide guidance that supports teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences to engage students in figuring out phenomena and solving problems.
N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials contain teacher guidance with sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3e - 3k

Materials are designed to support all students in learning.

Indicator 3e

Materials are designed to leverage diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students.
N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide appropriate support, accommodations, and/or modifications for numerous special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning science and engineering.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials provide multiple access points for students at varying ability levels and backgrounds to make sense of phenomena and design solutions to problems.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials include opportunities for students to share their thinking and apply their understanding in a variety of ways.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials include a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3k

Materials are made accessible to students by providing appropriate supports for different reading levels.
N/A

Criterion 3l - 3s

Materials are designed to be usable and also to support teachers in using the materials and understanding how the materials are designed.

Indicator 3l

The teacher materials provide a rationale for how units across the series are intentionally sequenced to build coherence and student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to NGSS.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts and Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3n.i

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts Common Core State Standards.
N/A

Indicator 3n.ii

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3o

Resources (whether in print or digital) are clear and free of errors.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials include a comprehensive list of materials needed.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials embed clear science safety guidelines for teacher and students across the instructional materials.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials designated for each grade level are feasible and flexible for one school year.
N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials contain strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers about the science program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3t - 3y

Materials are designed to assess students and support the interpretation of the assessment results.

Indicator 3t

Assessments include a variety of modalities and measures.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Assessments offer ways for individual student progress to be measured over time.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities and guidance for oral and/or written peer and teacher feedback and self reflection, allowing students to monitor and move their own learning.
N/A

Indicator 3w

Tools are provided for scoring assessment items (e.g., sample student responses, rubrics, scoring guidelines, and open-ended feedback).
N/A

Indicator 3x

Guidance is provided for interpreting the range of student understanding (e.g., determining what high and low scores mean for students) for relevant Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 3y

Assessments are accessible to diverse learners regardless of gender identification, language, learning exceptionality, race/ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.
N/A

Criterion 3z - 3ad

Materials are designed to include and support the use of digital technologies.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate digital technology and interactive tools (data collection tools, simulations, modeling), when appropriate, in ways that support student engagement in the three dimensions of science.
N/A

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials are web based and compatible with multiple internet browsers. In addition, materials are “platform neutral,” are compatible with multiple operating systems and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess three-dimensional learning using digital technology.
N/A

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be customized for individual learners, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g., websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A
abc123

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 12/15/2020

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
ELVSCI20 CA SGMNTS DCW 1YR LIC GR.2 0134926323 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 1 SE G2 0134980123 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 2 SE G2 0134980131 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 3 SE G2 013498014X 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 4 SE G2 0134980166 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW TE GR. 2 0134980336 2020

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Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

Science K-5 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The science review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflects the importance of alignment to the standards then considers other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For science, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Three-Dimensional Learning
  • Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning
  • Coherence and Full Scope of the Three Dimensions
  • Design to Facilitate Teacher Learning
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

To best read our reports we recommend utilizing the Codes for NGSS Elements document that provides the code and description of elements cited as evidence in each report.

 

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

Math High School

ELA K-2

ELA 3-5

ELA 6-8


ELA High School

Science Middle School

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