Alignment: Overall Summary

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
27
52
58
56
52-58
Meets Expectations
28-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-27
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
24
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials meet the expectations for Gateway 1. Texts students read and hear are of high quality and appropriately rigorous. Questions, tasks, and activities that students engage in as they read, write, speak, and demonstrate comprehension are focused on the texts themselves. Foundational skills instruction meets the expectations of the indicators. 

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
19/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 fully meet the expectations of including rich and appropriately rigorous, high quality texts. Over the course of the year, materials support students' literacy development by providing access to high quality texts and reading experiences of depth and breadth. 

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading/listening and consider a range of student interests.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for anchor texts (including read aloud texts in K-2 and shared reading texts in Grade 2 used to build knowledge and vocabulary) are of publishable quality, worthy of especially careful reading/listening, and consider a range of student interests.

Many of the anchor texts are written by celebrated and award-winning authors. The texts include a variety of genres and consider a range of students’ interest including: poems, biographies, realistic fiction, mysteries, science and social studies topics, and chapter books. The stories cover multiple cultures and have enriching vocabulary and quality illustrations that help build student knowledge.

Examples of high-quality, publishable texts in Shared Reading include:

  • In Week 2, students listen to Henry & Mudge: The First Book, a popular children’s book about friendship between a boy named Henry and a big dog named Mudge. This well-known Ready to Read series is written by Newbery Medalist Cynthia Rylant.
  • In Week 17, students listen to Practice Makes Perfect for Rotten Ralph by well-known author Jack Gantos, which was first published in 1976 and then published in 2001.
  • In Week 28, students listen to The Magic Tree House: Day of the Dragon King by Mary Pope Osborne, which is part of the well-known Magic Treehouse series.

Examples of high-quality, publishable texts in ELA include:

  • In Week 3, students listen to A New Coat for Anna by Harriet Ziefert, which is an award-winning post World War II story about a mother’s dedication to acquire a coat for her daughter. The book has been named an ALA Notable Children’s Book and Booklist Books for Youth Editors’ Choice Award winner.
  • In Week 13, students listen to Arrow to the Suni by Gerald McDermott, which is a Pueblo folktale. This folktale is about how the sun god sent his own son to earth. The illustrations resemble pictures that Pueblo people once drew and are engaging for students.
  • In Week 23, students listen to The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles, which recounts the ordeal that Ruby Bridges went through in the 1950s to pave the way for integrated schools. Students learn about the historical importance of her choices with the author’s use of easy language allowing students to engage in a discussion about the book after reading.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

In Grade 2, students read and listen to both literary and informational texts in both Shared Reading and ELA. Text types include: biographies, fables, historical fiction, mysteries, poems, and science fiction.

Examples of literary texts found throughout the Grade 2 program include:

  • Henry and Mudge: the First Book by Cynthia Rylant
  • Pinky and Rex by James Howe, A New Coat for Anna by Harriet Ziefert
  • Where in the Wild by David Schwartz and Yael Schy
  • Cam Jansen and the Mystery Writer Mystery by David A. Adler
  • Practice Makes Perfect for Rotten Ralph by Jack Gantos
  • Wolf Island by Celia Godkin
  • Tornado by Betsy Byars
  • Judy Moody Saves the World by Megan McDonald
  • Practice Makes Perfect for Rotten Ralph by Jack Gantos
  • My Rows and Piles of Coins by Tololwa Mollelan
  • Mud Ball by Matt Tavares
  • Magic Tree House: Day of the Dragon King by Mary Pope Osborne
  • Time Warp Trio: It’s All Greek to Me by Jon Scieszka

Students also read and hear informational texts in both Shared Reading and ELA. There are no informational texts in Unit 2 of ELA or Unit 4 of Shared Reading. Examples include:

  • Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace
  • The Journey of a Butterfly by David Salariya
  • Creatures Yesterday and Today by Karen Patkau
  • Cracking Up--A Story about Erosion by Jacqui Bailey
  • The Very First Americans by Cara Ashrose
  • Jackie Robinson by Sally M. Walker
  • History’s All Stars: Abraham Lincoln by Augusta Stevenson
  • Helen Keller: Break Down the Walls! by Margaret Fetty
  • The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles

Indicator 1c

Texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that texts (including read-aloud texts and some shared reading texts used to build knowledge and vocabulary) have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and a relationship to their associated student task. Read-aloud texts at K-2 are above the complexity levels of what most students can read independently.

Within both the ELA and Shared Reading components of the materials, the students listen to grade-appropriate read-alouds with an appropriate level of complexity according to the quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and the relationship to their associated student task. The majority of the texts have a Lexile that is 1-2 grade levels above their reading level and/or are qualitatively complex for Grade 2 students.

Specific examples include:

  • In Week 4, students listen to Cracking Up: A Story about Erosion by Jacqui Bailey, which has a Lexile of 880. Both the quantitative measure and qualitative measures are very complex; however, while reading the text, the teacher simultaneously draws a diagram to help explain the concept of erosion.
  • In Week 8, students listen to Gooney Bird Greene by Lois Lowry, which has a Lexile of 590. While the language is moderately complex, the text is relatable and deals with the theme of individuality.
  • In Week 10, students listen to and read A-Z Mysteries: The Kidnapped King by Ron Roy, which has a Lexile of 610. This is the first mystery in the unit, so the teacher introduces the text structure to aid comprehension. This supports students’ understanding due to the complexity of the text.
  • In Week 25, students listen to Mummies by Joyce Milton, which has a Lexile of 530. The text complexity ranges from very complex in terms of text structure to slightly complex in terms of purpose. Students with no background knowledge of mummification or of Ancient Egypt will find this text more complex than those who have prior knowledge.
  • In Week 28, students listen to The Magic Tree House: Day of the Dragon King by Mary Pope Osborne. While the Lexile is only a 380, the text is very complex with the organization of the text structure, the language features, and the knowledge demands. There is unfamiliar vocabulary, and the characters travel back in time, making the structure complex.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (leveled readers and series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

In both English Language Arts and Shared Reading, the texts and tasks increase in complexity to develop independence of grade level skills. While the majority of the texts in Grade 2 are read to the students, the complexity and/or tasks increase within each unit, as well as throughout the year. Students also reread texts chorally or with a partner that the teacher first reads aloud in Shared Reading. These texts have much lower complexity than the texts that are just read aloud in English Language Arts.

In English Language Arts, texts and skills increase over the course of the year. For example, at the beginning of the year, students use a story map to track fiction stories. For example:

  • In Week 3, students use a story map to identify setting, characters, and problem and solution in Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday.
  • In Week 30, students use a Venn diagram to map two different versions of Cinderella to then compare and contrast the problems and events within each text.

In English Language Arts, students hear a variety of texts of different quantitative and qualitative complexities to help them develop independence of grade level skills. For example:

  • In the first nine weeks, students read a total of ten texts, half of which are non-fiction. The Lexile range from 670 to 880.
  • In the second nine weeks, students read a new genre, legends, and therefore, the Lexile range is slightly lower. The Lexiles range from 480 to 740.
  • In the third nine weeks, students read a variety of texts with a Lexile range of 560 to 970.
  • In the final nine weeks, students read a variety of texts with a Lexile range of 270 to 1,000. The publisher recognizes that the text that has a Lexile of 270 is not very complex, but it was chosen to evoke some higher order thinking around the Vietnam Wall.

In Shared Reading, because more ownership is placed on the students for reading, the Lexiles stay relatively static across the four units. In the first nine weeks, Lexiles range from 400 to 510 and in the second nine weeks, they range from 410 to 760. In the third nine weeks, they range from 500 to 580, and in the last nine weeks, they range from 380 to 530. Students are asked inferential questions from the beginning of the year, and follow-up questions are provided for students who need more support.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts (including read-aloud texts in K-2) and the series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis.

The materials include general information about how the texts were selected for inclusion in the program; however, text selection criteria are not provided for individual texts. The Teacher Guide explains that texts were selected based on the quantitative and qualitative measurements, but those specifications are not provided. Quantitative levels are provided, but a qualitative analysis is not. The Teacher Guide explains that the year starts with two simple narratives that have a straightforward narrative structure, familiar characters and settings, and a simple problem and solution. Then the program progresses into simple fantasy and realistic fiction. The Teacher Guide also explains that after five weeks of narrative instruction, the program moves into non-fiction with different text structures. Then, the program moves into mysteries and more informational texts. This is the only information provided for reader and task considerations.

There is a chart in the Teacher Guide with each quantitative level, but a qualitative analysis is not given. The Chart, found in Appendix B, lists the genre, subject, Lexile, and other notes such as if a book used in a different grade that relates to that specific book.

There is also a chart in the Teacher Guide that explains the texts, what those texts teach, and where they are placed in the program. Again, this information is not specific for each text, nor is a qualitative analysis or a reader and task consideration provided. One example is the decodable texts which are used to practice decoding and are found only with small-group instruction. Another example is mysteries, which are used to introduce clues and more complex problems and found in Weeks 23-29. An additional example is authentic narrative children’s literature which is used for knowledge building, and is found in the ELA read-alouds.

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that support materials for the core text(s) provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to support their reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

Within the program, there are three designated forty-five minute periods of literacy instruction. Shared reading instruction is comprised of 5-10 minutes of word study, 25-30 minutes of shared reading, and 10 minutes of discussion. The ELA instruction is comprised of 45 minutes of a read-aloud and process writing. The final block is designated for differentiated instruction. Throughout the year, students read a range and volume of fiction and non-fiction texts.

In Grade 2, the program begins with simple narratives with familiar characters before moving to simple fantasy and realistic fiction. After five weeks of narrative texts, students begin reading non-fiction with a four-volume science text set about life cycles. Students then read mysteries, biographies, and Native American informational texts.

The Shared Reading curriculum has students read and reread one chapter or one section of a text every day. Every day in shared reading, the whole class reads that day’s selection aloud once chorally, and then with a partner. In Shared Reading, students will spend 155 school days interacting with texts. Some specific examples include:

  • In Week 6, students read Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace, which is a non-fiction text that students read for five days about life science and amphibians.
  • In Week 12, students read Cam Jansen and the Mystery Writing Mystery by David A. Adler, which is a familiar fiction mystery series.
  • In Week 21, students read History All Stars: Abraham Lincoln by Augusta Stevenson, which is a biography about presidents.
  • In Week 28, students read Magic Tree House: Day of Dragon King by Mary Pope Osborne, which is a fantasy book about adventure.

During the English Language Arts Instruction students listen to a read-aloud about half of the days during the week and then discuss the book. The books are typically above grade-level in order to expose students to rich language, expand their vocabulary and build knowledge.

For each text, the teacher begins by developing and/or activating background knowledge, asks questions while reading and models comprehension strategies, discusses the text with the students after the read aloud. In the Interactive Read-Aloud, students will hear a text on 108 days of instruction. Examples include:

  • In Week 4, students hear Magnets Pull, Magnets Push by Mark Weakland, which is a non-fiction text about magnets
  • In Week 22, students hear Mudball by Matt Tavares, which is a historical fiction story about baseball.
  • In Week 34, students read How do you Raise a Raisin? by Pam Munoz Ryan, which is a non-fiction book. It is a mixed-genre book since it is written like a poem, but parallels an informational text.

During the Differentiated Instruction block, students work with the teacher for small group instruction. Students not working with the teacher read self-selected independent reading books for fifteen minutes. Bookworms includes a sample classroom library list in the Teacher Manual with over 100 fiction and non-fiction texts that address a variety of topics and themes.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
15/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations for text-focused questions and tasks over the course of the year. Questions and tasks include speaking and writing work that is connected and focused on the text(s) with which students engage. Some culminating tasks are not connected to what students previously read and demonstrated. 

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-based, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

Most lessons have text-dependent and text-specific questions and offer multiple opportunities for students to engage in discussions about the texts. Students are asked evidence-based questions in both the Shared Reading portion of the curriculum, as well as the ELA portion. The majority of the questions in both sections take place while reading to help students comprehend the text.

The majority of the questions in Shared Reading are text-dependent or text-specific inferential questions. The text-based discussions happen with a partner after the students engage with the text in most cases, while whole group questions happen during the reading. Examples include:

  • Week 3, after chorally reading Pinky and Rex by James Howe, students reread the story and are then asked "Which character was jealous? What character did something to impress another character? Why did Amanda want to help pick out her clothes? and Why doesn’t Pinky help her?"
  • Week 16, after reading If you Lied with the Cherokee, students are asked how the boys learn to hunt, why they changed their clothes for winter, how they get things to decorate their clothes, and how the families chose the gifts to exchange before getting married.
  • Week 21, after chorally reading History’s All Star: Abraham Lincoln by Augusta Stevenson students read the text again and are asked to describe Abe, how Abe’s father finds out that he wants a little wagon, why Abe’s father almost forget about the wagon, and why was Abe crying while he waited for his father.
  • Week 30, students read Time Warp Trio: It’s All Greek to Me by Jon Scieszka and are asked how the boys identify the thrones and why Apollo is not impressed with Twinkle, Twinkle.

The majority of the questions in the ELA interactive read-alouds are text-dependent or text-specific inferential questions, which require students to combine information presented in the text with their prior knowledge. The majority of the questions and tasks happen during the read-aloud, but there is usually one or two discussion questions after the read-aloud. Examples include:

  • In Week 3, after hearing A New Coat for Anna by Harriet Ziefert, students summarize what they read using transition words. During the read-aloud students are asked questions such as how Anna feels about the sheep and will Anna’s mother have to pay for the cherries.
  • In Week 12, after hearing The Girl who Loved Wild Horses by Paul Gobel, students are asked why they think the people in the text lived in tents and not houses and what was the girl's first problem.
  • In Week 22, while listening to Mudball by Matt Tavares, students are asked why was the umpire Andy would make an out and did Andy see where the ball went and how do they know.
  • In Week 30, while listening to Cinderella by Marcia Brown, students are asked how Cinderella feels about having to do the hardest chores, how do the stepsisters feel about Cinderella, and what is the theme of Cinderella.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of high-quality sequences of text-based questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding (as appropriate, may be drawing, dictating, writing, speaking, or a combination).

Within the program, there are two culminating tasks at the end of the year that require students to reflect on their personal growth as well as on their favorite book. However, these labeled culminating tasks are the same tasks as Kindergarten and Grade 1, and students do not necessarily need to use texts read from the units to complete the tasks. The Teacher Guide also states that these two major culminating tasks remain consistent across grade levels, but the expectations change to meet the standards. There are biweekly on-demand written responses that assess comprehension and require students to integrate skills to demonstrate understanding of what they have been listening to during the read-alouds.

The two culminating tasks are:

  • In Week 35, students create an advertisement on paper or as a video including the elements of a book review they have learned throughout the year to share their favorite book from the year.
  • In Week 36, students write a reflection of how they have changed as a reader and writer throughout the year. After creating this “memoir”, they complete a museum walk, in which they walk around and assess each other’s work.

Students complete writing tasks throughout the year to demonstrate their comprehension of the texts in the unit. Examples of how lessons build to a culminating activity in the form of process writing include:

  • In Week 8, students hear Gooney Bird Greene by Lois Lowry and reflect on the text and write whether they think Gooney Bird is telling the truth and why.
  • In Week 13, students write a book review of Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney. Students go through the writing process, use the Book Review Graphic Organizer, and use the Book Review Frame to help them complete this task.
  • In Week 19,  students read and discuss Helen Keller: Break Down the Walls by Margaret Fetty over the course of several days and on the last day the students write a paragraph describing how the author demonstrated that Helen Keller is a determined and brave woman.
  • In Week 23, students spend several days reading and discussing The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles, and then write a paragraph about what they would have done if they had been in Ruby’s place.
  • In Week 34, students listen to and discuss How a Plant Grows by Bobbie Kalman. At the end of the week, students draw a diagram showing the roots of the plant, the stem, the leaves, and then write about their diagram.

Students also engage in end-of-week writing assignments in Shared Reading some of which may serve as a culminating assessment for the book they read and reread throughout the week. Examples include:

  • In Week 4, students read Ivy and Bean by Annie Barrows and work on making inferences for the first four days, and then on the fifth day students write about what the details in the story tell us about Ivy as a character.
  • In Week 12, students spend the week reading Cam Jansen and the Mystery Writer Mystery by David A. Adler. On the final day, students draw conclusions about whether they think Mr. Winter is persistent and if they think Cam is persistent.
  • In Week 17 students write a retelling of Practice Makes Perfect for Rotten Ralph by Jack Gantos.
  • In Week 21, students read and discuss History's All Stars: Abraham Lincoln by Augusta Stevenson and explain in writing why they think the Indian did not shoot Abe Lincoln.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

Throughout the Grade 2 Bookworms materials, there are frequent opportunities for students to participate in whole group, small group, and partner discussions about what they are reading. Whole Group discussions take place regularly during dialogic reading, which occurs during the Shared Reading block in the beginning of the year, as well as the interactive read-aloud, which occurs during the ELA block. The teacher uses Turn-and-Talk strategy to prompt students to participate in discussions. Students also work with partners to discuss the book after it is read aloud. Additionally, there are opportunities for teachers to utilize Every Pupil Response techniques such a voting, raising hands, providing signaled responses, thumbs up/down, etc. to engage students and to gauge comprehension. The Teacher’s Guide explains the various discussion protocols included within the lessons.

During Shared reading, after the second reading, the teacher engages the students in a focused inferential discussion of text content. Teachers are encouraged to ask “how do you know?” to prompt students to use evidence from the text in their answer. Students answer some questions individually and other questions in partners. During shared reading, students also discuss with partners the vocabulary words; however, the discussion is not necessarily text-based. Students read with partners frequently and specific instructions are provided in the Teacher Guide including how to group students and the roles of reader and coach so students understand their responsibilities when rereading. Specific examples include:

  • In Week 6, students partner read Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace, and then discuss how they think authors of informational texts choose what information to include in the illustrations or photographs and in the text.
  • In Week 17, students partner read Practice Makes Perfect for Rotten Ralph by Jack Gantos, and then students discuss why they think Ralph does not want to practice for the game and who Sarah likes best with a partner.

During the ELA Read Aloud, the teacher employs the Every Pupil Response Technique to ensure engagement. Examples include talking to a partner, polling the class, etc. Most of the discussions occur while listening to the read-aloud. Specific examples include:

  • In Week 22, while listening to Mud Ball by Matt Tavares, the teacher promotes a whole class discussion by asking questions such as: "Why does the second baseman try to grab Andy (which is discussed with a partner)? Why is the second baseman covered with mud?" and What they think of the manager of the other team saying the runs should not count because no one knows where the ball is (which is also discussed with a partner).
  • In Week 34, after reading How do you Raise a Raise? by Pam Munoz Ryan, students are given sentence frames to help aide in the discussion of the text such as, "So who discovered ____________."

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading (or read aloud) and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

Throughout the Grade 2 material, students are given multiple opportunities to practice their speaking and listening about what they are reading. Opportunities come in the form of recalling information though comprehension questions or peer discussions with a selected portion of the text. Students are asked a series of comprehension questions during and after hearing the teacher read the text in both the ELA and Shared Reading components of the program.

During the Shared Reading component, the teacher provides the students with a focus for reading and provides text-based questions for students to discuss with their partners. Students are also given the opportunities to share their previous day’s text-based writing response with a partner. In addition, after students chorally read, the teacher provides a new focus for reading and the students are asked text-based questions to discuss with their partners. Examples of opportunities for students to practice their speaking and listening about what they are hearing and/or reading include:

  • In Week 3, after hearing Pinky and Rex by Jame Howe, the teacher reminds students about the two main characters and then students reread the text prior to having a whole-class discussion about what they learned about Pinky and Rex and what they learned about how Amanda irritates them. Then, students write how they think Amanda feels about the trip and share their response with a partner.
  • In Week 14, after listening to First Day by Cara Ashrose, the teacher helps the students analyze the details about the life of Native Americans on the Northwest Coast. After rereading, students engage in a discussion about the text including why they think the people ate animals from the sea, why it was easier to fish for salmon, and what the people used to make their homes.
  • In Week 25, prior to rereading and discussing Mummies by Joyce Milton, the teacher reminds the students to think about all the reasons people stole mummies and engage students in discussion about why robbers broke into the mummies tombs, why scientists take x-rays of mummies instead of unwrapping them, and where is the best place to look for mummies.
  • In Week 29, after listening to and reading D is for Dancing Dragon: A China Alphabet (Letter A) by Carol Crane, students engage in a discussion about if they think American traditions are similar to acrobats and what are the similarities between Chinese traditions and American ones.

During the ELA Interactive read-aloud, the teacher utilizes Every Pupil Response techniques, such as polling the class and talking to a partner, to promote students’ listening and speaking about the text. Following each read-aloud, the lesson plans include guiding questions and/or prompts for post read-aloud discussions of the text. Specific examples of opportunities for students to practice speaking and listening about what they read or listen to include:

  • In Weeks 8 and 9, students hear Gooney Bird Greene by Lois Lowry and talk to a partner about whether they think the things in the story really happened.
  • In Week 12, after listening to a portion of the text The Legend of the Bluebonnet by Tomie DePaola, the students participate in both a partner and whole group discussion answering questions such as what do they think people will sacrifice, why the two characters said they are sure the spirits did not want something belonging to them, and why did one of the main character's think Great Spirits wanted her doll.
  • In Week 19, students hear Helen Keller: Break Down the Walls! by Margaret Fetty and Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride by Pam Munoz Ryan. After hearing the stories, students discuss with their partner why Helen wanted to help others. A whole group discussion encourages students to discuss if they think Helen’s parents punished her for kicking and screaming.
  • In Week 33, after listening to The Wall by Eve Bunting, students talk to their partner about why they wanted to find his name and if they think the characters will leave something when they find his name.
  • In Week 34, after hearing How do you Raise a Raisin? by Pam Munoz Ryan, student discuss if they believe anyone truly knows who ate the first raisin. Then students discuss why they cannot use machines to dry them faster.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g., grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Weekly lessons conclude with an on-demand written response to a text-based prompt for each interactive read aloud in the ELA portion of the materials. The writing prompts increase in difficulty over the course of the school year. Process writing is also included throughout the year. Students utilize checklists to guide their revision and editing efforts. Technology is utilized for word processing and for the research projects.

According to the Teacher Guide, at the end of the ELA block each week, there is a writing task for students to react to the book as they demonstrate and deepen their understanding. The on-demand, text-based writing prompt often includes sentence frames and other supports to make the writing task quick and targeted. In the beginning of the year, it is recommended that writing takes place whole class, and then goes to partner and independent writing as students progress through the year. Specific examples include:

  • In Week 5, students invent their own animal. They give it a name and write about it. They also draw a picture of it using camouflage.
  • In Week 13, after hearing Arrow to the Sun by Gerald McDermott, students write an opinion response in which they state an opinion and supply a reason supporting the opinion, including linking words to connect the opinion and reason. In their writing, they need to tell which kiva is the worst and why.
  • In Week 23, after hearing The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles, students write an opinion piece about what they would have done if they were in Ruby Bridges’ place.
  • In Week 31, after hearing Starry Messenger by Peter Sis, students write a response in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement. They have to explain how Galileo’s idea about Earth was different from tradition.

On-demand writing is also found in the Share Reading portion of the program. Examples include:

  • In Weeks 8-9, after reading The Journey of a Butterfly by David Salariya, students draw a diagram of a butterfly and label its parts.
  • In Week 23, after reading History’s All Stars: Abraham Lincoln by Augusta Stevenson, students write why they think the author chose to write the biography.

Process writing in the Grade 2 materials includes scaffolding in the beginning, and reducing the scaffolding over time. For all process writing opportunities, students learn the characteristics of the genre, evaluate good and poor examples of the genre, plan the genre, draft, and then revise with both peers and independently. Graphic organizers are used throughout the program and writing genre-specific checklists are used to evaluate the writing for its structure and content, as well as editing checklists to consider mechanics. Examples of process writing include:

  • In Week 1, students plan and write their own narrative story in the lesson and evaluate their narratives using the Narrative Writing Checklist. Students are placed into groups and two groups write paragraph two and the other groups write paragraph 3. This is done with minimal support from the teacher.
  • In Week 14, students participate in a four-day descriptive writing task where they write about a specific group of Native Americans they have already read about. The teacher models each part of the writing process and after students complete their first four paragraphs and add the conclusion, they begin revising and editing using the Descriptive Checklist and the Second Grade Editing Checklist.
  • In Week 32, students participate in a five-day compare and contrast process writing activity. Students read three different versions of Cinderella and then write compare and contrast pieces structured as descriptive writing. Students do pre-writing on Day 1 and on Day 2, the students, with the teacher, complete a compare and contrast graphic organizer. On Day 3, the students watch the teacher model how to write a compare and contrast piece using the graphic organizer as a guide. Then students draft and revise on Day 4 and 5.
  • In Week 35, students complete an opinion writing culminating task where they review a book from the year as a form of an advertisement. On Day 1, the teacher models how to complete the graphic organizer before the students do their own. On Day 2, the students plan a creative way to display the reasons why they love their favorite book. On Day 3, they finish drafting their advertisements and on Day 4, they work with a partner to practice presenting their advertisements. On Day 5, students do a share with the whole class.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing (year long) that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to write narrative, informative, and opinion pieces that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Materials also include checklists that are genre specific to help students. In the ELA portion of the program, there are three opportunities for students to do informative writing, four opportunities for students to do narrative writing, and seven opportunities for students to do opinion writing. Students are given writing prompts and sentence frames following Shared Reading.

Students practice narrative writing in the ELA portion of the program in weeks such as 10, 20, and 36. Examples include:

  • In Week 10, students work in groups to plan a narrative story. Then in Week 11, students write their narrative story.
  • In Week 20, students write a story and are provided a graphic organizer to support their writing. Additional graphic organizers are provided to make sure events are linked with transition words.

Students practice informative writing in the ELA portion of the program in weeks such as 6, 14, and 32. Students also are given informative writing prompts after reading during Shared Reading. Specific examples include:

  • In Weeks 8 and 9 of Shared Reading, after reading The Journey of a Butterfly by David Salariya, students write a paragraph about what happens to a caterpillar as it becomes a pupa.
  • In Week 14, students write about a specific group of Native Americans they have read about.
  • In Week 32, students write a compare and contrast piece about the three different versions of Cinderella that they read.
  • In Week 34, students write sentences that tell about each kind of pollinator after hearing How Do you Raise a Raisin? by Pam Munoz Ryan.  

Students practice opinion writing in the ELA portion of the program in weeks such as  2, 3, 13, 18, 22, 24, and 35. Students write book reviews throughout all four units. Students also write their opinions of texts in Shared Reading. Specific examples include:

  • In Week 3, after reading Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday by David Schwartz and Yael Schy, students write an opinion piece about whether they would have bought anything that Alexander bought and explain why. Later in the week, the students write a book review.
  • In Week 13, students write a book review about the book Miss Rumphius.
  • In Week 23, after reading History’s All Stars: Abraham Lincoln by Augusta Stevenson, students write an opinion piece about why they think the author chose to write the biography.

Indicator 1m

Materials include regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including regular opportunities for evidence-based writing to support recall of information, opinions with reasons, and relevant information appropriate for the grade level.

In the Grade 2 materials, students complete one text-based response independently each day, connected to their Shared Reading, and together complete a text-based response on the days when the teacher does a read-aloud. Most lessons in both ELA and Shared Reading allow students to practice and apply writing skills, including using evidence. Following each read-aloud, students respond to a text-based prompt.

Some examples of evidence-based writing in Shared Reading include:

  • In Week 3, students write how Pinky and Rex are similar after reading Pinky and Rex by James Howe.
  • In Weeks 10-12, after reading A-Z Mysteries: The Kidnapped King by Ron Roy, students write about whether they think Dink’s friends will like Sammi and whether they think the kaleidoscope is important or not.
  • In Week 30, after reading Time Warp Trio: It’s All Greek to Me by Jon Scieszka, students explain why they think Zeus appears to the boys and why he is angry by using evidence to support their opinion.

The interactive read-aloud concludes with a prompt for writing each day. Sentence frames and other supports are provided to make the writing quick and targeted. Some examples of evidence-based writing in ELA include:

  • In Week 13, after hearing Arrow to the Sun by Gerald Mcdermott, students tell which kiva they think is the worst and why using evidence from the text.
  • In Weeks 16 and 17, students listen to Tornado by Betsy Byars and then students write why Tornado got his name.
  • In Week 23, after students hear My Brother Martin by Christine King Farris, students write one or two sentences that tell about the main lesson from the book.
  • In Week 29, after hearing D is for Dancing: A China Alphabet by Carol Crane, students draw a picture of what they think a human pagoda might look like using evidence from the text.
  • In Week 34, after hearing How Do You Raise a Raisin? by Pam Munoz Ryan, students write a paragraph following raisins from the cutting to the trailer.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Bookworms Grade 2 materials provide explicit instruction on Grade 2 grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Materials integrate grammar into the writing process. The explicit grammar instruction takes place within four instructional activities: Combining, Unscrambling, Imitating, and Expanding. The read-alouds provide the context for instruction of grammar and conventions. When there is not a read-aloud, students practice skills out of context through writing instruction and tasks.

Materials include explicit instruction of grammar and conventions standards for the grade-level, and materials include opportunities for students to demonstrate application of skills both in- and out-of-context. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to use collective nouns. For example:
    • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 3, Day 2, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, students use the sentence, They bought plants because my mother likes to grow plants. from the text, Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday. The teacher prompts, “If I replace mother, I need another noun. Let’s try a noun that represents a whole group of people.” The teacher prompts students to create a list of collective nouns such as: team, group, family, friends, cousins. The lesson plan encourages the teacher to change the word likes to like if needed.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 6, Day 2, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, an example sentence is provided, “Metal is a useful material for making many objects.” The word ‘objects’ is defined as representing a group of objects. The discussion continues with brainstorming names of specific items that could be used to replace the word ‘objects’ - “Metal is a useful material for making _____.”
  • Students have opportunities to form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns. For example:
    • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 9, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, students use the sentence, She looked around, and almost all the children nodded, from the text, Gooney Bird Greene. The lesson asks the students to replace the word children with other plural nouns. In this case, the word children is an irregular plural noun. The teacher says, “Now I’ve taken away children. What a coincidence! Children is a plural form of child. Most plurals are made with just -s or -es. But some are irregular. Person means one. What about more than one? That’s people! What verbs can go with people? All of the people shouted. All of the people waved. All of the people smiled.”
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 17, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, using the sentence frame, “Nothing came down from the sky except _____ and _____.” Students are prompted to think of nouns that came down from the sky.
  • Students have opportunities to use reflexive pronouns. For example:
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 3, Teach Sentence Composing, Combine, the teacher shares the following two sentences to be combined: Animals use mimicry. Mimicry helps animals look like other things. The teacher points out the two sentences have the word animals in them. The teacher asks which pronoun could be used in the place of animals (them). The teacher shares that themselves would also work here and gives examples of the use of myself and yourself. The teacher combines the two sentences: Animals use mimicry to help themselves look like other things. The teacher asks students to think about using the following reflexive nouns in their writing: myself, yourself, himself, herself and themselves.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 18, Day 3, Teach Sentence Composing, Combine, instruction is provided on combining two sentences and using a pronoun to better explain. Example: “The boy buys a cookie. The boy buys a cookie for his sister too. Prompt as one possibility: “The boy buys a cookie for himself and his sister.”
  • Students have opportunities to form and use the past tense of frequently occurring regular verbs. For example:
    • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 9, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, students are asked to use the sentence: She looked around, and almost all the children nodded. from the text, Gooney Bird Greene. The lesson prompts the teacher to guide the class in changing the verb nodded. The teacher says, “Nodded is a verb. I see the -ed ending, so I know that it is a past tense verb. What if it was art class? If I wanted to say draw, but in the past. It would be drew. What if it was physical education? If I wanted to say run, but in the past. It would be ran. What if it was lunch, and I wanted to say eat, but in the past? It would be ate. Most verbs show the past with -ed. There are a few that have different forms. We’ll keep looking for them and we can make an anchor chart to help us remember the correct forms.”
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 16, Day 2, Teach Sentence Composing Imitate, using the sentence frame: We ___ for a moment, ____., students use past tense verbs that end in -ed or are irregular in the first blank and an adjective that make sense in the second blank.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 30, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher has students provide past-tense verbs that could complete the following sentence frame: Now when Rhodopis danced, her feet ___ like _____.
  • Students have opportunities to use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified. For example:
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 3, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shares the sentence: I got more gum. The teacher says, “Let’s add more detail.” The teacher discusses adjectives and asks students what adjectives could be used to describe gum. The teacher shares the sentence from the book: I know because I used to be rich. The teacher explains that rich is the adjective. The teacher removes rich from the sentence and asks student to give other adjectives that could be used.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 3, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, this sentence is provided: The ledge was being eroded. Students are guided to expand on the sentence by adding an adjective to describe the ledge and an adverb to tell how. A phrase beginning with because will also be added to explain why.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher shares the sentence: Slowly, the pebbles were carried away. The teacher explains that slowly is an adverb that describes the verb and that adverbs usually end in -ly. The teacher and students think of other adverbs that could be used in the sentence and match a noun that would make sense.
  • Students have opportunities to produce, expand, and rearrange complete, simple, and compound sentences. For example:
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 3, Day 3, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher shares the sentence: First we need wool. The teacher asks students to suggest adjectives that could describe wool.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing Combining, several simple sentences are provided about items that will stick to a magnet and one that will not. Instruction is provided as to how students might combine them to make a more interesting, complex sentence.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 25, Day 5, Teach Sentence Composing, Expand, the teacher and students expand the sentence: Poppy suspected that few grieved. to tell when and why.
  • Students have opportunities to capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. For example:
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 4, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate: the teacher asks students to identify different nouns that could be substituted in the sentence frame: One ___ there was a great ___. The teacher reminds students that if a proper noun is used it needs to be capitalized.
    • In the ELA Guide, Week 14, Day 5, lesson plans consistently use a checklist called Second Grade Editing Checklist. After students write descriptions of Native Americans in previous lessons, the lesson states that “students will work with a partner to review and edit their papers.” The Second Grade Editing Checklist asks students to check the following criteria: I capitalized the first word in each sentence; I capitalized the pronoun I; I capitalized product names, holidays, and geographic names; I used end punctuation for sentences; I used commas in greetings and closings of a letter, date, and in a series; I used apostrophes for contractions and to show ownership; and I used spelling patterns I know to help me spell words I don’t know.
  • Students have opportunities to use commas in greetings and closings of letters. For example:
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 3, Day 4, during Assign or Model Written Response, the following format is used to write an invitation to a Christmas party: Dear ______, Please come to our Christmas party. The date is _______. The time is _____. The address is _______. We hope to see you there! Sincerely, Anna.
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 3, Day 3, Assign or Model Written Response, the students are assigned to write a letter to an old woman thanking her for some cherries. The letter format is provided.
  • Students have opportunities to use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. For example:
    • In the ELA Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 1, Teach Sentence Composing, Imitate, the teacher has students create new sentences using nouns and adjectives in the sentence frame: The frog’s ___ is ____. The teacher explains that the ‘s shows that something belongs to the frog.

Students have opportunities to generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words. For example:  

  • In the Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 8, Day 1, Teach Word Study, direct instruction on reading and spelling long and short /e/ spelling patterns is provided. As words are introduced, words are sorted into /e/, /ee/, and /ea/ patterns. After all the words are sorted, words are chorally read. Words are mixed up for students to sort and write on page 72 of the student workbook.
  • In the How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction materials, on page 84, there is a Using Letter Patterns: Generic Lesson Plan that includes Teaching Letter Patterns. In this part of the lesson, the students write a word that is given to them using the letter pattern that they have been taught.

Criterion 1o - 1t

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
22/22
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Grade 2 meet the expectations of foundational skills instruction. Students receive regular practice with foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context. Additionally, the materials provide support for fluency, decoding, word recognition, and support for differentiation in the classroom. 

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relations, phonemic awareness, phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks directly teach foundational skills to build reading acquisition by providing systematic and explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle, letter-sound relationships, phonemic awareness, and phonological awareness (K-1), and phonics (K-2) that demonstrate a transparent and research-based progression for application both in and out of context.

Bookworms Grade 2 materials provide systematic and explicit instruction in phonics. Students have opportunities to learn foundational skills in both Shared Reading and during Differentiated Instruction, where systematic and explicit instruction is embedded within the lessons. A transparent progression is in place.

Lessons and activities provide students opportunities to learn grade-level phonics skills while decoding words (e.g., distinguish long and short vowel sounds, apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode two syllable words with long vowels). Examples include, but not limited to:

  • Students have opportunities to distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable words. For example: 
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 1, Day 2, Word Study, the teacher reviews the letters that are vowels and reminds students that vowels can represent different sounds. The teacher explains that when the vowel is making the long sound, it is saying its name and when the pattern is CVC, the vowel is a short vowel and is making the short vowel sound. The teacher further explains that if the pattern is vCe, the vowel sound is long. The students listen to each word read aloud and determine if the vowel sound is a short vowel or a long vowel. The following words are read in a mixed order: his, box, glad, pick, get, bus, snack, mine, close, came, drive, here, safe, rule. The students and teacher chorally read the word lists once they are sorted.
    • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, students engage in differentiating long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words during “Teaching Letter Patterns.” The teacher says “We are going to start by listening for vowel sounds. We are going to review words that have the short-vowel sounds in hat, pig, pot, and sun. We are going to review words that have the long-vowel sounds in cake, bike, bone, and cube. I’ll say a word and you point to the picture with the same vowel sound.” The teach distributes cards and goes through 15 words as the students listen for the vowel sound and point to the correct clue word on their visual.
  • Students have opportunities to know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams. For example: 
    • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, students engage in decoding by analogy. The teacher says “We are going to work with some vowel patterns. The way we’ll do it is we’ll learn a set of clue words, and we’ll use those words to read other wods. Your clue words today are rain, May, and eight. They all use patterns to spell the same sound. In the word rain, the letters a and i represent the sound /a/.” The teacher explains the pattern in May and eight that say /a/, as well. The teacher then says, “Keep your clue words on top of your new words. Touch your new word. Find the vowel pattern. Then touch the clue word with the same vowel pattern. When I say “Go,” I want you to say: “I know_______, so this is _________.”  For example, “ I know May, this must be way.”
    • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, a generic lesson plan is provided that includes instruction on long vowel teams. Students learn a set of clue words and use them to read other words. In this sample lesson the clue words are: rain, May, eight. Students use them to read: spray, paid, freight, stain, pay, claim, sprain, train, stray, veil, straight. Fifteen lists of words and passages for decoding are provided for practice during small group instruction.
  • Students have opportunities to decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels. For example: 
    • In Shared Reading Lesson plans, Week 1, the students review VCe words. The optional challenge words include two-syllable words with long vowels: replace, refuse, polite, comment
    • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, the lesson plan includes spelling practice of words with closed, open, and vowel-consonant-e syllables: compose, athlete, donate, refuge, stampede, ignite, supreme, volume, deplete, expire, estate, humane, immune, dictate, divide.
    • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, the strategy of placing a dot underneath each vowel and then deciding how to divide the word into its syllables is reviewed. Students are instructed that if vowel-consonant-e is found in a word that the vowel sound will be long. Student use what they know about the three syllable types to decode 2 syllable words.
  • Students have opportunities to decode words with common prefixes and suffixes. For example: 
    • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, students learn prefixes on Day 1 and Day 2. The students learn a prefix is a word part used at the beginning of a word. Students divide and read words with prefixes by finding the prefix, read the root word and then read the prefix and root word together. On Day 3 and 4, the students learn a suffix is a word part used at the end of a word. Students learn to divide and read words with suffixes. On Day 5, the students work with words that have prefixes and suffixes. The students learn that to divide and read words with prefixes and suffixes, they should find the prefix, find the suffix, read the root word, and then read the prefix, root word, and suffix together.
  • Students have opportunities to identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences. For example: 
    • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 17 Day 1, Word Study, the teacher says, “This week we will work on reading and spelling words with the /ar/ and the /ay/ sounds. The /ar/ sound is spelled with a-r. Three ways to represent the /ay/ sound are: a-r-e, a-i, a-i-r. Listen to each word and think about which pattern you hear.” In this set of lessons, the a-r-e pattern is inconsistent with the a-r pattern but is a common spelling-sound correspondence for long /a/.

Materials have a cohesive sequence of phonics instruction to build toward application. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, mentions the authors “were searching for maximum challenge in the instructional items, maximum effectiveness in the instructional strategies, and a brief and clear instructional delivery. We had to choose the words and patterns to teach, and then we had to decide which routines would maximize instruction and practice. Many of the orthographic features of words are actually repeated across lessons sets. We view the features as cumulative (see Figure 5.3)” (p. 104).
  • In the Teacher Manual, Appendix D, shows the cohesive sequence of phonics instruction during Shared Reading, moving from reviewing VCe and r-control words, to sorting words with vowel teams, then sorting words with common vowel digraphs, to words with beginning blends and digraphs, and ending the year with irregular plural words and y to -ies spellings.

Indicator 1p

Materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acqusition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, directionality, and function (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks provide explicit instruction for and regular practice to address the acquisition of print concepts, including alphabetic knowledge, and directionality (K-1), structures and features of text (1-2).

Bookworms Grade 2 materials provide explicit instruction and regular practice in print concepts, text structures and text features. Identifying text structures and text features are part of ELA and Shared Reading lessons.

Students have frequent and adequate opportunities to identify text structures (e.g., main idea and details, sequence of events, problem & solution, compare and contrast, cause and effect). Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 1, Day 1, Teach Text Structure Anchor Chart, the teacher reminds students that stories have parts. The teacher tells the students the setting is the place and time where the story happens and the characters are people or animals in the story. The teacher and students work to summarize what they know so far on the story map.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 6, Day 1, the teacher previews the text structure of sequence with the students. The teacher explains they will be reading nonfiction text and that in nonfiction text, the information is real, the illustrator is often a photographer, and nonfiction books have no characters, problems, and resolutions. The teacher explains the text will be a cycle book, and the author shares a series of events that happen over and over again.
  • In Shared Reading, Week 6, Day 1, the teacher previews the text structure of sequential organization. The teacher explains a book that uses a sequential organization means the author will tells the events in time order.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 20, Day 2, Teach Text Structure Anchor Chart, the teacher reminds students that a biography is generally structured as a sequence of events. Students create a timeline based on the events in the text.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 25, Day 1, Teach Text Structure Anchor Chart, the teacher and students identify the main topic and subtopics of the book using a web organizer.
  • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 1, Teach Text Structure, direct instruction is provided about how the author wrote the book in two parts. A diagram is included with a section about how magnets work and how magnets are used.

Materials include frequent and adequate  lessons and activities about text features (e.g., title, byline, headings, table of contents, glossary, pictures, illustrations). Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 7, Day 1, Preview Text Structure Anchor Chart, the teacher tells about the table of contents. The teacher explains that the table of contents helps us to know how the author has organized information.
  • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 3, the teacher and students discuss the title and subtitle of the text: Cracking Up: A Story about Erosion.
  • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 4, Day 4, Model a Comprehension Strategy and Ask Questions During Reading, as the text is read the teacher is prompted to explain to students how to use a diagram to understand what is being read. “End of page 10: “This diagram is called a cross-section. It lets us see what’s happening underground, where we can’t see in real life.”
  • In ELA Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 3, the teacher is prompted to point out that the book does not have an illustrator because all of the pictures are photographs.

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and gain decoding automaticity and sight-based recognition of high-frequency words. This includes reading fluency in oral reading beginning in mid Grade 1 and through Grade 2.

Bookworms Grade 2 materials support students’ development of automaticity and accuracy of grade-level decodable words during weekly Teach Word Study lessons. Students learn a phonics skill, sort words based on the sound and decode the words with the phonic focus. High-frequency words are a focus of daily lessons in the How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Using Letter Sounds, Using Letter Patterns, and Basic Letter Patterns, which students participate in during small group instruction. There are opportunities for students to purposely read grade-level text through the weekly opportunities including choral and echo reading in the Shared Reading Lessons.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to purposefully read on-level text. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 2, students participate in choral and partner reading of Ivy and Bean and then engage in a comprehension discussion with the following questions:
    • Do you think that the spell book is real? Why or why not?
    • Why do you think Ivy pretended that she was going to be sick in Mrs. Tranz’s yard?
    • How was Bean helpful to Ivy?
    • How was Ivy helpful to Bean?
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 15, Day 1, after the students participate in choral reading and partner reading of If You Lived with the Cherokee, students then engage in a comprehension discussion with the following questions:
    • Look at the map. Which Native Americans have we already learned about who lived close to the Cherokee?
    • It says that the Cherokee moved. What other Native Americans that we learned about moved?
    • What kinds of things do you think the Cherokee may have traded with the explorers and the settlers?
    • Why did the author write the book this way?
    • Is 200 years ago a long time? Why?
  • In the Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 30, Day 1, the students participate in choral reading and partner reading of Time Warp Trio: It’s All Greek to Me. Students then engage in a comprehension discussion with the following questions:
    • How can we tell that Cerberus is actually real?
    • What do you think the Book is?
    • How is the setting of this story similar to Day of the Dragon King?
    • What do you think is going to happen next? Why?
    • Does anyone know what a toga looks like?
    • Look up an image if they don’t.
    • Sam has a lyre. Does anyone know what that is?
  • In the Teacher Manual, under Shared Reading: Comprehension, it states that “In Bookworms Reading and Writing, we always help students target important content by providing a specific focus before they read. This will help them access relevant prior knowledge and lead them toward an appropriate mental representation of text meaning. You will see that in multiple readings the students always have a new purpose for reading. We never target skills in our language with children; we always target meaning.” Additionally, “during choral reading, you will be prompted to model one of seven high-utility comprehension strategies. When you  model, you tell the students how you use the strategy to increase your own comprehension of the text. Specifically, you tell what the strategy is, how you used it, and why you used it. Remember that modeling is showing your own thinking; it is different from prompting students to use strategies. Strategies targeted in these lessons are listed in the table below along with procedural cues. Note that we provide the text just before the spot where you think the modeling is most appropriate.” Additionally, the teacher manual says “Over time, strategic processing can become normal routine. Using the same language from book to book conveys the message that the reasoning process is the same. To learn more about this approach to comprehension strategy talk, see Explaining Reading (Duffy, G. G. (2014). Explaining reading: A resource for explicit teaching of the Common Core Standards (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Guildford Press.).

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy, rate, and expression in oral reading with on-level text and grade level decodable words. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 5, Day 2, the students participate in choral reading of Ivy and Bean with the teacher. Students reread the text with a partner and look to find ways that Ivy is surprising.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 15, Day 1, the students participate in choral reading of If You Lived with the Cherokee. Students reread the text with partners and think about how life may have changed for the Cherokee when the settlers came.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 30, Day 1, the students participate in choral reading of Time Warp Trio: It’s All Greek to Me. Students reread the text with partners and look for clues about the main characters.
  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, students use decodable texts to participate in Whisper Reading (application of decoding and word recognition), Partner Reading (calls for an authentic purpose for rereading) and Choral Reading (ensures that any decoding errors do not remain uncorrected and that the day’s text is read at least once at an appropriate rate).

Students have opportunities to practice and read irregularly spelled words. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 17 Day 1, Word Study, the teacher says “This week we will work on reading and spelling words with the /ar/ and the /ay/ sounds. The /ar/ sound is spelled with a-r. Three ways to represent the /ay/ sound are: a-r-e, a-i, a-i-r. Listen to each word and think about which pattern you hear.” In this set of lessons, the a-r-e pattern is inconsistent with the a-r pattern but is a common spelling-sound correspondence for long /a/.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 18, Day 1, students work on reading and spelling words that have /e/, /er/, /ee/ and /ay//r/ working together.
    • The /e/ sound can be spelled e-a.
    • The /ee/ sound can be spelled e-e and e-a.
    • The /er/ sound can be spelled e-r and e-a-r.
    • The /ay/ - /r/ sounds can be spelled e-a-r.

A column is made for each spelling pattern. Words are given that have one of the spelling patterns and the word is sorted accordingly.

  • /e/ word: deaf
  • /ay/-/r/ word: bear
  • /er/ words: perch, clerk, earth
  • /ee/ words: streak, cheek, creek

Optional challenge words: rehearse, converse, repeat, person.

The students read the words chorally in each column.

  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, the teacher must create a list of high-frequency words using the Fry Inventory. The teacher will assess each student in the differentiated group, and any high-frequency word unknown by any one member of the group will be taught to all. Students review and learn new high-frequency words at a pace of two per day for the first two weeks, and then review the 20 words learned in the third week. Students first point to the words as the teacher says them in a speed drill, and then the student points, waits, and spells the word aloud.
  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, high-frequency word instruction is included in the lessons for Using Letter Sounds Group. The high-frequency words used for instruction in this portion of the lesson are selected from the results of the high-frequency word inventory.  Ten words are included the first week, 10 words for the second week and all 20 words are reviewed the third week.

Indicator 1r

Materials, questions, and tasks provide systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing systematic and explicit instruction in and practice of word recognition and analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Bookworms Grade 2 materials provide opportunities for students to learn foundational skills in connected texts and tasks. In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, students have opportunities to participate in writing sentences based in the word study pattern, and students have opportunities to read texts with decodable words and high-frequency words. During Differentiated Instruction, Word Recognition and Fluency small group, students read decodable texts that contain high-frequency words.

Materials support students’ development to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills (e.g apply spelling-sound relationship on common words, decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels, decode words with common prefixes and suffixes) in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, a generic lesson plan is provided that includes instruction on long vowel teams. The plan includes the use of passages for decoding are provided for practice during small group instruction.
  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, steps are provided for reading text with students that contain multisyllabic words.
    • Introduce the words and have student mark the vowels and divide the words.
    • Lead the students to chorally pronounce each word part and then say the entire word.
    • Distribute an authentic, engaging, near grade level text and engage students in a choral reading for 5 minutes (If too difficult, switch to echo reading.).
    • Engage the students in a re-reading of the day’s segment of text (whisper reading or partner reading).
  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, R-Controlled Vowels, students read the following text which contains r-controlled vowels in-context: I can sit in the sun. I get a sunburn. The sunburn can hurt me. I must rub it. It hurts so much. I cannot sit in the sun so much. A sunburn is bad.
  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Vowel-Consonant-e, students read the following text which contains VCe: I saw a cook with a white hat. His hat had a flat top. He could make a cake. He had eggs and butter. He had milk and flour. He could bake a cake for a birthday. He could bake a cake for my mother. I had a long chat with the cook.

Materials provide frequent opportunities to read irregularly spelled words in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 21, Day 4, students read History’s All Stars: Abraham Lincoln. The text contains irregularly spelled words.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 28, Day 1, students read Magic Tree House: Day of the Dragon King. The text contains irregularly spelled words.
  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, R-Controlled Vowels, students read the following text which contains high-frequency words: I saw a ship at a port. It was dark. The ship had a torch. The torch was hot. The torch had a lot of light. The light was on the rocks. A torch can help a ship.

Lessons and activities provide students many opportunities to learn grade-level word recognition and analysis skills while encoding (writing) in context and decoding words (reading) in connected text and tasks. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 6, students learn short a and long a sounds. Students learn to decode words such as snag, scrape, span, paste, strange, clay, play, may, gray. On Day 2, students do a Written Response of two sentences, and students are to use two of their word study words in each sentence.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 18, students learn /e/, /er/, /ee/, /ay-/r/. Students learn words such as head, wear, herd, team, deaf, bear, perch, clerk, earth, streak, cheek, and creek. On Day 2, students do a Written Response of two sentences, and students are to use two of their word study words in each sentence.

Indicator 1s

Materials support ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meantingful differentiantion of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials supporting ongoing and frequent assessment to determine student mastery and inform meaningful differentiation of foundational skills, including a clear and specific protocol as to how students performing below standard on these assessments will be supported.

Bookworms Grade 2 materials provide opportunities to assess students on some foundational skills. Some assessments include the Informal Decoding Inventory (IDI), which is administered at the beginning of the year, as well as, Test of Fry Instant Words. Subtest assessments are given after three to six weeks of instruction and weekly Word Study tests are administered. These assessment opportunities support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Although most of the foundational skills are assessed through Word Study tests and assessments included in the How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, thorough, frequent fluency assessments are not provided. The materials do direct the teacher to the use of oral reading fluency assessments such as AIMSweb or DIBELS Next.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of foundational skills. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In Teacher Manual, Appendix F, Informal Decoding Inventory, 6 subtests that progress in difficulty: Short Vowels, Consonant Blends and Digraphs, R-Controlled Vowel Patterns, Consonant-Vowel-e, Vowel Teams, Multisyllabic Words. The first five subtests have twenty words in each: 10 real words, 10 nonsense words. The multisyllabic subtest consists of 10 real words that progressively differ in syllable type.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, 4 types of assessments described:
    • Screening Measures of achievement in a particular area are given at the beginning of the year and again at midyear;
    • Diagnostic Measures follow Screening Measures to break down the area into teachable skills and strategies;
    • Progress Monitoring Measures are administered periodically to determine if instruction is having the desired effect, so adjustments can be made in order to improve learning;
    • Outcome Measures administered at the end of a unit of instruction, or the end of the school year.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, assessment materials are provided or suggested for use after 14 lessons. The assessment consists of segmenting and blending CVC words, sounding and blending CVC words, and 20 high-frequency words (to be determined by the teacher). The segmenting and blending section is presented orally to the student. Words such as mad, bag, fan, map, hat, fin, lip, and hit are included. The sounding and blending section is presented visually to the students so that they can sound and blend untaught short-vowel words. The previously mentioned words are the same for this part of the assessment. A score of 10/15 or better is an indication of proficiency for each of those sections. The high-frequency words (selected by the teacher) are visually presented in random order. Words the students cannot yet read can be retaught in the next lessons.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Blends and Digraphs, assessment is suggested after 29 lessons. The assessment consists of reading either as a whole word, or by sounding and blending words with initial and final blends and digraphs. A score of 10 correct is a signal of proficiency. The first five words have initial blends, as in the word ‘slip.’ The second five words have initial digraphs, as in the word ‘chop.’ The last five words are a mix of initial and final blends and digraphs, as in the word ‘chest.’ It also includes 20 high-frequency words (to be determined by the teacher). It is suggested that any unknown words be taught in the next cycle of lessons.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, R-Controlled Vowel, assessment is suggested after 29 lessons. The assessment consists of 15 words that can be read as a whole word or by sounding and blending. A score of 10/15 words read correctly is an indicator of proficiency. Examples of words in this assessment include chart, term, skirt, north and burn. It also includes 15 high-frequency words (to be determined by the teacher). It is suggested that any unknown words be taught in the next cycle of lessons.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Vowel-Consonant-e, assessment is suggested after 14 lessons. It consists of reading VCe words, spelling VCe words, and reading high-frequency words (to be determined by the teacher). Fifteen VCe words are visually presented to the student. A score of 10/15 is an indicator of proficiency. Examples of the words included are pack, ice, place, cute, tame, and stun. An additional fifteen words are provided for the teacher to present orally as the students spell them. Examples from this section include cap, cape, man, mane, and time. Again, a score of 10/15 is an indicator of proficiency. It also includes 20 high-frequency words (to be determined by the teacher). It is suggested that any unknown words be taught in the next cycle of lessons.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Vowel Teams, assessment is suggested after 30 lessons. It consists of having students read words with vowel teams. Seventy words are visually presented for the students to read. A score of 50 is an indicator of proficiency. Examples include shown, glue, field, blind, pray, and threw.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current skills/level of understanding. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, there are assessments that test foundational skills:
    • Informal Decoding Inventory, Short Vowels through Vowel Teams (to determine the highest decoding skill set the student has attained in pronouncing one-syllable words of progressively more difficult patterns):
    • In the Vowel Teams subtest, the teacher points to the word neat and says, “What is this word?” The assessment includes the following words: neat, spoil, goat, pail, field, fruit, claim, meet, beast, craid, houn, rowb, noy, feap, nuit, maist, ploat, tead, steen
  • Informal Decoding Inventory, Multisyllabic Words (to determine proficiency in pronouncing two-syllable words of progressively more difficult patterns):
    • In the Multisyllabic Words subtest, the teacher points to the word flannel and says “What is this word?” The following words are included in the assessment: flannel, submit, cupid, spiky, confide, cascade, varnish, surplus, chowder, approach

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in foundational skills. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, it explains how to use the assessment results to form groups in the second half of grade 1 and beyond.
    • Failure to pass the benchmark in fluency and failure to pass the Multisyllabic subtest of the IDI, place the student in a Fluency and Comprehension group with Multisyllabic Decoding.
    • Failure to pass the benchmark in fluency but the student passes the Multisyllabic subtest of the IDI, place the student in a Fluency and Comprehension group without Multisyllabic Decoding.
    • Failure to pass the benchmark in fluency and pass the Vowel Teams subtest of the IDI, follow the steps in Figure 3.4
    • If the student passes the benchmark in fluency- place the student in a Vocabulary and Comprehension group
  • In the Teacher’s Manual, Evaluation and Grading, a sample word study assessment is provided. This type of assessment asks students to use the featured patterns from the week’s word study focus to spell 15 words, including one transfer word from each featured pattern, with the remaining words coming from the word study list. “For each word, write a plus (+) in the blank next to it if the student correctly pronounces it until you have identified 10 unknown words. If you re-administer the inventory, return only to those words not automatically recognized during previous testing.”
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, the book states, “formative assessments are most useful when they are given periodically” and “we recommend 3-week and in some cases 6-week cycles” for teachers to “regularly take stock of student progress and adjust their instruction accordingly.” After each cycle, “the last day of the cycle is devoted entirely to assessments that target the work the students have undertaken during the past weeks.” These assessments can be seen at the end of each skill set. For examples, see pages 75-76, 86, 95, and 147 to see end-of-skill assessments.

Indicator 1t

Materials, questions, and tasks provide high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The Bookworms materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks providing high-quality lessons and activities that allow for differentiation of foundational skills, so all students achieve mastery of foundational skills.  

Bookworms Grade 2 materials provide differentiated lessons and guidance based on screening test results, assessment results and progress monitoring results in order for teachers to support each student’s learning needs.

Materials provide high-quality learning lessons and activities for every student to reach mastery of foundational skills. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Multisyllabic Decoding, Week 11: Vowel Teams, instruction is provided about decoding words with open, closed, r-controlled, and vowel team syllables. “A strategy you can use is to place a dot underneath each single vowel and an underline beneath a vowel team.” Students mark the vowels in words, divide the syllables, decode, and then blend them to read the word.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Multisyllabic Decoding, Week 9: Closed, Open, and Vowel-Consonant-e Syllables, the strategy of placing a dot underneath each vowel and then deciding how to divide the word into its syllables is reviewed. Students are instructed that if vowel-consonant-e is found in a word that the vowel sound will be long. Students use what they know about the three syllable types to decode  syllable words.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, Multisyllabic Decoding, Week 4: pre-, dis-, -able, -er, -ar, -or, -ed, each day of Week 4, a prefix and/or suffix is taught, and students have guided practice in reading words containing a prefix or suffix. There is a segment where students practice spelling words with the prefix or suffix that was taught.
  • In Shared Reading Lesson Plans, Week 2, Day 1, Word Study, the focus of the lesson is on reading and spelling words with long and short vowel sounds. After listening for the the short or long sound of the vowel, the word is shown to students and sorted based on CVC or CVCe. Once the words are all sorted, students read the words in each group. Words included in the lesson: short vowel words: did, dog, hug; long vowel words: like, home, huge; Optional challenge words: propose, remake, revise, promote.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons and activities to support each student’s needs. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, coaching template for vowel teams explain instructional decisions and processes for the lesson components:
    • During High-Frequency Words, the teacher selects words based on the high-frequency word inventory. Two new words are introduced each day.  The teacher is instructed to stretch the sounds first and then print the word. The teacher shows how the sounds match the letters from left to right. The teacher gives the children the two news words and the previously taught ones on a list. The teacher calls the words, and the students touch them. The teacher calls the words, and the students spell them aloud
    • In Vowel Team Analogies, the teacher introduces the key words for the day and reviews the vowel patterns. Students receive the day’s card. Students find its vowel pattern and then touch a key word with the same vowel pattern. Students chorally respond. “I know ________. This must be ________.”
    • During student practice, the teacher models the whole card and then sets a timer for 1 minute. The students are to practice on their own. The teacher is reminded that the students should look at each word, say it if they know, or sound and blend it if they don’t.
    • During Decoding Text Reading, the teacher pre-teaches words that will be problematic. The teacher sets a timer and asks students to whisper read until time is called. The teacher tells student that if they know the words, they should say them, and if they don’t, they should sound and blend. Then the students switch to partner reading. The teacher has students read alternate sentences until time is called and that one student should read while the other tracks and listes. The teacher is directed to coach students to reread.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, coaching template for fluency and comprehension with multisyllabic decoding, includes:
    • Through choral response, the teacher helps student chorally to pronounce each word part and then to say the entire word.
    • During First Reading, the teacher shares a near grade level text with few or no text features. The teacher engages students in an initial choral reading of a new text segment for 5-minutes. If the text appears to be too difficult, the teacher can switch to echo reading.
    • In Second Reading, the teacher engages the students in a rereading of the day’s segment. The teacher can use whisper reading, or partner reading if the text is more difficult.
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, the materials guide the teacher in forming small groups based on the results of the assessments administered to determine current skill levels. For example (page 201-202), if a student passed the Vowel Team subset of the Informal Decoding Inventory, but is not reading at fluency benchmark, the student should be placed in a Fluency and Comprehension small group which may or may not include instruction on multisyllabic decoding (at the discretion of the teacher).

Students have multiple practice opportunities with each grade level foundational skill component in order to reach mastery. Examples include, but not limited to:

  • In How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, the number of lessons for each foundational skill focus is listed:
    • Vowel Teams (30 lessons)
    • Multisyllabic Decoding (18 weeks)
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, after students are placed appropriately in a foundational skills group, they receive targeted instruction in that skill for either a three-week or six-week cycle. For example, K if students are receiving instruction in “Letter Sounds” starting on page 78 in In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, students will receive lessons and activities for 14 days to assist with reaching mastery of foundational skills. After the 14 days, the students will receive an end-of-skill assessment (page 86), to gauge their readiness to move on or receive further instruction in this skill.  
  • In How to Plan for Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources for Grades K-3, a generic lesson plan is provided that includes instruction on long vowel teams. Students learn a set of clue words and use them to read other words. In this sample lesson the clue words are: rain, May, eight. Students use them to read: spray, paid, freight, stain, pay, claim, sprain, train, stray, veil, straight. Fifteen lists of words and passages for decoding are provided for practice during small group instruction.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the expectations for Gateway 2. Materials do provide organized and cohesive year-long academic vocabulary support, as well as comprehensive writing instruction that supports students in building their writing skills. Students have some practice to analyze different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. The materials partially meet the expectations of building students’ knowledge of topics, with some texts and text sets supporting a topic. Texts are accompanied by questions, tasks, and activities that partially support attention to the topics within and building knowledge.

Criterion 2a - 2h

24/32

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students' ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics to build students knowledge and vocabulary which will over time support and help grow students’ ability to comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

In Shared Reading and ELA, there are some texts that are organized around a text topic. In Shared Reading, the students listen to the same text for five says and the text changes each week. ELA units include several topics; however texts are inconsistently organized around a topic/topics to build knowledge. The publisher states, "Before grade 1, there are both narrative and information texts, but nearly all of the information texts are used for read alouds during English Language Arts rather than for Shared Reading. Our Shared Reading curriculum is deliberately unbalanced – it devotes little time to basic skills after grade 1 and instead targets spelling. fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and text structure knowledge." In some sections, the materials provide limited teaching notes that give guidance on how teachers can support students building knowledge of a topic, and a single text set rarely includes more than two books, thus limiting the students' opportunities to apply knowledge and vocabulary in a new context.

Materials include limited examples of texts organized around a topic in ELA. For example:

  • In ELA, Week 5, students listen to texts about animal survival. In Week 5, students listen to, Where in the Wild? by David Schwartz and Yael Schy and Camouflage: Changing to Hide by Bobbie Kalman.
  • In ELA, Week 19, students listen to biographies. They read Helen Keller: Break Down the Walls! by Margaret Fetty and Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride by Pam Munoz Ryan. Students also listen to Dad, Jackie, and Me by Myron Uhlberg about Jackie Robinson and then The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles. Finally, students read My Brother Martin by Christine King Farris. 
  • In ELA, Weeks 33, students listen to texts about symbolism in American. In Week 33, they listen to the book The Flag We Love by Pam Munoz Ryan, which is about the American Flag. They also listen to The Wall by Eve Bunting, which is about the Vietnam Wall.
  • In ELA, Week 34, students listen to texts about plants. They begin by listening to How a Plant Grows by Bobbie Kalman and then they read How do you Raise a Raisin? by Pam Munoz Ryan, which is about how to grow raisins.

Materials include limited examples of texts organized around a topic in Shared Reading. For example:

  • In Weeks 6-9, students read non-fiction books about life cycles. In Week 6, they read Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace. In Week 7, they read From Tadpole to Frog by Wendy Pfeffer. Then in Week 8, students read From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Hellingman and The Journey of a Butterfly by David Salariya.
  • In Week 20 and 21, students read the biographies Jackie Robinson by Sally M. Walker and History’s All Stars: Abraham Lincoln. This correlates with the biographies read in ELA during Week 3.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

Throughout the Grade 2 materials, there are coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze language, key ideas and details, and craft and structure in both the ELA and Shared Reading components of the program.

Students are asked a series of questions about key ideas and details throughout both the ELA and Shared Reading portion of the component. The level of analysis increases throughout the year. Examples include:

  • In ELA, Week 12, after reading The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses, students are asked to analyze the key ideas and details when asked if they thought it was a good idea to jump on a horse or would it have been better to stay on the blanket, and do they think that calling these people Horse People like the author is a good name for them.
  • In Shared Reading, Week 12, students read Cam Jansen and the Mystery Writer Mystery by David A. Adler. Students are asked to describe if Mr. Winter is persistent and if Cam is persistent. Students are asked to support their responses with evidence from the text.
  • In Week 32, students compare and contrast the stories Cinderella and Rough-Face Girl and are asked how the stories are different. To support comprehension, students are asked to discuss the setting, the characters, and then the big events, in order, with a partner. Students are also asked how the sisters feel about Cinderella and why Cinderella loses track of time during the second ball. Students are also asked to determine the theme of the story.

Some language questions come prior to the student reading the text to help aid their comprehension, while other questions help students analyze specific phrases from the texts. Questions and tasks that require students to analyze language include:

  • In ELA, Week 5, students read Where in the Wild by David Schwartz and Yael Schy. Prior to reading the text, the teacher explains the terms camouflage and predator and then students are asked if the same animal can be both a predator and prey.
  • In Shared Reading, Week 6, students are asked what it means to say that the stickleback is a predator after reading Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace.

Narrative text structure is discussed after reading while informational text structure is introduced prior to reading and revisited after reading. In most cases, the teacher introduces and discusses the text structure. There are also questions that ask students to analyze the craft and structure of the text. For example:

  • In Shared Reading, Week 15, students read If you Lived with the Cherokee. The teacher discusses the structure and then asks the students questions after reading. The teacher explains that the author has a creative way of organizing the information and asks the students to use the table of contents to figure it out. After reading the text, students are asked why the author wrote the book with this type of text structure.
  • In ELA, Week 25, students write a letter to Ragweed telling him what has happened to them as if they are Poppy from the book Poppy by Avi. This addresses point of view.

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Throughout the program, students analyze knowledge and ideas within individual texts; however opportunities are limited for students to analyze and integrate knowledge across multiple texts. Students answer a series of discussion questions and then answer a written response. Some of the writing tasks require students to build upon knowledge in more than one text.

Examples of questions and texts that require students to integrate knowledge in Shared Reading and ELA include:

  • In Week 6, after reading Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace, students write a paragraph about the lifecycle of a frog. Similarly in Week 9, after reading The Journey of a Butterfly by David Salariya, students write a paragraph about the migration of a butterfly. 
  • In Week 19, students listen to Helen Keller: Break Down the Walls by Margaret Fetty and write what the author does to demonstrate that Helen Keller is determined and brave.
  • In Week 20, students read Jackie Robinson by Sally M. Walker and write a newspaper article summarizing his life after reading and discussing the text over the course of the week.
  • In Week 25, students listen to Mummies by Joyce Milton. Students are asked questions such as, "Why did the pharaoh want his body to be turned into a mummy? Where was the Land of the Dead? and Why did the pharaoh's body have to be taken across the Nile River."
  • In Week 33, after reading The Flag We Love by Pam Munoz Ryan which describes the first American flag, students design a new original flag with the right number of stars and describe why they designed it the way they did. This is related to the text, but does not assure they will anchor their work in new knowledge gained from the reading. 

Materials provide limited opportunities for students to answer a series of questions and tasks that require them to integrate knowledge and ideas across multiple texts include. For example:

  • In Week 14, students listen to The Very First Americans by Cara Ashrose and If You Lived with the Cherokee by Peter Roop. After working with each text for an entire week, students are put into three groups and are asked to synthesize what they have learned about Native Americans and write about one of the three tribes of Native Americans they have read about. The final writing piece must describe the Native American tribe, include two big ideas with supporting facts from the text, and include a closing.
  • In Week 32, students listen to several versions of Cinderella including Cinderella by Marcia Brown and The Rough-Faced Girl by Rafe Martin. Students are guided through creating a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Cinderella and The Rough-Faced Girl. Students write about ways the stories are similar and different.

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Within the program, there are two final culminating tasks at the end of the year that are intended to integrate skills and have students demonstrate their knowledge. However, students demonstrate their knowledge of a text and their knowledge of themselves as readers and writers, but do not demonstrate their knowledge of the topics learned throughout the program. These tasks do not always require synthesizing knowledge of actual content, but rather depend on students’ ability to form an onion and/or write about themselves. There are some writing tasks throughout the year that could serve as culminating tasks that require students to integrate knowledge of a topic through integrated skills.

At the end of Grade 2, students are given two weeks to complete two culminating tasks. These tasks, according to the publisher, are similar in every grade, though the rigor increases due to the standards. These tasks require students to integrate skills, students are not asked to demonstrate their knowledge of the topics learned throughout the year. The culminating tasks focus more on demonstrating integration of  reading and writing skills, rather than demonstrating knowledge of topics or being text focused. These include:

  • In Week 35, students complete a final book review, in which they demonstrate their knowledge of one book and their knowledge of the skill of writing a book review. Prior to this culminating task, students are taught to write book reviews. In Week 3 of ELA, students write a book review on Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst or A New Coat for Anna by Harriet Ziefert, and students write three reasons why they like one of the books. The teacher guides the students through the process for the one day they work on it. For the culminating task, students write an advertisement about their favorite book from the year with the goal of having future Grade 2 students excited to read that book.
  • In Week 36, students reflect on their growth as readers and writers throughout the year. The program calls this writing a memoir. This culminating writing task requires students to demonstrate their knowledge of the skills learned in the year, but not the topics learned in the year. In addition, there are minimal opportunities throughout the year that require students to reflect on their growth or read or write memories, which would lead to the successful completion of this culminating task.

Students are given writing assignments throughout the year, that require them to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills; however, these are not considered culminating tasks by the publisher and unlike the labeled culminating tasks, these support students’ growth as readers and writers, and do not serve as a year-end project to see how much students have learned. At the end of each Shared Reading text, students complete a retelling. The bi-weekly, on-demand writing tasks assess reading comprehension in ELA. Examples include:

  • In ELA, Weeks 6-7, students write facts after reading the books Camouflage: Changing to Hide by Bobbie Kalman and What is it Made? Nothing Types of Materials by Martha E.H. Rustad. While students are asked to demonstrate their knowledge of the topics presented in these texts, the teacher guides the students throughout the process. To assure students are demonstrating their own learning, the teacher may have to amend the lessons. 
  • In Shared Reading, Week 6, after reading Tale of Tadpole by Karen Wallace, students draw a diagram of a tadpole and label its parents and then write a paragraph about the life cycle of a frog.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.

Vocabulary is embedded throughout the Grade 2 materials in both Shared Reading and ELA. In Shared Reading, words are useful for comprehension of the text or for understanding the theme. The words are introduced before reading and it also addresses multiple meanings of words and how context clues help determine which meaning. ELA has routines with both fiction and non-fiction texts. Tier II words are introduced after reading fiction texts. Only two words are introduced per book using the procedure recommended by Isabel Beck.  For informational books, the words are previewed prior to reading. The approach is a cluster approach so students can see how words are connected. In both ELA and Shared reading, Tier II and Tier III words are taught.

Some examples of vocabulary instruction in Shared Reading include:

  • In Week 3, before reading Pinky and Rex by James Howe, the teacher defines the word jealous and impress. Students then chorally repeat the words and turn to a partner to discuss the words. Throughout the week irritate, selfish, distracted and cooperate are introduced. The same procedure is done for each word.
  • In Week 18, prior to reading Judy Moody Saves the World by Megan McDonald, the teacher defines the word competition. The teacher provides the word in context before requiring students to repeat the word and then discussing it with a partner. Additional words are created, complicated, inspiration, and endangered. After reading the book, comprehension questions are asked that include the vocabulary words such as, “Why is it complicated for Judy Moody to save the word? and Why did Frank’s stamp give Judy Inspiration?”
  • In Week 25, students read the book Mummies by Joyce Milton and learn that a mummy is a dead body that has been carefully prepared to last a very long time. This will help students better understand the book.

In ELA fiction texts, vocabulary is taught after reading. Most of the words are Tier II words. Examples include:

  • In Week 1, after listening toArthur's Back to School Day by Lilian Houben, the teacher introduces the word prepare. The students chorally repeat the word and then the teacher provides a definition and examples of the word in context. Students then turn to their partner to discuss how they might prepare for school in the morning.
  • In Week 3, students listen to Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst and learn the word positively. The teacher explains that positively means without a doubt and then explains that in the book, Alexander says that he was positively saving the rest of the money.
  • In Week 18, students listen to My Rows and Piles of Coins by Tololwa Mollel and learn the word gape and determined. Students are told the definitions of each word and are given examples from the text.
  • In Week 30, students listen to the book The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo and learn that the word dainty means small, ilight, and delicate. Students are given sentence frames with the word such as I have a dainty....

In ELA non-fiction texts, vocabulary is taught before the text is read. These words are more Tier III words so teaching the words ahead of time helps students comprehend the text. After learning the words, the teacher models how to incorporate the words in their discussions and writing. Examples include:

  • In U Week 4, prior to reading Cracking Up: A Story about Erosion by Jacqui Bailey, the students learn the word erosion. Students are asked questions such as why do plants slow down erosion and does erosion help make pebbles bigger.
  • In Weeks 16-17, students read the text Tornado by Betsy Byars and learn the word twister and tornado. Students are asked why a tornado is sometimes called a twister.
  • In Week 29, students read D is for Dancing Drago: A China Alphabet by Carol Crane and learn the word pagoda. After learning about the word, students turn to a partner to discuss what Carol Crane means when she says that the acrobats form a human pagoda.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts. school year.

The Grade 2 curriculum includes a cohesive writing plan in both Shared Reading and English Language Arts. In Shared Reading, students write daily. At the beginning of the year, the teacher models  writing for students to establish norms for length and quality and sentence frames are provided. Each interactive read-aloud concludes with a brief writing prompt. At the beginning of the year, the teacher models how to complete the prompts, but over time, the teacher releases responsibility to the students. Process writing also involves a cohesive plan with extensive teacher support in the beginning of the year. Graphic organizers are provided in the beginning of the year but are used less towards the end of the year to help build independence. Over the course of the year, the writing demands build to increase student ability to express knowledge of text through writing.

In the beginning of the year, the students are given support with the daily written responses in ELA. Examples include:

  • In Week 4, after listening to Magnets Push, Magnets Pull, students are given a sentence starter to explain what they learned about magnets to a first grader.
  • In Week 13, after reading Arrow to the Sun by Gerald McDermott, students choose one of the kivas and tell what they think happened. Instead of just writing with nouns and verbs, they are to include adjectives.
  • In Week 16, students explain why they think Peter should have told Tornado he was a good dog. A sentence frame is not provided.
  • In Week 30, students write from another point of view. They write a diary entry from the point of view of Cinderella.

Students also write during the Shared Reading block, which also follows a cohesive plan for writing instruction throughout the year. Examples include:

  • In Week 6, students draw a diagram of a tadpole after reading Tale of a Tadpole by Karen Wallace.
  • In Weeks 10-12, students write about The Kidnapped King by Ron Roy. Students are expected to pull evidence from the text to support their answers.
  • In Weeks 26-27, students write about The Mystery of the Mummy's Curse by Chandler Warner and after writing with evidence, they share with a peer to get feedback.

Process writing also include a cohesive plan that leads students towards independence. For example:

  • In Week 1, students collaborate to write a personal narrative as a class. They use a graphic organizer and a checklist as a guide. The teacher writes the introduction and the first event and then students work in groups or with a partner to write the subsequent paragraphs. The teacher then models how to write the conclusion.
  • In Weeks 10-11, students work in groups to complete a narrative graphic organizer. The teacher creates an introduction and the first event and then students work in groups to write about the next events. During the second week of this instruction, students write their own personal narrative.
  • In Weeks 20-21, students independently complete the narrative graphic organizer.
  • In Week 34, students write sentences to tell information about the text How a Plant Grows by Bobbie Kalman. They then share it with peers for feedback.

Students write many book reviews throughout the program. The progression for teaching these include:

  • For the first book review, students only complete a graphic organizer, taking time to plan their book reviews.
  • For the second book review, students quickly fill in a graphic organizer, and then spend the majority of the time drafting.
  • For the third book review, students quickly fill out a graphic organizer and draft, and spend the majority of their time revising and drafting.
  • For the final book review, the teacher does no modeling, and instead, the students work independently.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

In Grade 2, students are engaged in exploring books and giving their opinions about the texts with guidance, modeling, and support of the teacher. Students have opportunities to learn, practice, and apply developing writing skills in varying contexts typically with teacher modeling and peer partnering.

While students build upon these skills throughout the year, there are limited opportunities for students to engage in projects designed to build their research skills. In the program, research skills involve informative writing based on the texts read during read-aloud.  

Students have minimal opportunities to participate in a research project in Grade 2. Some of these opportunities are optional. Some of the opportunities include:

  • In Week 2, ELA, students read The Very First Americans by Cara Ashrose and If you Lived with the Cherokee by Connie Roop, and work with a partner to write about a specific group of Native Americans. In this example, students work together to identify information to pull into writing, which supports their research development. 
  • In Week 25, students read Mummies by Joyce Milton. Students then participate in a research project in which they watch two videos “How Were Mummies Made In Ancient Egypt” and “How to Make a Mummy”. Students then begin the creation of a timeline of mummification.
  • In Week 34, after reading How a Plant Grows by Bobbie Kalman and viewing a recommended short time-lapse YouTube video on a bean developing over 18 days, students draw a diagram showing the roots of the plant, the stem, and the leaves, and then write about the diagram.

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The Grade 2 materials include time for independent reading during the day. It is suggested that students read at home. The program includes a proposed schedule that includes time for differentiation each day, which does include daily opportunities for self-selected, independent reading. There are suggestions for a shared reading homework procedure and a home reading log.

During the differentiated block of instruction each day, students engage in three 15-minute blocks of instruction that allow the teacher to meet with small groups of students. During this time, students engage in daily self-selected independent reading from the classroom library after finishing their written response to Shared Reading. This can impact how much time each student spends on independent reading daily. It is expected that students also spend 7-10 minutes each day with a partner to practice fluency. Appendix B provides a sample classroom library book list to help teachers pick books for independent reading.

For independent reading at home, the Teacher Manual recommends that grade level teachers collaborate to develop a consistent grade level homework procedure.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

The lessons and pacing throughout the program are both academically and developmentally appropriate. Students are given multiple opportunities to engage with a text, discuss with peers and teachers, learn new vocabulary words, and improve their writing. Opportunities for reteaching are also included. In the program, there are three 45-minute blocks of instruction. One block is used for whole-class shared reading. Students spend 5-10 minutes of word study or sharing written response from the previous day before beginning 25-30 minutes of shared reading which includes vocabulary instruction, setting a purpose for reading, choral or echo reading, and revisiting the purpose. The final 10 minutes of the block involves a comprehension discussion, updating the anchor chart, or assigning written response prompts. The second block is used for English Language Arts instruction, where students either engage in an interactive read-aloud or process writing. During interactive read-alouds, students work on summarizing, updating the anchor chart, sentence composing, and/or written response. During process writing, there is direct instruction, followed by work time, and time to share. The third block is used for differentiated instruction to develop foundational skills based on data. The program allows for three groups to meet with the teacher for 15 minutes a day, while engaging in word study, written responses, or self-selected independent reading.

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet, partially meet, do not meet) the criteria that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The Bookworms materials for both Shared Reading and English Language Arts is broken into 36 weeks and five lessons a week, which equals exactly 180 days. In addition, because the differentiated period can be used for reteaching, review, extension work, and additional exposure to print through independent reading time, the pacing allows for maximum student understanding. While this material covers the entire course of a typical school year, it is important to note that if schools have interruptions to a typical learning day or do not start the lessons on day 1 of school, then teachers will not finish the entire program.

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (eg. visuals, maps, etc.).

The student resources included in the program include clear directions and explanations and correct labeling of reference aids. However, it is important to note that there are very few student resources included because schools need to purchase the texts separately. The materials that are available include graphic organizers, descriptive writing, narrative, book review, opinion and editing checklists, book review text(s), and book review checklists. Not all of the downloads have a set of directions, but they are easy to interpret, well-labeled, and explained in the lesson plans on how to use. Student workbooks are also included for foundational skills. These include the labeling of text titles and days of the week.

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

The publisher provides Common Core Standards alignment tables that are organized by Shared Reading and English Language Arts lessons by week. There is also a standards alignment document for Word Study and Shared Reading written responses. Furthermore, standards alignment is included for the Fluency Measure and Informal Decoding Inventory found in Unit 1, the Holistic Assessment found in Unit 2, and the Oral Reading Fluency Measure found in Unit 3 and 4. In addition, in each lesson plan, each portion of the lesson identifies the related standards alignment.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The materials that are included with the program have a visual design that is not distracting and is engaging for students. The Grade 2 curriculum includes two Reading and Writing student response workbooks. They are used for word study and written responses to Shared Reading. The design is simple and supports students with the curriculum. There is ample space for writing and drawing, plus they are labeled clearly so the students can easily follow along. In addition, the curriculum also includes a variety of checklists that are used by the teacher and students during the planning stages of writing. These checklists incorporate student-friendly language and support the writing process. These are the only materials included in the program because the texts that students listen to are published books and need to be purchased separately or projected using technology.

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The materials contain a Teacher Manual for each grade level that provides information on the rationale behind each instructional method, the purpose of the design of the curriculum, and a breakdown of each lesson in English Language Arts, Shared Reading, and Differentiated Instruction. Lessons are written in first person. The design of the program is intentionally structured with repetitive routines to make it easier to use in real time, according to the publisher.  The daily lesson plans include information on the Common Core State Standards being addressed, the texts being used, and plannings notes that offer suggestions on how to use additional resources to enhance lessons. For example:

  • In Week 17 of ELA, after reading Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, teachers have the option of showing the movie or YouTube clips. Each lesson provides a script for the teacher to follow in order to lead students in their learning. In addition, there is guidance on which sections to review, how to design charts and model responses.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

While the Teacher Manual provides some adult-level explanations and some example of more advanced literacy concepts for teachers to improve their knowledge, a majority of the explanations refer to resources not included with the materials, and instead as a reference teachers can access on their own.

Examples of referring to resources that teachers can access on their own time include:

  • Suggesting that teachers would benefit from a book study on Words Their Way even though the program uses Word Study as grade-level instruction instead of differentiated instruction in Words Their Way.
  • For vocabulary, two words per session are introduced using a procedure by Isabel Beck and her colleagues and teachers can refer to her book Creating Robust Vocabulary: Frequently Asked Questions and Extended Examples. Teachers are also told to look at Teaching Vocabulary in all Classrooms to learn about vocabulary instruction of content words.
  • For better understanding fluency, teachers should read Developing Fluent Readers: Teaching Fluency as a Foundational Skill according to the publisher.
  • In order to understand the comprehension approaches used in this program, it is recommended that teachers read Explaining Reading: A Resource for Explicit Teaching of the Common Core Standards.
  • The program makes extensive use of the why-questions because of their established effectiveness listed in the article Elaborative Interrogation: Using ‘why’ Questions to Enhance the Learning from Text and Elaborative Interrogation Effectiveness on Children’s Learning of Factual Content.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

The Teacher Manual does not appear to have information regarding the ELA/Literacy Standards with the exception of the Standards Alignment Document, found in supplemental materials, and listing the specific standards being addressed in each individual lesson. Bookworms does not state that their design is built around the standards, and instead states that it is built around literacy research and evidence-based pedagogy. The Teacher Manual includes a myriad of studies on word study, fluency, and comprehension, but there is no framework of the role of the specific standards. The Teacher Manual does state the high volume design of Bookworms Reading and Writing produces daily opportunities for addressing multiple standards. In addition, because of the research and the standards, the program indicates the material is repetitive and consistent in order to provide a high volume of practice opportunities, without giving specific assignments to demonstrate mastery of standards in any one marking period.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research based strategies.

The materials include a Teacher Manual that breaks down the Literacy block into Shared Reading, English Language Arts, and Differentiated Instruction. Within each section, there are explicit explanations and guidance for each method that is mentioned, ranging from word study, fluency, comprehension, writing, and vocabulary. The Teacher Manual explains the process involved for every section and often details why approach was included in the program. The identification of research-based strategies are present, and books and articles are referred to for teachers to learn more about the specific approaches and strategies.

Some specific explanations and research-based practices include:

  • The Teacher Manual states why they chose a specific writing prompt. It states that the prompt is the most important kind of writing students will do, is closely tied to the comprehension strategies of determining the relative importance of ideas, and provides a sharing activity that sets up the new days’ text segment by reviewing recent events.
  • The Teacher Manual states that the goal for the fluency portion of the Shared Reading routine is to build the skills for students to move from a teacher-supported choral reading to an independent partner reading.
  • For vocabulary, the Teacher Manual explains that while there are many evidence-based routines for vocabulary instruction, they have chosen just a few to make sure teachers and students are accustomed to the routines.
  • The Teacher Manual encourages teachers to engage in a Semantic Feature Analysis in Shared Reading and in interactive read-alouds, whenever new concepts are a part of a larger overarching category, and can be compared and contrasted on the basis of a set of features.

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

In the Teacher Manual, there is a section called Family Connections, which offers a letter home outlining the literacy program and includes the components of the program, the teaching approaches used, as well as recommendations for how to support the student at home in regard to reading with them and asking them what they are reading and learning in school. For example, it tells families that the best thing to do at home is to read to and with their child everyday. It also says that the text chosen does not matter and students are encouraged to read a range of texts including magazines, books, newspapers, blogs, informative texts, and even cookbooks. There is also a Word Study Parent Letter that explains the phonics and spelling routines. For both letters, the program recommends customizing the letters so they reflect the school’s norms and traditions.

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

The Grade 2 materials include weekly Word Study tests, bi-weekly on-demand written responses to assess comprehension, and longer fully processed writing tasks to assess composition and mechanics. Standards-based rubrics are included to assess these compositions.

The Teacher Manual also states that there are fluency assessments available with clear interpretive guidance for free or low cost. The Bookworms K-5 Reading and Writing diagnostic assessment for phonics knowledge as been provided free by the publisher in Appendix F.

In addition, Bookworms recommends assessing student progress in external transfer tasks using periodic holistic assessments, though these assessments are not included within the Bookworms curriculum. For example, it recommends two specific Achieve the Core, Grade 2 writing performance assessments.

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

The evaluation enhancements section of the Bookworms Curriculum, "Evaluating Student Progress", includes a summary of all Grade 2 assessment opportunities within each unit as well as the standard alignment. The assessments are in decoding, fluency, genre writing, and shared reading.

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

In the Bookworms program, there is minimal guidance to teachers on interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up. The program recommends discussions with peers to learn from each other and to build a community of teachers who support one another’s work instead of providing guidance on follow-up. The conventions and genre rubrics are used to evaluate student writing, which informs the teachers of important components of the writing task. Teachers can use the rubrics to analyze student performance and determine necessary follow-up; however, the program itself does not provide this guidance. The program suggests teachers bring student writing to professional learning community meetings to make informed decisions about instruction, though there is no guidance for this. Sample student written responses are provided to model a progression of skills to help teachers see the increase in writing throughout Grade 2.

Additionally, there are checklists used three times a year for speaking and listening. Teachers can determine when to use the checklists and how to use the data. Similar to the rubrics, teachers can determine which skills need additional instruction based on the checklist, no specific guidance is provided for follow-up.

In addition, there is no guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow - up included in the materials in terms of Word Study. In order to take advantage of the Informal Decoding Inventory diagnostic data, schools need to purchase the 2017 edition of the book How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Resources of K-3 by Sharon Walpole (author of Bookworms) and Michael C. McKenna.

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

Within the program, the publisher includes an "Evaluating Student Progress" document consisting of a summary of all Grade 2 assessment opportunities within each unit, along with each assessment’s standards alignment. This is a separate document though, and not in the Teacher Manual. Within the Word Study and Shared Reading lesson plans, assessment opportunities are indicated with a green box in the Teacher Manual to highlight the opportunity for assessment. Genre writing assessments are not highlighted in the same manner, and teachers need to refer to this separate document.

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

The materials in Grade 2 include a proposed schedule during the Differentiation block that includes time for independent reading. Students must complete handwriting practice and a written response before engaging in independent reading though. However, there is no tracking system provided for students to log independent reading in the classroom or at home. There are suggestions that students read at home, but no accountability system is indicated nor is it required.

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

In the program, one of the three blocks of instruction is the Differentiation block that offers instruction to different small groups of learners. This time allows the teacher to instruct and monitor students to ensure they are understanding the content, while offering opportunities for reteaching, practice, review, and other scaffolding techniques, based on the students’ need.

The program does not create small group instruction based on reading levels, but instead uses diagnostic data to place students in groups, which is outlined in the book How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction (sold separately). This Tier II instruction is designed to target skill deficits. In addition, the publisher reports that there is an opportunity for more intensive instruction during this block if students need it, which prevents them from missing Shared Reading and English Language Arts instruction. Each of the groups engage in three-week or six-week cycles, with progress-monitoring assessments used to help teachers know when to reteach the lessons, move to the next set of lessons, or regroup students. When students are not working with the teacher during this time, they are engaged in a written response from Shared Reading or engaged in self-selected reading.

In addition, differentiation is recommended for in-class and push-in supports during Shared Reading and English Language Arts instruction. Some examples of in-class supports include allowing students to track print rather than read it and engaging in choral reading instead of partner reading, using sentence frames for students who struggle to complete sentence, and allowing less details in a sentence. Examples of push-in support include conducting parallel discussions in order to allow more students to participate and receive scaffolding, and allowing the use of dictation or assistive technology for students with disabilities.

Differentiation is provided for both weak readers and strong readers. For weaker readers, it is recommended that teachers provide oral sentence frames. For weaker writers, students should be giving graphic organizers and monitoring should be provided. It is recommended that high-achieving students are paired together so they can challenge each other’s comprehension or students do not have to participate in partner reading, and can read independently instead.

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

The Teacher Manual has a section that addresses English Language Learners. It provides a routine with built-in supports for English Language Learners in a traditional classroom setting, and they also identify additional supports that could be added to a classroom for more assistance in accessing the curriculum. In addition, the Differentiation section provides different levels of scaffolding that an English Language Learner may need, and it offers recommendations depending on the specific needs of the students. It is recommended that English Language Learners always meet with the teacher for 15 minutes a day during this block of time. The Teacher Manual also gives suggestions such as replacing English Language Arts if students require more intensive speaking and listening instruction in English.

Some examples of built-in English Language Learner supports include:

  • Words are presented with their syllables physically identified and then transformed into different parts of speech by adding prefixes, suffixes, and inflectional endings
  • Using pictures to support meaning
  • Using super sentence webs to use vocabulary words in sentence contexts

Some examples of additional supports include:

  • Listening and tracking print rather than reading chorally
  • Displaying a set of sentence starts that students can use
  • Adding sentence frames to support answers to text-based writing

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet  the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Bookworms provides extension tasks, scaffolding, and explicit instruction for teachers on how to teach their above grade level students. Bookworms identifies the need for teachers to identify the strengths of the strong students and to scaffold their learning so that the content is meaningful and engaging. During the Differentiation block, all students receive differentiated content based on the assessment data collected throughout the year. Additionally, Bookworms provides a chart for teachers of ways to add more advanced opportunities in Shared Reading and English Language Arts.

Specific opportunities for extensions for above grade level students include:

  • Silently reading instead of participating in choral reading
  • Working with another high-achieving student to have a discussion about the text
  • Asking the student to help with the whole class summary of the text
  • Being given a specific sentence frame, instead of giving them a choice for vocabulary development

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The materials provide a guideline for 45 minutes of Differentiated Instruction per day, which allows for a variety of group work for students that includes reaching, review, and practice of concepts that they may be struggling with. Students are placed into one of three groups during this time. Students meet with the teacher for 15 minutes, and then spend 30 minutes completing their written response to Shared Reading, and engaging in self-selected reading. During Shared Reading, students often partner read or chorally read as a whole class, and during English Language Arts, students often share responses with peers.

  • During Week 6, ELA, students work in partners or small groups with a pre-selected text set. Students work together to take notes on what they read with a focus on the similarities among the texts.
  • During Week 20, Shared Reading, students turn and talk to their partner about how they think being judged makes someone feel.
  • During Week 24, ELA, students work on creating their opinion graphic organizer near peters that they feel comfortable sharing their with opinion with in order to get feedback and support as needed.
  • During Week 28, Shared Reading, students practice their word study test with a partner.

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 meet the criteria that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple internet browsers (eg. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (ie., Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The publisher provides both a  web-based and a print format for teachers. The Grade 2 material is accessible on any device via a web browser and is compatible with all recent versions of Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer, etc. Additionally, the Bookworms curriculum can be used on both Windows and Apple devices, including tablets and mobile devices.

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 partially meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The Teacher Manual is digital; however, there is not a digital component for students. The Grade 2 materials suggest that students use a word processor for drafting and revising if necessary. The curriculum also includes a few research projects in which students find and synthesize information and can do so online. However, this is the only technology incorporated in the Grade 2 curriculum.

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

Digital materials do not include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students using adaptive or other technological innovations. The only digital available is the opportunity to use a word processor or the internet for research.

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

Because of the lack of technology in the program, the materials cannot be easily customized for local use.

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 2 do not meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

There are no opportunities found within the program for the teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other. One culminating project does provide an opportunity for students to utilize technology to make a Book Review commercial that they can share with students in another grade; however, the technology does not provide an opportunity for collaboration such as a webinar or website.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 07/25/2019

Report Edition: 2018

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
How to Plan Differentiated Reading Instruction: Second Edition: Resources for Grades K-3 978-1-462531-51-6 Open Up Resources 2017
Bookworms Grade 2 Student Workbook, Beta Release: Add On Pack of 5 978-1-64311-033-2 Open Up Resources 2018

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

ELA K-2 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence
  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks
  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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