Alignment: Overall Summary

Instructional materials provide explicit instruction and opportunities for printing all 26 upper and lowercase letters. Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction for students about the organization of print concepts. Materials include a variety of activities for phonological awareness, providing students with ample opportunities to engage with phonological awareness activities daily. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction for students in phonological awareness throughout all lessons. Instructional materials include consistent systematic and explicit instruction in phonics skills with repeated teacher modeling across all Skills in the Teacher Guide. The materials provide frequent opportunities for students to decode phonetically spelled words using phonemes and/or syllables. The materials provide systematic practice for decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence through the decodable readers and activity pages that align with the phonics skill for the lesson. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction and modeling to demonstrate the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters and words in writing tasks through dictation work. Instructional materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity. Materials include limited opportunities for explicit, systematic instruction in fluency using grade-level text in the form of decodable readers. Materials provide few explicit lessons in confirming and self-correcting errors in fluency.

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Standards and Research-Based Practices

0
29
52
60
56
52-60
Meets Expectations
30-51
Partially Meets Expectations
0-29
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment

0
25
46
52
48
46-52
Meets Expectations
26-45
Partially Meets Expectations
0-25
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Alignment to Standards and Research-Based Practices for Foundational Skills Instruction

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

Instructional materials provide explicit instruction and opportunities for printing all 26 upper and lowercase letters. Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction for students about the organization of print concepts. Materials include a variety of activities for phonological awareness, providing students with ample opportunities to engage with phonological awareness activities daily. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction for students in phonological awareness throughout all lessons. Instructional materials include consistent systematic and explicit instruction in phonics skills with repeated teacher modeling across all Skills in the Teacher Guide. The materials provide frequent opportunities for students to decode phonetically spelled words using phonemes and/or syllables. The materials provide systematic practice for decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence through the decodable readers and activity pages that align with the phonics skill for the lesson. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction and modeling to demonstrate the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters and words in writing tasks through dictation work. Instructional materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity. Materials include limited opportunities for explicit, systematic instruction in fluency using grade-level text in the form of decodable readers. Materials provide few explicit lessons in confirming and self-correcting errors in fluency.

Criterion 1a - 1b

Materials and instruction provide embedded support with general concepts of print, and systematic and explicit instruction and practice for letter recognition.
4/4
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials provide explicit instruction and opportunities for printing all 26 upper and lowercase letters. Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction for students about the organization of print concepts.

Indicator 1a

Letter Identification
Narrative Evidence Only

Indicator 1a.iv

Materials provide explicit instruction to print and to practice forming the 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).(K-1)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to provide explicit instruction to print and to practice the 26 letters (uppercase and lowercase).

The materials provide explicit instruction and opportunities for printing all 26 upper and lowercase letters. The teacher has explicit wording to use when modeling and reviewing letter formation. Students finger write on their desk and utilize pages from the Activity Book to practice forming letters. The program states that most of this is reviewed for students, and in Skills 1, students review the sound, the letter name, the lowercase letter, and the uppercase letter.

Materials include clear directions for the teacher concerning how to explain and model how to correctly form each of the 26 letters. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, the teacher provides clear directions forming the letters Aa, Pp, Nn, Cc, and Gg. Examples of explicit instruction for Aa include, lowercase a, “Start between the dotted line and the bottom of the line. 1. Circle to the left. 2. Short line down” and for the uppercase A, “Start on the top line. Diagonal left (lift) 2. Diagonal right (lift) 3. Line across.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 2, there are clear directions for the letters, Ii, Oo, Tt, and Dd. Explicit directions for the lowercase t include, “Start between the dotted line and the top line. 1. Long line down (lift) 2. Line across. For uppercase T, “Start on the top line. 1. Line down (lift) 2. Line across.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 13, the letters Ee, Ww, and Uu are reviewed in regards to letter formation.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 15, Jj and Yy are reviewed.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 20, there are formation directions for the letters qu. The Teacher Guide states, “Start between the dotted line and the bottom line. 1. Circle to the left. 2. Line down ending below the bottom line (lift). Start on the dotted line. 1. Cup. 2. Short line down.”

Materials include frequent opportunities for students to practice forming all of the 26 letters. In Skills 1, Lessons 1, 2, 4, and 5 letter formation is reviewed, and students trace letters on the activity pages and then practice the letter formations on their own. Students practice letter formation through spelling activities. Some examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Activity Page 13.1, students practice forming the letters Ww, Ee, and Uu.
  • In Skills 1, Activity Page 15.1 students practice forming the letters Jj and Yy.
  • In Skills 1, Activity Page 20.1 students practice forming the letters ng and qu.

Materials include frequent opportunities for students to practice forming letters using multimodal and/or multisensory methods. During review spellings, found in Skills 1, Lessons 1, 2, 4, 5, 11, 13, 15, and 16, students trace the letter on their desk with their pointer finger. They student move to their activity page and practice tracing the letter with a pencil, and then work to form the letter on their own. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, the teacher reminds students that every letter can be written as an uppercase or lowercase letter. The teacher writes a lowercase letter and describes the steps. Students trace the same letter on their desk with a pointed finger. The students move into Activity Page 1.1. where they trace the letter and say the sound of the letter. The letters practiced are Aa, Pp, Nn, Cc, and Gg.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 18, the teacher models the letters and sound of /th/. Students trace the letter on their desk, before completing an activity page for the letters.

Indicator 1b

Materials provide instructional support for general concepts of print and connect learning of print concepts to books (K-1) and provide cumulative review of print concepts, letter identification, and printing letters. (K-early Grade 1)
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to provide instructional support for general concepts of print and connect learning of print concepts to books (K-1) and provide cumulative review of print concepts, letter identification, and printing letters. (K-early Grade 1).

Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction for students about the organization of print concepts. The materials physical books such as Big Books that are suitable for the teaching of print concepts. Students engage in authentic practice using print concepts in the context of student books. Big Books are used for Skills 1-3, and student readers (decodables) are available in all Skills units.

Materials include sufficient and explicit instruction for all students about the organization of print concepts. Specific examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 18, the teacher is to, “Tell students that a sentence is a complete thought. The first letter in the first word of a sentence is capitalized. Point to the first sentence on the board/chart paper and point out the spaces between the words... Point out the period at the end of the sentence. Explain that the little dot at the end of a sentence is called a period. It indicates that it is time to make a full stop and take a breath when reading.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 19, the teacher is to, “Remind the class that stories are made up of sentences. A sentence is a complete thought. The first letter in the first word of a sentence is capitalized, and it ends with a little dot called a period. The period indicates that it is time to make a full stop and take a breath when reading.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 21, the teacher stops on page 20 of the text and points to the exclamation point in the second sentence. The teacher explains “that many sentences end in a period, but sometimes they end in something else.” The teacher asks, “Does anyone recognize what this is? It is called an exclamation point, and it means that we should read the sentence with excitement.”

Materials also provide frequent lessons, tasks, and questions for all students about the organization of print concepts. Specific examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 18, in the Practice Reader, the teacher utilizes a page of phrases and sentences to model spaces between words, uppercase letters, and punctuation. The teacher models reading the sentence and has the students participate.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 3, students distinguish between questions and statements by identifying periods and question marks at the end of sentences.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 5, students read sentences on the board without punctuation, and students add the correct punctuation mark.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 9, students review punctuation and tell the teacher which words to capitalize and where to add punctuation, so that the two sentences are written correctly.

Materials contain periodic cumulative review opportunities during which the teacher reminds students about previously learned grade- level print concepts, letter identification, and letter formation. The Teacher Guide provides connections to previously learned concepts. Student activity pages give students the opportunity to practice letter formation in regards to spelling of words. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Activity Page 5.2, students practice lowercase o as students are learning about vowel digraph oo.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 17, the teacher points out that sentence starts with a uppercase letter and ends with correct punctuation.

Criterion 1c - 1e

Materials emphasize explicit, systematic instruction of research-based and/or evidence-based phonological awareness.

12/12
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials include a variety of activities for phonological awareness, providing students with ample opportunities to engage with phonological awareness activities daily. Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction for students in phonological awareness throughout all lessons.

Indicator 1c

Materials have frequent opportunities for students to engage in phonological awareness activities during Kindergarten and early Grade 1.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to have daily opportunities for students to engage in phonological awareness activities through Kindergarten and early Grade 1.

Materials include a variety of activities for phonological awareness, providing students with ample opportunities to engage with phonological awareness activities daily. Phonological awareness activities are done orally, utilizing different materials and routines. The majority of the activities include routines such as tapping fingers or pushing objects in sound boxes.

Materials include a variety of activities for phonological awareness. For example:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, the teacher says sounds for the students to blend into words.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 11, students discriminate between sounds that are similar in words that they hear. The sounds are /s/, /z/, /f/, and /v/.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, the teacher provides instructions for students to repeat words with the /ae/ sound. Then students share words with the /ae/ sound with a neighbor.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 9, students have manipulatives and after hearing a word stated, students pull the manipulative apart to represent each sound in the word.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 7, the Warm-Up includes segmenting and blending. The teacher says the word, then the syllables, and then blends the word back together. The students repeat the activity modeled by the teacher.

There are frequent opportunities, especially in the beginning of first grade, for students to practice phonological awareness. For example:

  • In Skills 1, the Teacher Guide provides lesson overviews, showing Lessons 1, 3, 11, 12, 14-18, 21, 22, and 27-32 all contain oral blending and oral segmenting Warm-Up activities.
  • In Skills 6, Lessons 7, 13, 14, and 23 provide Warm-Up activities for segmenting and blending two syllable words.

Indicator 1d

Materials provide explicit instruction in phonological awareness through systematic modeling across the K-1 grade band.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten meet the criteria for materials to provide explicit instruction in phonological awareness through systematic modeling across the K-1 grade band.

Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction for students in phonological awareness throughout all lessons. The Teacher Guide contains information for the teacher to utilize when providing instruction, as well as explicit modeling for each newly taught sound and spelling patterns. Materials include specific instructions, illustrations for blending and segmenting activities, and consistent routines.

Materials provide the teacher with systematic, explicit modeling for instruction in syllables, sounds, and spoken words. Examples include:

  • Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words.
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, students are introduced to the digraph a_e during digraph dictation. The teacher models words including mad, made, can, cane. Other words include: tap, tape, fat, fate, rat, rate, plan, plane.
  • Orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, students orally blend single-syllable words with up to three phonemes. The Teacher Guide tells the teacher to “explain that you will say sounds for students to blend into words. Say at in a segmented fashion, marking each sound with a thumb-finger tap. Start with a thumb-forefinger tap. Blend the sounds to produce the word at, making a fist with your hand. Have students take and blend the sounds in the word.”
  • Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 1, the teacher introduces the medial sound /ee/. The teacher says the word feet as an example. The teacher says the words, greet, meat, peace, heat, and students repeat. The teacher orally says a group of words, students close their eyes and raise their hands when they hear /ee/ in the middle of a word.
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 6, the teacher introduces the sound /ie/. The teacher orally says words that contain /ie/ at the beginning, middle, and end of words, and students repeat the words. Words include: ice, item, idea, island, bike, nice, sign, time, fly, tie, try. The teacher says a list of words, and students raise their hand if they hear the /ie/ sound in the middle.
    • In Skills 3, Lesson 9, the teacher introduces the sound /ou/. The teacher orally says words that contain /ou/ at the beginning, middle, and end of words ,and students repeat the words. Words include: ouch, out, owl, shout, loud, round, couch, hound, how, now, cow.
  • Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds.
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, students segment single-syllable words with up to three phonemes. The teacher is told to hold up two fingers and say the word at and then have students repeat the word. The teacher wiggles the index finger for the first sound in the word and then wiggles the middle finger for the second sound before students repeat. In Lesson 18, the teacher is provided with an illustration and instructions to follow in Lesson 1.
    • In Skills 6, Lesson 13, students segment and blend two syllable compound words, one syllable at a time. The teacher models this concept using the word sunset. The teacher says the entire word first, then repeats the word, pausing slightly between the syllables. The teacher then models segmenting the first syllable using a thumb-finger tap beginning with the forefinger for each sound in sun. The teacher segments the word set in the same way. The teacher blends while making a first. Four additional words (bookbag, cupcake, hornets, hanger) are provided for practice.

Materials provide the teacher with examples for instruction in syllables, sounds, and spoken words called for in grade level standards.

  • In Skills 4, Lesson 9, Advanced Preparation, the teacher is informed that words that have double consonants are divided into syllables after the double consonant to maintain consistency, as students are taught since Kindergarten that double letter spellings are considered single spelling units.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 2, Foundational Skills, the teacher is provided with directions and illustrations for how to segment and blend two-syllable words, one syllable at a time. Modeling is provided using the word classroom.

Indicator 1e

Materials provide practice of each newly taught sound (phoneme) and sound pattern across the K-1 band.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to provide practice of each newly taught sound (phoneme) and sound pattern across the K-1 band.

Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice phonological awareness skills throughout the lessons. The Teacher Guide contains lists of words for further practice in each lesson. Many lessons include multimodal/multisensory activities for student practice of phonological awareness.

Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice each new sound and sound pattern. Examples include:

  • Students have opportunities to distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words.
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 4, students are presented with a short vowel word, and then change the word using a long vowel. Words presented for practice include: can/cane, plan/plane, mad/made, rat/rate, hat/hate, cap/cape.
  • Students have opportunities to orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, students orally blend single-syllable words with up to three phonemes. Students tap and blend the sounds in the words. Words provided for practice include at, it, on, bee, sip, big, cub, tap.
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 3, students use thumb-finger taps to represent sounds in a word and when they blend the word, they use a fist. Eight words are provided for practice.
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 11, students use hand motions to blend and segment words such as flea, soap, rail, nap, task, brag, climb, and stone.
  • Students have opportunities to isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds in a spoken single-syllable word.
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 4, students segment words, utilizing a finger motion to demonstrate the initial, medial, and final sounds of words. Words provided for student practice include: sip, bin, cub, tap, flip, drop, hips, mats.
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 6, the teacher says a number of words and some of them have the /ie/ sound as their middle sound. Students raise their hand when they hear a word that has the /ie/ sound.
    • In Skills 3, Lesson 12, students learn the /oi/ sound. The teacher says words with the /oi/ sound in the beginning of the word, and students repeat. The teacher says a number of words with the /oi/ sound in the middle of the word, and the students repeat.
  • Students have opportunities to segment spoken syllable words into a complete sequence of individual sounds.
    • In Skills 5, Lesson 7, students segment and blend two-syllable words by breaking the words into two-syllables and segmenting each syllable. Practice words provided include toothpaste and mailbox.

Materials include a variety of multimodal/multisensory activities for student practice of phonological awareness. Activities include hand motions and mirrors to help students see what the mouth is doing during the activities. Students continue to use thumb-finger tapping for each sound in a word and close their hand or clap when they blend the entire word together.

Criterion 1f - 1j

Materials emphasize explicit, systematic instruction of research-based and/or evidence-based phonics.

20/20
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials include consistent systematic and explicit instruction in phonics skills with repeated teacher modeling across all Skills in the Teacher Guide. The materials provide frequent opportunities for students to decode phonetically spelled words using phonemes and/or syllables. The materials provide systematic practice for decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence through the decodable readers and activity pages that align with the phonics skill for the lesson. The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction and modeling to demonstrate the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters and words in writing tasks through dictation work.

Indicator 1f

Materials emphasize explicit phonics instruction through systematic and repeated modeling.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to emphasize explicit phonics instruction through systematic and repeated modeling.

Materials include consistent systematic and explicit instruction in phonics skills with repeated teacher modeling across all Skills in the Teacher Guide. The program includes scripted information and examples for the teacher as well as additional supports for students throughout phonics lessons. Phonics instruction includes oral and written practice with both encoding and decoding opportunities.

Materials contain explicit instructions for systematic and repeat teacher modeling of all grade-level standards. This includes:

  • Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs. Examples include:
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 17, students learn that the sound /ch/ is spelled ch and the sound /sh/ is spelled sh. In order to teach the concept, the teacher draws a triangle and a square and says when they are by themselves they are just a triangle and just a square, but when they come together it is a house. The teacher shows the letter c and the letter h and gives the sound for the individual letter, but explains that when we put it together it says /ch/.
    • In Skills 5, Lesson 6, students learn the spelling alternative for /ch/. The teacher uses the Consonant Code Flip Book page 7 and reviews spelling /ch/ as in chin. The teacher tells students that they will learn another spelling for consonant sound /ch/ and writes /tch/ and writes the letters on the board. The teacher explains that these letters work together to stand for the /ch/ sound. The teacher displays the Spelling Card /tch/ as in itch and has students practice saying words.
    • In Skills 6, Lesson 10, students learn that an alternative spelling for /n/ is /kn/. The teacher uses the Consonant Code Flip Book page 16 to review the basic code spelling for /n/. The teacher writes /n/ on the board with the words nut, cent. The teacher tells students they will learn another spelling for the /n/ sound. The teacher displays Spelling Card /kn/ as in knock. The teacher writes /kn/ on the board and the sample words of knot, knit.
  • Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words. Examples include:
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, the teacher models how to read regularly spelled one-syllable word. After spelling the word cap, the teacher says, “If I want to read the word, I need to start at the left, look at the first letter, and then remember and say the sound it stands for. Then I need to look at the next letter and last letter and say the sounds they stand for. Then I blend the sounds together to read and say the word /c/.../a/../p/... cap.”
    • In Skills 1, Lesson 4, the teacher explains that students will combine spellings to make words. Using letter cards, the teacher moves the f, o, and g cards to the center of the pocket chart to spell fog and asks the class to read the word. The teacher removes the o card and add the i card and say, “If that is fog, what is this?” A student decodes the word fig, and provides which sound or letter was changed in the word fog to get the word fig. If the student need prompting, the teacher may ask them whether they changed the first, middle, or last sound or letter. Students continue to decode: fog > fig > fit > fat > vat > mat > pat > pot > cot > cat; vat > van > fan > fin > tin > tan > man > pan > pin > din
    • In Skills 3, Lesson 1, students learn how to read words with oo. The teacher writes f and ff on the board and explains that it is pronounced the same way but that o and oo are not. The teacher explains that when they see oo, they should say the oo as in soon.
    • In Skills 4, Lesson 4, the teacher introduces the ar spelling for /ar/. The teacher explains that the sound /ar/ is not the same as the sound /a/ followed by the sound /r/. The teacher says one-syllable words such as tap, tar, cat, car, bad, bar, fat, far to model.
  • Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds. Examples include:
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, the teacher introduces the spelling a_e. The teacher explains that the letter a and the letter e work together to stand for one sound, /ae/.
    • In Skills 2, Lesson 8, the teacher introduces the spelling o_e. The teacher explains that the letter o and the letter e work together to stand for one sound, /oe/.
    • In Skills 7, Lesson 1, the teacher introduces the spelling ai and ay for the /ae/ sound. The teacher explains that while they previously learned how a and e work together to stand for one sound /ae/, they now have additional ways to spell the /ae/ sound.
  • Use knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a printed word. Examples include:
    • In Skills 4, Lesson 7, students are introduced to two-syllable words. The Teacher Guide states, “Explain that you can count how many syllables are in a word if you know how many vowel sounds are in the word: a word has the same number of syllables as it has vowel sounds.” Words for practice include: cake, cupcake, drop, gumdrop, pack, backpack, day, birthday.
    • In Skills 5, Lesson 7, students are reminded that every syllable has a vowel sound before segmenting and blending two syllable words.
  • Decode two-syllable words following basic patterns by breaking the words into syllables. Examples include:
    • In Skills 4, Lesson 8, students learn the Three Step Chunking method to segment and blend two-syllable words. In this method, students place a dot between the syllables. Students learn that in addition to compound words, root words with suffixes are also two-syllable words. The lesson begins by the teacher saying several two-syllable words, and the students clap the syllables. The teacher explains that these words are separated into syllables by root word and suffix. Students practice with additional words including jumping, mixing, and skipping.
    • In Skills 4, Lesson 10, before students complete a chaining activity with two-syllable words, the teacher asks students how many vowel sounds each syllable has and models by clapping out the syllables in the words basket and picnic. The teacher reviews why a dot is placed between syllables and explains that it “makes it easy to sound out each part using the three-step chunking method.”
    • In Skills 6, Lesson 6, before reading the story “Mister Spencer and the Rabbits,” the teacher tells students that multisyllabic words will no longer appear with a dot between them. Materials state that teachers may wish to review strategies students should use when encountering a multisyllabic word.
  • Read words with inflectional endings. Examples include:
    • In Skills 5, Lesson 1, the teacher writes the words cat, dog, and chick on the board, and then explains when they count more than one animal the words become cats, dogs, and chicks.
    • In Skills 6, Lesson 15, students read plural nouns ending in -s and -es. The teacher reminds students that “the sound of the -s can either be /s/ or /z/, depending on the last consonant of the word.
    • In Skills 7, Lesson 8, the teacher points out that when the root word has a short vowel sound and ends in a single consonant, the students double the consonant before adding the suffix.

Lessons provide teachers with systematic and repeated instruction for students to hear, say, encode, and read each newly taught grade-level phonics pattern. In each lesson, when a new sound is taught, students have the opportunity to review previously learned sound/spellings during warm up. For example:

  • In Skills 3, Lesson 5, the teacher introduces the vowel sound /oo/. The teacher explains that “the two letters work together as a team to stand for the /oo/ sound.” The teacher models writing the phonics pattern two or three times. Students trace the spelling on their desks with their finger while saying the sound. The students use their Vowel Code Flip Book and practice reading the example word. Students complete Activity 5.2, where students decode /oo/ words and write them under the matching picture.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 14, the teacher asks students what two-syllable words are made up of and asks for examples. Students complete an activity using the three-step chunking method to segment syllables by placing dots in between the syllables to read and write words. Words for practice include: brook, foot, book, hook, hood, cook.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 1, the teacher leads students through the identification of a single-syllable, short vowel root word. The teacher tells students that because stop is a one-syllable word with a short vowel sound and a single consonant ending, the final consonant is doubled when adding -ing or -ed. Students complete Activity Page 1.1, adding endings to single-syllable words.

Indicator 1g

Materials include frequent practice opportunities for students to decode words that consist of common and newly-taught sound and spelling patterns and provide opportunities for students to review previously taught phonics skills.

4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials include frequent practice opportunities for students to decode words that consist of common and newly-taught sound and spelling patterns and provide opportunities for students to review previously taught phonics skills.

The materials provide frequent opportunities for students to decode phonetically spelled words using phonemes and/or syllables. Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to read complete words by saying the entire word as a unit using newly taught phonics skills, while providing review opportunities for previously taught phonics skills. The program utilizes a variety of methods and resources for students to practice phonics skills. Pocket chaining gives the students the opportunity to decode words in isolation. Decodable readers give students the ability to apply phonics in continuous text. Student activity pages give students the opportunity to practice both in isolation and in continuous texts.

Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to decode (phonemes and syllables) phonetically spelled words. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, students decode CVC words with /a/ in a pocket chart chaining activity. The chain of words includes, cap, nap, nag, gag, gap, cap, can, and pan.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 13, students practice reading two-syllable words by blending sounds in the first syllable, and then the sounds in the last syllable, and finally putting the word together. Practice words include basket and catfish.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 11, students complete a chain activity where they read words by segmenting them and then practice blending the words. Students identify which sound changed in the word. Words include poof, pool, cool, tool, and fool.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 13, students use magic e strips to read CVC words and then CVCe words. For example, students read man and then mane and pan and then pane.
  • In Skills 5, Pausing Point, the students engage in a chaining activity with two-syllable words. The teacher writes the word kitchen on the board and inserts a dot divider in the middle of the word to segment it into two syllables.

Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to read complete words by saying the entire word as a unit using newly taught phonics skills. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 2, students read “The Pet” and read words such as when, what, pet, dog, big, is, this, and has.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 4, before reading the book, “Things that Swim,” students review and read words with ar and ou. Words include mark, mouth, because, shark, trout, here, and smart. The whole class reads the chapter together, and then students take turns reading aloud again.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 14, students practice reading two-syllable words, which include /er/ spellings that were taught in Lesson 1. Practice words include shorter and sharper.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 21, students complete Activity Page 21.1 where they are given sentences with a blank and two word choices. Students read the sentence and choose the word that makes the most sense.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 2, students read “Meet Vern” and read words such as Vern, Fern, green, and creep.

Materials contain opportunities for students to review previously earned grade level phonics. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 5, students review the magic e in a large letter card activity where students make CVC words and then the student holding the magic e joins the word. The students read the word.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 4, the teacher tells students they will be working again with the different spellings for the /s/ sound. Students read several words with the different /s/ spellings including sun, prince, and rinse.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 11, students review spellings for /n/ including kn, n, nn and for /s/ including ce and se. Students use Activity Page 11.1 and 11.2 to sort words based on the spelling pattern. Students read the words and write the words under the correct picture.

Materials contain a variety of methods to promote students’ practice of previously taught grade level phonics. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, students read Wiggle Cards and perform the action on each card. Wiggle cards include the phrases: Sit down, Take a step to the left, and Do a rain dance.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 7, students practice reading words that review previously taught sound/spellings and tricky words in a word baseball activity, where students take turns reading words to earn points. Words include: have, no, so, and here.

Indicator 1h

Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to practice decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials that promote frequent opportunities for students to practice decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence.

The materials provide systematic practice for decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence through the decodable readers and activity pages that align with the phonics skill for the lesson. In Skills 1-3, the teacher utilizes the Big Books and in Skills 1-7, decodable readers are used to help students practice decoding phonetically regular words in sentences.

Materials provide explicit, systematic practice for decoding phonetically regular words in a sentence. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, the Introduction states that the Reader is called “Gran” and the teacher presents the stories in the Reader as demonstration stories to model the process of reading the sentences.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 4, the teacher discusses the words found in the decodable reader that have ee or a_e in them. The teacher has students go to page 16, and then models how to read some of the words such as, “Point to the word takes and cover the ‘e’ and ‘s’ with your hand. If I remove the ‘e’ and ‘s’ from the word, how would we say this word? If I add magic ‘e’ to ‘tak’, how do we now say the word?” The teacher does this with several of the words before reading the decodable.

Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to decode words in a sentence. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 18, students practice reading sentences such as “This is fun. Beth had some chips. I have one big moth in that box.”
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 2, students read the decodable text “The Pet.” The text includes sentences such as, “I got a pet.”
  • In Skills 5, Activity Page 4.1, students read decodable questions and answer choices, all written in sentences. Examples include, “What is the land Kate sees out in the West like? It is green. It has lots of trees. It has hills and red rocks.”
  • In Skills 6, Activity 19.1, students are asked to read sentences such as, “I’m hot. Can I have something to drink?” in an activity identifying which /n/ sound words make.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 13, students engage in partner reading of the decodable text.

Indicator 1i

Materials include frequent practice opportunities for students to build/manipulate/spell and encode grade-level phonics, including common and newly-taught sound and sound patterns.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to include daily practice opportunities for students to build/manipulate/spell and encode grade-level phonics, including common and newly-taught sound and sound patterns.

The Grade 1 materials have daily student practice beginning for building, manipulating, and spelling grade-level appropriate words. Materials include explicit instructions, as well as background information for the teacher to utilize. Students are provided with opportunities to build, manipulate, spell, and encode common and newly-taught grade level phonics through activities through chaining activities, dictation activities, letter cards, digital components, and Student Activity pages.

The materials contain teacher-level instruction/modeling for building, manipulating, spelling, and encoding words using common and newly-taught sound and spelling patterns of phonics. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Lesson 1, the teacher shows students how to write the vowel sound /oo/. The teacher begins by writing oo and describing what they are doing. The teacher tells the students that the /oo/ sound is a vowel team, and the teacher models writing and saying the spelling two or three times.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 15, in a Teacher Chaining activity, the teacher reminds students what compound words are and writes bath/room on the board with a dot divider between the syllables. The teacher removes the syllable bath and adds bed to make bedroom. The teacher asks, “If that is bathroom, what is this?” The teacher asks students if the first or second syllable changed and is to continue the process with the remaining words provided in the activity. In the lesson, the teacher reviews the concepts of root words and suffixes -er, -est, and -ing. The teacher creates another chain using the same syllable routine with root words adding suffixes -er and -ing. Words include: buzzer, buzzing, shouting.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 2, the teacher models a chaining activity for sounds /ee/ to /ay/ and /in/ to /ain/. Words include: see > say > hay > day > way > pay > pray > ray > tray > tree; grin > grain > gain > pain > main > chain >rain > train > drain > drains.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 8, the teacher models adding inflectional endings -ed and -ing to roots words and tells students that, “that because stop is a one-syllable word with a short vowel sound and a single consonant ending, the final consonant is doubled when adding a suffix.” The teacher uses the word, peep, and explains that “because peep has a long vowel sound, the ending consonant is not doubled when adding a suffix.” Words include: stop, stopped, stopping, peep, peeping, tag, tagged, tagging.

Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to build, manipulate, spell, and encode words in isolation based in common and newly-taught phonics patterns. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1 students read and write one-syllable words spelled with vowel digraph /ee/ spelled ee using the Vowel Code Flip Book and Activity Page 1.1. Students copy the spellings and words on the front page of the activity. Words include feet, green, keep, and need.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 5, in a Large Card Chaining activity, the students form words provided by the teacher with Large Letter Cards. Students with letter cards create the word zap. Students without cards identify if the word looks correct by giving a thumbs up or down. Once the students spell the word correctly students with letter cards create the word zip. Students identify what letter or sound changed. Students continue the process with all the words provided by the teacher in the activity.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, students engage in a Digraph Dictation activity where students write words that are dictated by the teacher on Activity Page 3.1. The teacher dictates a CVC word and writes the CVCV word dictated by adding a silent e.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 11, the teacher shows images or objects for words winner, dinner, cent, scent, knee, knot, fence, and students repeat the words after they are introduced. Students work on Activity Page 11.2 where they read words with alternatives for /s/ and /n/. The the students write the correct word under the correct picture.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 8, students complete Activity page 8.1 where they add inflectional endings -ed and -ing to long and short vowel words, noting when to double the consonant.

Indicator 1j

Materials provide application and encoding of phonics in activities and tasks. (mid K-Grade 2)
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials that promote application and encoding of phonics in activities and tasks. (mid K-Grade 2)

The materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction and modeling to demonstrate the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters and words in writing tasks through dictation work. The program provides students with frequent activities and tasks to promote application of phonics to encode words in phrases or sentences based on common and previously taught phonics patterns.

Materials include explicit, systematic teacher-level instruction of teacher modeling that demonstrates the use of phonics to encode sounds to letters and words in writing tasks. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 20, the students write eight words which contain double letter spellings with consonant sounds. The teacher models with the word will. The teacher holds up a finger for each sound, the students count the sounds, and the teacher draws a line for each sound they hear before the teacher writes the word.
  • In Skills 2, Activity Page 3.1, the teacher explains that each of the thick black lines on the page stands for one sound/spelling. The teacher says the word mad, holds up three fingers and segments the word. The teacher points out that the word mad contains three sounds and is spelled with three letters. The teacher says the word made and repeats the modeling. The lines for the word made have a v under it, and the teacher explains that this mark shows that these letters are working together. The teacher dictates more words.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 5, the students write words with er and ar. The teacher tells students to count the sounds in each word, then draws a line for each sound in the word before writing the word.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 22, students practice writing words with vowel digraphs. The teacher says a word and tells students to hold up a finger for each sound. The students count the sounds in the word and draw a line for each individual sound in the word. The teacher reminds students that many of the vowel sounds are spelled with two letters and they work together and should be written on one line. The teacher models with the word bake.

Lessons provide students with frequent activities and tasks to promote application of phonics as they encode words in sentences or in phrases based on common and newly taught phonics patterns. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 6, while reading the decodable story, “The Swim Meet” students write answers to questions about the story with the newly taught phonics pattern of i_e and a_e and previously taught phonics patterns.
  • In Skills 3, Pausing Points, the teacher dictates sentences. The students repeat the sentence, count the number of words, and write lines on the paper for each word, before writing the sentence.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 11, students complete Activity Page 11.2 by writing words in blanks to complete sentences. Words in the word box at the top of the page include digraphs.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 3, students read the decodable story “Meet Vern” and answer questions about the story with answers that practice the phonics patterns of er, ou, oi, oo, and aw.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 6, students complete Activity Page 6.1 by writing words in blanks to complete sentences. The words include the /ch/ sound spelling.

Criterion 1k - 1m

Materials and instruction support students in learning and practicing regularly and irregularly spelled high-frequency words.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials include systematic and explicit instruction of high-frequency words through the Tricky Word Instruction. Materials include the opportunity to read grade-level, high-frequency words in sentences and to write the words in tasks to promote automaticity. Materials include frequent and explicit instruction of word analysis strategies.

Indicator 1k

Materials include systematic instruction of high-frequency words and opportunities to practice reading of high-frequency words to develop automaticity.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to include systematic instruction of high-frequency words and practice opportunities of high-frequency words to develop automaticity.

Materials include systematic and explicit instruction of high-frequency words through the Tricky Word Instruction. Tricky words are taught explicitly, then modeled and practiced in isolation and in the Reader stories.

Materials include systematic and explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 13, the Tricky Word some is introduced. The teacher tells students how it is pronounced. Then the teacher tells students that the letter m is pronounced as expected. The teacher underlines the remaining letters, and then tells the students that it is the tricky part of the word.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 2, the teacher provides explicit instruction of the word how. The teacher explains that in this word the sound /ou/ is spelled ow instead of ou, just like in the Tricky Word down. The teacher circles the letter h and explains that it is pronounced as expected. The teacher underlines the letters o and w and explains that they are the tricky part of the word and stand for the /ou/ sound.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 7, the teacher discusses the word talk before students read their story. The teacher underlines the a and tells students that the al is pronounced /aw/ or /o/ depending on the region of the United States.

Materials include frequent opportunities for the teacher to model the spelling and reading of irregularly spelled words in isolation. Examples include:

  • In Skils 1, Lesson 5, the teacher writes the word no on the board and tells students that the letter n is pronounced as expected, but that the letter o is not pronounced as expected in Grade 1. The teacher tells the students that when writing the word, they need to remember to spell the /oe/ sound with the letter o.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 5, students review the Tricky Word they. The teacher circles the letters th and explains that it is pronounced /th/ as expected. The teacher underlines the remaining letters and explains that it is the tricky part of the word. The teacher reminds students that when reading this word, they need to remember that the letters say /ae/ and when spelling, they need to remember the sound /ae/ is spelled ey.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 7, teacher modeling is provided for spelling and reading the high-frequency word should. The teacher circles the sh and d since they are pronounced as expected and underlines oul and tells students it says ool.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 1, the teacher introduces the days of the week as Tricky Words. The teacher writes the days of the week on the board and tells students that they d is pronounced as expected. The teacher underlines the ay and tells students they have not learned this spelling and it says /ae/. The teacher reads each word aloud, and the students repeat the word.

Students practice identifying and reading irregularly spelled words in isolation. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Lesson 5, students take out their Tricky Word cards that they made. When the teacher says a Tricky Word the students find the card with that word and hold it up. The teacher points to the correct Tricky Word on the word wall so students can check their work.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 24, students play Bingo with Tricky Words. The teacher reads a word, and if students have the word, they put their finger on it and read it back to the teacher.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 4, the teacher previews the Tricky Words with students that will be found in the decodable text “In the Cave.” The Tricky Words include where, once, and tomorrow.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 3, the teacher prepares word cards for each of the students with a Tricky Word on it. The teacher circulates the room, listening to each student read their word.

Materials include a sufficient quantity of new grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words for students to make reading progress. For example:

  • In Skills 1, Appendix A, materials state, “By the end of Unit 10 in Kindergarten, 129 high frequency words (41 Tricky Words, plus 88 decodable words) from the Fry Instant Word List have been taught. Using the Dolch Sight Word List as criteria, by the end of Unit 10, 116 high frequency words (42 Tricky Words, plus 74 decodable words) from the Dolch List have been taught. Many of these Tricky Words are practiced and reviewed in Grade 1 Units 1 and 2.”
  • In Skills 1, Appendix A, a list of all Tricky Words taught in Grade 1 are listed. It states that many of the Kindergarten Tricky Words are practiced and reviewed in Units 1 and 2 and no Tricky Words are taught in Units 6 and 7. The Scope and Sequence provided lists the 25 Tricky Words taught in Skills Units as follows:
    • Unit 1: a, I, no, so, of, is, all, some, from, word, are, have, were, one, once, do, who, two, the, said, says, was, when, where, why, what, which, here, there
    • Unit 2: he, she, we, be , me, they their, my, by, so, no, some, you, your
    • Unit 3: should, would, because, could, down
    • Unit 4: today, yesterday, tomorrow
    • Unit 5: how, picture, coach

Indicator 1l

Materials provide frequent practice opportunities to read and write high-frequency words in context (sentences).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to provide frequent practice opportunities to read and write high-frequency words in context (sentences).

Materials include the opportunity to read grade-level, high-frequency words in sentences and to write the words in tasks to promote automaticity. The materials are systematic and provide practice through activities such as reading the decodable reader and writing sentences in the activity pages.

Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to read grade- level, irregularly spelled words in sentences. In each Student Reader, students are minded that the tricky parts of Tricky Words are underlined in the reader. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 11, students read the Tricky Words is and to aloud in sentences. Sentences include: “It is a cat.”; “Is it hot?”; “Sam went to bed.”
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 8, students read the Tricky Words here, from, and two in the story “Chimp.”
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 3, students read sentences with high-frequency words in Activity Page 5.3 such as, “Which book do you like best?”
  • In Skills 7, Activity Page 5.4 is a take home story for students to read at home. The directions tell families that “the tricky parts in Tricky Words are underlined in gray.”

Lessons provide students with frequent opportunities to write grade-level irregularly spelled words in tasks such as sentences in order to promote automaticity in writing grade-level irregularly spelled words. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 13, students read Tricky Words in a box at the top of Activity Page 13.2 and use them to fill in the blank in sentences.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 9, the teacher copies sentences from the activity book onto pieces of paper and cuts the sentences into individual words. The students take the cut sentences and reconstruct them into complete sentences and copy the sentence on paper. Students underline the tricky part of the Tricky Words and read the sentences.
  • In Skills 8, Lesson 2, students fill in the high-frequency word all in sentences and read the sentence.

Materials provide repeated, explicit instruction for using student friendly reference materials and resources on reading irregularly spelled words (e.g., word cards, word lists, word ladders, student dictionaries). Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, the teacher guide states, “You might want to create a word wall with Tricky Words, adding to your wall each time a new word is introduced. Tricky Words printed on yellow cards remind students to use caution when reading them.”
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 4, students keep track of the different spellings for the /k/ sound. The students use a Spelling Tree to sort different words with the /k/ sound. The teacher explains that some of the words are odd ducks, and these Tricky Words will be written on yellow paper. The teacher reads several words and students tell the teacher which branch on the Spelling Tree the word belongs, including the odd ducks.

Indicator 1m

Materials explicitly teach word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition, syllabication, morpheme analysis) based on the requirements of the standards and provide students with frequent practice opportunities to apply word analysis strategies.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to explicitly teach word analysis strategies (e.g., phoneme/grapheme recognition, syllabication, morpheme analysis) based on the requirements of the standards and provide frequent opportunities for students to apply word analysis strategies.

Materials include frequent and explicit instruction of word analysis strategies. Materials include frequent explicit instruction for decoding familiar words. Activities are varied throughout the year to provide adequate opportunities for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis strategies.

Materials contain frequent explicit instruction of word analysis strategies (e.g. phoneme/grapheme recognition, syllabication, morpheme analysis). Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 2, the teacher demonstrates word analysis strategies for short and long vowel words. The teacher begins by reminding students that when reading a word that has the letter e, one e is usually pronounced /e/ and two e’s side by side are usually pronounced /ee/. The teacher writes the word fed on the board and asks students to read the word in their mind, first in a segmented way and then blended. The teacher writes the word feed and says, “If this is fed, what is this?”
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 8, the teacher reminds students that yesterday they learned about syllables. The teacher asks how many vowel sounds a syllable has. The teacher reminds students that a compound word is made up of two separate one-syllable words. The teacher says catfish and asks students how many vowel sounds they hear in the word. The Teacher Guide states “Students may place their hands underneath their chins while saying the word to detect how many vowel sounds are in catfish.”
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 3, in a Root Word activity, the teacher says “Because nap is a one-syllable word that has a short vowel sound and ends in a single consonant sound, we add an extra ‘p’ before adding the suffix -ed or -ing to nap. Nap turns to napped or napping.” The teacher has the students circle double consonant spellings as well as underline the suffixes.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 13, students learn how to segment and blend two-syllable words. The teacher writes the word sunset with a dot to segment the syllables. The teacher models how to read it by using a thumb-finger tap to blend the first word and the second and then read the word together.

Materials contain frequent explicit instruction of word solving strategies to decode unfamiliar words. Examples include:

  • In Skills 6, Lesson 19, students learn about the tricky spelling of n when it can stand for the /n/ sound or the /ng/ sound. The teacher explains “that students should try pronouncing it /n/ as in nap but if that does not sound right, or does not make sense in context, they should try pronouncing it /ng/ as in pink.”
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 1, the teacher explains that the words on the page have a c in it that can say either /k/ or /s/. The teacher tells students that when they encounter the spelling c in a printed word they do not already know, they should try pronouncing it /k/ as in cat. If that does not sound right or does not make sense in context, they should try pronouncing it /s/ as in cent.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 5, the students read a story containing three-syllable words and are told to use the same chunking strategy they have learned for two-syllable words. The Chunking Strategy helps students decode multisyllabic words and words with suffixes. The directions state, “When students first encounter two -syllable words, a small dot is used as a visual prompt or cue between the syllables. The dot is intended to visually break the word into two chunks, each of which can then be sounded out separately.”

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis strategies. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Lesson 1, students learn the sound spelling oo for /oo/. In one activity, students practice hearing the sound /oo/ in words by giving a thumbs up if they hear the /oo/ sound in the middle of both words. In the Activity Page 1.1, students read words with /oo/ spellings and match and write words to that correspond with the pictures.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 8, students learn about the rules for doubling consonants before adding suffixes -ed and -ing. In Activity Page 8.1, students practice adding suffixes -ed and -ing to words to fill out a chart, which includes words fish, dip, hatch, and flip.

Criterion 1n - 1q

Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding in K and 1, and rate, expression, and accuracy in mid-to-late 1st and 2nd grade. Materials for 2nd grade fluency practice should vary (decodables and grade-level texts).

12/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity. Materials include limited opportunities for explicit, systematic instruction in fluency using grade-level text in the form of decodable readers. Materials provide few explicit lessons in confirming and self-correcting errors in fluency. The materials contain some opportunities for students to confirm and self-correct errors in fluency; however, the majority of lessons help students determine the sound of a phoneme when it makes multiple sounds.

Indicator 1n

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity in K and Grade 1.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to provide opportunities for students to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity in K and Grade 1.

The materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity. Before reading decodable readers, students preview words using the Preview Spelling charts found in each text. The Grade 1 materials provide students with opportunities to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity through partner readings of decodable texts and activity page reading practice.

Materials provide systematic and explicit instruction and practice in fluency by focusing on accuracy and automaticity in decoding. Examples include:

  • In Skils 2, Lesson 3, students learn that a_e says /ae/ and then in Lesson 4, students read the story “Wong” which includes words such as crate, takes, snake, scared, and safe.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 15, the teacher reads aloud the text “King and Queen” from the Big Book/Decodable Reader and uses a finger or a pointer to model following the text while reading.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 6, the teacher introduces the story “Mister Spencer and the Rabbits” and writes the word “Spencer” on the board. The teacher points out the c spelling for /s/, which students just learned. The teacher previews additional words in the Sound Spelling chart that have the /s/ sound spelled c, ce, or se.

Materials provide opportunities for students in Kindergarten and Grade 1 to engage in decoding practice focused on accuracy and automaticity. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Activity 12.3, students read the decodable reader “The Tape” aloud. Students are reminded that underlined parts of words signal that it contains a tricky part.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 8, students read sentences, name the action, then perform the action in the sentence. For example, one sentence in the activity is “Bloom like a rose.”
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 1, students read sentences and fill in the blanks with words from the word bank, which includes alternative spellings for /ae/ such as ie and ay.
  • In Skills 7, Activity 5.4, students read the story “Martez, Martez, Martez” and words underlined in gray are tricky words and uncommon spelling patterns are in bold to help students with accuracy while reading.

Indicator 1o

Instructional opportunities are built into the materials for systematic, evidence-based, explicit instruction in fluency. (Grades 1-2)
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are built into the materials for systematic, evidence-based, explicit instruction in fluency (Grades 1-2).

Materials include limited opportunities for explicit, systematic instruction in fluency using grade-level text in the form of the decodable readers. While materials provide explicit instruction in expression, materials do not include explicit instruction in rate or accuracy. The materials provide opportunities for students to hear fluent reading of grade-level text by the teacher modeling reading and rereading the decodable texts.

Materials include limited opportunities for explicit, systematic instruction in fluency elements using grade level-text. Examples include:

  • In Skills 5, Lesson 11, the teacher models how to read sentences with exclamation points. The teacher explains that sentences that end with exclamation points contain strong emotions such as excitement, fear, and frustration. The teacher models reading.

Materials provide opportunities for students to hear fluent reading of grade-level text by a model reader. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 19, the students hear the first demonstration story. According to the materials, “Demonstration stories provide many opportunities for you to model reading skills and more for students.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 20, the teacher reads the story “Nat” to students. On page 16, the teacher focuses on the comma in the sentence, “Nat left, and I felt sad” explaining to students that they should pause to take a breath when they see a comma when reading.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 3, the teacher introduces periods and question marks with sentences. The teacher uses the sentence “He has a big dog” and reads it once with a period and once with a question mark at the end.

Materials include a variety of resources for explicit instruction in fluency. Students use decodable books in small groups. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 1, the teacher reads aloud “Gran’s Trip.” After the teacher reads the sentence, “Gran is here!”, the teacher pauses and asks students what the punctuation mark is called and what it tells readers to do.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 3, students reread the text “Meet Vern.” Some students work with the teacher who need more direct support and immediate feedback for fluency work.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 16, students read “The Reptile Room” as a class. The students take turns reading aloud, and the teacher encourages the students to read with expression and models as needed.

Indicator 1p

Varied and frequent opportunities are built into the materials for students to engage in supported practice to gain oral reading fluency beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2 (once accuracy is secure).

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for varied and frequent opportunities that are built into the materials for students to engage in supported practice to gain oral reading fluency beginning in mid-Grade 1 and through Grade 2 (once accuracy is secure).

The Grade 1 materials provide opportunities over the course of the year to help students gain fluency. Students participate in repeated readings of grade-level texts to practice oral reading fluency through partner reading and repeated readings using the decodable texts. The materials include guidance and feedback suggestions for the teacher to support gains in oral reading fluency.

Over the course of the year, varied and frequent opportunities are provided in core materials for students to gain oral reading fluency. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 22, students participate in a Silly Voices activity, where they choose a silly voice and read aloud a sentence using that voice.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 6, students read “The Swim Meet” with a partner.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 3, students partner read the decodable text, “The Two Dogs.” Students take turns reading aloud.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 7, students read aloud sentences before completing a grammar activity.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 7 and 8, students read “The Picnic by the River” with a small group and the teacher or a partner.

Materials contain opportunities for students to participate in repeated readings of a grade-level text to practice oral reading fluency. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, students reread the decodable text, “Gran’s Trip” or “The Pet.” Students can either reread the story with a partner or to the teacher.
  • In Skills 4, Activity 5.3, there is a take-home activity for students to reread a decodable text aloud at home. The directions include “repeated oral reading is an important way to improve reading skills. It can be fun for your child to repeatedly read this story to a friend, relative, or even a pet.”
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 20, students reread “Two Good Things and One Bad Thing” with a partner.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 19, students reread “Grace the Performer.”
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 3, students reread the text, “Martez, Martez, Martez” either with a partner or by themselves.

Materials include guidance and feedback suggestions to the teacher for supporting gains in oral reading fluency. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 22, students practice using Silly Voices for texts they have already read. The Teacher Guide states, “If students are not already reading the text with high accuracy, then rereading without silly voices to first establish ease with word recognition is appropriate.”
  • In Skills 3, there is a Fluency and Comprehension Progress Monitoring assessment in the Assessment and Remediation Guide which helps teachers know which students need additional support. There is an Assessment and Remediation Guide II in Fluency and Comprehension, which provides explicit, guided, and independent fluency (and comprehension) exercises for remediation instruction.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 10, it states, “You may want to encourage students to practice reading the chapter several times normally to build fluency before using a silly voice.”
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 19, the teacher is told to use an anecdotal reading record to monitor oral reading fluency. This will help the teacher determine who needs remediation using either the Additional Resources lessons or additional practice with Pausing Points.

Indicator 1q

Materials provide teacher guidance to support students as they confirm or self-correct errors (Grades 1-2) and emphasize reading for purpose and understanding.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials to provide teacher guidance to support students as they confirm or self-correct errors (K-1) and emphasize reading for purpose and understanding (K-2).

The materials contain some opportunities for students to confirm and self-correct errors in fluency; however, the majority of lessons help students determine the sound of a phoneme when it makes multiple sounds. Students have opportunities to read for purpose and understanding.

Materials provide few explicit lessons for the teacher in confirming and self-correcting errors in fluency. These lessons only help students confirm and self-correct errors in reading phonemes with multiple sounds. Examples include.

  • In Skills 5, Lesson 8, the teacher introduces the spelling g for /g/ and /j/. The teacher tells students that “in order to figure out how to pronounce this tricky spelling, students may need to try it two different ways.” The teacher reads the first sentence modeling with the word larger initially using the /g/ sound and asks if it sounds correct, and explains to students that because it sounds wrong, they need to try the /j/ sound.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 2, the teacher introduces c spelling for /k/ and /s/. The teacher tells students that “when they encounter the spelling ‘c’ in a printed word that they do not already know, they should try pronouncing it /k/ as in cat. If that does not sound right, or does not make sense in context, they should try pronouncing it /s/ as in ‘cent’.” The teacher reads the word dancer, initially using the /k/ sound and asks students if it sounds correct. The teacher explains that because it sounds wrong, they should try it the other way.

Materials provide limited opportunities for students to practice using confirmation or self-correction of errors. Opportunities only give students practice reading words with phonemes that have multiple sounds. Examples include:

  • In Skills 5, Lesson 9, students complete Activity Page 9.1 by reading the sentence aloud to try the tricky spellings of g as /g/ and /j/ both ways. Then they practice writing the correctly spelled word on the line that makes sense in context.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 2, students complete Activity Page 2.1 by reading words spelled c that say either /k or /s/ by reading the sentences aloud and trying to determine which word makes more sense in context.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year for students to read on-level texts for purpose and understanding. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Lesson 8, students read “The Two Mules” to determine the moral or lesson of the story.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 2, students read the text, “Meet Vern” to determine the different types of animals at the Green Fern Zoo.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 6, students read “Mister Spencer and the Rabbits” and prior to reading, the teacher tells students that they are reading this story to learn more about how Grace’s dad solves a problem he has with some rabbits.

Gateway Two

Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

Instructional materials include a Teacher Guide that facilitates foundational skill instruction through consistent written step-by-step directions and visuals. The materials also include an overview of the foundational skills taught at the grade level, with complete, detailed adult-level explanations. While the materials include well-designed, research-based lesson plans, the program cannot be completed in a typical school year. The materials include a coherent scope and sequence of phonics instruction that builds toward application of skills. The materials include decodable texts that align to the scope and sequence of phonics and high-frequency word instruction. Materials also regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate student progress toward mastery of all foundational skills. The materials provide opportunities for small group reteaching through Additional Support activities, which are included in every Skills lesson. Throughout the Teacher’s Guide, there is support for English Language Learners, which is found in sidebars throughout lessons. The Grade 1 digital materials, which include Teaching Guides, Activity Books, Readers, Big Books, Picture Readers, Sound Library, and the Assessment and Remediation Guides are compatible with multiple internet browsers, including FireFox, Safari, Explorer, and Google Chrome.

Criterion 2a - 2e

Materials are accompanied by a systematic, explicit, and research-based scope and sequence outlining the essential knowledge and skills that are taught in the program and the order in which they are presented. Scope and sequence should include phonological awareness, phonics and word recognition, fluency, and print concepts.
18/20
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Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials include a Teacher Guide that facilitates foundational skill instruction through consistent written step-by-step directions and visuals. The materials also include an overview of the foundational skills taught at the grade level, with complete, detailed adult-level explanations. While the materials include well-designed, research-based lesson plans, the program cannot be completed in a typical school year. The materials include a coherent scope and sequence of phonics instruction that builds toward application of skills.

Indicator 2a

Materials contain a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to contain a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The Teacher Guide helps facilitate foundational skills instruction via written step-by-step directions and visuals. Each lesson provides the teacher with explicit routines, timelines, materials, and assessments. The Teacher Guide lists the Tricky Spellings, Warm-Up activities, Unit Assessment, Pausing Points, and teacher resources for each unit. There is a consistent lesson structure that starts with a Warm-Up, then moves into phonological awareness (environmental sounds), phonics, and then writing.

The materials provide a well-defined, Teacher Guide for content presentation. Materials include a Table of Contents, Common Core Alignment, Primary Focus Objectives for each lesson, Formative Assessments, and a Lesson at a Glance. Grouping strategies and suggested times are provided. There is an Advance Preparation Chart to help the teacher prepare prior to the lesson. For example, in Skills 5, the Advanced Preparation section explains the major spellings for the /p/ sound. There are sidebars throughout the program that provide support and challenges for various learners.

The Teacher Guide contains instructional routines to help the teacher effectively implement all foundational skills content. The teacher needs picture readers, blending picture cards, a chaining folder, large letter cards, sound cards, small letter cards, and sound posters. All lessons follow a similar routine. Lessons start with a Warm-Up. For example, in Skills 2, Lesson 1, students review how to use the vowel flip code book to practice decoding short vowel sounds. The lesson continues with phonological awareness, then phonics, and ends with a writing component. When introducing a new sound, there are step-by-step directions on how to introduce the sound. Each lesson contains visual aids for the teacher. For example, in Skills 3, Lesson 1, materials explicitly show the total physical response motions that correlate to the blending motion.

Technology is provided to support and guide teachers. For example, there is a sound library that models the correct pronunciation of each sound. The teacher can sort the sounds by grade level or use the search feature.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain full, adult-level explanations and examples of the foundational skills concepts included in the program so teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to contain full, adult-level explanations and examples of the foundational skills concepts included in the program so teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

The materials include an overview of the foundational skills taught at the grade level, with complete, detailed adult-level explanations. In the introduction to each unit, there are explanations and rationales behind the instructional practices presented to students. Examples of each concept are provided along with additional information to help support the teacher in delivering the foundational skills lessons. Appendix A includes a detailed explanation of the Simple View of Reading, and it informs the program design. It has detailed explanations for the difference between sight words and tricky words.

Throughout the program there are complete, adult-level explanations for each foundational skill taught at the grade level. Each lesson includes a primary focus objective and the corresponding Common Core State Standard(s) are listed. The Teacher Guide introduction provides an overview of the lessons and skills taught throughout the unit. Some specific examples include:

  • In Skills 1, the introduction provides an overview of the lessons and skills taught. The Overview explains that “These lessons review the majority of sounds and spellings taught in the CKLA Kindergarten curriculum. The presentation and practice of sound/spelling correspondence in these lessons, most of which should be familiar to students who participated in the Kindergarten CKLA program, allows for rapid review.”
  • In Skills 4, the introduction provides an overview of the lessons and skills taught throughout the unit. It says, “In this unit, you will introduce the sounds that are sometimes called r-controlled vowel sounds and are most common (or least ambiguous spelling for each sound... /er/ spelled ‘er’ as in her, /ar/ spelled ‘ar’ as in car, and /or/ spelled ‘or’ as in for.” It also goes on to say, “The sounds /er/ as in her, /ar/as in car, and /or/ as in for are classified as r-controlled vowel sounds rather than vowel+consonant combinations. In this program, /er/, /ar/ and /or/ are treated as discrete phonemes.”
  • In Skills 5, the introduction explains that “the term digraph refers to two letters that stand for a single sound. It is not necessary to teach this term to students. However, it is important that students understand that a letter can stand for a single sound all by itself or it can work with a second letter to stand for a single sound.”

There are detailed examples of the grade level foundational skill concepts for the teachers. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, students begin segmenting words that contain two or three sounds. Explanations for the teacher include, “Blend the sounds to produce the word at, making a first with your hand. Have students tap and blend the sounds in the word” and “Wiggle or move your index finger for the first sound in the word, /a/.”
  • In Skills 2, when introducing the spelling of /ee/ examples of words that follow the sound spelling are given. The teacher explains that “the two letters work together to stand for the /ee/ sound.”
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 1, students are introduced to the sound /er/ through sound riddles. The teacher is prompted to say, “ask students to repeat a number of words that have the /er/ sound in the middle: burn, fern, clerk, lurk, circus” and “Ask students to repeat a number of words that have the /er/ sound at the end: her, sister, brother, cover, later.”

Indicator 2c

Foundational skills lessons are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Content can reasonably be completed within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for foundational skills lessons that are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. Content can reasonably be completed within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

While the materials include well-designed, research-based lesson plans, all grade-level content may not be able to be completed in a typical school year. In order to complete all seven skills books, a teacher needs a minimum of 39 weeks, which does not factor in disruptions to a typical school year. It is suggested that 180-187 school days will be needed to complete the program. The Teacher Planner suggests a way to complete this in 38, 5-day weeks, but that is not feasible in every school setting. Pausing Points are optional and can be removed to fit in the entire curriculum; however, that is also taking away the opportunity for reinforcement or reteaching of skills.

Lesson plans utilize effective, research-based lesson plans designed for early literacy instruction. According to the National K-2 Program Guide, CKLA teaches the most frequent sound spellings first in order to maximize the words students can read and move them into engaging, well-written, decodable texts. Lessons are multi-sensory, and each lesson starts with phonological awareness. The lesson moves from the auditory to the visual production of a sound with the teacher modeling before students form the sound.

The lessons include both whole group and small group instruction. According to the Program Guide, the teacher will “engage in direct instruction, particularly when new concepts, foundational skills, and content are introduced.” In addition, “small group and partner activities and discussions are used in short and longer sessions.”

The pacing of each component of daily lesson plans is clear and appropriate. The Program Guide suggests 60 minutes of instruction daily, with 2-3 Pausing Point days built in. CKLA provides the teacher with a calendar tool to assist in planning. Within each individual lesson, the time needed for each component is listed.

Indicator 2d

Order of Skills

Indicator 2d.i

Scope and sequence clearly delineate the sequence in which phonological awareness skills are to be taught, with a clear, evidence-based explanation for the expected hierarchy of phonemic awareness competence. (K-1)

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for scope and sequence to clearly delineate the order in which phonological awareness skills are to be taught, with a clear, evidence-based explanation for the expected hierarchy of phonemic awareness competence.

In the Grade 1 Teacher Guide, Appendix A, the materials provide an explanation for the sequence of phonological awareness skills. The Teacher Guide states, “CKLA focuses consistently on the phoneme, or single sound, and not on larger units.” The progression of phonological awareness skills, found in the Standards Alignment, allows for students to learn in a sequential way to build their understanding of phonological awareness. The Standards Alignment document provides both the grade level Standard Alignment and the individual Skills Standard Alignment, providing a cohesive sequence of instruction for phonemic awareness.

Materials contain a clear, evidence-based explanation for the expected hierarchy for teaching phonological awareness skills. Specific examples include:

  • In the Program Guide, the materials explain the program is based on the Simple View of Reading and “The Skills strand is built upon a large research base including the National Reading Panel...” Furthermore, the materials state, “Each lesson is dedicated to print concepts, phonological awareness, and phonics, and word recognition.”
  • The Program Guide says, “In CKLA phonics instruction, students are first introduced to the sound and participate in interactive, engaging oral language exercising in which they repeatedly say and hear the sound.”
  • In the Alignment Chart, each lesson lists the phonological awareness standards. For example, in Skills 2, Lessons 1, 3, 6, 8, and 12, students isolate and pronounce initial, medial, and final sounds.

Materials contain a coherent phonemic awareness sequence of instruction and practice exercises based on the expected hierarchy. The Grade 1 Alignment Chart references the Grade 1 Skills Teacher Guide in which phonological awareness standards are noted. Some of the activities include:

  • In Skills 1, students orally produce single syllable words by blending, isolating, and producing sounds in words. In Lesson 5, students isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds in spoken syllable words.
  • In Skills 2, students distinguish long from short vowel sounds and segment words into individual sounds.
  • In Skills 3, students produce single-syllable words by blending sounds. In Lesson 13, students orally produce single syllable words by blending sounds, including consonant blends.
  • In Skills 4, students blend and segment onset and rimes.
  • In Skills 5, students blend and segment onset and rimes and distinguish long from short vowels in spoken words.
  • In Skills 6, students blend and segment onset and rimes.
  • In Skills 7, students segment words into individual sounds.

Indicator 2d.ii

Scope and sequence clearly delineate an intentional sequence in which phonics skills are to be taught, with a clear explanation for the order of the sequence.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for the scope and sequence to clearly delineate an intentional order in which phonics skills are taught. A clear explanation for the sequence is included.

The materials include a coherent scope and sequence of phonics that build toward application of skills. Through the research base and sequence of instruction, the program teaches the 150 spellings for the 44 sounds of the English language throughout the first three years of school. The scope and sequence can be found in the Table of Contents, the Appendix, the Scope and Sequence document, and the Alignment Chart. Research is found in the Research Guide which explains the underlying reason for the order of instruction.

Materials clearly delineate a scope and sequence with a cohesive, intentional sequence of phonics instruction and practice for building toward application of skills. In the Resources, a Scope and Sequence of the Skills strand is identified for each grade level. The materials provide the scope and sequence, broken apart by the focus of each lesson, for each Unit in the Skills Strand. In addition, the Table of Contents for each CKLA Skills Teacher Guide provides a reference sequence of phonics instruction and activities in the lesson that build toward application of the skill. The following is the Grade 1 Scope & Sequence (note: in the Appendix B, which lists the Scope & Sequence, it is labeled as Unit instead of Skills):

  • Unit 1: review reading and writing CVC, CCVC, CVCC, CCVCC words.
  • Unit 2: long vowel spellings of ee, a_e, i_e, o_e, u_e.
  • Unit 3: spelling for the sounds /oo/, /ou/, /oi/, and /aw/ and read two syllable words
  • Unit 4: Spelling for r-controlled vowel sounds and past tense endings.
  • Unit 5: Consonant spelling alternative such as tch for /ch/, g for /j/, and wr for /r/.
  • Unit 6: Consonant spelling alternatives for sounds such as c for /s/ and kn for /n/.
  • Unit 7: Spelling alternatives for vowel such such as ai, ay and oe.

Materials have a clear research-based explanation for the order of the phonics sequence. Evidence of a clear research-based explanation include:

  • “Research consistently demonstrates that explicit phonics instruction has important, lasting benefits to children’s reading accuracy, and this is one of the most emphasized aspects of phonics instruction for English language learners, as well as children struggling to learn reading (August et al., 2005, Brady, 2011; DeGraaff et al., 2009; Ehri et al., 2001; Torgesen, 2006; Torgesen et al., 2001; Vaughn, 2007).”
  • It is important to include “a variety of features designed to minimize confusion and maximize practice and application of each sound spelling, consistent with research that such an approach leads to significant benefits in efficiency and in accuracy with children’s learning (Share, 1995; Torgesen, 2006; Torgesen et al., 2001; Ziegler and Goswami, 2005).”
  • “Emphasizing the use of systematic, mastery-oriented practice that distinguishes the program from many other explicit phonics instructional programs... CKLA’s approach balances both the motivation and mastery aspects of practice (Carpenter et al., 2012., 2012; Cepeda et al., 2006; Gerbier and Toppino, 2015).”
  • CKLA teaches “phonics and reading/writing fundamentals through an integrated system of assessment, general curriculum, and supplementary curricular materials designed for added differentiation and support. Research finds that one of the challenges in providing differentiated instruction to students is a lack of specifically designed activities or ideas that relate to the skills or targets taught within the general curriculum (e.g., Al Otailba et al., 2011).”
  • In Skills 1, the introduction states, “CKLA includes explicit, systematic phonics instruction, but the instruction differs from the type of phonics usually taught in the United States in that it begins with a focus on sounds and then links those sounds to spellings.” It states, “CKLA uses a synthetic phonics approach which teaches students to read by blending through the word; it does not teach multiple cueing strategies, use of pictures as a primary resource in decoding, or part-word guessing.
  • In Skills 1, Appendix A, the Teacher Guide references Philip Gough and William Tunmer’s research on the Simple View of Reading and its focus on word recognition skills and language comprehension

Phonics instruction is based in high utility patterns and/or common phonics generalizations. CKLA explicitly teaches the 150 spellings of the 44 sounds throughout Kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. The year starts with phonics of consonants and then moves into vowels and one syllable words. In Skills 3, students learn about vowel digraphs before learning about vowel r combinations in Skills 4. In Skills 5-7, students learn about alternative spellings for phonemes.

Patterns and generalizations are carefully selected to provide a meaningful and manageable number of patterns and common generalizations for students to learn deeply. According to the program, the sequence of instruction “progresses from the most common, least ambiguous spellings in Kindergarten to the least frequent, most confusing sound spellings in Grade 2.” One phoneme pattern or common generalization is taught per lesson.

Indicator 2e

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the Foundational Skills program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

The program materials contain information for all stakeholders on how to support students with the material covered during the day. The materials contain a take-home component for each lesson as well as reproducible take-home activities. In addition, there is a family letter that is sent home explaining what the students will be learning.

Materials contain jargon-free resources to inform all stakeholders about the foundational skills taught at school. In every Skills unit, there are take-home activity pages to reinforce the skills taught during the day. These pages are optional, but highly recommended. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Letter 1.2 explains what Kindergarten skills will be reviewed at the start of grade 1 and how the review time will allow for individual strengths and weaknesses to be determined.
  • In Skills 3, take-home activity 7.2, there is a letter that explains the two sounds of oo.
  • In Skills 5, take-home activity 1.3, there is a letter that explains the tricky words and the purpose of the reader that will be coming home.

Materials provide stakeholders with strategies and activities for practicing phonological awareness, phonics, and word recognition that will support students in progress towards and achievement of grade- level foundational skills. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, take-home letter 2.3, there are instructions for the family member to guide the student to cut out the letter cards and arrange the letters into a word, sound by sound. Words to practice include pat, pot, pit, and nap.
  • In Skills 4, take-home letter 4.3, there are instructions for the family member to practice the included word cards with their child, blending the sounds together to make a word. Words to practice include fat, pig, mad, and cat.
  • In Skills 5, the take-home activity explains that students are learning to read words with the spellings tch. It explains that students should use the words in a sentence and then copy them onto a sheet of paper.
  • In Skills 7, take-home activity 5.4 explains the sounds /ay/ and /a/. Directions are given to repeat oral reading words with these sounds.

Criterion 2f - 2f.ii

Program includes work with decodables in K and Grade 1, and as needed in Grade 2, following the grade-level scope and sequence to address both securing phonics.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials include decodable texts for each unit, aligned to the phonics and high-frequency word scope and sequence for Grade 1.

Indicator 2f

Aligned Decodable Texts

Indicator 2f.i

Materials include decodable texts with phonics aligned to the program’s scope and sequence and opportunities for students to use decodables for multiple readings.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to include decodable texts with phonics aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

Materials include decodable texts for each unit, aligned to the scope and sequence for Grade 1. Students have multiple opportunities to read the decodable texts during small group and partner reading sessions.

Materials include decodable texts to address securing phonics. For example:

  • In the K-2 Program Guide, it states that the “readers contain decodable text aligned to the sequence of phonics instruction.” It also states that the “CKLA Readers are built according to the program and the code students have been introduced to.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 29, the decodable text “The Bus Stop” contains words to practice sh, th, and -ck phonics skills and includes words such as thrush, Beth, and deck.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 4, students review the various ways to spell the /k/ sound and then read the text “In the Cave,” which includes words with this phonics skill. Words included in this text are cave, hike, and coin.

Decodable texts contain grade-level phonics skills signed to the program’s scope and sequence. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, students read “The Fish” which contains the double-letter spellings for consonant sounds, such as ll and ss, and “The Man in the Kilt,” which contains the /qu/ sound.
  • In Skills 2, the reader states that students will encounter words with short vowel sounds, which they have already learned and additional phonics skills will be added. For example in the text “Gran’s Trips” students begin reading words with the /ee/ sound and in the story “The Swim Meet,” students begin encountering words with the sound /ie/ as in bite.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 13, students read “The Sweet Shop,” which includes long vowel spelling words such as sweet, cake, shakes, make, sweet, case, and games. The scope and sequence for Skills Unit 2 says students will learn the long vowel sound spelling of ee, a_e, i_e, o_e, and u_e.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 10, students read the decodable text, “Mandrills,” which include words looking, because, yawning, and sharp. The Scope and Sequence for Unit 4 includes r-controlled vowel sounds, past tense endings, and reading two-syllable words.
  • In Skills 6, students read “Mister Spencer and the Rabbits” and encounter words with the sound /s/ spelled with c and ce and in the text “The Band” they begin reading the sound /n/ spelled kn.

Materials include detailed lesson plans for repeated readings of decodable texts to address securing phonics skills. Examples include:

  • In the K-2 Program Guide it states, “The decodable Student Readers have been carefully constructed to provide students with recurring, distributed practice in reading stories that use decodable words.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 26, the Teacher Guide encourages teachers to use silly voices to get kids to reread decodable texts, as long as students are reading fluently.
  • In Skills 2, Lessons 3, 9, 14, 16, and 19, students have opportunities for rereading the stories from the Reader.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 9, students reread the decodable text “The Two Mules,” which contains words to practice the /ou/ sound spelling taught in the lesson. Students take turns rereading the text aloud with a partner.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 19, students reread the decodable text “Grace the Performer,” which contains words to practice the /n/ spellings in Lessons 18 and 19 and /wh/ in Lesson 16.

Indicator 2f.ii

Materials include decodable texts with high-frequency words aligned to the program’s scope and sequence and opportunities for students to use decodables for multiple readings.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to include decodable texts with high-frequency words aligned to the program’s scope and sequence.

The materials include decodable texts for each unit, which contain opportunities for students to read high-frequency/irregularly spelled words. The decodable texts are used for multiple readers during small group instruction and partner reading.

Materials include decodable texts that utilize high-frequency/irregularly spelled words. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, the Reader includes Tricky Words such as she, they, their, and your.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 17, students read the text “The Fox and the Grapes,” which includes Tricky Words such that, those, look, and down.
  • In Skills 6, the Reader includes Tricky Words such as the days of the week, picture, stagecoach, should, and yesterday.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 4, students read the text “Dinner with Kay,” which includes high-frequency words such as next, for, on, and after.

Decodable texts contain high-frequency/irregularly spelled words aligned to the program's scope and sequence. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 22, students read the text “Bud the Cat,” which includes Tricky Words such as of, the, one, and said, which is part of the Skills 1, Scope and Sequence.
  • In Skills 2, students learn Tricky Words such as he, she, be, me, their, and your and are found throughout the Reader.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 8, students learn the Tricky Words today and yesterday and the words are in the Reader in the stories “Groundhogs” in Lesson 15 and “Deer” in Pausing Points.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 23 the word cow is introduced as a Tricky Word, and it is introduced in the Reader as well.

Materials include detailed lesson plans for repeated readings of decodable texts to address securing reading of high-frequency words/irregularly spelled words in context. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 26, students reread their Reader with silly voices.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, students reread either the text “Gran’s Trip” or “The Pet” independently or with a partner. Both of these texts include Tricky Words such as when, was, says, no, and what.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 8, students reread the text “The Picnic by the River” which includes Tricky Words by, down, their, and should.

Criterion 2g - 2i.iii

Materials provide teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. Materials also provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that students demonstrate independence with grade-level standards.
22/24
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Criterion Rating Details

Instructional materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress through mastery of print concepts. Materials also regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate student progress toward mastery and independence in phonological awareness. The materials provide phonics assessment materials and tools that include scoring and recording sheets to collect ongoing data about student progress in phonics. Materials include assessments to monitor progress of word recognition and analysis. The materials provide opportunities for small group reteaching through Additional Support activities, which are included in every Skills lesson. Throughout the Teacher’s Guide, there is support for English Language Learners, which is found in sidebars throughout lessons. Materials provide multiple opportunities through the Challenge sidebars and the Pausing Point opportunities to provide extension opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Indicator 2g

Regular and Systematic Opportunities for Assessment

Indicator 2g.i

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress through mastery of print concepts (K-1), letter recognition (K only), and printing letters (as indicated by the program scope and sequence) (K-1).

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress through mastery of print concepts (K-1), letter recognition (K only), and printing letters (as indicated by the program scope and sequence) (K-1).

Materials offer assessments throughout the year. There are formative assessments throughout the Skills units and Summative Assessments found at the end of the Units. Assessments require students to show understanding of print concepts, letter recognition, and writing letters.

Materials regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year. The assessments show student progress toward mastery and independence of print concepts, letter recognition, and letter formation.

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 7, there is a letter name assessment where the teacher says a letter, and the student circles that letter in a line of letters.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 18, Student Performance Assessment, Practice Reading, the teacher assesses students on understanding phrases and sentences. Teacher directions state: “Tell students that when we write, we leave a space between each word in a phrase. Point to the phrase fast ship on the board/chart paper and point out the space between the two words. Invite a student to read the phrase. Repeat with the phrase two cups. Explain that words can also be combined to make sentences. Tell students that a sentence is a complete thought. The first letter in the first word of a sentence is capitalized. Point to the first sentence on the board/chart paper and point out the spaces between the words: This is fun. Invite a student to read the sentence. Point out the period at the end of the sentence. Explain that the little dot at the end of a sentence is called a period. It indicates that it is time to make a full stop and take a breath when reading. Repeat with the remaining sentences.”

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information concerning the current skills/level of understanding of print concepts, letter recognition, and letter formation.

  • In the Assessment and Remediation Guide, there is a flow chart for each skill assessed that helps the teacher know which lessons to use next with a student, whether it is a Pausing Point activity or a lesson from the Assessment and Remediation Guide.
  • Within the Skills Units, formative assessments are marked for the teacher to gather data to determine need for additional supports.

Materials support teachers with instructional suggestions for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in print concepts, letter recognition, and letter formation.

  • For each skill, Sample Remediation lessons are in the Assessment and Remediation Guides.
  • In Skills 3 of the Assessment and Remediation Guide, there are sample lessons.
  • Formative assessments during a Skills Unit help the teacher know how much time is needed to master the concept by a class or small group. By utilizing Pausing Points or additional support activities found within the unit a teacher can verify if additional support is needed.

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonological awareness (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (K-1)

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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for materials to regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress in phonological awareness (as indicated by the program scope and sequence).

Materials include informal opportunities for monitoring and assessing phonological awareness, but no formal phonological awareness assessments are available. Phonological awareness is informally assessed in Skills 1 for blending and segmenting. It is stated in the Assessment Guide that phonological awareness is not assessed in 1st grade.

Materials do not regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery in phonological awareness over the course of the school year. The limited examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 1, phonological awareness is assessed as a pre-assessment during a Review of Code Knowledge from Kindergarten.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 12, the teacher records observations on different students after they are called on to demonstrate oral blending and segmenting skills.
  • A phonological awareness observation chart is provided in the Assessment and Remediation Guide on page 37. “Specific performance standards are not designated; a sample system for collecting progress monitoring data is provided instead.”

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with some information about current skills/level of understanding of phonological awareness. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 10, there is a placement overview which “guidance is provided here for a thorough analysis of the assessment data... This analysis will then inform decisions as to whether students are ready to continue with Grade 1, Unit 2 instruction or whether other instruction is needed to ensure mastery of skills taught in CKLA at the Kindergarten level.” This is not strictly a phonological awareness assessment.
  • An oral blending and segmenting observation chart is found in Skills 1.

There are no materials to support teachers with the development of instructional assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in phonological awareness. However, there are additional phonological awareness activities that teachers can use with students in the Assessment and Remediation guide.

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonics in- and out-of-context (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (K-2)

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials that regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of phonics (as indicated by the program scope and sequence).

The materials provide phonics assessment materials and tools that include scoring and recording sheets to collect ongoing data about student progress in phonics. The materials help teachers determine levels of progress through the systematic implementation of Student Performance assessments in the Skills Unit and the Phonics Progress Monitoring assessments within the Assessment and Remediation Guide. The materials include instructional adjustments that help students progress towards mastery in phonics with scoring information, item analysis charts, and remediation lessons in the Assessment and Remediation Guide.

Materials provide resources and tools for the teacher to collect ongoing data about student progress in phonics. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, the Assessment and Remediation Guide provides a Phonics Progress monitoring assessment that contains nine words with vowel digraphs that students read.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 7, a Progress Monitoring assessment for r-controlled vowels is administered. The teacher uses the Record Sheet to record each word as the student reads.
  • In Skills 6, there is a Phonics Progress Monitoring assessment in the Assessment and Remediation Guide that includes seven words with consonant spelling alternative words.

Materials offer assessment opportunities to determine student progress in phonics that are implemented systematically. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 18, a Unit Assessment is given which includes a Word Recognition Assessment, which assesses students’ skills to read words with digraphs and spellings previously taught.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 22, a Unit Assessment is given, which includes a Word Recognition assessment that assesses students’ ability to read words that contain previously taught sound spellings.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided regularly for students to determine progress toward mastery and independence with phonics. Examples include:

  • In Skills 4, spelling assessments are provided in Lessons 5, 10, 15, and 20. In Lesson 20, words contain one-syllable words that contain ar, oi, er, and the Tricky Word because.
  • In Skills 7, spelling assessments are provided in Lessons 5, 10, and 15. In Lesson 10, words include /ae/ spelled ay, /ae/ spelled a_e, and ai.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information about current skills/level of understanding of phonics. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, students are given a Phonics Progress monitoring assessment which is composed of nine vowel digraphs. Scoring interpretation includes a score of 8 points is considered excellent, a score of 6 or 7 is considered good, a score of 5 points is considered fair, and a score of 5 or less is considered poor.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 8, students take an assessment on r-controlled vowels and receive a point for every word read correctly. A score of 6 indicates excellent, a score of 5 indicates good, a score of 4 indicates fair, and a score that is less than 4 points indicates poor.
  • In Skills 6, students take a Phonics Progress Monitoring assessment, which is composed of seven consonant spelling alternative words. Scoring interpretation states that a score of 6 is considered excellent, a score of 5 is considered good, a score of 4 is considered fair, and a score less than 4 is considered poor.

Materials genuinely measure student progress to support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in phonics. Each unit contains a flow chart to help teachers determine the needs of each student. Specific examples include:

  • In Skills 3, the Phonics Progress Monitoring assessment states that if students score five or less, they require additional reteaching and reinforcement from the Assessment and Remediation Guide.
  • In Skills 3, there is a teaching resource with five columns that indicate five phonics skills recently taught. The teacher records errors while students read and the chart indicates what next steps should be done in order to ensure the student has mastered the phonics. For example, an error in Column 2 means, “the spelling ‘oo’ for the ‘oo’ sound is a vowel digraph, where two letters work together to stand for a single sound.... What you should do: You may wish to review the Tricky Spelling discussion in Lesson 7, You may also wish to do Minimal Pairs activities to help students distinguish between this and other similar sounds.”
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 8, students take a Progress Monitoring assessment and a score of 4 or less indicate additional reteaching and reinforcement from either Pausing Points or the Assessment and Remediation Guide. The teacher is encouraged to analyze scores to determine if there is one or more particularly problematic sound/spelling.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 8, students who score 8 or less require reteaching and reinforcement. It suggests that teachers analyze student errors to determine whether there is one particularly problematic sound/spelling.

Indicator 2g.iv

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of word recognition and analysis (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (K-2)

2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress of word recognition and analysis (as indicated by the program scope and sequence).

Materials to monitor and assess student progress of word recognition and analysis are provided. Assessments provide information to the teacher concerning student levels and understanding, as well as next steps for students to reach mastery. The materials contain opportunities during the lessons to assess students and the Assessment and Remediation Guide provides summative and more formal assessments to determine the abilities and learning needs of each student.

Materials regularly and systematically provide a variety of assessment opportunities over the course of the year to demonstrate student progress toward mastery and independence of word recognition and analysis. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, there is an optional Tricky Word Assessment that teachers are encouraged to give at the beginning and end of the unit. A Tricky Word Assessment Record is provided, and students are expected to read words faster than 3-5 seconds.
  • In Skills 3, there is a Tricky Word Assessment that includes all 46 Tricky Words. While it is an optional assessment, it is suggested to be given at the beginning of the unit and at the end of the unit.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information concerning student current skills/level of understanding of word recognition and word analysis. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Assessment and Remediation Guide, there is a Tricky Words Progress Monitoring Assessment. While it is encouraged that teachers make note of errors, the scoring interpretation provided states, “5 points - Excellent, 4 points - Good, 3 points - Fair, Less than 3 points - Poor.” It goes on to state that a score of 4 or 5 is considered good, and a score of 3 or less “indicate additional reteaching and reinforcement."

Materials support teachers with instructional suggestions for assessment-based steps to help students to progress toward mastery in word recognition and word analysis. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, the Assessment and Remediation guide states that for students who struggle with Tricky Words, several materials can be used including, Tricky Word Cards (Skills 3, Lessons 2, 7, 10), Tricky Word Review/Practice (Skills 3, Lessons 5 & 10), and Tricky Word Baseball Game (Skills 3, Lessons 11 & 16).

Indicator 2g.v

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress in fluency (as indicated by the program scope and sequence). (1-2)
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that measure student progress in fluency (as indicated by the program scope and sequence).

The materials provide fluency and comprehension Progress Monitoring assessments within the Assessment and Remediation Guide. The materials provide teachers with an Anecdotal Reading Record in order to monitor reading progress through observations while students read aloud. The Fluency and Comprehension Progress Monitoring Assessment provides information about a student's current level of understanding of fluency and instructional adjustments to help each student make progress toward mastery in fluency. Flow charts are provided that help students and teachers with information about current levels and supports to make progress.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided regularly and systematically over the course of the year. Using these core materials, students demonstrate progress toward mastery and independence of fluency. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, in the Assessment and Remediation Guide, there is a Fluency and Comprehension assessment, where students are given a passage to read and the teacher takes a running record while the teacher records errors on a given record sheet.
  • In Skills 4, students read aloud “The Ostrich” in their oral reading fluency assessment.
  • In Skills 5, there is a Fluency and Comprehension Progress Monitoring assessment found in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. The assessment includes a running record for oral reading.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 19, an Anecdotal Reading Record is provided for teachers to make notes as they listen to students read aloud.

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information about a student’s current skills/level of understanding of fluency. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, in the Assessment and Remediation Guide, students take a fluency and comprehension assessment. In the Running Record portion of the assessment, the goal is for students to score between 89% and 100%. Scores of 88% or below indicate that additional reteaching and reinforcement may be needed.
  • In Skills 4, students take a fluency assessment and are considered good if they score between 89% and 100%. Scores below 88% indicate that additional reteaching and reinforcement may be needed.
  • In Skills 5, students take a fluency assessment and information is provided to analyze scores. It states that if a student makes between 0-8 errors, they are reading 96-100% accurate which is very good and okay for the student to move on. If a student makes between 9-21 errors, the student scores between 85% and 89%. The teacher should use judgement to determine if a student is ready to move on or needs additional support. If a student makes more than 22 errors, the student is considered weak in fluency and should receive additional support.

Materials support teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery in fluency. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, in the Assessment and Remediation Guide there is a flow chart for the teacher to determine next steps for students who need additional support. The flow chart includes various skills and the corresponding section and plan for reteaching.
  • In Skills 3, students take a fluency assessment. For students who need reteaching and remediation, the Assessment and Remediation Guide II in Fluency and Comprehension provides explicit and independent fluency and comprehension exercises for remediation and instruction. The section Steps for Determining Student Need assists the teacher in deciding which remediation lessons to use.

Indicator 2h

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment and assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for assessment materials to include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment and assessment materials clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

The Grade 1 Resource Guide lists formative and/or summative assessments at the beginning of each lesson with the corresponding standards. The materials provide a Standard Alignment document, which lists the Common Core State Standards for each lesson. The Alignment Chart located within each unit lists the primary and secondary standards for each lesson. However, the alignment document does not provide specific standard alignment for tasks, questions, or assessment items.

Materials include denotations of the standards being assessed in the formative assessments. Examples include:

  • In Skills 2, Lesson 3, students complete a digraph dictation, which is listed as a formative assessment and is attached to the standards RF.1.2d.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 9, the teacher uses the Anecdotal Reading Record as students read aloud, which is listed as a formative assessment and attached to the standard RF.1.4a.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 2, students complete an activity page, which is listed as a formative assessment and is attached to the standards RF.1.2 and RF.1.3b.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 11, students are formatively assessed on words with oe pronounced /oa/, which is attached to standard RF.1.3b.

Materials include denotations of standards being assessed in the summative assessments. Examples include:

  • In Skills 4, Lesson 15, students are given a unit assessment, where they spell words with r-controlled vowels. This is attached to standards RF.1.3d.e.
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 24, students take the end of unit assessment, which is attached to standard RF.1.3b.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 20, students take the end of the year assessment, which includes an oral reading fluency assessment, which is attached to standard RF.1.4a.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 21, students take the end of the year assessment. The Word Reading in Isolation portion is attached to the standards RF.1.3a-e.

Alignment documentation is provided for all tasks, questions, and assessment items.

  • No evidence is found

Alignment documentation contains specific standards correlated to specific lessons. Examples include:

  • The Skills 3 Alignment Chart lists the standard RF.1.3b for Lesson 10.
  • The Skills 6 Alignment Chart lists the standard RF.1.3c for Lesson 3.

Indicator 2i

Differentiation for Instruction: Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding grade-level standards.

Indicator 2i.i

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials regularly providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen in a language other than English with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards.

The materials provide support for English Language Learner students through the Language and Foundational Skills sidebars in the Teacher Guide for individual lessons. There is specific information about Spanish and English correlations, as well as other languages. The materials contain suggestions with Universal Access to assist students with letter sounds such as the use of pictures or photographs.

Materials provide support for English Language Learner (ELL) students. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Lesson 5, when students are reviewing the letter h, the sidebar states, “The spelling ‘h’ is silent in Spanish (unlike in the English word hot). When we see the spelling h we make the /h/ sound.” The teacher models how to create this sound.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 4, the Universal Access suggests that the teacher brings in pictures of coins, brooms, a tooth, scoop, couch, and a hood to help students complete Activity Page 14.1.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 1, in Universal Access, it is suggested that the teacher find and use pictures of objects that begin with the letter ‘p’ such as puppy, pink, and popsicle before students complete a sentence competition activity.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 1, the Support Sidebar suggests that if students have trouble with the spelling alternatives, the teacher should draw different looking flowers and explain that in the same way there can be different looking pictures of flowers, we can draw different looking pictures for the /ae/ sound.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 5, in a Match the Picture activity, a note is provided to teachers that most r-controlled vowels in Spanish do not include the sound of the vowel as in -er in English.

General statements about ELL students or strategies are noted at the beginning of a unit or at one place in the Teacher Guide and are then implemented in the materials throughout the lessons. Examples include:

  • In the K-2 Program Guide, it notes that a hand raised icon provides an Alert for Access Support to help ELL learners access grade-level content.
  • In the K-2 Program Guide, it explains a variety of tools to help students, including ELL students, access the curriculum. Some of the tools include the digital component field that allows for a range of presentations of images and text to support learning and clarification on language throughout the program.
  • In the K-2 Program Guide, it lists a variety of methods for students, including ELL students to demonstrate their learning. This includes the Wiggle Cards that allow students to demonstrate their decoding and a variety of ways to respond to prompts such as oral responses, written responses, and shared class response.
  • In Skills 1, the Teacher Guide Introduction states that Additional Support activities are suggested at the end of each lesson and can be used with any student needing more help, including English Language Learners.
  • In Skills 1, the Teacher Guide Introduction states that sidebars are found throughout the lesson to provide further guidance for teachers.

Indicator 2i.ii

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade-level with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials that regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level with extensive opportunities for reteaching to meet or exceed grade-level standards.

Throughout the program there are opportunities for students to receive reteaching of skills through the use of small groups. These opportunities include rereading through a decodable reading in small groups, support ideas on the sidebar of lessons, Additional Support activities found at the end of lessons, Pausing Points at the end of each Skills Teacher Guide, and also through activities found in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. The materials include Universal Access points to provide scaffolding and adaptations for activities for students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level.

Materials provide opportunities for small group reteaching. Examples include:

  • In Skills 1, Teacher Guide, Introduction, it provides information about Small Groups. One group will consist of independent workers while the other consists of students needing more support. Small group work is typically either done during story reading time or when students are completing activity pages. The Guide states that, “you may also use small group time to reteach/reinforce a skill that you feel needs further practice with students needing more support.”
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 2, students who need more support work in a small group to finish the activity of matching words from a group. The teacher can practice chaining, blending, and/or segmenting.
  • In Skills 2, Lesson 1, the teacher reviews vowel sounds. For students that need extra support, the program asks that teachers pull students struggling with identifying the correct sound in the Vowel Code Flip Book for small group practice with other words that contain short vowel spellings...”
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 4, students reread “The Two Dogs” in small groups. One group works with the teacher to reread the text.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 10, students read the text “Mandrills.” In Lesson 12, additional support is provided in a small group to help students with oral reading using picture cards from Activity Page TR 10.2.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 4, the teacher divides students into two groups and one group works with the teacher to get additional support with the text “The Cave.” Students reread the text aloud and then complete Activity Page 4.1 in a group.

Materials provide guidance to teachers for scaffolding and adapting lessons as well as activities to support students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level in extensive opportunities to learn foundational skills at the grade-level standards. Examples include:

  • In Skills 3, Lesson 1, in a minimal pairs activity, a support sidebar is provided with information for the teacher to help students understand the /oo/ sound. It tells the teacher to say the words provided one at a time and have the students repeat the words with /oo/ and then choose the word in the pair with the /oo/ sound in it.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 2, in the Additional Supports section at the end of the lesson, there is more help with blending. The teacher completes another chaining activity.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 3, students learn how to spell words with suffixes that may or may not need to double the consonant before adding the suffix. Support is offered to students who are below grade level by having “students read each word on the activity page and circle the words that end with a single consonant, to indicate that those words need the final letter doubled before adding the inflectional endings.”
  • In Skills 6, the Assessment and Remediation Guide provides a remedial lesson template for reteaching /w/ spelled wh versus /w/ spelled w. Multiple remedial lessons are available for this skill.

Indicator 2i.iii

Materials regularly provide extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade-level.

4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials to regularly provide extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

Materials provide multiple opportunities through the Challenge Sidebars and Pausing Points to provide extension opportunities for students who read, write, speak, and listen above grade level. Additional readers are included in the Pausing Points for extension opportunities.

Materials provide multiple opportunities for advanced students to investigate grade-level foundational skills at a greater depth. Examples include:

  • In the K-2 Program Guide, Differentiation, it notes, “Pausing Point days include several days’ worth of enrichment and remediation instruction.”
  • In the K-2 Program Guide, Student Enrichment, it notes, “CKLA provides multiple opportunities for challenge and enrichment, including Challenge Sidebars.” These provide stretch questions and activities throughout the lesson.
  • In Skills 1, Lesson 15, in a chaining lesson, a Challenge Sidebar is provided to ask students after the word is created if it is a real word or a nonsense word.
  • In Skills 3, Lesson 1, the Challenge Sidebar provides the following extension guidance, “Ask students to think of other word pairs with /oo/ and /ue/. Have individual students say the word pairs to the class and ask which word has the /oo/ sound.” The teacher displays a list of words that students may use to practice using their Code Charts independently, finding the appropriate short vowel spellings for words.
  • In Skills 4, Lesson 14, the Challenge Sidebar asks students to write the number of syllables in each word in the circles on Activity Page 14.1 while the rest of the class writes down the number of sounds heard in the word and copy the word.
  • In Skills 5, Lesson 3, students learn about root words and doubling the final consonant when adding suffixes. For the challenge, it states, “have students think of other one-syllable words to which the inflection endings can be added. Have them identify whether the final consonant must first be doubled before adding the inflectional endings.”
  • In Skills 6, Lesson 6, the Challenge Sidebar provides the following extension guidance, “After students finish sorting the words, have students write silly sentences using some of the words from Activity Page 6.1.” Students may share their sentences with a partner.
  • In Skills 7, Lesson 5, the teacher groups students. Students who are above-level work independently or with a partner, but the other students work with the teacher.

There are no instances of advanced students simply doing more assignments than their classmates. Opportunities for advanced students were noted during whole group and small group time. Students were not assigned to do more work than their classmates, but rather, a variance of activity. Students who were advanced were seen more to work on their own or with a partner, whereas students showing the need for additional support worked with a teacher.

Criterion 2j - 2n

Materials support effective use of technology and visual design to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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Criterion Rating Details

The Grade 1 digital materials, which include Teaching Guides, Activity Books, Readers, Big Books, Picture Readers, Sound Library, and the Assessment and Remediation Guides are compatible with multiple internet browsers, including FireFox, Safari, Explorer, and Google Chrome. Online materials are available for both the teacher and the student. The Grade 1 digital materials allow the teacher to differentiate instruction by selecting additional lessons for students in Pausing Point lessons and in the Assessment and Remediation Guide. The materials include decodable readers and e-books with simple color illustrations, which include spelling patterns with bold type to support students in engaging with the text.

Indicator 2j

Digital materials (either included as a supplement to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for digital materials (either included as a supplement to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) that are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

The Grade 1 digital materials, which include Teaching Guides, Activity Books, Readers, Big Books, Sound Library, and the Assessment and Remediation Guides are compatible with multiple internet browsers, including FireFox, Safari, Explorer, and Google Chrome. The materials are compatible on Apple Products as well as the Windows operating system. Materials are compatible on Amazon tablets and Apple devices, including iPads and iPhones, as well as Chromebooks and Microsoft Surface Pro.

Indicator 2k

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials that support effective use of technology and visual design to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Online materials are available for both the teacher and the student. Digital materials for the teacher that enhance student learning include projectable and printable activity pages, letter cards, and reading materials. The digital components also enable the teacher to enlarge Activity Pages for students. Materials to support student learning include the sound library, which provides audio sounds of letters, animation off the letter, and songs to support and enhance student learning. Audio and e-books of the student readers are provided to help make the text more accessible. The Big Books (Skills Units 1-3) and student decodable readers (Skills Units 1-7) can be projected and downloaded in a PDF format.

Indicator 2l

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details


The materials reviewed for Grade 1 partially meet the criteria for digital materials to include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

The Grade 1 digital materials allow the teacher to pick additional lessons for students in Pausing Point lessons and in the Assessment and Remediation Guide to differentiate instruction. However, the materials do not include adaptive materials that allow for teachers to personalize learning for individual students. Teachers are not able to manipulate or construct individual learning experiences for students. There is not a student learning technology component within or in addition to the digital platform to personalize learning for students.

Indicator 2m

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
Narrative Evidence Only
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for materials can be easily customized for local use.

The Grade 1 materials can be customized for local use. Customization may occur in scaffolding and in opting for digital or print materials use. Differentiation and extension opportunities are available throughout the instructional materials, which allows for customization for local use. In the Pausing Points, teachers and/or districts can determine how many additional days to spend in the Unit. The Assessment and Remediation Guide can be utilized based on student need for reteaching and local use.

Indicator 2n

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
Narrative Evidence Only
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 1 meet the criteria for the visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The Grade 1 materials include decodable readers and e-books with simple color illustrations, which include spelling patterns with bold type to support students in engaging with the text. Tricky words are included, and they are underlined. When presenting the Big Book or the decodable reader in the digital format, two pages are shown at a time, similar to a book. The Activity Pages include simple graphics, which are not distracting or chaotic and also emphasize focus on the spelling pattern with bold letters. The size of the font can be adjusted. The materials include Student Chaining folders with letter cards for students to build words, which are not distracting. The Sound Library includes audio phoneme pronunciation, an animated video, and a song for the sounds, which support students in engaging thoughtfully with the sounds. The teacher materials have clear headings and a consistent layout.

abc123

Report Published Date: 2021/01/12

Report Edition: 2020

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
CKLA 2nd Edition G1 Single Student Skills Kit (2020) 978‑1‑6816‑1822‑7 Student/Teacher Amplify Education 2020

Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1.5 of our review tools. Version 1 of our review tools can be found here. Learn more about this change.

ELA Foundational Skills Review Tool

The ELA foundational skills review criteria identifies the indicators for high quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

The ELA foundational skills review criteria evaluates materials based on:

  • Alignment to Standards and Research-Based Practices for Foundational Skills Instruction

  • Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

NOTE: The ELA foundational skills review criteria contains only two gateways. The structural pieces that we normally review as a part of Gateway 3 (e.g. differentiation) in our comprehensive reviews are critical to the success of a program, and are, therefore, interspersed and combined with other indicators in Gateway 2.

The ELA foundational skills rubric contains only two gateways: Alignment to Standards and Research-Based Practices for Foundational Skills Instruction (Gateway 1) and Implementation, Support Materials & Assessment (Gateway 2). The structural pieces that we normally review as a part of Gateway 3 (e.g. differentiation) in our comprehensive reviews are critical to the success of a program, and are, therefore, interspersed and combined with other indicators in Gateway 2.

The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators.

Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators (gateway 1) to move to the other gateways. 

Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning?

Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. 

In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability (Gateway 3), the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment (Gateways 1 and 2).

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded.

For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career.

For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices (as outlined in the evaluation tool) for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use.

Math K-8

  • Focus and Coherence - 14 possible points

    • 12-14 points: Meets Expectations

    • 8-11 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 8 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 18 possible points

    • 16-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 11-15 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 11 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 38 possible points

    • 31-38 points: Meets Expectations

    • 23-30 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 23: Does Not Meet Expectations

Math High School

  • Focus and Coherence - 18 possible points

    • 14-18 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices - 16 possible points

    • 14-16 points: Meets Expectations

    • 10-13 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 10 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 36 possible points

    • 30-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 22-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 22: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA K-2

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 58 possible points

    • 52-58 points: Meets Expectations

    • 28-51 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 28 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 3-5

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 42 possible points

    • 37-42 points: Meets Expectations

    • 21-36 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 21 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

ELA 6-8

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 36 possible points

    • 32-36 points: Meets Expectations

    • 18-31 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 18 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


ELA High School

  • Text Complexity and Quality - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meets Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks - 32 possible points

    • 28-32 points: Meet Expectations

    • 16-27 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 16 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 34 possible points

    • 30-34 points: Meets Expectations

    • 24-29 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 24 points: Does Not Meet Expectations

Science Middle School

  • Designed for NGSS - 26 possible points

    • 22-26 points: Meets Expectations

    • 13-21 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 13 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Coherence and Scope - 56 possible points

    • 48-56 points: Meets Expectations

    • 30-47 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 30 points: Does Not Meet Expectations


  • Instructional Supports and Usability - 54 possible points

    • 46-54 points: Meets Expectations

    • 29-45 points: Partially Meets Expectations

    • Below 29 points: Does Not Meet Expectations