Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for First Grade do not meet expectations for Alignment to NGSS, Gateways 1 and 2. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. While the learning sequences incorporate the three dimensions in a few lessons, the materials do not consistently integrate them into three-dimensional learning opportunities for students. Only a few opportunities for student sensemaking occur with the three dimensions; student sensemaking is consistently two-dimensional with SEPs and DCIs. The summative assessments are not consistently three dimensional and do not consistently measure the three dimensions for the topic-level objectives (PEs). The lesson level objectives are also not three-dimensional. Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS; Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations. Phenomena and problems are not present and therefore are not able to be connected to DCIs, presented to students as directly as possible, to elicit and leverage student prior knowledge and experience, or drive learning and use of the three dimensions within or across lessons.

Alignment

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Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Designed for NGSS

0
14
24
28
2
24-28
Meets Expectations
15-23
Partially Meets Expectations
0-14
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Coherence and Scope

0
16
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
17-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-16
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
30
50
59
N/A
50-59
Meets Expectations
31-49
Partially Meets Expectations
0-30
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Designed for NGSS

Does Not Meet Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations for Gateway 1: Designed for NGSS. Criterion 1: Three-Dimensional Learning does not meet expectations. Criterion 2: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning does not meet expectations.

Criterion 1a - 1c

Materials are designed for three-dimensional learning and assessment.
2/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations for Criterion 1a-1c: Three-Dimensional Learning. The materials do not consistently include integration of the three dimensions in at least one learning opportunity per learning sequence. However, nearly all learning sequences are meaningfully designed for student opportunity to engage in sensemaking with the SEPs and DCIs, but only a few learning sequences include the CCCs in sensemaking opportunities with the other dimensions. The materials do not provide three-dimensional learning objectives at the lesson level and the respective assessments are not consistently three dimensional. The materials provide three-dimensional objectives at the topic level, but summative tasks do not measure student achievement of all learning objectives (PEs) or their associated elements, and few summative assessment tasks are three-dimensional in design.

Indicator 1a

Materials are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) into student learning.

Indicator 1a.i

Materials consistently integrate the three dimensions in student learning opportunities.
0/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that they are designed to integrate the Science and Engineering Practices (SEPs), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs) into student learning opportunities. Grade 1 materials are organized into four segments, with one to two topics per segment and two to four learning sequences or lessons per topic, totaling 14 lessons. Each lesson consists of four sections: Engage, Explore, Explain and Elaborate, and Evaluate. Of the 14 lessons or learning sequences, few integrate all three dimensions within a single learning opportunity in the lesson. When present, the integrated opportunities are typically found in the Explain and Elaborate section. A few lessons include the three dimensions across the learning sequence but did not integrate them within a learning opportunity. The remainder of the lessons were two-dimensional, consistently incorporating SEPs with DCIs.

Examples where the materials do not incorporate all three dimensions into a learning sequence:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 3: People Learn from Plant and Animal Parts, students learn about how engineers can mimic plant and animal parts as they design solutions. Students remove the cap of an acorn to observe the acorn, use a small hammer to tap on the acorn, and record their observations. Then they analyze the data by explaining how the hard shell helps the acorn and how people can copy what the acorn does to help people stay alive (SEP-INV-P4, SEP-DATA-P3, DCI-LS1.A-P1). Students read text about how people mimic nature then describe how porcupines use quills for protection and how a burr is like velcro. They relate these protective structures to a barbed wire fence (SEP-INFO-P2). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of using structures in nature for engineered solutions.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 2, Topic 3, Lesson 2: Make Sound, students learn about the relationship between sound and vibrations. Students use plastic cups, string, plastic wrap, and sand to vibrate objects to make sounds and show that sound can make objects vibrate, then read about sound (DCI-PS4.A-P1). They develop a simple model to represent an instrument to show vibrations and to make sound. They explain their evidence and answer the question, “How do you know the sand is evidence of sound?” (SEP-MOD-P3, SEP-ARG-P1). Students then compare the results to what happens when they hum loudly versus softly (SEP-INV-P4). Students use their voices and look at a variety of instruments in order to conclude that sounds are made by vibrations. Then students make a plan to investigate how different combinations of objects can make different sounds. They listen to sound as they strike a rubber spatula to a metal box. They repeat the process with a wooden spoon and a plastic container, and then with a whisk and a metal baking tray. Each time they record the objects, a description of the sound, and the assigned action. Lastly, they analyze and interpret data and compare their results with another group. They share why some objects would make good instruments to send a secret message (SEP-INV-P2, SEP-INV-P4). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop this understanding of making sound.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 2: Light and Matter, students observe and explore how light interacts with different materials. Students plan and carry out an investigation to recognize that different materials allow more light to get through than others (DCI-PS4.B-P2, SEP-INV-P2). They use a flashlight to examine different materials and use what they have learned to decide what kind of material should be used to completely darken a room. They read text about how different types of matter interact with light: blocking it, letting it through, or reflecting it (DCI-PS4.B-P2, SEP-INFO-P1). Students identify materials that let light through or block light and explain what happens when light reflects. There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of light and matter.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 2, Lesson 2: Patterns in Animal Behavior, Explain and Elaborate, students learn how parents protect their young. Students watch a video showing how penguins protect their eggs and their young chicks. Students then look at pictures of different animals and their offspring and identify specific ways these animal parents protect their young (DCI-LS1.B-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). There is a missed opportunity for students to use crosscutting concepts as they develop their understanding of animal behaviors used to protect their young.

Examples where the materials incorporate all three dimensions into a learning sequence but do not integrate within a learning opportunity:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Plant Parts, students identify major parts of plants and explain how those parts can help plants. In the Explore section, students observe parts of a plant (SEP-INV-P4) and explain how they think the shape of the stem helps the plant. In the Explain and Elaborate section, students view a picture of a plant and discuss how the leaves, trunks, and roots of the tree help it live (DCI-LS1.A-P1) and discuss the function of flowers and fruit. Students then match different leaf types to different trees, based on their descriptions. In the Evaluate section, students discuss the concept of structure and function and relate it to plant roots. They are asked to determine how shallow roots function to keep plants alive and how the structure of taproots help keep plants alive (CCC-SF-P1). While all three dimensions were present in this lesson, they were not integrated within a learning opportunity.

Examples where the materials integrate all three dimensions into a learning opportunity within a learning sequence:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 2: Patterns in the Sky, uConnect Lab, students plan and conduct an investigation and record their observations of where the sun appears in the sky at different points in the day (DCI-ESS1.A-P1, SEP-INV-P2, SEP-DATA-P1). They record their observations and explain the pattern of the sun’s movement. They then use their data to determine that there is a daily pattern of motion (CCC-PAT-P1): the sun appears higher and lower in the sky at certain times of day and appears to move from east to west throughout the day.

Indicator 1a.ii

Materials consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions.
2/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet expectations that they consistently support meaningful student sensemaking with the three dimensions. In nearly all of the 14 lessons, SEPs meaningfully support student sensemaking with a DCI. In three lessons, the materials contain three-dimensional sensemaking where both a CCC and a SEP are used to help students make sense with the DCI.

Examples of learning sequence where SEPs or CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 2, Lesson 1: Observe Parents and Young, students learn that young plants and animals are similar, but not exactly like their parents. Students compare two plants and share ideas about what their offspring might look like. Students read material comparing and contrasting adult plants and animals and young plants and animals (DCI-LS3.A-P1). Students use text and images to compare parents and offspring in both plants and animals. Students discuss differences among a young plant and a parent plant based on prior knowledge by acting out the differences. Students explore the question, "What do young plants look like?" They choose one parent plant from a set of images. They draw the plant on paper. They look at the parent plant to observe the size, shape, leaves, and color. They draw what the young plant would look like. They share their observations around the differences between the parent tree and its offspring (SEP-DATA-P1, SEP-DATA-P2, SEP-DATA-P3). There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of differences between parents and their young.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 1: Observe Light, students learn that light sometimes is reflected and sometimes is blocked. Students observe their hand making shadows on a piece of paper and a toy’s shadow on a piece of cardboard. As they do this, students move the light source different distances from the object (SEP-INV-P4, DCI-PS4.B-P2) and then record their observations (SEP-DATA-P1). Students use information from their investigation and text to explain that a shadow is made when an object blocks light (SEP-INFO-P1, DCI-PS4.B-P2). There is a missed opportunity for students to use elements of the crosscutting concepts to make sense of light and shadows.

Examples of learning sequence where SEPs and CCCs meaningfully support student sensemaking with the other dimensions:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 2: Animal Parts, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of how animal parts help the animal (DCI-LS1.A-P1). Students read text about how animals use their body parts to help them move. In one example, a bear uses its legs to move. Students look at the feet in a picture of a bear, explain how the feet help the bear move, and describe one way the bear might use its claws (DCI-LS1.A-P1, SEP-INFO-P1, SEP-INFO-P2, CCC-SF-P1). Students read about how parts help animals and then design a tool based on an animal part. Students make a model of a cat’s whiskers to demonstrate that the shape and structure of the cat’s whiskers can help it move through objects and around objects safely (SEP-MOD-P3, CCC-SF-P1). Students continue to make sense of how animal parts help an animal by exploring the shapes of animal parts and that they use these parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp, protect, move, seek, find, and take in food and water and air (DCI-LS1.A-P1, CCC-SF-P1).
  • In Grade 1, Segment 2, Topic 3, Lesson 1: Describe Sound, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of sound, vibration, pitch, and volume. Students describe, investigate, and read about sound. Students make a model using different lengths of straws to make sense of how the length of a straw affects the pitch of a sound. They discover how their breath makes the straws vibrate and produce different sounds (DCI-PS4.A-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Students continue to make sense of how sound is made from vibrations by hitting sticks on drums, plucking a violin string, and striking a pencil on a desk (CCC-CE-P2). Students see that sound can make matter vibrate and vibrating matter can make sound. As they explore these instruments, they make sense of how vibrations cause sound.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 3: Daylight Changes and Seasons, students use SEPs and CCCs to make sense of why days have different lengths during different seasons. Students look for a pattern to make sense of the length of days changing as they read the captions that go along with each picture representing each season. They use their observations of these pictures and captions to identify a pattern in the amount of sunshine that occurs in each season (SEP-INFO-P1, CCC-PAT-P1, DCI-ESS1.B-M2). Then students observe and record the time of sunset over five days (SEP-DATA-P1). They compare the data they collected to the data in the provided table. Students determine if the patterns are similar between the collected and provided data (CCC-PAT-P1). Finally, they use patterns from their data collected to predict how the sunset time will change in a week's time (DCI-ESS1.B-P1, CCC-PAT-E2).

Indicator 1b

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence for the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.

Across the materials, lesson objectives are not three-dimensional, and, as a result, assessment tasks do not consistently reveal student knowledge and use of the three dimensions to support the targeted three-dimensional learning objectives. While the objectives often build towards the performance task for the topic, they do not represent three-dimensional learning targets for the lessons. The majority of the assessment tasks address the objectives and assess the DCIs, and at times the SEPs.

Formative assessments are frequent and are spread across each lesson. However, most tasks do not include support for teachers to adjust instruction based on student responses to formative assessments. The majority of the Teacher Edition formative assessment questions are discussion-based and no directions are provided to support the teacher in eliciting ideas from each student or adjusting instruction based on student responses.

The discussion-based questions do not elicit individual student understanding. The Student Edition Check Points, Interactivities, and Online Quizzes are taken individually. Interactivities frequently only assess the DCIs. The online quizzes are all multiple choice. The uInvestigate Labs are at the beginning of each lesson, before any reading or investigations, and do not measure any lesson learning. While information gained from the labs could provide formative data to inform instructional next steps, the teacher materials do not include support for using this data or adjusting instruction.

Examples of lessons that do not have a three-dimensional objective, the formative assessment tasks partially assess student knowledge of all three dimensions, and the materials do not provide guidance to support the instructional process:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 2: Animal Parts, the lesson objectives are “Students will identify the major parts of animals” and “Students will explain how the parts help animals.” These are not three-dimensional learning objectives, although they build towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. In the uInvestigate Lab, students build a model of a cat’s whiskers and figure out how the whiskers can help cats get through openings (DCI-LS1.A-P1, SEP-MOD-P3). Students then compare their models with other student models to identify similarities and differences (SEP-MOD-P2). In the Interactivity, students are asked what body parts are used to keep animals safe (DCI-LS1.A-P1). This task addresses the lesson objectives. After the reading in the Explore there is a set of three scaffolded formative assessment questions in which students are asked who, what, when, where, and why questions to describe a horse’s hooves (DCI-LS1.A-P1). The materials state, “Who—a horse has hooves. What—hooves are parts of the horse’s feet. When—a horse uses hooves when it walks, trots, or runs.” Students are then asked how fins help fish (DCI-LS1.A-P1, SEP-CEDS-P1) and the final question asks them to compare and contrast how bird wings and fish fins are alike (DCI-LS1.D-P1, SEP-INV-P4). These questions also address the lesson objective. In the Online Quiz, all four questions deal with the external structures of the animals and how those structures help those animals to survive. The first two questions ask students how scales and gills help fish (DCI-LS1.A-P1). The third question asks students to look at a picture of a squirrel that has parts of the body highlighted. Students are to identify the part that helps it to sense danger (DCI-LS1.D-P1). These questions assess the lesson objectives, but do not assess all dimensions. The materials do not provide teacher guidance for adjusting instruction based on student responses to formative assessments.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 2, Lesson 2: Patterns in Animal Behavior, the lesson objectives are “Students will tell what an animal needs” and “Students will explain how the behaviors of the parents and their young help them survive.” These are not three-dimensional learning objectives, although they build towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. In the uInvestigate Lab, “How Do Nests Protect Birds,” students design and build a nest (SEP-MOD-E4). They use marbles to represent eggs. They then describe how the nest they built protects the marbles. Students then compare their model to a real bird’s nest (SEP-MOD-P1). After the reading in the Explore, the teacher asks three formative assessment questions. The students look at text and pictures and identify the way the parent is helping their young. In question two, students draw how a parent is helping its young. In the final question, students make a general statement of how parents help their young after seeing pictures of four different birds bringing food to their young (DCI-LS1.B-P1). These questions address the learning objectives. In the Interactivity, students read that the behavior of parent animals helps their young survive. Students select the picture of an adult bird feeding its young. Then students are shown a picture of a baby kangaroo in its parent’s pouch and asked how the parent is helping. Finally, there is a picture of a parent wolf and its young hunting and students are to determine what behavior the parent is doing (DCI-LS1.B-P1). In the second set of formative questions, students define behavior, explain why it is important for elephants to teach the young how to use the trunk, and revise their thinking after reading, explaining what parents teach their young (DCI-LS1.B-P1). These questions also assess the lesson objective. In the Online Quiz, there are questions about baby birds in a nest and the parent making the nest. Students then look at a picture of a zebra drinking water and are asked what is happening. The last question asks students what a lion is doing when it shows its young to hunt. Students then choose between what is an animal need and what is animal behavior (DCI-LS1.B-P1, DCI-LS1.C-P1). These questions partially address the lesson objectives but do not assess all dimensions.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 3: Uses of Light, the lesson objectives are “Explain how people use light” and “Identify how people use light to communicate with others that are far away.” These are not three-dimensional learning objectives, although they build towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. In the uInvestigate Lab, students investigate how mirrors can be used to see a toy at the end of a maze. They plan a way to see the toy, try their plan, and describe how light is used to see the toy (DCI-PS4.B-P2, SEP-CEDS-P1). After the reading in the Explore section, students are asked “Why would a store owner want to use an ‘open’ sign that is lit?” Then students define a problem and suggest a solution for people to see better in a parking lot at night (DCI-PS4.B-P1). In the Interactivity, students synthesize and apply what they have learned throughout the lesson in five interactivity tasks that reveal what they know about how lights can keep people safe. First, they click on different colors of a stoplight to listen or read about what each color means for drivers. Then, students drag and drop pictures of lights to the places they are used to help people on a city street. They look at a picture of lights on the floor of a theater and infer why they are there. Students are shown a picture of a city street at night and asked to circle the lights that are used to keep people safe. Finally, students are shown a picture of neon reflective sneakers and asked to explain why someone might wear these sneakers to be safe running at night (DCI-PS4.B-P1, SEP-DATA-P1, DCI-CEDS-P1). In the Online Quiz, students answer, “Why is this driver using headlights now?” and ”Which change would make the driver not need to use headlights?” (DCI-PS4.B-P1). The next question asks students, “Which sentence tells about bright yellow lights and dark purple lights in a theater?” These questions assess the lesson objectives but do not assess all dimensions.

Example of a lesson that does not have a three-dimensional objective, the formative assessment task(s) assess student knowledge of the learning objective and includes all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 4, Topic 5, Lesson 2: Patterns in the Sky, the lesson objective is “Students will tell what causes day and night and moon patterns.” This is not a three-dimensional learning objective, although it builds towards a three-dimensional objective for the topic. In the uInvestigate Lab, students investigate how to observe sun patterns. Students plan and conduct an investigation, record observations, and analyze data to build knowledge about patterns of how the sun moves (DCI-ESS1.A-P1, SEP-INV-P2, SEP-DATA-P2). After the reading in the Explore section, the formative assessment questions ask students, “What is a sunrise?” and “Why do we say that the sun ‘seems’ to be moving?” (DCI-ESS1.A-P1, SEP-CEDS-P1). These questions assess the lesson objective but go far beyond what they have been learning. In the lesson Check Point, students describe what they see in the pictures of a boy and a telescope and the night sky (SEP-INFO-P1). They are guided to note the boy looking through the telescope pointed to the night sky for observation. Then they are asked to describe how the close of view of the stars through a telescope differs from what they can see of the stars without a telescope. They should use clues to conclude that a telescope is a type of magnifier that makes objects look larger and easier to observe. This task does not measure the lesson objective. In the second set of formative questions, students respond to the questions, “How does the moon move? What causes the patterns of the moon?” These questions assess the lesson objective. They are also asked about what kind of lens they would buy for a telescope. The Online Quiz asks students the question, “Carlos is looking at the night sky. Which tool can he use to make the stars appear larger and closer?” The next question asks how much time passes if a model of the earth spins one time (DCI-ESS1.B-E1, SEP-DATA-P3), which aligns with a fifth-grade DCI. Students are then asked what the flashlight represents in the model of the Sun and Earth (SEP-MOD-P1). While the objective is not three-dimensional and the lesson objective is not fully assessed, the questions assess three dimensions.

Indicator 1c

Materials are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials.
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that they are designed to elicit direct, observable evidence of the three-dimensional learning in the instructional materials. The materials provide three-dimensional learning objectives for the topic level in the form of performance expectations (PEs), but summative tasks measure student achievement of only some learning objectives (PEs) or their associated elements and few summative assessment tasks are three-dimensional in design.

There are three assessments at each topic level: Evidence-Based Assessment, uDemonstrate Lab, and the Online Topic Test. The Evidence-Based Assessment is typically four to six questions, the uDemonstrate Lab is a performance-based assessment, and the online assessment is mainly presented as a multiple-choice exam. There are two assessments at the segment level: the California Performance-Based Assessment and the Summative Benchmark Assessment which consists of multiple-choice questions. The assessments most often address the DCIs. The SEPs are occasionally assessed independently or in combination with the DCI. The CCCs are generally not assessed on any of the three assessments.

Examples where objectives are three-dimensional, but summative assessment tasks do not fully assess the three-dimensional learning objectives and are not three-dimensional in design:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 2: Parents and Offspring, the topic level objectives include two performance expectations: 1-LS1-2 and 1-LS3-1. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. The topic includes a four-question Evidence-Based Assessment, a uDemonstrate Lab, and a 10-question Online Test. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, students fill in a chart, write an explanation, answer a multiple-choice question, and fill in a blank. Two of the four questions assess a DCI and two of the four assess SEPs, but there is no evidence of CCCs being assessed. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, students are provided a scenario of a fish tank that has two kinds of fish, rocks, and plants. One fish had babies and they had to hide from the big fish by staying together in the plants. They only came out when they were fed. For the two questions, students use information from the reading passage to fill in a chart to indicate which listed characteristics are shared by both the younger and older fish and for the next question, students describe how the behaviors of the adult and young fish are different (SEP-INFO-P1, DCI-LS3.A-P1). Then students are asked to recall what color each kind of fish is. Finally, students choose the reason the young fish need the plants. Students are provided a procedure to follow in the uDemonstrate Lab performance-based assessment. Students observe and record observations of different materials used to model parts of a living thing to relate to the differences between the young and the parent (SEP-INV-E3). Then students explain how a young porcupine is the same and different from its parent (DCI-LS3.A-P1). Finally, students explain how a young plant is the same and different from its parent (DCI-LS3.A-P1). None of the questions assess a CCC. The Online Test is a 10-question test that addresses how young and parents are the same and different, as well as how parents help their young. The first three questions involve a scenario about meerkats and a table of data that have to be used to answer the questions (SEP-INFO-P1). The data show what a meerkat eats throughout five developmental stages. The questions ask students to choose patterns among the data and also write how they are like humans. Students determine from a picture which animals are the parent and which are the young, as well as how the parent is helping the young (DCI-LS3.A-P1, DCI-LS1.B-P1). Finally, students answer two multiple-choice questions about how adult and young plants are the same and different from each other (DCI-LS3.B-P1). The CCC in the PEs for this topic was not assessed: CCC-PAT-P1.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3: Shadows and Light, the objectives include three performance expectations: 1-PS4-2, 1-PS4-3, and 1-PS4-4. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. There is a six-question California Performance-Based Assessment and a 10-question Summative Benchmark Assessment. In the California Performance-Based Assessment, students read about how days get light, when it starts to get dark, and how the moon can also be seen but does not make its own light. Students answer question tasks that show their thinking. Students write to say what lights up the sky and earth during the day. Students tell a partner why they were able to see an object at night (DCI-PS4.B-P1). Students draw a diagram that shows how light moves from a flashlight in a dark room so you can see a book. Students then look at a diagram of Earth, Moon, and Sun and write to say why parts of the Earth and Moon are lit up and add arrows to show how light moves. Finally, students write to explain what has to happen to be able to see the moon. Of these six questions, only one assesses a DCI, and the SEPs and CCCs are not assessed. In the Summative Benchmark Assessment, students answer 10 online questions which are multiple-choice, drop-down, short-answer, and click-on-the-right-spot. Students click a drop-down to choose why a greenhouse is made of glass (DCI-PS4.B-P2). Students choose why light can reach plants in a greenhouse and write to say why covering part of the greenhouse will help plants from getting too much sun (DCI-PS4.B-P2). Students choose how a person can use light to tell people they can come into her store. Students click on a spot to choose what will help people see clothes in a store at night. Students choose how to make the lights less bright so people know the store is closing soon. Students click on the right spot to choose what will let someone in a boat at night know they are there and then choose how to use the light to let people know a person is in a boat. Then, students choose how a boy can see his seat in the theater. Finally, students choose what kind of material to make a lampshade from when it is too bright. Out of the 10 questions, two of them assess one of the DCIs in the PE objectives. The following elements from the PEs are not assessed in any of the summative assessments: SEP-INV-E3, CCC-CE-P1, SEP-INV-P2, SEP-CEDS-P2, DCI-PS4.C-P1, and CCC-INFLU-P3.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 4, Topic 5: Sky and Earth, the topic level objectives include two performance expectations: 1-ESS1-1 and 1-ESS1-2. Not all of the dimensions in these PEs are assessed. The topic includes a four-question Evidence-Based Assessment, a performance-based uDemonstrate Lab, and a 10-question Online Test. In the Evidence-Based Assessment, students read about how a girl makes a model of patterns in the sky by moving a ball in a circle around a lamp and then answer four questions. First, students identify that the ball is meant to represent the Earth and the lamp represents the Sun. Then students write to say what she modeled when she moved the ball around the lamp. Students are asked to identify what predictable pattern the model shows to say how the girl can use her model to explain patterns in the amount of daylight. While an SEP of modeling is assessed here, it is not one that is targeted toward the PEs for this topic. In the uDemonstrate Lab, students predict and then explore if a shadow will stay the same or change during a day. They make a plan to test the prediction, make observations, and record in a table showing the different lengths of the shadow and how the length changed (SEP-INV-P4). They explain what happened to the shadow and explain what pattern their observations show (SEP-DATA-P3). The CCC is not assessed here as students are not using the pattern as evidence. Students answer 10 online questions which are multiple-choice, drop-down, and short answers. Students click a drop-down to choose which part of the earth is having day and write to say how shadows look in the morning in an experiment. Students then choose which item would have a good shape to make a shadow for the experiment. Students choose how five-pointed stars should be redrawn to make them look more real. Next, students choose which picture shows what people do in summer and then choose pictures of which seasons have similar temperatures and hours of daylight (DCI-ESS1.B-P1). Students choose which object is moving to make shadows change. Then students choose how many days on the calendar it would be until the moon looks the same again. Finally, students choose when you would use a telescope and when someone could watch the stars (DCI-ESS1.A-P1). Two questions assess a DCI addressed in this topic’s PEs. The rest of the questions do not assess any elements and some assess above-grade-level DCIs. The following elements from the targeted PEs are not assessed in the summative assessments: CCC-PAT-P1 and SEP-INV-P4.

Criterion 1d - 1i

Materials leverage science phenomena and engineering problems in the context of driving learning and student performance.
0/12
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations for Criterion 1d-1i: Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning. The materials include phenomena and problems in 0% of the topics. Since phenomena and problems are not present, there is a missed opportunity for them to connect to DCIs, to be presented directly as possible, and for the materials to elicit and leverage student prior knowledge and experience related to phenomena and problems. The materials do not include phenomena and problems that drive student learning and use of the three dimensions within and across individual lessons. Across the grade, a concept or a question is used to frame learning across multiple lessons in the topic, rather than a driving phenomenon or problem.

Indicator 1d

Phenomena and/or problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that phenomena and problems are connected to grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs). While the materials include sections that label an Anchoring Phenomenon and Investigative Phenomenon, these sections contain questions to help build an understanding of the question that center around a DCI or content learning, resulting in missed opportunities for students to explain phenomena that they observe. Similarly, investigations and Quest PBLs do not provide students opportunities to gather evidence in order to design their own solutions to solve problems. Instead, students often use trial and error to test solutions, resulting in missed opportunities for students to use science ideas to design solutions.

Indicator 1e

Phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems are presented to students as directly as possible. While the materials include sections that label an Anchoring Phenomenon and Investigative Phenomenon, these sections contain questions to help build an understanding of the question that center around a DCI or content learning, resulting in missed opportunities for students to explain phenomena that they observe. Similarly, investigations and Quest PBLs do not provide students opportunities to gather evidence in order to design their own solutions to solve problems.

Indicator 1f

Phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that phenomena and/or problems drive individual lessons or activities using key elements of all three dimensions. Across the grade, the materials do not use phenomena or problems to drive student learning within individual lessons. Frequently, the learning objective focuses on the learning of a DCI or associated element, resulting in a missed opportunity for students to use the three dimensions as they work towards explaining phenomena or solving problems.

Examples where individual lessons or activities are not driven by phenomena and/or problems and do not engage students with all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 2, Topic 3, Lesson 3: Uses of Sound, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn how people use sound. Students plan and carry out an investigation to test how Morse Code can make a message using sound (SEP-INV-P4, DCI-PS4.C-P1). Students read about how sound and devices that produce sound are used to communicate over distances (SEP-INFO-E4). They also read about how phones have changed over time and discuss what types of phones they have used and why it is important to be able to communicate over distances. Finally, students make a device to send sound and use it to send a code (SEP-INV-P2, SEP-MOD-P4).
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 2: Light and Matter, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn about light. Students hold their hands or a piece of paper over their eyes to determine how that affects what they see (DCI-PS4.B-P2). Students plan an investigation (SEP-INV-P2) to observe the effect of light on each type of material (SEP-INV-P4), use this information to choose which material would be best to cover a window to darken a room, and explain the reason for their choice (DCI-PS4.B-P2). Students read text that focuses on the properties of materials: opaque, transparent, translucent, reflective, and how that relates to light. Students sort material through a digital activity based on opaque, transparent, translucent, and reflective properties and observe what it looks like when these materials interact with light. Students choose which material they would want to use for curtains and explain and engage in constructing an argument with evidence to support a claim (SEP-ARG-P6).
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3, Topic 4, Lesson 3: Uses of Light, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning. Rather, students learn about uses of light. Students state why the headlights on the car are turned on (DCI-PS4.C-P1). Students use cardboard and mirrors to build a maze; they place a toy at the end and plan a way to see the toy from the start of the maze (SEP-CEDS-P2). Students explain how they used mirrors to redirect light as they were trying to see through the maze (DCI-PS4.B-P1). Students answer the question, “What message do the lights on ambulances send?” and then make a message that they can send using light (DCI-PS4.C-P1, SEP-CEDS-P2). They make up a code, test it, and then evaluate their code.

Examples of lessons or activities that are not driven by a phenomenon or problem but incorporate elements of all three dimensions:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 1, Lesson 1: Plant Parts, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn that all organisms have external parts (DCI-LS1.A-P1). Students investigate and observe various plant parts and explain how those parts help the plant (SEP-INV-P1, SEP-INV-P4). Students read about the different structures in plants, learn their function, and then identify some of the structures and functions (DCI-LS1.A-P1, SEP-INFO-P1). Students explore the concept of how structures relate to their functions as they explore plant roots by comparing them to a picture of a tent stake (CCC-SF-P1).
  • In Grade 1, Segment 4, Topic 5: Sky and Earth, Lesson 2: Patterns in the Sky, a phenomenon or problem does not drive learning. Rather, students learn about patterns of the Sun and Moon (DCI-ESS1.A-P1). Students draw different shapes of the Moon they have seen and make a plan to observe Sun patterns during the day. Students plan and carry out a plan to make observations of the motion of the sun in the day sky (SEP-INV-P4). Students use their observations to identify a pattern and make sense of what is happening in the sky (DCI-ESS1.A-P1, CCC-PAT-P1). Students read text that identifies the predictable patterns of motion of the Sun and Moon and fill in a cause and effect chart about the sun in the morning (CCC-CE-E1). Students then observe the moon for several days and record their observations (SEP-DATA-P1). Students use moon patterns to fill in a calendar with appropriate moon shapes and then predict the date of the next full moon by using the pattern from the calendar (CCC-PAT-P1).

Indicator 1g

Materials are designed to include both phenomena and problems.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 are designed for students to solve problems in 0% (0/5) of the topics. Throughout the materials, 0% (0/5) of the topics focus on explaining phenomena. There are four Instructional Segments in Grade 1, each comprised of one to two topics with a total of five topics altogether. Each topic consists of two to four lessons, uConnect labs, uInvestigate labs, uDemonstrate labs, a Career Connection page, and Quest Problem Based Learning (PBL). The Quest PBL is part of the launch of the topic and then revisited in each lesson and at the end of the topic. As a result, students do not solve problems in this grade level.

Each Instructional Segment begins with a section labeled as an Anchoring Phenomenon that provides a focus question for the segment. For example, Instructional Segment 3 provides the question, “How can you make a room brighter?” as the Anchoring Phenomenon. Each topic within a segment provides a question labeled as an Investigative Phenomenon. These questions help build an understanding of the segment-level question. The topic within Segment 3 labels the question, “How can we use light?” as the Investigative Phenomenon. Each of the three lessons within this topic focuses on smaller questions to help students answer the topic-level question. The learning at each of these levels focuses on answering a lesson-, topic-, or segment-level question centered around a DCI or content learning, resulting in missed opportunities for students to explain phenomena that they observe. As a result, students do not figure out phenomena in this grade level.

Indicator 1h

Materials intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that they intentionally leverage students’ prior knowledge and experiences related to phenomena or problems. While the materials include sections that label an Anchoring Phenomenon and Investigative Phenomenon, these sections contain questions to help build an understanding of the question that center around a DCI or content learning, resulting in missed opportunities for students to explain phenomena that they observe. Similarly, investigations and Quest PBLs do not provide students opportunities to gather evidence in order to design their own solutions to solve problems.

Indicator 1i

Materials embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 1 do not meet expectations that they embed phenomena or problems across multiple lessons for students to use and build knowledge of all three dimensions. Across the grade, a concept or a question is used to frame learning across multiple lessons in the topic, rather than a driving phenomenon or problem. Within the five topics in the grade, students do not have opportunities to solve problems or design challenges in Quest PBLs. The Quest PBL provides multimodal opportunities for students to engage in developing, evaluating, and revising their thinking as they work through the Quest. There are few opportunities for students to develop, evaluate, and revise their thinking outside of the Quest PBLs.

Examples of topics that do not use phenomena or problems to drive student learning across multiple lessons:

  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 1: Living Things, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the question, “What traits and behaviors help living things survive?” In the three lessons and the California Spotlight, students engage in various learning activities that are focused on the traits and behaviors of living things needed for survival. At the start of this topic, students think of ways that the parts of plants and animals help them. Over the course of the topic, students engage in lessons to learn how the parts of living things help them survive. In Lesson 1, students investigate how various plant parts help the plant (SEP-INV-P1, SEP-INV-P4). In the Quest PBL, students learn about the structure and function of plant roots (CCC-SF-P1). Students observe and read about how plants also have different parts (i.e., roots, stems, flowers, leaves, fruits) that help them survive and grow (DCI-LS1.A-P1). In Lesson 2, students make a model of a cat’s whiskers to determine how whiskers help the cat (SEP-MOD-P3). In the Quest PBL, students explore the shapes of animal parts and how they help animals (CCC-SF-P1). Students learn that animals use their body parts in different ways: to see, hear, grasp, protect, move, seek, find, and take in food, water, and air (DCI-LS1.A-P1). Students design a tool based on an animal part. In Lesson 3, students break an acorn shell, describe how the shell protects the acorn, and consider that people can design things to copy the function of an acorn shell (SEP-DATA-P1). In the Quest PBL Check-In, students explore how snowshoe hares use their fur color to stay safe.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 1, Topic 2: Parents and Offspring, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the concept that living things are like their parents. Over the course of the topic, students learn how parents and offspring are similar, but not exactly the same, and how parent behavior helps their young survive (DCI-LS3.A-P1). In Lesson 1, students observe trees and match a young tree to the parent (SEP-DATA-P1, SEP-DATA-P2, SEP-DATA-P3). In Lesson 2, students examine photos regarding parents protecting young (DCI-LS1.B-P1), make a model of a nest to show how it protects eggs, and draw how a parent protects its young (SEP-MOD-P3). In the Quest PBL Check-In, students identify patterns of behaviors in bears and other animals (CCC-PAT-P1). This topic provides multimodal opportunities for students to develop, evaluate, and revise their thinking as they design, build, and test a model of a nest.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 3, Topic 4: Light, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the question, “How can we use light?” At the start of this topic, students observe objects in a box with the lid on and off to determine that light is needed to see objects (DCI-PS4.B-P1). In Lesson 1, students produce shadows and read informational text about shadows and light (SEP-INV-P4, SEP-INFO-P1, DCI-PS4.B-P2). In Lesson 2, students investigate different materials (SEP-INV-P4) and the amount of light that can pass through each material (DCI-PS4.B-P2). In Lesson 3, students learn about different ways light can be redirected, used in theaters, and used to communicate messages (DCI-PS4.C-P1). Students design and build a maze and design lights for a stage show (SEP-CEDS-P2). Throughout the topic, students engage in a Quest PBL to figure out how to use light to send a message. They write a code and use a flashlight to send three different messages using their code (DCI-PS4.B-P1, DCI-PS4.B-P2, DCI-PS4.C-P1, SEP-CEDS-P2). Students have the opportunity to revise their thinking as they evaluate their code.
  • In Grade 1, Segment 2, Topic 3: Sound, a phenomenon or problem does not drive student learning across multiple lessons. Rather, learning is driven by the concept of sound. In Lesson 1, students test the relationship between sound and length of different straws (SEP-MOD-P3). Students read about sound, vibration, pitch, and volume (DCI-PS4.A-P1). Students investigate how sound is made from vibrations by hitting sticks on drums, plucking a violin string, and striking a pencil on a desk (CCC-CE-P2). In Lesson 2, students investigate ways that sound can make objects vibrate and provide evidence from their observations (DCI-PS4.A-P1, SEP-ARG-P1). In Lesson 3, students test how Morse Code can be used to send a message using sound (SEP-INV-P4). They read about how phones have changed over time and discuss what types of phones they have used and why it is important to be able to communicate over distances.

Gateway Two

Coherence and Scope

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Two Details
Materials were not reviewed for Gateway Two because materials did not meet or partially meet expectations for Gateway One

Criterion 2a - 2g

Materials are coherent in design, scientifically accurate, and support grade-level and grade-band endpoints of all three dimensions.

Indicator 2a

Materials are designed for students to build and connect their knowledge and use of the three dimensions across the series.
N/A

Indicator 2a.i

Students understand how the materials connect the dimensions from unit to unit.
N/A

Indicator 2a.ii

Materials have an intentional sequence where student tasks increase in sophistication.
N/A

Indicator 2b

Materials present Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), Science and Engineering Practices (SEP), and Crosscutting Concepts (CCC) in a way that is scientifically accurate.*
N/A

Indicator 2c

Materials do not inappropriately include scientific content and ideas outside of the grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.*
N/A

Indicator 2d

Materials incorporate all grade-level Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 2d.i

Physical Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.ii

Life Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iii

Earth and Space Sciences
N/A

Indicator 2d.iv

Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
N/A

Indicator 2e

Materials incorporate all grade-band Science and Engineering Practices.
N/A

Indicator 2e.i

Materials incorporate grade-level appropriate SEPs within each grade.
N/A

Indicator 2e.ii

Materials incorporate all SEPs across the grade band.
N/A

Indicator 2f

Materials incorporate all grade-band Crosscutting Concepts.
N/A

Indicator 2g

Materials incorporate NGSS Connections to Nature of Science and Engineering
N/A

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

+
-
Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3d

Materials are designed to support teachers not only in using the materials, but also in understanding the expectations of the standards.

Indicator 3a

Materials include background information to help teachers support students in using the three dimensions to explain phenomena and solve problems (also see indicators 3b and 3l).
N/A

Indicator 3b

Materials provide guidance that supports teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences to engage students in figuring out phenomena and solving problems.
N/A

Indicator 3c

Materials contain teacher guidance with sufficient and useful annotations and suggestions for how to enact the student materials and ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3e - 3k

Materials are designed to support all students in learning.

Indicator 3e

Materials are designed to leverage diverse cultural and social backgrounds of students.
N/A

Indicator 3f

Materials provide appropriate support, accommodations, and/or modifications for numerous special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning science and engineering.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials provide multiple access points for students at varying ability levels and backgrounds to make sense of phenomena and design solutions to problems.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials include opportunities for students to share their thinking and apply their understanding in a variety of ways.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials include a balance of images or information about people, representing various demographic and physical characteristics.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3k

Materials are made accessible to students by providing appropriate supports for different reading levels.
N/A

Criterion 3l - 3s

Materials are designed to be usable and also to support teachers in using the materials and understanding how the materials are designed.

Indicator 3l

The teacher materials provide a rationale for how units across the series are intentionally sequenced to build coherence and student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to NGSS.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts and Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3n.i

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to English/Language Arts Common Core State Standards.
N/A

Indicator 3n.ii

Materials document how each lesson and unit align to Math Common Core State Standards, including the standards for mathematical practice.
N/A

Indicator 3o

Resources (whether in print or digital) are clear and free of errors.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials include a comprehensive list of materials needed.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials embed clear science safety guidelines for teacher and students across the instructional materials.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials designated for each grade level are feasible and flexible for one school year.
N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials contain strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers about the science program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3t - 3y

Materials are designed to assess students and support the interpretation of the assessment results.

Indicator 3t

Assessments include a variety of modalities and measures.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Assessments offer ways for individual student progress to be measured over time.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities and guidance for oral and/or written peer and teacher feedback and self reflection, allowing students to monitor and move their own learning.
N/A

Indicator 3w

Tools are provided for scoring assessment items (e.g., sample student responses, rubrics, scoring guidelines, and open-ended feedback).
N/A

Indicator 3x

Guidance is provided for interpreting the range of student understanding (e.g., determining what high and low scores mean for students) for relevant Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.
N/A

Indicator 3y

Assessments are accessible to diverse learners regardless of gender identification, language, learning exceptionality, race/ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.
N/A

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Materials are designed to include and support the use of digital technologies.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials are web based and compatible with multiple internet browsers. In addition, materials are “platform neutral,” are compatible with multiple operating systems and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess three-dimensional learning using digital technology.
N/A

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be customized for individual learners, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference digital technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g., websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate digital technology and interactive tools (data collection tools, simulations, modeling), when appropriate, in ways that support student engagement in the three dimensions of science.
N/A
abc123

Report Published Date: 2020/12/15

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 1 SE G1 0134980085 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 2 SE G1 0134980093 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 3 SE G1 0134980107 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW INST SEG 4 SE G1 0134980115 2020
ELVSCI20 CA NEW TE GR. 1 0134980328 2020

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

Science K-5 Review Tool

The science review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflects the importance of alignment to the standards then considers other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For science, our review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Three-Dimensional Learning

  • Phenomena and Problems Drive Learning

  • Coherence and Full Scope of the Three Dimensions

  • Design to Facilitate Teacher Learning

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

To best read our reports we recommend utilizing the Codes for NGSS Elements document that provides the code and description of elements cited as evidence in each report.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations