Alignment: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for alignment to the Mathematics Florida Standards (MAFS). The instructional materials meet expectations for focus and coherence in Gateway 1. In Gateway 2, the instructional materials partially meet expectations for rigor and balance and partially meet expectations for practice-content connections. Since the instructional materials partially meet expectations for alignment, the materials were not reviewed for usability in Gateway 3.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
9
14
18
15
14-18
Meets Expectations
10-13
Partially Meets Expectations
0-9
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
9
14
16
11
14-16
Meets Expectations
10-13
Partially Meets Expectations
0-9
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
21
30
36
N/A
30-36
Meets Expectations
22-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-21
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

Criterion 1a - 1f

Focus and Coherence: The instructional materials are coherent and consistent with "the high school standards that specify the mathematics which all students should study in order to be college and career ready" (p. 57 of CCSSM).
15/18
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for focus and coherence. The instructional materials meet expectations for attending to the full intent of the mathematical content contained in the high school standards for all students; spending the majority of time on the CCSSM widely applicable as prerequisites for a range of college majors, postsecondary programs, and careers (WAPs); engaging students in mathematics at a level of sophistication appropriate to high school; making meaningful connections in a single course and throughout the series; and explicitly identifying and building on knowledge from Grades 6-8 to the High School Standards. The instructional materials partially meet expectations for attending to the full intent of the modeling process and allowing students to fully learn each standard.

Indicator 1a

The materials focus on the high school standards.*
0/0

Indicator 1a.i

The materials attend to the full intent of the mathematical content contained in the high school standards for all students.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for attending to the full intent of the mathematical content contained in the high school standards for all students. The instructional materials include few instances where all aspects of the standards are not addressed across the courses of the series.

The following are examples for which the materials attend to the full intent of the standard:

  • N-CN.3.7: In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.6, students recall the imaginary unit i and how it applies to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra in Key Concepts and Instruction. In Scaffolded Practice and Guided Practice, students solve quadratic equations with complex solutions.
  • A-REI.2.3: In Algebra 1, Lesson 1.10, students solve linear equations. Throughout the lesson, students solve equations with variables on the same side of the equal sign, variables on opposite sides of the equal sign, and use the distributive property. Students also solve equations with coefficients represented by letters as seen in Practice Problems 9 and 10.
  • F-IF.3.9: In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.12, students compare linear functions represented by tables, equations, and graphs. Students compare y-intercepts and rates of change of linear functions. In Lesson 2A.13, students compare rates of change and y-intercepts of exponential functions in multiple ways. In the Problem-Based Task of Lesson 2A.13, students compare two medical procedures used to measure how well a person’s kidneys are functioning. Students compare the initial value of each procedure, as well as the rate of decay to determine which has a faster rate of decay.
  • F-LE.2.5: In Algebra 2, Lesson 3A.4, students investigate the exponential growth of a savings account. Students interpret the meaning of each term of the function in context to the problem. Throughout the lesson, students work with population growth, half-life of radioactive material, and cooling of liquids. Students identify the initial value and relate its meaning to its context. Students create and compare equations to model a savings account in the Problem-Based Task in Lesson 3A.5. Students identify domain constraints and the outstanding balance after t months.
  • G-SRT.3.7: In Geometry, Lesson 2.11, students explore the relationship between the sine and cosine of complementary angles. Through the Warm-Up, Scaffolded Practice, and Guided Practice, students explore sine and cosine as complements. Students determine the best location for a garden, based on the amount of sunlight it will receive, in the Problem-Based Task in Lesson 2.11. Students apply sine, cosine, and the Pythagorean Theorem in 30-60-90 degree triangles to defend their findings.
  • G-C.1.1: In Geometry, Lesson 5.1, students extend their knowledge of similarity of triangles to prove similarity of circles. In the Problem-Based Task of Lesson 5.1, students prove all circles are similar. Students identify circular objects in the classroom and apply relationships between the parts of the circle (circumference and diameter) to prove similarity.
  • S-IC.1.1: In Algebra 2, Lesson 4.4, students explore if a number of possible samples exist even for a small population. In the Guided Practice, students examine variability in sampling and assess a set of data representing the frequency of the most requested songs over a six-year time period in the Problem-Based Task. Students choose a sample of three songs from the six years and compare the mean and standard deviation of the sample to that of the population.

The materials attend to some aspects, but not all, of the following standards:

  • G-CO.4.12: In Geometry, Lesson 1B.9 (copying segments and angles), Lesson 1B.10 (bisecting segments and angles), and Lesson 1B.11 (constructing perpendicular and parallel lines), students make formal geometric constructions using a straightedge and compass. In Lesson 1B.9, the Introduction and Key Concepts references utilizing patty paper, but students do not use this tool throughout the lesson. Other tools or methods for creating formal geometric constructions are not referenced in the materials.
  • G-MG.1.1: In the Introduction of Geometry, Lesson 3.3, there is an example of cutting a carrot in half, resulting in either a circle or oval, depending upon the type of cut. No other opportunities were found where the materials use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects.

Indicator 1a.ii

The materials attend to the full intent of the modeling process when applied to the modeling standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for attending to the full intent of the modeling process when applied to the modeling standards. The instructional materials do not use the full intent of the modeling process with many modeling standards across the series.

The following standards are not addressed with the modeling process as students do not formulate, validate, and revise their own conclusions. Each of these Problem-Based Tasks, labeled as modeling in the instructional materials, have a specific answer, and students do not formulate their own model or method of computations, revisions, and validations:

  • N-Q.1.1,3: In Algebra 1, Lesson 1.6, students create and graph an equation in the context of the cost of a phone card. The problem contains a constraint on the number of minutes used. Students determine the slope and y-intercept in the context of the problem. Throughout the lesson, the teacher’s resources provide guiding questions for the students to formulate, compute, interpret, and validate their findings. Students formulate a model, but they do not use the model to compute nor do they interpret or validate their computations.
  • A-SSE.1.1: In Algebra 1, Lesson 4.1, students write an algebraic expression representing the area of a triangular deck when given one piece of information, such as the base is ten meters less than the altitude. Students identify the terms, factors, and coefficients of the expression. Students discuss their plans for constructing the algebraic expression to represent the area of the deck, but there are not multiple approaches to this problem and the coaching questions guide students to one particular path of producing the expression. Students do not compute anything once they have created this expression, nor do they have to interpret or validate their results.
  • F-IF.2.4: In Algebra 1, Lesson 5.2, students create a quadratic model to determine the path a basketball travels. They use a quadratic model to determine for what horizontal distances the height of the ball is increasing and decreasing. Students are prompted by the teacher in the implementation guide to compare the strategies and explanations they used. There is not an opportunity for students to develop their own model or to devise their own computational pathway.
  • F-IF.3.7e: In Algebra 2, Lessons 3A.1 and 3A.8, students are presented with a problem involving average lengths of rescue attempts for boaters. The function, domain, and range are given. Students interpret the meaning of the domain and range for the function in context, but students do not validate their conclusions and make appropriate revisions.
  • F-TF.2.5: In Algebra 2, Lesson 2.6, students analyze a sine function that represents a note played on a piano. Students find an equation for the function representing the note that is one octave higher than the original note. Students do not have the opportunity to formulate their own model.
  • G-SRT.3.8: In Geometry, Lesson 2.13, students use the Pythagorean Theorem and trigonometric ratios to calculate the distance from the roof a building to a windowsill where firefighters will need to descend by rope to enter the building. Students are provided the height of the firefighter as well as the angle of elevation. Students do not formulate their own model.
  • G-GPE.2.7: In Geometry, Lesson 4.4, students use coordinates representing the locations of the vertices of a rectangular shaped baseball field to calculate the amount of fencing needed to enclose the field and the area of the field. Students use the distance formula and do not have the opportunity to validate and reflect upon their solution.
  • G-MG.1.3: In Geometry, Lesson 3.6, students apply area formulas, congruence postulates, and the Pythagorean Theorem in order to determine missing lengths of triangular-shaped panels of a solar sail that is part of the design of an experimental spacecraft. Although students formulate and compute, the problem has one solution path and one correct solution. Students are directed to solve for missing side lengths by applying area formulas and the Pythagorean Theorem.

There are a few modeling standards for which the materials attend to with the full modeling process. The implementation guide for the teacher provides guidance to support students’ validation and interpretation of their results in some of the standards. Examples of this include:

  • A-CED.1.3: In Algebra 1, Lesson 1.12, students write a system of inequalities to compare the time it takes for one group of workers to make the blades of figure skates and hockey skates to another group making the boots for both types of skates. Students provide possible combinations of the number of figure skates and hockey skates given the constraints of the time it takes for both groups to complete their job. Students test various scenarios for feasibility.
  • S-ID.1.4: In Algebra 2, Lesson 4.1, students compare the mean and standard deviation of two lemonade machines. They provide an argument to explain which machine, if either, is better than the other in terms of how consistently it dispenses sufficient amounts of lemonade.

Indicator 1b

The materials provide students with opportunities to work with all high school standards and do not distract students with prerequisite or additional topics.
0/0

Indicator 1b.i

The materials, when used as designed, allow students to spend the majority of their time on the content from CCSSM widely applicable as prerequisites for a range of college majors, postsecondary programs, and careers.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series, when used as designed, meet expectations for allowing students to spend the majority of their time on the CCSSM widely applicable as prerequisites (WAPs) for a range of college majors, postsecondary programs, and careers. Examples of how the materials allow students to spend the majority of their time on the WAPs include:

  • In Algebra 1, Unit 2A, Lessons 7-9, students use appropriate vocabulary to describe functions. Students analyze a function in terms of its graph and the context of the situation the graph depicts. In Lesson 2A.8, students calculate the average rate of change and compare rates of change over specific intervals (F-IF.2.6, F-LE.1.1a).
  • In Algebra 1, the pacing guide recommends 25 days for Unit 2B, and of those days, 20 address WAPs from A-REI, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and F-BF.1.1 and F-LE.1.1 on creating equations and distinguishing between linear and exponential functions.
  • In Geometry, Unit 2, Lessons 5-9, students extend their knowledge of triangle similarity statements to include Side-Angle-Side (SAS) and Side-Side-Side (SSS). Students use these similarity statements to prove the Pythagorean Theorem (Lesson 2.5). Students work with triangles related to this example and expand on their understanding of similar triangles, specifically the relationship between angle bisectors and ratio segments. In Lesson 2.9, students build an understanding of ratios of lengths of sides within right triangles (G-SRT.2.4,5).
  • In Geometry, Unit 1B, Lessons 3-6, students prove each of the theorems represented in G-CO.3.10. For example, students prove measures of interior angles of a triangle sum to 180°, base angles of isosceles triangles are congruent, the segment joining midpoints of two sides of a triangle is parallel to the third side, and half the length and the medians of a triangle meet at a point.
  • In Algebra 2, the pacing guide recommends 27 days for unit 3A, and of those days, 18 address WAPs from F-IF (graphing trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic graphs). Students also interpret and identify key features of these graphs.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 3.9, students interpret the slope and intercept of a linear model in the context of data (S-ID.3.7).

Indicator 1b.ii

The materials, when used as designed, allow students to fully learn each standard.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series, when used as designed, partially meet expectations for letting students fully learn each standard. The instructional materials do not enable students to fully learn some of the standards. All of the non-plus standards that would not be fully learned by students are:

  • N-RN.1.3: In Algebra 1, Lessons 5.1 and 5.7, students determine that the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational, the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational, and the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational. Explanations for these are provided in the teacher’s resources, but students do not provide any of the explanations.
  • N-CN.1.3: In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.3, students find the conjugate of complex numbers but do not use the conjugate to find the moduli and the quotients of complex numbers.
  • A-APR.3.4: The teacher’s resources provide aspects to proving identities, but students do not prove polynomial identities. In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.10, Guided Practice 1, students “determine which identity is written in the same form as the given expression,” but do not prove it.
  • A-REI.3.5: In Algebra 1, Lesson 2B.6, students solve systems of linear equations using substitution and elimination, but students do not validate the solutions. In the Guided Practice, the materials indicate the solution to a system of equations would be validated through graphing, but students do not practice proving that by replacing one equation by the sum of that equation and a multiple of the other produces a system with the same solutions.
  • F-IF.3.7e: Students do not fully learn to use midline when graphing trigonometric functions. In Algebra 2, Lesson 3A.1, Guided Practice 7 refers to midlines.
  • G-CO.1.2: In Geometry, Lesson 1A.2, Guided Practice and Scaffolded Practice, students use transformation functions to find new coordinates, but students do not use transparencies or software to discover transformations. There is also limited practice with stretches and dilations in this lesson.
  • G-CO.1.4: In Geometry, Lesson 1A.4, students have limited opportunities to use parallel lines, perpendicular lines, and circles to define transformations.
  • G-CO.2.7: In Geometry, Lesson 1B.1, Problem-Based Task, students use congruences and geometric properties to determine congruent triangles within a figure, and students also identify congruent triangles according to congruent parts. Students do not use rigid motions to determine that triangles are congruent.
  • G-CO.2.8: In Geometry, Lesson 1B.2, students work with triangle congruences to determine why two triangles are congruent, but rigid motions are not used to explain the triangle congruences.
  • G-SRT.1.1a: No evidence was found where students use dilations with parallel lines.
  • G-C.1.1: In Geometry, Lesson 5.1, Guided Practice, the materials use similarity transformations to prove that all circles are similar, but students do not practice this standard.
  • G-GPE.1.2: In Geometry, Lesson 4.5, the materials derive the equation of a parabola given a focus and directrix, but students have limited opportunities to practice this standard.
  • G-GMD.1.2: In Geometry, Lesson 3.4, students investigate the relationship between the volume formulas for a cylinder, cone, and hemisphere, in preparation for the derivation of the volume of a sphere using Cavalieri’s Principle. However, students do not practice using Cavalieri’s Principle in the student exercises.
  • S-ID.1.4: In Algebra 2, Lessons 4.1 and 4.2, students use the empirical rule and standard normal calculations to determine probabilities. In Algebra 2, Lesson 4.3, students view normal versus non-normal data sets and determine the appropriateness of each. Students do not use spreadsheets and calculators when addressing this standard.
  • S-ID.2.5: There were no problems found for students to practice joint and marginal relative frequencies in the materials.

Indicator 1c

The materials require students to engage in mathematics at a level of sophistication appropriate to high school.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for engaging students in mathematics at a level of sophistication appropriate to high school. The instructional materials regularly use age-appropriate contexts, use various types of real numbers, and provide opportunities for students to apply key takeaways from grades 6-8.

Examples where the materials regularly use age-appropriate contexts with various types of real numbers include:

  • Algebra 1: In Lesson 2A.10, students organize a fundraising concert for their community. Students identify combinations of numbers, including decimals, to produce equivalent values. Throughout Lesson 2A.10, students work with integers and rational values.
  • Algebra 1: In Lesson 5.2, students create a quadratic model to determine the path of a basketball. Students explore the reasonableness of decimal values related to measurement in feet.
  • Geometry: In Lesson 3.3, students describe the building of a new observatory planned for a local college in terms of its basic geometric shapes. They also determine the volume of the dome of the building and other parts of the building.
  • Geometry: In Lesson 2.13, students apply their knowledge of the Pythagorean Theorem and trigonometric ratios to calculate the distance from the roof a building to a windowsill where firefighters will need to descend by rope to enter the building. Students encounter decimal values to the thousandths place and make sense of the solution in context. Students work with rational and irrational numbers in this context.
  • Algebra 2: In Lesson 3B.12, students use graphing technology to create exponential, linear, and quadratic functions for data sets representing the growth in users of a popular social media website. Students work with data sets representing millions of users, and as students choose a model, the values are written in scientific notation.
  • Algebra 2: In Unit 2, Problem-Based Task 2.5, students determine the best wax for a surfboard. The method involves placing a block on the board and lifting the end. The sooner the block slides, the better the wax. Students work with decimal values and angles as they discover the angle that produces the best wax as seen by the movement of the block.

Examples where the materials regularly provide opportunities for students to apply key takeaways from grades 6-8 include:

  • Algebra 1: In Lesson 2A.7, students apply their understanding of graphs (8.F.2.4) and begin to more formally describe various features. Students interpret key features from graphs and tables, as well as sketch graphs when given a verbal description.
  • Geometry: Students apply proportions and ratios as key takeaways from grades 6-8 as they find arc lengths and areas of sectors in Lessons 5.8 and 5.9. Students use the definition of a sector as the portion of a circle bounded by two radii and their intercepted arc to create and solve a proportion to find the area of the sector.
  • Algebra 2: In Lessons 1A.1-3, students find sums and differences of complex numbers by applying their understanding of combining like terms (8.EE.3.7b) and the Commutative Property of Addition (6.EE.1.3).

Indicator 1d

The materials are mathematically coherent and make meaningful connections in a single course and throughout the series, where appropriate and where required by the Standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for being mathematically coherent and making meaningful connections in a single course and throughout the series. The instructional materials foster coherence through meaningful mathematical connections in a single course and throughout the series, where appropriate and where required by the Standards.

Examples where the materials foster coherence through meaningful mathematical connections in a single course include:

  • Algebra 1: In Lesson 1.3, students create linear equations in context (A-CED.1.1). In Lesson 1.6, students extend creating linear equations to creating and graphing linear equations in two variables (A-CED.1.2). In Lesson 1.10, students solve linear equations, and in Lesson 2B.6, students continue the progression of solving linear equations as they solve systems of linear equations through substitution and elimination (A-REI.3.5).
  • Algebra 2: In Lessons 1B.3-5, students add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions (A-APR.4.7). Students extend their understanding of rational expressions as they solve rational equations in Lessons 1B.6 (A-REI.1.2). In lessons 1B.8, students graph rational functions (F-IF.3.7).
  • Geometry: In Lessons 1A.6 and 1A.7, students encounter properties of congruence within geometric figures (G-CO.2.6). In Lesson 2.4, students work with similar figures (G-SRT.2.4). In Lessons 2.6 and 2.8, students determine how side lengths of similar figures are proportional instead of congruent (G-SRT.2.5).

Examples where the materials foster coherence through meaningful mathematical connections throughout the series include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lessons 2B.6 and 2B.7, students solve systems of linear equations (A-REI.3.7). In Algebra 1, Lessons 4.19 and 4.20, students extend that knowledge to solving systems of linear and quadratic equations. In Algebra 2, Lessons 1B.10-12, students review solving systems of equations graphically and extend that knowledge to rational and radical equations.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 2.7, students extend their understanding of the Pythagorean Theorem as they prove it through the application of similarity (G-SRT.2.4). In Algebra 2, Lesson 2.5, students apply the Pythagorean Theorem to trigonometric identities.
  • Transformations are found throughout the series. In Algebra 1, Lesson 2B.4, students transform linear and exponential functions. In Algebra 1, Lessons 5.17 and 5.18, students transform quadratic functions. In Geometry, Lessons 1A.4 and 1A.5, students use rotations, reflections, and translations in their work with transformations. In Algebra 2, Lesson 3B.7, students work with transformations of parent functions.

Indicator 1e

The materials explicitly identify and build on knowledge from Grades 6--8 to the High School Standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for explicitly identifying and building on knowledge from Grades 6-8 to the High School Standards. The standards from Grades 6-8 are explicitly identified in the Introduction and Key Concept, and the materials build on prerequisite knowledge. Examples where the materials identify standards and build on them include:

  • In Algebra 1, lesson 1A.1, students translate verbal expressions into algebraic expressions and use order of operations (6.EE.2) to simplify algebraic expressions (A-SSE.1.1).
  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 5.1, students extend the properties of integer exponents (8.EE.1.1) when simplifying expressions with rational exponents (N-RN.1.2).
  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.8, students use their previous learning of reading and interpreting data from charts and tables (6.EE.3.9) and understanding slope (8.EE.2.5) to calculate average rate of change of a function over a specified interval given a graph. Students also compare rates of change over various intervals (F-IF.2.6).
  • In Geometry, Lesson 2.1, students apply operations with fractions (7.NS.1.1,2) and operations with fractions and decimals (7.EE.2.3) to calculate scale factors for similar figures (G-SRT.1.2).
  • In Geometry, Lesson 2.10, students apply the Pythagorean Theorem (8.G.2.7) and ratios (7.RP.1.3) to solve problems involving trigonometric ratios and right triangles (G-SRT.3.6).
  • In Geometry, Lesson 5.8, students find the circumference of circles (7.G.2.4) to find arc lengths (G-C.2.5).
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 3.1, students find the median and quartiles of a data set (6.SP.2.5) to construct box plots (S-ID.1.1).

Indicator 1f

The plus (+) standards, when included, are explicitly identified and coherently support the mathematics which all students should study in order to be college and career ready.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

During the review of the Walch Traditional Florida series, the mathematics standards for Florida did not identify plus (+) standards. All mathematics standards for Florida are considered in indicators 1ai through 1e for this series.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Partially Meets Expectations

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: The instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by giving appropriate attention to: developing students' conceptual understanding; procedural skill and fluency; and engaging applications.
6/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for reflecting the balances in the Standards and helping students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations. The instructional materials meet expectations for developing procedural skills and providing opportunities to engage in applications. The instructional materials partially meet expectations for developing students’ conceptual understanding and ensuring that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately.

Indicator 2a

Attention to Conceptual Understanding: The materials support the intentional development of students' conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or clusters.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings. The instructional materials, across the series, do not develop conceptual understanding for several standards that address conceptual understanding.

In addition, the Program Overview for each course contains Conceptual Activities, which lists resources by unit, but these resources often do not address conceptual understanding. For example, in Algebra 2, Computations with Complex Numbers is a Conceptual Activity where students develop procedural skills with operations on complex numbers.

Examples where the materials do not develop conceptual understanding for specific standards across the series include:

  • N-RN.1.1: In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.1, students evaluate and simplify expressions with rational exponents. In Algebra 2, Lesson 1B.1, students practice evaluating and simplifying expressions with radicals and rational exponents by applying the properties of integer exponents. Students do not develop understanding by explaining how the definition of the meaning of rational exponents extends from the properties of integer exponents.
  • A-APR.2.2,3: In Algebra 1, Lesson 5.7, students encounter the relationship between zeros and factors of a polynomial. The teacher’s materials present this information, but students do not develop understanding of the relationship by investigating or explaining the relationship on their own.
  • A-REI.4.10: In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.2, the materials state that the graph of an equation in two variables is the set of all its solutions plotted in the coordinate plane, often forming a curve (which could be a line). However, students do not develop understanding of this standard, as they substitute numbers into equations and plot points to produce the graphs.
  • F-LE.1.1: In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.7, students interpret key features from linear and exponential graphs and sketch graphs from a verbal description. In lesson 2A.9, students calculate average rate of change of a function, and in Lesson 2A.14, students create exponential functions from context, determine the rate of change, and compare exponential functions to linear functions. In Algebra 2, Lesson 3B.12, students select a function to represent real-world problems, analyze data sets, identify the domain of the data sets, and the rate at which the range is changing in order to select a model that best fits the data set. Students’ conceptual understanding of exponential and linear functions is reduced in these lessons due to the amount of scaffolding and step-by-step instructions provided for the students.
  • G-SRT.3.6: In Geometry, Lesson 2.10, students use ratios and proportions to determine missing lengths. In the Scaffolded Practice, students examine corresponding angles and sides of similar triangles, but in the Practice, students do not explain how the side ratios in right triangles lead to the definitions of trigonometric ratios. The teacher materials provide scaffolded questions leading students to the connections between sides of similar triangles and the definition of trigonometric ratios, but students do not independently demonstrate conceptual understanding of this standard.

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: The materials provide intentional opportunities for students to develop procedural skills and fluencies, especially where called for in specific content standards or clusters.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for providing intentional opportunities for students to develop procedural skills, especially where called for in specific content standards or clusters. The instructional materials develop procedural skills throughout the series. Opportunities for students to independently demonstrate procedural skills across the series are included in each lesson through Scaffolded Practice and Guided Practice. The Scaffolded Practice is a set of 10 practice problems providing practice during instructional time. The Guided Practice examples start with step-by step prompts for solving and finish with Guided Practice examples without prompts.

Examples that show the development of procedural skills and opportunities for students to independently demonstrate procedural skills across the series include:

  • A-SEE.1.2: In Algebra 1, Lessons 4.7-9, students identify the structures of quadratics based on the leading coefficients and rewrite them in equivalent factored forms. In Algebra 2, Lessons 1A.10-12, students use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it through polynomial identities, complex polynomial identities, and the binomial theorem.
  • A-APR.1.1: In Algebra 1, Lessons 4.4 and 4.5, students find sums, differences, and products of polynomial expressions. In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.8, students add and subtract polynomial expressions, and in Lesson 1A.9, students multiply polynomial expressions.
  • A-APR.4.6: In Algebra 2, Lesson 1B, there are four lessons in which the materials develop procedural skills with operations on rational expressions, and students independently demonstrate those procedural skills.
  • F-BF.2.3: In Algebra 1, Lesson 2B.4, students graph multiple functions, compare the functions, and describe the functions in terms of geometric translations of another function. In Algebra 2, Lessons 5.17 and 5.18, students practice transforming quadratic functions.
  • G-GPE.2.7: In Geometry, Lesson 4.4, Scaffolded Practice, students compute perimeter and area given the vertices of quadrilaterals and triangles. In Guided Practice, students use the distance formula to determine the perimeter of the polygons. Throughout the practice worksheets, students compute the area and perimeter of polygons using coordinates.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: The materials support the intentional development of students' ability to utilize mathematical concepts and skills in engaging applications, especially where called for in specific content standards or clusters.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of students’ ability to utilize mathematical concepts and skills in engaging applications, especially where called for in specific content standards or clusters. The instructional materials include multiple opportunities for students to engage in routine and non-routine application of mathematics throughout the series. The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate the use of mathematics flexibly in a variety of contexts through the Problem-Based Tasks located in each lesson.

Examples from the instructional materials that demonstrate opportunities for students to engage in routine and non-routine application of mathematics throughout the series include:

  • A-SSE.2.3: In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.4, Pyroclastic Projectiles, students determine how long they expect a volcanic bomb to remain in the air if it was ejected from a volcanic eruption with a given velocity and height. Students use multiple methods to solve the problem, decide which is solution is best, and justify the answer.
  • A-REI.4.11: In Algebra 2, Lesson 1B.10, Connectivity Calculations, students determine how far away from the front wall of a house the WiFi can be accessed while on the sidewalk that passes in front of the house.
  • F-IF.2: In Algebra 2, Lesson 3B.12, Comparing Social Media Growth, students determine if exponential, linear, or quadratic functions best model the data points that represent the growth of users of a social media website.
  • G-SRT.3.8: In Geometry, Lesson 2.12, students apply the Pythagorean Theorem to validate the diagonal measurement of a television set. In Guided Practice, students calculate the dimensions of a courtyard using trigonometric ratios. In the Practice Student Worksheets, students use trigonometric ratios to determine how far up the side of a building a ladder will reach.

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. The three aspects are balanced with respect to the standards being addressed.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. Each lesson is the same throughout the series beginning with a Warm-up, Scaffolded and Guided Practice, which typically address procedural skills, and a Problem-Based Task. The materials incorporate conceptual understanding in Extending the Task.

The three aspects are not balanced with respect to standards being addressed as minimal evidence of conceptual understanding can be found throughout the materials. The majority of lessons address procedural skills and application. These two aspects of rigor are sometimes presented separately and sometimes presented together in the same lesson. The instructional materials balance procedural skills with application throughout the series, and procedural skills are practiced within the context of application problems.

Examples of how conceptual understanding is not presented together with either of the other aspects of rigor include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 1.6, students create and graph linear equations in two variables (A-CED.1.2, N-Q.1.1). Throughout the Scaffolded Practice and Guided Practice, students create a linear equation from a real world example, such as hourly rates for a job. From student-generated graphs, students identify the slope and y-intercept and give meaning to those values in context. In the Problem-Based Task, students apply linear equations to purchasing phone cards. Students create a coordinate plane, determine the scale, write the linear equation, and interpret the meaning of their solutions. Application and procedural skills are addressed together.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 1A.4, students define specific reflections and rotations as well as the general form for a translation, and students describe and manipulate functions algebraically (G-CO.1.4). In the Problem-Based Task, students analyze a series of transformations performed on a surfboard as it goes through a conveyor belt and describe an equation to represent the transformation. Application and procedural skills are addressed together.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 2.2, students examine radians and how radians relate to the unit circle (F-TF.1.2). Throughout the Guided Practice and Scaffolded Practice, students sketch radian measurements on the unit circle. In Example 3 of the Guided Practice, students use the coordinate plane to demonstrate why the point where the terminal side intersects the unit circle is (cos x, sin x), but there are no opportunities for students to perform this independently. The Problem-Based Task relates the unit circle to a bicycle tire. A sticker is on the tire and rotates as the wheel moves counterclockwise. Students determine how far the sticker is from the ground after a given amount of time utilizing angle measurement in radians, arc length, and the radius of the tire. Application and procedural skills are addressed together.

Criterion 2e - 2h

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
5/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for meaningfully connecting the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The instructional materials meet expectations for the intentional development of overarching, mathematical practices (MP.1.1 and MP.6.1), and the instructional materials partially meet expectations for the remainder of the indicators in this criterion.

Indicator 2e

The materials support the intentional development of overarching, mathematical practices (MPs 1 and 6), in connection to the high school content standards, as required by the mathematical practice standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of overarching, mathematical practices (MP.1.1 and MP.6.1), in connection to the high school content standards. In the Program Overview of the Teacher’s Edition, a Correspondence to Standards for Mathematical Practice is included. Within each lesson, a Problem-Based Task denotes the Standards for Mathematical Practice specific to that task. The majority of the time MP.1.1 and MP.6.1 are used to enrich the mathematical content. Across the series, there is intentional development of MP.1.1 and MP.6.1 that reaches the full intent of the Mathematical Practices.

Examples of the materials supporting the intentional development of MP.1.1 and MP.6.1 include:

  • In Algebra I, Lesson 2A.7, Problem-Based Task, students consider the year, make, model, included options, and price of new cars. Students consider how the car will decrease in value over time. The teacher’s guide has Facilitating the Task, which discusses student behavior that will demonstrate the mathematical practices. For this Problem-Based Task, Facilitating the Task indicates for MP.1.1, “Student will recognize the two quantities that are involved, the quantities will represent an exponential function, and interpret the information in terms of the key features of the graph.” For MP.6.1, “correct terms and notation for domain, asymptote, and maximum. Look for proper units of years and dollars.”
  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 4.1, Problem-Based Task, students determine the terms, factors, and coefficients of a quadratic expression to represent the area of a deck to be decorated. Students make sense of the shape of the deck and clarify the meaning of altitude, coefficient, factor, quadratic expression, and term. In the Problem-Based Implementation Guide, teachers are given suggestions to reinforce MP.1.1 for their students. Students persevere as they work with order of operations, translating verbal descriptions to algebraic expressions, and like terms.
  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.5, students work with function notation and evaluating functions. Students are precise with function notation, f(x), and the language that the range of a function is dependent on its domain. Students identify the domain and range in set notation, and use function notation in their work with functions, exemplifying MP.6.1.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 1A.3, Problem-Based Task, students examine a plan for a park that must meet certain requirements regarding symmetry. Students determine where trees must be planted in order to meet these requirements. Students make sense of the stated conditions and requirements (MP.1.1) in order to plant the trees in appropriate places. Students also attend to precision by considering lines of symmetry and using the coordinate grid to precisely mark the location of the trees (MP.6.1).
  • In Geometry, Lesson 1A.6, students describe how to navigate an unmanned vessel through the ocean floor to recover an artifact from the Titanic. Students specify the transformations that should be used to avoid obstacles and retrieve the artifact. Students use precision in their descriptions of the transformations (MP.6.1).

Indicator 2f

The materials support the intentional development of reasoning and explaining (MPs 2 and 3), in connection to the high school content standards, as required by the mathematical practice standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of reasoning and explaining (MP.2.1 and MP.3.1), in connection to the high school content standards. The materials develop MP.2.1 to its full intent, but the materials do not develop MP.3.1 to its full intent. There are several Problem-Based Tasks where students explain their reasoning or construct an argument, but no evidence was found where students critique the reasoning of others. The implementation guides for the Problem-Based Tasks often encourage teachers to have students share their thinking, but they do not include prompts for students to critique others’ thinking.

Examples of the materials supporting the intentional development of MP.2.1 include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 2B.6, Problem-Based Task, students use detailed information about the sale of 2-day and 3-day tickets for adults and children. Students reason about the quantities provided as they define variables to represent different quantities and use those variables to write a system of equations describing the constraints of the task.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 2.2, Problem-Based Task, students determine how to enlarge a picture from 5x7 to 8x10 without distorting the picture. Students reason about the physical scenario of enlarging a picture and make connections between that and the abstract mathematical work of performing a dilation.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 3A.7, Problem-Based Task, students reason abstractly by determining how to organize data presented to them in a paragraph so they can find a logarithmic function that models the data. Students also reason quantitatively by determining if the corresponding exponential function models the given data.

Examples of the materials not supporting the intentional development of MP.3.1include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 2B.8, Problem-Based Task, students write and graph an inequality representing the number of friends who can be assigned to help make cupcakes if there are at most 5 friends available. The Implementation Guide has teachers encourage students to work together to discuss their methods. Students construct viable arguments determining whether the inequality is inclusive or non-inclusive. Students choose test points to determine if the solution of the inequality allows for viable arguments and whether any of the student solutions are correct. Students do not critique the reasoning of others.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 1B.2, students prove or disprove a statement made about a stained glass art pattern. Students construct a viable argument, but they are not prompted to critique the reasoning of others.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.6, Problem-Based Task, students solve a quadratic equation using the quadratic formula, property of square roots, and factoring. The Implementation Guide states, “When presenting their arguments to others, students will explain their results and validate that each method resulted in the same solutions, as they illustrate how each method produced solutions that can be displayed in the same formats.” There are no directions that involve students analyzing the arguments of others.

Indicator 2g

The materials support the intentional development of modeling and using tools (MPs 4 and 5), in connection to the high school content standards, as required by the mathematical practice standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of modeling and using tools (MP.4.1 and MP.5.1), in connection to the high school content standards. The materials develop MP.4.1 to its full intent, but the materials do not develop MP.5.1 to its full intent.

Examples of the materials supporting the intentional development of MP.4.1 include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 5.16, Problem-Based Task, students help Fatima determine which is the better of two options for buying a car. Students formulate a mathematical model to represent each option, and students perform calculations for each model. Students interpret their results and report their recommendation on which option to select.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 3.5, Problem-Based Task, students are presented with a table of data, and a scatterplot of the data, relating the density of melting ice to its temperature. Students examine the table and plot to determine what type of function might best model the data. After picking a type of function, students can interpret how well their selection models the data and make revisions as needed.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 1B.9, Problem-Based Task, students create a graph and make a recommendation to a company about the size of cans for a new product. Students engage in the full intent of MP.4.1 as they formulate possible solutions, compute, interpret, and validate their findings.

Examples of the materials not supporting the intentional development of MP.5.1include:

  • In Algebra 1, Unit 2A, Station Activities, students are directed to use graphs, rulers, calculators, and tables for comparing linear models, but students do not choose which tools to use.
  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 5.7, Problem-Based Task, students analyze profits modeled by a polynomial function and determine when the company shows a zero profit, positive profit, and a loss. Students are directed to sketch a graph.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 3.5, Problem-Based Task, students are given a graph and a table showing the density of water at different temperatures. Students are directed to use a graphing calculator to find an equation relating temperature to density. Students do not choose the appropriate tool.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.16, students use the equation representing the volume of a hot-water tank to determine if there is enough space for the hot-water tank to fit in the space allotted in a basement. The coaching questions direct students to utilize a graphing calculator as the tool, rather than having students choose a tool. Students are also directed to use synthetic division and do not choose a method of their own for solving the problem.

Indicator 2h

The materials support the intentional development of seeing structure and generalizing (MPs 7 and 8), in connection to the high school content standards, as required by the mathematical practice standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for the Walch Traditional Florida series partially meet expectations for supporting the intentional development of seeing structure and generalizing (MP.7.1 and MP.8.1), in connection to the high school content standards. The materials develop MP.7.1 to its full intent, but in the few instances where MP.8.1 was identified in the materials, the tasks did not align to MP.8.1.

Examples of the materials supporting the intentional development of MP.7.1 include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 2A.8, Problem-Based Task, students analyze a table of data that represents two methods an insurance company uses to calculate the worth of a desk over a period of time. Students apply the structure for rate of change to the two scenarios as they calculate rates of change over an interval. The structure of rate of change is also applied to a nonlinear function.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 3.2, Problem-Based Task, students look for and make use of structure as they determine how many square feet on the ground will be saved when three conical piles of sand are moved to one cylindrical storage tank.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.20, Problem-Based Task, Luca pours water into a 5-gallon bucket. He initially pours 200 ounces into the bucket, and on each subsequent pour, he adds half of the previous amount. Students make use of structure to determine if Luca will add so much water that it overflows the bucket.

Examples of the materials not supporting the intentional development of MP.8.1 include:

  • In Algebra 1, Lesson 1.11, Problem-Based Task, students determine how many years until the number of households with only cell phone service would be greater than the number of households with both cell phones and landlines. According to the Implementation Guide, MP.8.1 is addressed as, “encourage students to draw parallels between and make generalizations about solving an equation compared to solving an inequality.” Students do not express regularity in repeated reasoning in this task.
  • In Geometry, Lesson 5.1, Problem-Based Task, students verify by measuring and comparing the circumference and diameter of circular objects in the classroom. Students use the same process each time, but they do not look for repeated reasoning nor do they need to express any regularity they find.
  • In Algebra 2, Lesson 1A.8, Problem-Based Task, students are given numerical dimensions of a garden, and within a diagram of the garden, several sections are represented with variable expressions. Students determine the dimensions of one of the sections. The Implementation Guide states MP.8.1 is addressed because students use repeated reasoning as they determine the expressions for the length and width of the corn section. Students add and subtract polynomials, and there is no evidence of looking for or expressing regularity in repeated reasoning.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
N/A

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
N/A

Indicator 3c

There is variety in how students are asked to present the mathematics. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
N/A

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives, both virtual and physical, are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult--level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts and the mathematical practices so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific mathematics standards in the context of the overall series.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition, cross-- referencing the standards addressed and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
N/A

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing students, parents, or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research--based strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels/ courses.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials provide support for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
N/A

Indicator 3o

Materials provide support for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing assessments:
N/A

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
N/A

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies to help sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
N/A

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials provide support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials provide support for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
N/A

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
N/A

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
N/A

Criterion 3z - 3ad

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
N/A

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Mac and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
N/A

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3ac.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3ac.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
N/A

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: 05/24/2019

Report Edition: 2018

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Florida Algebra 1 with Honors Teacher Resource Book 978-0-8251-8751-3 Walch Education 2018
Florida Algebra 1 with Honors Student Workbook 978-0-8251-8757-5 Walch Education 2018
Florida Geometry with Honors Teacher Resource Book 978-0-8251-8764-3 Walch Education 2018
Florida Geometry with Honors Student Workbook 978-0-8251-8770-4 Walch Education 2018
Florida Algebra 2 with Honors Teacher Resource 978-0-8251-8777-3 Walch Education 2018
Florida Algebra 2 with Honors Student Workbook Units 978-0-8251-8783-4 Walch Education 2018
Florida Algebra 1 with Honors Student Resource Book 978-0-8251-8809-1 Walch Education 2018
Florida Geometry with Honors Student Resource Book 978-0-8251-8813-8 Walch Education 2018
Florida Algebra 2 with Honors Student Resource Book 978-0-8251-8817-6 Walch Education 2018

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

The publisher has not submitted a response.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Rubric Design

The EdReports.org’s rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of standards alignment to the fundamental design elements of the materials and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum as recommended by educators.

Advancing Through Gateways

  • Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move along the process. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?
  • Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Key Terms Used throughout Review Rubric and Reports

  • Indicator Specific item that reviewers look for in materials.
  • Criterion Combination of all of the individual indicators for a single focus area.
  • Gateway Organizing feature of the evaluation rubric that combines criteria and prioritizes order for sequential review.
  • Alignment Rating Degree to which materials meet expectations for alignment, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.
  • Usability Degree to which materials are consistent with effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, and differentiated instruction.

Math HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

The High School review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The High School Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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