Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

Mirrors & Windows: Connecting with Literature - Grade 12 partially meets expectations of alignment. High quality anchor texts are paired with text-based writing and some speaking and listening work. Students have frequent opportunities to engage in research activities and integrated writing to build grade-level writing skills. The materials are not organized around topics and themes and therefore do not build knowledge and vocabulary consistently across a topic. Culminating tasks to do not require demonstration of knowledge built throughout a unit and do not require integration of skills.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
18
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Text are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests. Materials meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. Students encounter a wide variety of texts with a range of length and difficulty throughout each unit and throughout the year. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Materials partially meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Materials provide opportunities and some protocols for evidence-based discussions. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice a mix of both on-demand and process writing along with opportunities to engage in writing activities over the course of the year in a variety of modes, including argumentative, informative, narrative, and descriptive writing as well as research writing and writing to sources. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
16/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that texts are worthy of students’ time and attention. Materials meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests. Materials meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. Students encounter a wide variety of texts with a range of length and difficulty throughout each unit and throughout the year. The texts are quantitatively supported by a Lexile level and qualitatively supported by purpose and rationale; this is provided for every unit and found within The Scope and Sequence Guide located in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.

The materials meet the criteria as many of the anchor texts are previously published and widely read works of literature. Students are presented with multiple texts, including selections from the Common Core Exemplars, that are worthy of reading, discussion, and analysis.

    Examples of publishable and worthy texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • In Unit 1, students read from Book II of Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People: “The Story of Caedmon” by Saint Bede. This text has a moderate reading level at 1290L and has complex and sophisticated vocabulary. The text discusses thought-provoking issues.
    • In Unit 2, students read from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, translated by Nevill Coghill. This frame tale is of challenging length with complex vocabulary.
    • In Unit 3, students read “Death, be not proud” (Holy Sonnet 10) by John Donne. This text has a moderate reading level with complex vocabulary in terms of archaic terminology.
    • In Unit 4, students read The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare. This is a challenging text with complex vocabulary and syntax.
    • In Unit 5, students read “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift. This text is a satirical essay expressing sympathy for the plight of the oppressed Irish peasants and anger at the English ruling class. It has complex sentences, formal language, and satire.
    • In Unit 6, students read “The Tyger” by William Blake. This text is deep in allegorical meaning.
    • In Unit 7, students read “The Lagoon” by Joseph Conrad. This text has complex sentence structure.
    • In Unit 8, students read from “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf. This essay is written at a moderate reading level with complex sentence structure and a conversational tone.
    • In Unit 9, students read “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell. This essay has a moderate reading level with challenging vocabulary and simple sentence structure.

    Indicator 1b

    Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
    *Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

    The materials present students with a variety of different text types and genres organized by historical time periods. Considering the organization strategy for the textbook, there are more informational, nonfiction texts present than literary texts. Text types and genres present in this unit include, but are not limited to, biography, diary excerpts, memoirs, articles, poetry, speeches, and excerpts from novels. The distribution of text types and genres required by the standards includes texts from the Anglo-Saxon period, Medieval period, Renaissance period, Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries, Romantic period, Victorian era, Modern era, and the Postmodern era. All texts within the curriculum can be found listed in the Range of Reading section located at the beginning of the Teacher Edition in the Program Overview.

    Literary Texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Unit 1: Beowulf translated by Burton Raffel
    • Unit 2: “The Wife of Bath’s Tale” from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
    • Unit 3: “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun” (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare
    • Unit 5: “The Pilgrim’s Progress” by John Bunyan
    • Unit 6: “The Lamb” by William Blake
    • Unit 7: “Porphyia’s Lover” by Robert Browning
    • Unit 8: “The Demon Lover” by Elizabeth Browning
    • Unit 9: “A Shocking Accident” by Graham Green

    Informational Texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Unit 1: “The Story of Caedmon” by Saint Bede the Venerable
    • Unit 2: “Simply Divine” from The Guardian by Stephen Cook
    • Unit 3: “Of Studies” by Francis Bacon
    • Unit 4: “Macbeth,” from Characters of Shakespeare’s Plays by William Hazlitt
    • Unit 5: “The Diary of Samuel Pepys” by Samuel Pepys
    • Unit 6: “Introduction to Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley
    • Unit 7: “Cardiac Arrest in Healthy Young Athletes” by Karen Ase
    • Unit 8: “Wartime Speech, May 19, 1940” by Winston Churchill
    • Unit 9: “Shooting An Elephant” by George Orwell

    Indicator 1c

    Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis.

    The majority of texts are at the appropriate quantitative level. Within the series, quantitative texts levels range from 600L-1710L, with some texts above and below the current grade level Lexile and stretch bands. Texts that are above or below grade level quantitative bands have qualitative features and/or tasks that bring them to the appropriate grade level. Along with Lexiles, each text is labeled as moderate, easy, or advanced. Texts are scaffolded in Units 1-5 as Guided, Directed, and Independent Reading, and Unit 6 is centered on Independent Reading. Supports are provided in the additional resource materials, particularly the Meeting the Standards Resource Guide that has guided reading activities with graphic organizers, vocabulary development, and practice quizzes. The Program Planning Guide contains lesson plans that provide student tasks and multiple reading strategies to support student learning.

    Examples of texts that have the appropriate level of complexity for Grade 12 include but are not limited to:

    • In Unit 3, students read "Meditation 17" from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Lexile 1120.This short text includes vivid language and strong vocabulary.
      In Unit 8, students read Primary Source Connection: “The War Letters of Wilfred Owen.” This essay has difficulty considerations such as length and the fact that background knowledge is required before reading; the ease factor is the inclusion of vivid description. Essentially this text addresses the letters that were sent to family members as Owen participated in World War I; most letters were sent to his mother.
    • In Unit 9, students read “Games at Twilight” by Anita Desai, Lexile 1130. While it contains some difficult vocabulary, the text provides a list of the vocabulary for preview. The subject matter of the text is familiar to students, and the Teacher’s Edition provides an entry point with a suggested student discussion. It also suggests that students maintain a chart to keep track of the settings in the selection. The difficulty consideration for this text is vocabulary; the ease factor is the author’s use of familiar subject matter.

    Examples of texts that are above the quantitative measure, but are at the appropriate level for Grade 12 based on qualitative analysis and associated tasks include but are not limited to:

    • In Unit 8, students read Primary Source Connection: “Needed: An Irish National Theater” by Lady Augusta Gregory and William Butler Yeats, Lexile 1710. While above Lexile level, this text has factors that put students at ease, such as its straightforward language and length. The difficulty considerations consist of vocabulary and formal style. This letter essentially “ask[s] for funds to start...a theatre,” which allowed the authors to raise the necessary funds between 1898 and 1899.

    Example of text that are below the quantitative measure, but are at the appropriate level for Grade 12 based on qualitative analysis and associated tasks include but are not limited to:

    • In Unit 3, students read “Of Studies” by Francis Bacon, Lexile 700. while below grade level lexile, is challenging considering the vocabulary used and the long complex sentences throughout.
    • In Unit 9, students read “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, Lexile 1060. The ease factor is simple sentence structure while the difficulty consideration is vocabulary. “The author is called on to respond and finds he must choose between doing what he feels is right and doing what he believes the narratives expect of him as a representative of the power of the British crown.”
    • In Unit 8, students read “Araby” by James Joyce, Lexile 940. While it is below grade level in terms of Lexile, “Araby” is part of the literary canon and Joyce is a renowned author. The difficulty consideration for this text is that the “ending is inconclusive.” There are many ease factors for this text: sympathetic main character, simple plot, young person’s point of view, and students relate to the main character. The story focuses on the notions of unexpected love.

    Indicator 1d

    Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

    The instructional materials increase in rigor and complexity from month to month to the end of the year, growing students’ literacy skills. Units cover a range of reading skills, such as compare and contrast, drawing conclusions, clarifying information, asking questions, cause and effect, main idea, predicting, author’s purpose, sequencing, summarizing, and organizing text. For each text, students are presented with at least two skills that are refined throughout the reading. Units include differentiated instruction and reading skills for developing readers. The Program Planning Guide provides opportunities for students to practice reading skills and strategies in order to become College and Career Ready. As students use the skill of inferring throughout these units, the reading selections range from easy to challenging, with text complexity increasing students knowledge, and understanding of what they are reading becomes critical. Within the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, instructors are presented with a variety of questions to pose to students as reading is taking place. Questions are typically formatted as discussions, so that students are required to refer to the text, analyze, and discuss the various concepts that are studied throughout. Texts contain a broad range of Lexile levels.

    In the beginning of the year, the students are establishing routines for reading the selections in each unit. They are guided through the process of building background knowledge about a text, setting a purpose for reading, and taking note of reading skills that will benefit them when they start reading the text. They are also guided through the process of using reading strategies and making connections while reading. Lastly, they are guided through the process of remembering details about the text and interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating the text after they have read it. In the middle of the year, students are more practiced at before, during, and after reading strategies. Their ability to access and interact with the text is increasing, and student answers to questions and classroom discussions are likely increasing in depth. By the end of the year students are able to read, comprehend, and examine texts independently through established routines for thinking about the text before reading it, asking self- generated questions of the text while reading it, and answering provided questions that ask them to refer to the text and reason with the text after reading it. Examples include:

    • In Unit 1, students read excerpts from Beowulf, verse translation by Burton Raffel. In this selection students are asked to Make Inferences: “In canto 6, Wulfgar tells Beowulf and his men to leave their weapons at the door and go in to see Hrothgar, but Beowulf orders a few of his men to stay with their weapons. Ask students to discuss what this incident says about the culture and customs of the time and about Beowulf himself.”
    • In Unit 4, students read “The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act lll,” A drama by William Shakespeare. In this selection students are asked to Make Inferences: “Ask students to infer why Macbeth asks Banquo if Fleance will go with Banquo on his errand. Ask students to infer the answer to the following questions: Why does Macbeth want Fleance killed along with Banquo? Why doesn't Macbeth order the murderers to carry out their deed at some distance from the palace?”
    • In Unit 5, students read “To Althea from Prison,” and “To Lucasta, Going to the Wars,” lyric poems by Richard Lovelace. In this selection students are asked to Make Inferences: “Judging from the poem as a whole, ask students what the speaker's emotional mood seems to be. Is he really happy, or is his claim to liberty merely wish-fulfillment? Infer how Lucasta will respond and what the speaker will say to her to make her feel better.”
    • In Unit 9, students read the anchor text, “B. Wordsworth,” a short story by V.S. Naipaul. In this selection students are asked to Make Inferences: “Have students infer why B. Wordsworth does not want the narrator to tell anyone about him and the mango tree and a coconut tree and the plum tree. Infer why B. Wordsworth initially tells the story. Why does B. Wordsworth eventually tell the narrator of the story is untrue?”

    Indicator 1e

    Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

    The texts that are present are quantitatively supported by Lexile level and qualitatively supported by purpose and rationale; this is provided for every unit and found within The Scope and Sequence Guide located in the Annotated Teacher Edition. Each selection in the Teacher’s Edition also has a Preview the Model or Selection section that has notes on text complexity, difficulty considerations, and ease factor. In every Before Reading section, teachers are presented with objectives that students should master by the end of the text selection, and a Launch the Lesson section that gears students toward questions that reflect the theme(s) and issues present within the text selection. All of the texts chosen are connected and appropriate for Grade 12, while allowing for differentiation and flexibility for students and teachers.

    Examples of instructional and text notes found in Grade 12 materials include the following:

    In Unit 1, students read Beowulf, a heroic epic written by an anonymous author, translated by Burton Raffel. The word count for this text is 6,728. The Literary Focus is on Alliteration and Motif. The Preview the Selection, Text Complexity, Reading Level section identifies this text as Challenging, a Lexile level is not available. Difficulty Considerations are selection length, and long, complex sentences. Ease Factors are action-packed narrative. Instructors are presented with lesson objectives that after students studying this lesson, they will be able to do the following: "read, interpret, analyze and evaluate a heroic epic, understand and analyze Alliteration and Motif."

    In Unit 3, students read Queen Elizabeth I’s speech, “Speech to the Troops at Tilbury.” The identified Lexile level for this speech is 1310L. The difficulty considerations for this text are vocabulary and style, while the ease factors are selection strength. Within the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, instructors are presented with lesson objectives that after students studying this lesson, they will be able to do the following: “read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a speech given by Queen Elizabeth I before an impending battle; describe the historical context of the speech; analyze and understand purpose and parallelism; read an encyclopedia article to learn more about Elizabeth I; and develop writing and other language arts skills as specified in the Unit 3 Scope & Sequence Planning Guide." The rationale for reading Queen Elizabeth I’s speech is furthered in the Before Reading section: Historical Context, Meet the Author, Analyze Literature, and Set Purpose.

    Indicator 1f

    Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

    The materials are organized into nine chronological units based on time periods. Texts are not organized by Guided Reading, Directed Reading, and Independent Reading; instead, the Grade 12 textbook--aside from the differentiated textbook--releases all responsibility to students. The units are broken up into two to three subsections, further dividing the time period covered by the unit. Each unit begins with a timeline and an introduction to the time period, and each subsection contains relevant period selections, some including Before and After reading activities to support students in their understanding and comprehension. Anchor texts include extra reading support and are spread out over the course of the unit. Each unit subsection culminates in at least one Independent Reading selection with activities such as questions about the text and writing options. Within each unit, text types vary widely in genre, content, and length.

    • In Unit 1, Anglo-Saxon Period (449-1066), students read multiple texts, each with a suggested pacing of one to four days. Text types include historical nonfiction, heroic epic, graphic novel, novel, elegy, and riddles. The selections vary in genre, length, and content. The unit begins with the anchor text, “The Conversion of King Edwin,” a piece of historical nonfiction by Saint Bede the Venerable, followed by a variety of other selections, including the Independent Reading selection, “Anglo-Saxon Riddles,” which is the last text of the unit.
    • Unit 5 focuses on the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (1625-1798) and is divided into two parts. Part 1: Ideas Old and New has “Why so Pale and Wan,” a lyric poem by Sir John Suckling as its anchor text. Additional texts in Part 2 include lyric poems, sonnets, an epic poem from “Paradise Lost” by John Milton, a Bible story from Genesis 1-3, an allegory from The Pilgrim’s Progress, a haiku, a selection from Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift, a selection from Candide by Voltaire, two poems, an essay, and a selection from the novel, Oroonoko by Aphra Behn. Part 2: Life and Times has two anchor texts; one is “from the The Diary of Samuel Pepys” by Samuel Pepys, and the other is “from the Journal of a Plague Year” by Daniel Defoe. This section has a fictional journal, newspaper article, diary entry, how-to document, dictionary selection, a letter, a biography, an elegy, and a sonnet. The pacing for reading texts in this unit ranges from one to three days.
    • Unit 7 focuses on the Victorian Era (1832-1901) and is divided into two parts. In Part 1, A Realistic Approach, students are presented with two anchor text readings: a dramatic poem, “My Last Duchess,” and a narrative poem, “Porphyria’s Lover,” both by Robert Browning. Part 2 focuses on Faith and Doubt and includes two anchor texts, both poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Overall, students experience fourteen poems--including sonnets--an online article, an elegy, and three short stories. The pacing for each text ranges between one and three days. Each selection varies in genre, length, and content. Examples of the various texts include Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnet, “How Do I Love Thee?”, Charlotte Bronté’s novel, Jane Eyre, Rudyard Kipling’s short story, “The Mark of the Beast,” and Karen Asp’s article, “Cardiac Arrest in Healthy, Young, Athletes.”

    Criterion 1g - 1n

    Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
    12/16
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    Criterion Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts. Some questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Materials provide opportunities and some protocols for evidence-based discussions. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice a mix of both on-demand and process writing along with opportunities to engage in writing activities over the course of the year in a variety of modes, including argumentative, informative, narrative, and descriptive writing as well as research writing and writing to sources. Materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply research-based and evidence-based writing to support analyses, arguments, and synthesis. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

    Indicator 1g

    Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

    The materials provide a consistent format for students to engage with text-dependent questions and/or tasks. However, text-dependent/specific questions, tasks, and assignments do not consistently support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. Many questions have students recall key details within texts and do not build to questions that ask students to analyze or infer based on what they have read. Questions do not grow in complexity across the course of the year.

    Questions, tasks, and assignments can be found in Before and After Reading sections. The Before Reading section includes four subsections with questions embedded within the margins of the textbook: Build Background, Analyze Literature, Set Purpose, and Use Reading Skills. The After Reading section includes four subsections: Refer to Text, Reason with Text, Analyze Literature, and Extend the Text. The British Tradition curriculum also includes Differentiated Instruction, Common Core Assessment Practice, Meeting the Standards, and Exceeding the Standards guides that also provide text-specific questions. Each unit provides a variety of supports to text-dependent and text-specific questioning. Many questions that ask for student opinion require students to engage with the text directly as inferences are made, and students are required to provide support from the text in most of the work they complete within the unit.

    In Unit 1, students read an excerpt from Beowulf, translated by Burton Raffel. Within the Annotated Teacher Edition, teachers are provided with a Using Reading Strategies section that encourages further student questioning: “Grendel’s mother is unable to kill Beowulf when she has him pinned down and attacks him with a knife. Ask students to reread this passage and explain in their own words why the knife is useless.”

    Within the Student Edition, there is also a Text to Text Connection section that asks students to compare Gareth Hinds graphic novel of Beowulf to the epic: “This excerpt from the novel illustrates Beowulf’s speech to Hrothgar, King of the Danes, in Canto 6, beginning in line 116 on page 30. Why does Beowulf insist on fighting the monster Grendel with his bare hands? What is Beowulf’s one request if he dies in the battle?”

    Students also answer questions in the After Reading Refer to Text and Reason With Text: “Describe Grendel’s interactions with humans. Why do the Danes consider him a monster? Compare and contrast the battles, identifying similarities and differences among them.”

    In Unit 2, students read from L’Morte d’Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory. Students are asked in the After Reading Refer to Text and Reason With Text section: “In the excerpt from L’Morte d’Arthur with whom does Arthur spend his childhood? How is his royal heritage discovered? Describe Merlin’s influence on young Arthur, as described in L’Morte d’Arthur.”

    In Unit 3, after reading the informational text, “Elizabeth I, Queen of England,” from The Columbia Encyclopedia, students are asked to answer review questions: “What happened to Elizabeth just before her mother was executed? Why did Elizabeth’s father, the king, have her mother, Anne Boleyn, killed?”

    In Unit 4, students read The Tragedy of Macbeth Act II, a drama by William Shakespeare. Students are asked in the After Reading Refer to Text and Reason With Text section, questions: “At the end of scene ii, what voice does Macbeth imagine crying out. At the end of the act what does Rosse say about Malcolm and Donalbain?”

    In Unit 5, Students read an excerpt from John Milton’s epic poem, Paradise Lost, and Genesis 1-3 from the Bible. In the After Reading Refer to Text and Reason With Text section, students are asked, “In lines 1-5 what does the speaker say the subject of the epic will be? How effectively does Milton portray Satan? Use details from the epic to support your opinion.”

    Student also respond to the Analyze Literature section, which addresses motivation and apostrophe: “What motivates Satan to tempt Adam and Eve? What motivation does he reveal in the last section of the selection? How does this motivation compare to what motivated him to the actions that got him expelled from heaven?” and “Whom does Milton address in an apostrophe in line 17? What does Milton ask? How does this apostrophe relate to Milton’s purpose in Paradise Lost?”

    In Unit 6, students read the poem, “To a Mouse,” by Robert Burns. Students are asked in the After Reading Refer to Text and Reason With Text section to answer the following questions: “In lines 37-42 what famous statement does Burns’ make about insight? List five examples of Burns’ Scots dialect.”

    In Unit 7, after reading the poems, “My Last Duchess” and “Porphyria’s Lover,” both by Robert Browning, in the After Reading, Refer to Text and Reason With Text section, students are asked to respond to questions: “In lines 22-30 of ‘My Last Duchess,’ what about the Duchess bothers Duke? In lines 30-35 of ‘Porphyria’s Lover,’ what does the speaker discover? What does this lead him to do? Compare the speakers of the poems. What similarities do they share?”

    In Unit 8, students read, “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell. Students are asked in After Reading Refer to Text and Reason With Text section: “What steps does Orwell take as soon as he sees the dead man? In the end how does Orwell justify shooting the elephant?”

    In Unit 9, of the Annotated Teacher Edition, students complete the Reading Assessment section for the following poems by Dylan Thomas, “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” “Fern Hill,” and “The Hand That Signed the Paper.” Students must respond to the following questions: “Line 10 of ‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night’ contains which of the following poetic devices? In lines 46-54 of ‘Fern Hill,’ to whom or what does him/his refer?”

    Indicator 1h

    Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of sequences of text-dependent/text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

    After every text selection in the After Reading, Refer to Text, Reason with Text section, there are text-dependent questions, and throughout each reading, there are strategies and activities that build students’ skills to complete the end of unit activities. Each unit includes three types of culminating activities: a Speaking and Listening Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Test Practice Workshop. The performance tasks that the students are asked to complete in these culminating activities correspond to the questions, discussions, and writing prompts that students have completed throughout the unit as they read the various selections. The lessons are detailed, follow a step-by-step process, have checklists to support students, and the Language Arts Handbook and the Exceeding the Standards Speaking and Listening Resource Guides support students by providing additional lessons on the skills necessary to complete each task. However, skills are often not integrated. Students complete each workshop independently of one another. Some tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students are often demonstrating mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge.

    In Unit 1: Anglo-Saxon Period 449-1066, there are three culminating tasks for the unit:

    • For the Speaking and Listening Workshop, students describe a place. Students choose a place, plan the description, use descriptive language, practice their delivery, and present the description. Activities throughout the unit that build to this culminating task include:
      • visualizing the story of Beowulf: “encourage students to use Hrothgar’s vivid description of the setting in lines 339-360 to visualize the place where Beowulf will encounter Grendel’s mother.”
      • writing a descriptive paragraph after reading “Anglo-Saxon Riddles”: “Imagine that you are writing to a friend who lives out of town. Write a descriptive paragraph about a particular setting - perhaps your bedroom or locker. Use sensory details to bring the description to life for your friend.”
      • These tasks builds students’ presentation skills, but does not integrate skills to demonstrate understanding.These tasks do not connect to a text and do not integrate skills to demonstrate understanding.
    • For the Writing Workshop, students write a narrative poem about a modern-day hero. Students select their topic; gather information; organize their ideas; write their organizing statement; draft their poem with attention to conventions and structure of poetry; evaluate their drafts; revise their drafts for content, organization, and style; proofread for errors; publish and present their work; and reflect on their work. Activities throughout the unit that build to this culminating task include:
      • completing a piece of creative writing after reading “The Story of Caedmon”: Imagine that Caedmon has come to King Edwin’s court to perform his poetry. Wrote a one-page dialogue between King Edwin and Caedmon in which they discuss their experiences with religious transformation.”
      • writing a brief epic poem after reading “The Head of Humbaba” from Gilgamesh: “Choose a person from current society and write a brief epic poem that tells the story of a heroic episode from his or her life.”
    • For the Test Practice Workshop, the first section asks students to make inferences through reading an excerpt from Beowulf, translated by Burton Raffel; answering reading comprehension questions on the text; responding to a constructed response prompt on the text: “What inferences can you make from the repetition of the phrase ‘as Beowulf had asked’?” and completing an extended writing prompt on an issue: “What type of clothing policy is best for students? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your perspective on this issue.” Activities throughout the unit that connect to this culminating task include:
      • making inferences while reading “The Story of Caedmon”: “Even though Bede says it is impossible to translate poetry without losing some of its original beauty, he still includes the verses of Caedmon’s song in his account. Ask students to infer why Bede might have decided to include these verses.”
      • making inferences while reading Beowulf: “In canto 6, Wulfgar tells Beowulf and his men to leave their weapons at the door and go in to see Hrothgar, but Beowulf orders a few of his men to stay with their weapons. Ask students to discuss what this incident says about the culture and customs of the times and about Beowulf himself.”

    In Unit 6, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, the culminating activity is a “Writing Workshop, Write a Personal essay, Narrative Writing.” The "Assignment: Write a personal essay that captures an essential aspect of your character. Purpose: To preserve a picture of who you are now and to share your thoughts with others. Audience: A new friend who does not know much about you or perhaps a potential employer or college admissions officer.” This task is not connected to a text and does not integrate skills to demonstrate understanding.

    In Unit 7, Writing Workshop, students must practice argumentative writing by reviewing a short story or book. The assignment is to “write a review of a British short story or novel, using examples from the text to support your opinions.” The objectives for this task are to “review a short story or book; begin with an introduction that draws the reader into the piece, states the title and author of the subject of the review, and includes a clear thesis statement; organize a body that supports the thesis statement with specific evidence, including details or quotations from the short story or novel; end with a conclusion that summarizes the analysis presented in the review.” Tasks that occur throughout the unit that support students in their endeavors with this culminating task include the following:

    • Once students read Hardy’s “The Darkling Thrush,” they will compose a literary criticism: “Literary critics using the theory of biographical-historical criticism analyze a text within the context of the author’s life and historical period (see Understanding Literary Criticism, Unit 3, pages 266-267). Using the Author Focus on page 822 and other sources, apply biographical-historical literary theory to Hardy’s ‘The Darkling Thrush’ and write a short analysis of the poem. Identify events in the author’s life and time period that likely influenced his work.”
    • Students will read Rudyard Kipling’s “The Mark of the Beast’; once students complete the text selection, they will compose a short piece of Argumentative Writing: “Your school is thinking of producing a play based on one of Rudyard Kipling’s stories. You want the drama club to perform ‘The Mark of the Beast.’ Write a one-paragraph plot analysis of the story to share with the club. After the plot analysis, write a persuasive paragraph about why this story would be a good one to dramatize.”

    Indicator 1i

    Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

    The materials provide opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions. There are opportunities for classroom discussion throughout the materials.The Program Planning Guide provides several evaluation forms for communication, such as: Communicating in a Pair Group (Self-Evaluation), Communicating in a Pair Group (Peer-Evaluation), Communicating in a Small Group, and Communicating in a Large Group. The Exceeding the Standards resource for speaking and listening includes rubrics for individual presentations. The Speaking & Listening rubric found in the Workshops gives explicit instruction on how students should share thoughts.

    The EMC Passport Share feature gives students access to a digital tool that allows collaborative video discussions. Also in Passport, the Perform section allows for more formal video presentation opportunities. Using the Mirrors & Windows discussion prompts or the prompts in Extend the Text activities and projects makes for an engaging and efficient way for students to collaborate and analyze.

    In Unit 1, Collaborative Learning: Compare Cultures students work in small groups to analyze the boasts made by human characters in Beowulf. Then compare and contrast the Anglo-Saxon idea of a boast to that of modern culture. How has the concept changed? Who in modern culture is known for boasting? Why? In a class discussion, compare your group’s ideas with those of other groups.

    In Unit 5, students, " Communicate in a New Way: Milton expressed his ideas about self-evaluation and goal setting in traditional sonnets. Analyze how his expression of these ideas reflects the cultural and social views of the seventeenth century. Then choose a new way to communicate his ideas by writing a contemporary media piece, such as a rap song, an infomercial, a newspaper editorial, or a magazine article. Share your work with a small group. Then discuss what is and is not effective about how each piece communicates its message. Analyze whether Milton’s ideas have a modern application and how successfully each media piece reflects the cultural and social views of the twenty-first century."

    In Unit 6, students read an excerpt from A Vindication on the Rights of Woman, an essay by Mary Wollstonecraft. One of the extension activities for the text asks students to debate gender equality: “Do social norms, including attitudes and behaviors, still favor the development of men’s abilities over those of women? Do men still have more opportunities than women? Hold a class debate on these issues. Choose an equal number of men and women from among your classmates to represent each debate team. Your teacher can act as moderator.”

    In Unit 8, students study the definition and elements of an essay. A Student Activity in the Teacher Edition asks students to “hold a panel discussion on ways in which an essayist can reveal his or her personality to the audience: for example, with the use of first-person point of view, autobiographical anecdotes, quotations, allusions, or colloquialisms.”

    Indicator 1j

    Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

    The materials provide the teacher with ample questions to engage students in thinking about and responding to the text; however, no explanation is given on how the students will share this thinking - be it verbal or written, individual, or in groups. There are few supports or follow up questions to support students' listening and speaking to deeper their understanding about what they are reading and researching.

    Throughout the Annotated Teacher Edition there are many places that prompt teachers to have students discuss in the context of pre-reading. Since these discussion opportunities occur prior to actually reading the text, discussions are not evidence-based. For example, in The Launch the Unit section, questions for a whole-class discussion on the text type being studied in the unit are provided. The Speaking and Listening portion of the Exceeding the Standards resource provides opportunities for students to prepare projects, and to present information orally to the class through narratives, speeches, poems, dramatic scenes, and interviews, but these activities are not tied to the texts that are studied in the unit. In the Exceeding the Standards resource for speaking and listening, the majority of tasks are presentations--these supports tie to the speaking and listening requirements, but there are very few shared projects. Also, there are some relevant follow-up questions and supports, but the supports and follow-up questions are designed for students to respond to individually, rather than practicing through the Speaking and Listening standards with one another or in small and large groups.

    Each unit includes a Speaking and Listening Workshop, but the emphasis is on the individual preparing for a particular presentation. There are collaborative research and discussion activities that can be found in the Teacher Edition, most notably as Teaching Note(s) that suggest activities for students to process the text they are reading through pair and small group work, often focused on generating questions about the text. Students may also take part in Collaborative Learning, which usually occurs in the After Reading section where students practice speaking and listening skills--this includes student planning for group activities, group skit presentations, short discussions, etc. There are other frequent questions and activities that are designed to have students speaking and listening, but they do not require the student to have interacted with the text being studied. Rather, they are based on personal thoughts and experiences and connections to themes.

    The speaking and listening opportunities require students to provide evidence from what they are reading and researching. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • In Unit 1, Speaking and Listening Workshop, Describe a Place, students describe a place in an oral presentation. “If you were writing about a specific place, you would describe it in detail, using sensory images and vivid language to help your readers see, hear, smell, feel, and even taste it. You should use the same strategies when describing a place in an oral presentation, or speech. Students are given five steps to guide them in describing a place for or an oral presentation or speech:
    1. Choose a Place
    2. Plan the Description
    3. Use Descriptive Language
    4. Practice Your Delivery
    5. Present the Description

    Students are evaluated with a Speaking and Listening Rubric on Content, Delivery and Presentation.

    • In Unit 8, students read The Rising of the Moon by Lady Augusta Gregory. The Teacher Edition provides a critical thinking discussion guide: “The play presents conflicting perspectives on duty and patriotism. In light of these perspectives, ask students which character appeals to them more - the Sergeant or the Ragged Man. Have students discuss and explain their choices.”

    Frequently, questions and activities provide speaking and listening opportunities about what students are reading and researching, but do not require students to have interacted with the text being studied. Discussions are based more on personal thoughts and experiences and connections to the themes. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • In Unit 6, students are introduced to the genre of the lyric poem. They learn the definition, its forms, and its elements. They are then asked to “work individually, in pairs, or in small groups to create one of the following: a ballad, an ode, a sonnet, or a lyric poem composed in dialect. When students have finished their poem, invite them to share it with the class as a whole.”
    • In Unit 7, Speaking and Listening Workshop, Present an Argument, students present a viable argument to urge listeners to accept or reject a proposition. “An argument is not necessarily a nasty exchange between two angry people. The term argument, also refers to the evidence a writer or a speaker presents to readers or listeners, urging them to accept or reject a proposition (a statement of policy or belief) or a course of action. Legislators, for instance, would present an argument in support of a measure they want colleagues to enact into law.” Students are given three steps to guide their steps as they prepare to deliver their arguments:
    1. Choose a Suitable Topic and Locate Supporting Evidence
    2. Practice Your Delivery
    3. Listen Actively to Arguments

    Students are evaluated with a Speaking and Listening Rubric on Content, Delivery and Presentation.

    Indicator 1k

    Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.

    The materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice a mix of both on-demand and process writing. At the end of every reading selection, students are presented with an After Reading section that includes an Extended Text section. Within this section, students are presented with two on-demand writing options. At the close of every unit, students are presented with a Writing Workshop opportunity, which is a process writing where students prewrite, draft, and revise over time. Students are given both examples and steps to follow to ensure success. There are focused projects that incorporate digital resources where appropriate, as explained in the Introduction to Media Text and Visual Media resource.

    Examples of on-demand and process writing that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • In the Unit 1 Writing Workshop, Narrative Writing section, students are given a process writing opportunity with the following prompts:
    1. “Many of the stories you read, the movies you watch, and even the video games you play focus on the classic struggle between good and evil. In Old English storytelling, this type of tale often was told in a narrative poem, or one that tells a story. A traditional form of narrative is the epic, a long story often told in verse that features heroes and foes and provides a portrait of a culture.”
    2. “How might you apply this traditional form to a modern-day story? Contemporary heroes may not face foes such as monsters and dragons, but they encounter a variety of challenges within the culture in which they live. In this assignment, you will write a narrative poem about a contemporary hero facing a contemporary foe.”
    • In Unit 2, in the Annotated Teacher's Edition, students read “Robin Hood and Allen a Dale” an anonymous ballad. In the Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students are given an on-demand informative writing prompt: “Robin Hood seemed to have had charisma, the ability to attract followers. In a one-paragraph character analysis, identify the qualities that made him so appealing to so many people.”
    • In Unit 5, students compose a satire through process argumentative writing. The writing prompt states: “For this assignment, you will write a satire on a current social behavior or institution you feel needs to be changed.” The assignment goes on to state the purpose and audience: “Purpose: To challenge the ideas of your audience; Audience: Someone who is unaware of your topic as a problem, disagrees with your point of view, or is undecided about your topic.” This a multi-step process that takes them through the entire process of prewriting, writing, and revising.
    • In Unit 6, students the poem, “Casabianca,” by Felicia Dorothea Hemans. Once students complete the reading, they are presented with two writing options:
      "1. Choose an important historical or personal event that you are familiar with, and write a ballad about it. Identify or invent a person to be the focus of the ballad, and describe the heroic role he or she plays in the event.
      2. Based on the information provided in the poem, write a character analysis for the boy. What can you infer about his values and beliefs? What can you infer about his relationship with his father?"
    • At the beginning of Unit 7, students read an introduction to the time period, including information about “The Late Nineteenth Century,” “Growth of the British Empire,” and “Victorian Thought.” The Teacher Edition includes on-demand writing options to go along with this introduction:
      “1. Assume you are an avid reader living in Great Britain in Victorian times. On your bookshelf are works by Herbert Spencer, Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, and John Stuart Mill. What are your reactions to the theories of one of these thinkers?
      2. Discuss England’s role in world affairs - economic, political, and cultural - during the Victorian Era. Was England too involved, or was England’s involvement simply expected or necessary? What were the short-term and long-term results of England’s involvement?”

    Indicator 1l

    Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. (Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.)

    The materials provide students ample opportunities to engage in writing activities over the course of the year in a variety of modes, including argumentative, informative, narrative, and descriptive writing as well as research writing and writing to sources. Within these general categories, there is also a wide variety of specific writing tasks. Each of the reading selections is followed by two writing activities in two different modes, and the writing workshop at the end of each unit gives an in-depth exploration and practice of a specific mode. Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets (either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports). Each lesson offers a purpose for the writing, a teaching and modeling section, examples to help guide students, and independent writing time.

    • In Unit 1, Annotated Teacher Edition students read from Beowulf, verse translation by Burton Raffel, interlinear translation by Robin Lamb. In the After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students practice informative writing with the prompt: “Draft an essay that analyzes how the modern Grendel, by John Gardner, relates to the ancient Beowulf. You might consider how the themes of each work relate to the Germanic Society of its time; you might compare the portrayals of Grendel; or you might choose another topic to explore.”
    • In Unit 2, Annotated Teacher Edition students read “Speech to the Troops at Tilbury,” a speech by Queen Elizabeth I. In the After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students practice argumentative writing with the prompt: “Think of a cause you want to promote in your school, such as academic credit for volunteer work. Write a short persuasive speech, and present your argument at a student council meeting. During your presentation, maintain good eye contact, and appropriate speaking rate in volume, and clear enunciation. Use appropriate language conventions and gestures as well.”
    • In Unit 5, students read an elegy written by Thomas Gray, “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.” Once students complete their reading of Gray’s “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard,” students are presented with two writing options in the Extend the Text section within After Reading:
      1. Creative Writing: “An epitaph is a brief inscription or verse to be used as a written commemoration of someone who has died. Write an epitaph for a friend or loved one who has died or somebody still living for whom the epitaph could be used later. Write a couple of stanzas that capture something of the person’s spirit, values, or life.”
      2. Informative Writing: “Write a reflective essay on death or on the way of life of unknown people that Gray celebrates in ‘Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.’ In your essay, consider how the topic you chose relates to your life and to humanity at large. Use two or three concrete examples to illustrate your ideas.”
    • In Unit 6, students read the following poems by William Blake: “The Lamb,” “The Tyger,” and “London.” Once students read all three poems by Blake, students are presented with two writing options in the Extend the Text section within After Reading.
      1.Creative Writing: “Write an allegorical poem about an animal. Consider what that animal might symbolize for you. Then use details that will appeal to your reader’s senses of touch, taste, sight, smell, and hearing to describe the animal and develop the symbolic association.”
      2. Informative Writing: “Imagine you are a nineteenth century social reformer who has observed the conditions portrayed by Blake in ‘London.’ Write an exposé (a formal statement of facts) for a newspaper, pointing out these conditions and offering a proposal for correcting them.”
    • In Unit 7, after reading the sonnet “How Do I Love Thee?” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, students complete a text extension activity where they compose a piece of creative writing: “Imagine someone has just written a poem for you. Write a journal entry describing what the poem says and how you react.”
    • In Unit 8, after reading “The Lake Isle of Innisfree” by William Butler Yeats, students complete a text extension activity where they compose a piece of descriptive writing: “Think of a place you would like to live - a locality you know or one you imagine. Write a descriptive paragraph, using imagery with sensory details to help your readers visualize themselves in this setting. Then exchange papers with a partner and ask each other questions about the place you each have portrayed.”

    Indicator 1m

    Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.

    The materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply research-based and evidence-based writing to support analyses, arguments, and synthesis. At the end of every reading selection, in the After Reading/Extend the Text section, students are presented with two on-demand writing options that prompt students to complete short, research-based writing using the texts read within the section. The writing prompts that require students to interact with the text explicitly state that the students need to cite evidence. Students experience research-based and evidence-based writing within every Writing Workshop section that occurs at the close of each unit. Many writing opportunities are focused around each student’s analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources.

    • In Unit 1, students read from Beowulf, verse translation by Burton Raffel, interlinear translation by Robin Lamb. In the After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students practice creative writing in response to the following prompt: “Write a script for a brief scene in an adventure movie about Beowulf. Decide how to update the dialogue and action to appeal to a contemporary audience.”
    • In Unit 2, students read “The Prologue from The Canterbury Tales,” a frame tale by Geoffrey Chaucer, translated by Nevill Coghill. In the After the Reading, Writing Options, Extend the Text, Informative Writing section, students respond to the following prompt: “Write a one-paragraph character analysis of one of the pilgrims introduced in ‘The Prologue.’ Reread a description of this character then imagine meeting him or her. How might he or she behave, say, at a baseball game, rock concert, or other modern- day event? Base your judgement on the details provided in ‘The Prologue.’”
    • In Unit 2, students read “Robin Hood and Allen a Dale,” an anonymous ballad. In the Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students practice creative writing in response to the following prompt: “Shows like Saturday Night Live (SNL) have perfected the art of comedic parody. With a small group, write and perform a parody of ‘Robin Hood and Allen a Dale,’ focusing on the theme of the original work and how the characters relate to the economic ideas of their time. Keep in mind that humor of a parody comes from closely imitating the original work while exaggerating certain elements.
    • In Unit 3, students choose a famous inspirational speech and compare and contrast it to Queen Elizabeth’s “Speech to the Troops at Tilbury.” In addition, they do the following: "Lifelong Learning - As a class, conduct research about the Elizabethan Era; Creative Writing - Write a journal entry as if you were Queen Elizabeth going to Tilbury."
    • In Unit 4, in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, students are given the following tasks: "1. For each of the following scenarios, write a short paragraph that incorporates at least four sensory details. Appeal to at least three different senses with the details you choose. 2. As students read MacBeth by William Shakespeare, have them complete a cause and effect chart to record the wide range of effects of MacBeth’s murder of Duncan."
    • In Unit 5, students read two poems by Richard Lovelace: “To Althea, from Prison,” and “To Lucasta, Going to the Wars.” Once students read both poems, they are presented with two writing options at the end of the text selection in After Reading within Extend the Text. The second writing option requires students to analyze both poems through evidence-based writing to support their claims within a comparison-and-contrast essay: "Informative Writing: What does the word freedom mean in these two poems? Write a comparison-and-contrast essay examining how Lovelace’s poems ‘To Lucasta’ and ‘To Althea’ treat this topic. Organize your essay by analyzing one poem first and then the other.”
    • In Unit 5, students read an excerpt from The Diary of Fanny Burney by Fanny Burney. Students also read Ruth Folit’s article, “Ten Steps to Keeping an On-Going Journal.” Once students complete both readings, they are presented with two writing options at the end of the text selection in After Reading within Extend the Text. Both writing options require students to reference evidence from the text to make responses evidence-based to support claims, analysis, and the evaluation of information:
      • Creative Writing: “Write a dialogue between a character and someone that character admires. Focus on the diction of each speaker. What degree of formality would the speaker naturally use in his or her words? What tone would each person take with the other? Keep these things in mind as you write the dialogue. Aim to have each person reveal something of himself or herself through the dialogue.”
      • Informative Writing: “Write an essay that evaluates the structure of ‘Ten Steps to Keeping an On-Going Journal.’ In particular, evaluate the format, subheads, and other structural elements for clarity (clearness) and organizational coherence (logical connections). Also evaluate how graphic representations, such as diagrams or charts, might have been used effectively.”
    • In Unit 6, students read “The Lorelei” translated by Aaron Kramer. At the close of the text selection, students are presented with two writing options. The second writing option is heavy in research-based writing: “The Lorelei Rock has been a popular tourist site for years. Conduct some basic research about St. Goarshausen, Germany, and the Lorelei Rock. Then write a travel brochure for U.S. tourists describing the area attractions and explaining the legend of the Lorelei Rock.”
    • In Unit 7, after reading an excerpt from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, students complete a text extension activity which requires them to use evidence from the text: “This excerpt reveals that Jane is a governess for a wealthy businessman she meets unknowingly one day. Write an essay analyzing the character of Jane. Cite evidence of her character from the excerpt.”
    • In Unit 8, after reading an excerpt from A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf, students complete a Text Extension activity which requires them to use evidence from the text: “In the paragraph that begins on page 1002 and extends to page 1003, Woolf seems to say that it would have been both impossible and possible for a woman in Shakespeare’s day to have had Shakespeare’s genius. Write a brief essay in which you explain the effect this sort of ambiguity has on the reader. Use textual evidence to support your inferences and conclusions.”
    • In Unit 9, after reading “The Horses,” by Ted Hughes, students complete a Text Extension activity which requires them to use evidence from the text: “In the last two stanzas, the speaker imagines himself in the future. Based on details from the poem, write a brief character analysis describing the speaker as an older man. Consider how his views of nature might relate to the concepts of aging and the cycle of life.”

    Indicator 1n

    Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

    The materials contain several workshops in grammar and style, as well as vocabulary and spelling. Within each unit, students experience between two and six Grammar and Style Workshops; all workshops have students practice various grammatical and syntactical tasks that apply directly to the texts they read within the unit. However, there is inconsistent support for students to practice in increasingly sophisticated contexts. The skills instruction does not include opportunities for application both in and out of context. Additionally, the materials do not promote and build students’ ability to apply conventions and other aspects of language within their own writing. There are minimal opportunities to practice skills taught in the unit with the selected readings in the Teacher’s Edition, therefore limiting opportunities for increased sophistication of the addressed standards. While the resource workbook, Exceeding the Standards, includes “comprehensive skills development lessons," the same language standards are not necessarily addressed during the Writer’s Workshop task or other possible places within the unit of study. Therefore, students are not consistently given opportunities to apply the lessons on grammar and conventions in context.

    In Unit 1, within the Exceeding the Standards resource, students practice four different lessons. Within Lesson 4, which has three exercises, students practice Identifying the Parts of Speech. Students within exercise 2 practice writing “a sentence using each word as the designated part of speech.” The exercise provides two examples of how students should complete the activity, including the correct answers, and then students must practice on their own: “6. embittered (adjective); embittered (verb).”

    In Unit 2, students experience three Grammar and Style Workshops. Within each Grammar and Style Workshop, students practice Understand the Concept and Apply the Skill sections.

    • Sentence Variety: Students study the various types of sentences: simple sentence and complex/compound sentences. Once students go through the Understand the Concept section, students then practice applying the skill. Within the Apply the Skill section, students practice three sections: Identify Sentence Types, Improve Sentence Variety, and Use a Variety of Sentence Types. Within Improve Sentence Variety, students review the following items and “discuss with a partner how best to combine the simple sentences to create a compound or complex sentence. You may need to make minor adjustments in wording, such as adding a contraction or deleting extra words.” An example of a task item is as follows: “3. Serfs were at the bottom of the social scale. They usually worked the land.”
    • Sentence Fragments: Students study the various types of sentence fragments: phrase fragments and clause fragments. Once students go through the Understand the Concept section, students then practice applying the skill. Within the Apply the Skill section, students practice three sections: Identify Sentence Fragments, Fix Sentence Fragments, and Use Complete Sentences. Within Identify Sentence Fragments students “Indicate which of the following items are sentences (mark S) and which are fragments (mark F).”

    In Unit 4, Renaissance Drama 1485-1642, two Grammar and Style Workshops are included: Sensory Details and Allusions. It contains two Vocabulary and Spelling Workshops: Contractions and Synonyms and Antonyms.

    • In the Sensory Details Workshop students read about how to identify sensory details in a piece of writing and use sensory details in their own writing. They then complete practice exercises such as using a scenario to write a short paragraph that incorporates at least four sensory details: “1. Jake took a walk in the cemetary on a September night.”
    • In the Allusions Workshop students read about how to identify and explain an author's use of allusion in a text and use allusions in their own writing. They then complete practice exercises such as identifying who or what is referenced by the underlined allusion in a sentence: “1. Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,/Or memorize another Golgotha.”
    • The Vocabulary and Spelling section of The Exceeding the Standards resource, includes practice exercises to support the context clues and syntax workshop: inferential context clues; using context clues in your own writing; and syntax.

    In Unit 6, Grammar and Style, Understand the Concept, students learn the concept of using Parallelism or Parallel Structure. In Applying the Skill students Identify Parallelism in poetry. Students practice Fixing Errors in Parallelism by rewriting sentences to use parallel structure. Students also use Parallelism in Your Writing, by writing about the city or town you live in.

    In Unit 7, there are two Grammar & Style Workshops. The first is about Coordination: “Understand the Concept. To coordinate things means to join them in an equal or a balanced way. In writing, coordination is a strategy for combining related ideas of the same importance. Students Apply the Skill: “Identify Coordinating Conjunctions, Identify the coordinating conjunctions in the following sentences.”

    The second Workshop is about Appositives: “Understand the Concept, an appositive is a noun or noun phrase that is placed next to or near another noun to identify it or add information about it.” Students Apply the Skill: “Identify Appositives, For each of the following sentences from Jane Eyre, identify the appositive or appositive phrases. Then identify the noun the appositive identifies or renames.”

    In Unit 8, there are three Grammar & Style Workshops: Commas, Colons and Semicolons, Hyphens, Dashes, and Ellipses. In the Comma Workshop, students “Apply the Skill Identify Uses of Commas, In the following sentence from “Birds on the Western Front,” identify how each comma is used.” The Colons and Semicolons Workshop begins with Understand the Concept. Examples are provided and then students Apply the Skill for each of these sentences from “Araby,”: "determine whether Joyce uses a colon to (a) introduce a list, (b) introduce a quotation, or (c) offer an explanation or summary or if he uses a semicolon to (d) join two independent clauses or (e) separate items in a series.”

    In the Unit 9 Exceeding the Standards Resource, there are three lessons on Building Effective Sentences and Paragraphs and three lessons on Research Writing Skills. These lessons support the materials in the textbook, and provide ample opportunity for students to practice and apply the skills they are learning.

    Gateway Two

    Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

    Partially Meets Expectations

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    Gateway Two Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Materials do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic or theme/topic or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently. While there are targeted questions and series of questions for students that promote students’ ability to draw conclusions and cite textual evidence, determine theme, and analyze point of view, they do not promote students' building knowledge of the content and texts. Students are presented with text-dependent and text-specific questions; however, the questions do not require students to build knowledge across the text. Culminating tasks do not require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic, nor do they integrate skills. Materials include vocabulary over the course of a school-year, but there is no cohesive plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials include a variety of resources and supports to provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in research activities that support the understanding of texts and topics within texts. Materials meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

    Criterion 2a - 2h

    18/32
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    Criterion Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Materials do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic or theme/topic or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently. While there are targeted questions and series of questions for students that promote students’ ability to draw conclusions and cite textual evidence, determine theme, and analyze point of view, they do not promote students' building knowledge of the content and texts. Students are presented with text-dependent and text-specific questions; however, the questions do not require students to build knowledge across the text. Materials include a variety of resources and supports to provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in research activities that support the understanding of texts and topics within texts. Materials meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

    Indicator 2a

    Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic or theme/topic or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.

    The materials consist of chronological units that follow a timeline. There are no Essential Questions in which these units are organized, however; each unit opens with an image of a piece of fine art that is representative of the time period and critical viewing question(s) about the image. A quote at the beginning of each unit is intended to give insight into the collection of literature in the unit. Along with the quote are guiding questions and commentary that are meant to expand upon the quote. While the quote, questions, and commentary at the beginning set the stage for defining a theme or topic, the texts throughout the unit do not consistently connect back to them. Many of the texts in the unit do not relate to each other with a common theme or topic, and students do not build knowledge to help them better read complex texts. Many of the Mirrors & Windows questions focus on text-to-student understanding, rather than the text, and they are not building the student's textual knowledge.

    In Unit 1, students read two texts. The first text is extrapolated from Ecclesiastical History of the English People, “The Conversion of King Edwin,” which comes from Book II of Bede’s history. The second text is “The Story of Caedmon,” which is from Book IV of Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People. The first Mirrors & Windows question that is presented to the first text is as follows: “Kind Edwin delayed converting to Christianity for some and asked his counselors for advice on the matter. What type of leader would you prefer: one who asks for guidance or one who makes decisions independently?” The Mirrors & Windows question presented to students after they read “The Story of Caedmon” is as follows: “If you could wake up tomorrow with one extraordinary new talent, such as musical ability, what would you want it to be? How would having this talent change your life?” There is not a clear bridge between these texts and questions, and the teacher will have to supplement with other texts and questions to support building knowledge.

    In Unit 2, the Overview presents the genres that will be discussed via the sections that they will encounter as the title of the unit. The title of the unit is Medieval Period 1066-1485; the two parts that students encounter are as follows: “Songs and Tales,” and “Chivalry and Romance.” In Part One of Unit 2, students read three ballads--all by anonymous authors: “Bonny Barbara Allan,” “Get Up and Bar the Door,” and “Lord Randall.” The Mirrors & Windows question for “Bonny Barbara Allan” is as follows: “For whom do you feel more pity: Sir John or Barbara Allan? Do you usually forgive people who have wronged you, or do you tend to hold a grudge?” The Mirrors & Windows question for “Get Up and Bar the Door” is as follows: “What makes people so stubborn that they do foolish things? Can stubbornness be overcome?” The Mirrors & Windows question for “Lord Randall” is as follows: “Have you ever felt intimidated or offended by someone’s questioning, such as that of a parent? Was the concern justified?” There are multitudes of text-to-student connections provided within these questions, but the teacher will have to supplement with other texts and possibly questions to support building knowledge.

    In Unit 9, Postmodern Era, 1945-Present, there are two parts: Part 1, Realizations; and Part 2, Colonial Voices. In Part 1, the Anchor text is “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell. Following that is a Villanelle and two lyric poems by Dylan Thomas. Students are instructed in the Apply Reading Skills, Analyze Text Organization section to scan the selections to get a sense of the organization of each poem. Then have them skim “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” to look for repetition. Suggest that students use stanza structure and rhyme scheme to help guide them through the poems. Students read “Fern Hill” by Dylan Thomas. The Mirrors & Windows question at the end of the text is “What person, place, or event from your childhood do you remember fondly? What types of experiences make people aware of the passing of time?” Students read “The Hand That Signed the Paper” by Dylan Thomas. The Mirrors & Windows question at the beginning of the text is “In the poem, the speaker states, “Hands have no tears to flow.” Do you agree with this statement? Can people truly act without feeling?” While these questions are engaging, students are not necessarily building knowledge. Students are not proving their ability to read and comprehend, and they are not provided ample opportunities to deepen their understanding of the content.

    Indicator 2b

    Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

    While there are targeted questions and series of questions for students that promote students’ ability to draw conclusions and cite textual evidence, determine theme, and analyze point of view, they do not promote students' building knowledge of the content and texts. There are few questions that support students in analyzing author’s language and word choice. The questions that do focus on language and structure do not support students to analyze its effect on the text. In some selections, there is attention paid to vocabulary as well as content, craft, and style.

    In Unit 1, students read the two elegies, “The Wife’s Lament,” translated by Marcelle Thiébaux and “The Seafarer," translated by Burton Raffel. Once students complete the readings, they complete the After Reading Refer to the Text and Reason with Text section. The questions located within this section have students refer and analyze both poems. Refer to Text questions are as follows: 1a. “How does the speaker of ‘The Seafarer’ describe life on the sea and on land? 4a. In ‘The Wife’s Lament,” what does the speaker say in lines 46-47 about her former beloved’s situation? In the last stanza, where does the speaker say her beloved is?”

    Both of these questions, which are identified as Understand: Find meaning and Evaluate: Make Judgements correlate to the Reason with Text questions: “1b. Determine which way of life the speaker prefers, if either. Does he see either lifestyle as all positive or all negative? 4b. Argue whether the speaker accurately and fairly judges her beloved’s actions and situation, both past and present.”

    In Unit 2, students read three anonymous ballads, “Bonny Barbara Allan,” “Get up and Bar the Door,” and “Lord Randall.” After Reading, Reason with Text question 2b asks students to apply and use information to answer the question, “Dialogue or conversations between characters, is a frequent feature of ballads. What is the purpose of dialogue in this ballad? Refers to 'Get up and Bar the Door'." Question 3b asks students to analyze and take apart the question “What dramatic effects are created by the question-and-answer format of this ballad?” These questions identify some components within the texts but do not promote deeper vocabulary or content growth.

    In Unit 4, students read The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act V, a drama by William Shakespeare. After Reading, Reason with Text question 2b asks students to apply and use information to answer the question, ”Explain how the associations in these analogies reveal the men’s attitude toward Macbeth?” Question 5b asks students to create and bring ideas together when answering the question, “Write a rebuttal to Macbeth, disagreeing with the perspective he states in these lines.” While the questions are focused on the text, they do not support building knowledge of the content or a deep analysis of the effect of the language on the text.

    In Unit 6, students read from “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman,” an essay by Mary Wollstonecraft. In After Reading, Reason with Text question 1b asks students to find meaning to understand: “Summarize Wollstonecraft’s feelings about the contention that women are incapable to attain virtue.” Question 4b asks students to evaluate by making judgements: “Evaluate Wollstonecraft’s argument. What does she want for women? What reasons does she give? How effective is her argument?” In the Analyze Literature Argument and Epithet writing students are asked, “What are the main points of Wollstonecraft’s argument? How do her language and tone support her argument? Describe how she makes her argument effective. To whom is the epithet of innocence connected in this excerpt? Describe the effects of these word associations on Wollstonecraft’s argument.”

    In Unit 7, in the Meeting the Standards supplemental book, students are presented with different levels of activities. Students read the sonnet “How Do I Love Thee,” by Elizabeth Browning. The Analyze Literature: Sonnet assignment is labeled as medium in difficulty; assignments range between easy, medium, and difficult in complexity. Teachers are instructed to “use this chart, in combination with the results of the Formative Survey from the Assessment Guide, to identify activities that are appropriate for students.” For this particular assignment, students complete the following questions: “What is the poem’s rhyme scheme? Does the poem have an octave and sestet or quatrains and a couplet? Which type of sonnet is the poem? Sonnets were usually written by men. As indicated by the names of the types of sonnets, they were highly traditional. In your opinion, does Browning’s sonnet do justice to the form and the tradition? Explain.” These build in complexity as the questions are sequenced from easy--identification--to difficult--drawing evidence based conclusions.

    In Unit 8, students read “The Hollow Man,” a poem by T.S. Eliot. After Reading, the Reason with Text question 3b asks students to analyze the question, “How is the speaker moved by the people and the settings? What emotion do they evoke in him?” Question 4b asks students to evaluate and make a judgement when answering the question, “Critique Eliot’s views of humanity. Do you agree with his views? Why or why not?”

    In other selections, the teacher may need to support students with extended work to assure they have opportunities to grow vocabulary and knowledge, as the questions and sequences ask students to engage at a surface level as opposed to a deeper level.

    In Unit 9, in the Annotated Teacher Edition, students read “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” and “Fern Hill,” both poems by Dylan Thomas. After both readings, they will complete the Refer to the Text and Reason with Text section.

    • 2a. “What words does the speaker use to describe himself as a child in ‘Fern Hill’?”
    • 2b. “Would the child in ‘Fern Hill’ have the same attitude about death as each type of man in ‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night’? Why or why not?”
    • 5a. “How does Thomas classify the different stages of life?”
    • 5b. “Explain what both poems suggest about his attitude toward these different stages.”

    Indicator 2c

    Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

    In the curriculum, students are presented with text-dependent and text-specific questions; however, the questions do not require students to build knowledge across the text. Included are some text-dependent questions for each selection in the form of During Reading questions and After Reading questions. The During Reading questions require only a surface amount of knowledge to complete. The After Reading questions are broken into Refer to Text and Reason with Text questions. The Refer to Text questions require surface knowledge of the text. The Reason with the Text questions are designed to increase in complexity from understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating; however, these questions comprise a small percentage of the questions and tasks that students are required to address.

    Most questions and tasks do not require that students refer to the text, and it is unclear how the questions work to build knowledge across an individual text. Each unit includes two texts that are paired with the intention of teaching literary elements across texts. The individual paired texts have text-dependent questions at the end, but there is only one question that asks the students to compare the texts, and the question does not promote a deep analysis of the texts. There are other text-to-text connections established in the units, but the questions about these connections do not require an analysis of the integration of ideas.

    The Mirrors & Windows questions are mainly text-to-student questions, where students are not required to read the text in order to be able to respond. The Annotated Teacher’s Edition presents verbal questions within the outside band as students are reading, but students are not practicing questions independently or in groups. The Exceeding the Standards and Meeting the Standards supplemental resources offer additional, yet limited, activities within the unit to compare a set of texts. Various texts within the units have student writing, speaking, and researching tasks for evidence of students’ need to perform analysis of texts to complete quality cumulative assignments and tasks.

    • In Unit 1, Anglo-Saxon Period 449-1066, students read and compare two texts: “The Seafarer” by anonymous, translated by Burton Raffel and “The Wife’s Lament” by anonymous, translated by Marcelle Thiebaux. At the end of the second text, students are asked these comparison questions: “What is the mood of ‘The Seafarer’? What words and images help create that mood? What is the mood of ‘The Wife’s Lament’? Again, how is language used to create mood? What does the seafarer mourn? What leads you to this conclusion? What loss or losses has the speaker of ‘The Wife’s Lament’ suffered? What does she repeat to express her grief?”
    • In Unit 2, Medieval Period 1066-1485, students read the anonymous ballad “Lord Randall.” At the end of the selection, students are asked text-dependent questions. In order to Refer to the Text, students are asked to “List the topics of the mother’s questions in ‘Lord Randall’.” To further reason with the text, students are asked, “What dramatic effects are created by the question-and-answer format of this ballad?”
    • In Unit 3, Renaissance, students read, “Whoso list to hunt,” a sonnet by Sir Thomas Wyatt and “With how sad steps” (Sonnet 31), by Sir Philip Sidney.
      • The After Reading, Refer and Reason with Text questions have students refer to both poems, Question 4a. “Identify the primary characteristics of each speaker.” Question 4b. “Compare and contrast the speakers in the poems."
      • The Compare Literature: Sensory Details and Personification section asks students to: “Review the chart of sensory details you created for each poem. Which sense or senses are referenced most by each author? How does each author use sensory details to express the notion of unrequited love? What object is Sydney personified in 'With how sad steps?' What human qualities does he give this object? How does the use of personification help convey the idea of unrequited love?”
      • The Extend the Text, Writing Options: Creative Writing section says: “Rewrite Wyatt's 'Whoso list to hunt' so the speaker is talking to the deer and seeking answers, rather than hunting her. Refer to 'With how sad steps' as a model. Consider how changing the speaker’s role might affect what he conveys about unrequited love.”
    • In Unit 4, Renaissance, students read, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Acts I, II, and III, a drama by William Shakespeare. The Text to Text Connection section asks students, “Suppose you write a review of Macbeth. What will you say you like about the play? What will say you do not like? What lines in the play will you quote to support each of these points? Overall, will your review be favorable or unfavorable? Why?”
    • In Unit 4, Renaissance, students read, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act V, a drama by William Shakespeare and Primary Source Connection Comparing Shakespeare’s Macbeth to Holinshed’s Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland.”
      • Review Questions: 1. “What details does Holinshed provide about MacBeth? What details in Shakespeare's play support or contradict Holinshed's description? Compare and contrast the two descriptions.”
      • The Text to Text Connection questions ask: “Evaluate the ways in which Shakespeare adapted Holinshed’s text. What might have been his purpose in making these changes? Was he trying to rewrite history by altering the facts, or was he simply trying to create an interesting play? Support your explanation with details from both texts.”
      • Analyze Literature: Tragedy and Theme section asks, “What was your perception of Macbeth before reading Act V? What qualities of a tragic hero does he display? Use details from the play support your answer. Using information presented in Macbeth and your own knowledge and observations, draw an inference as to the central theme, or author's message, of the drama. How does Shakespeare develop the theme through the character of Macbeth? Support your answer using details from the play. What additional inferences can you draw about other themes that run through the drama?”
    • In Unit 5, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 1625-1798, there are two sections. Part 1, Ideas Old and New and Part 2, Life and Times. Each section in this unit focuses on the time era and the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, connecting students with the historical perspectives of the time through The House of Stuart and Oliver Cromwell, The Restoration and the Glorious Revolution, The House of Hanover, The Industrial Revolution and The Age of Reason and Empiricism.
    • In Unit 6, Part 1, The Beginning of Romantic Thought, on page 650 students are asked to:
      • Identify from the lyric poem, “To a Mouse,” the speaker and tone; Connect to prior knowledge and experience; Identify and evaluate sound effects such as onomatopoeia; and read the poem aloud to listen for rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, and repetition.
      • The Mirror and Windows question at the end of the text is: “Mice do not have to recall the past or worry about the future. How might this be an advantage? What other advantages are there to living in the present?”
      • In the Analyze Literature section, Dialect and Meter students are asked to: “Describe the patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables in 'To a Mouse.' What term would you use to describe the meter in 'To a Mouse'?”
    • In Unit 7, students read “My Last Duchess,” and “Porphyria’s Lover,” both are poems written by Robert Browning. The Mirrors & Windows question that follows “My Last Duchess” is “Think of a time you revealed to someone more about yourself than you had intended, perhaps in a moment of joy or anger. How did you feel? What were the consequences, if any?” At the close of “Porphyria’s Lover,” students are presented with the following Mirrors & Windows question: “The speaker’s desire to possess his love leads him to a drastic decision. When have you felt jealous about someone or something? How did your feelings influence your actions?” Students are then presented with an After Reading section. Within this section, students are presented with Refer to Text questions and Reason with Text questions. Questions are tiered in the following order: “Understand: Find meaning, Apply: Use information, Analyze: Take things apart, Evaluate: Make judgments, and Create: Bring ideas together.” Also, within this particular section, students are also presented with a Reading Assessment section where the questions are formatted based on standardized testing questions. An example question pair is as follows: “2a. In ‘Porphyria’s Lover,’ what does Porphyria do when she first arrives at the cottage?” and “2b. How do her actions inside the cottage contrast with the weather outside? How is the speaker’s psychological state similar to the weather?”
    • In Unit 9, students read the poems “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” and “Fern Hill.” The Mirrors & Windows question at the close of “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” is: “Thomas writes that when a person dies, he or she should ‘not go gentle into that good night.’ How should a person face death?” Students are also presented with Mirrors & Windows questions after “Fern Hill”: “What person, place, or event from your childhood do you remember fondly? What types of experiences make people aware of the passing of time?” Students are then presented with an After Reading section. Within this section, students are presented with Refer to Text questions and Reason with Text questions. Questions are tiered in the following order: “Understand: Find meaning, Apply: Use information, Analyze: Take things apart, Evaluate: Make judgments, and Create: Bring ideas together.” Within the “Analyze Literature” section, located within After Reading, students are presented with the following questions: “Review the structure of ‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.’ Identify what makes it a villanelle. Explain the significance of the lines Thomas repeats throughout the poem” and “What sensory details does Thomas use to create a sense of innocence and freshness in ‘Fern Hill’? How do the details change in the second part of the poem? How does this illustrate the change in the speaker’s mood?”

    Indicator 2d

    The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
    0/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 do not meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

    Culminating tasks do not require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic, nor do they integrate skills. Students complete each workshop independently of each other. Some tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students are often demonstrating mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge. After every text selection in the After Reading, Refer to Text, Reason with Text section, there are text-dependent questions, and throughout each reading, there are strategies and activities that build students’ skills to complete the end of unit activities. Each unit includes three types of culminating activities: a Speaking and Listening Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Test Practice Workshop. The performance tasks that the students are asked to complete in these culminating activities correspond to the questions, discussions, and writing prompts.

    In Unit 1, some tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students demonstrate a mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge. For example:

    • Speaking and Listening Workshop: Students describe a place. Students choose a place, plan the description, use descriptive language, practice their delivery, and present the description. This workshop focuses on the skills of a descriptive presentation. It does not connect to a text or demonstrate knowledge of a topic through integrated skills.
    • Writing Workshop: Students write a narrative poem about a modern-day hero. Students select their topic; gather information; organize their ideas; write their organizing statement; draft their poem with attention to conventions and structure of poetry; evaluate their drafts; revise their drafts for content, organization, and style; proofread for errors; publish and present their work; and reflect on their work. This workshop does not connect to a text, nor does it demonstrate knowledge of a topic.
    • Test Practice Workshop: the first section asks students to make inferences through reading an excerpt from Beowulf, translated by Burton Raffel; answering reading comprehension questions on the text; responding to a constructed response prompt on the text: “What inferences can you make from the repetition of the phrase ‘as Beowulf had asked’?” and completing an extended writing prompt on an issue presented in this prompt: “What type of clothing policy is best for students? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your perspective on this issue.” This workshop focuses on the skill of inferencing. The writing topic is not connected to the text read and does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic through integrated skills.

    In Unit 7, some tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students demonstrate a mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge. For example:

    • Speaking & Listening Workshop: Students present an argument. The steps students complete for this workshop are as follows: “1. Choose a Suitable Topic and Locate Supporting Evidence. 2. Practice Your Delivery. 3. Listen Actively to Arguments.” The rubric for this workshop indicates the following regarding content: “You have selected an argument on an appropriate school or community issue and have provided adequate supporting evidence.” The rubric also indicates what students should do for delivery and presentation: “You show familiarity with the material by using note cards only as prompts while speaking; you use appropriate language conventions; you maintain good eye contact, an appropriate speaking rate and volume, and clear enunciation; you use purposeful gestures.” This workshop focuses on the skill of presenting an argument and does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic.
    • Writing Workshop: Students practice argumentative writing by reviewing a short story or book. The assignment is as follows: “Write a review of a British short story or novel, using examples from the text to support your opinions.” The objectives for this task are as follows: “Review a short story or book; begin with an introduction that draws the reader into the piece, states the title and author of the subject of the review, and includes a clear thesis statement; organize a body that supports the thesis statement with specific evidence, including details or quotations from the short story or novel; end with a conclusion that summarizes the analysis presented in the review.” This workshop focuses on the skill of argument writing and does not demonstrate knowledge of a topic.

    Indicator 2e

    Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/language in context.

    Materials include vocabulary over the course of a school-year, but there is no cohesive plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Vocabulary is repeated in contexts, as seen in the Vocabulary and Spelling lessons which are integrated with two of the literature selections in each unit. These lessons incorporate vocabulary words from the preceding selection to provide context and repetition for students to increase their understanding and vocabulary knowledge. However, academic vocabulary is not repeated sufficiently across units throughout the course of the year.

    The Teacher’s Edition has key terms with definitions, but there is little to no representation of academic vocabulary. When the academic vocabulary is mentioned within a unit or along with a reading they are not repeated sufficiently through the unit or throughout the course of the year.

    A Language Arts Handbook is provided as a student resource at the back of the text which includes Vocabulary and Spelling, and teachers can direct students to these resources.

    The Meeting the Standards Unit Resources do include cumulative vocabulary lists and the teacher’s edition provides a Building Vocabulary which includes an overview of all unit vocabulary words, academic vocabulary, and key terms. The Master word lists cover vocabulary from Common Core Tier One, Tier Two, and Tier Three words. Academic words included and addressed in the Vocabulary Practice Lessons that follow do not appear in other Vocabulary Lessons within the grade level and do not appear within the assessment practice or Writing Workshop within the same unit. Additionally, the Exceeding the Standards resource includes a vocabulary and spelling section that contains lessons and practice on word parts and word origins; borrowed words and informal language; testing vocabulary and choosing words; and working with academic vocabulary.

    • In Unit 2, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, Vocabulary & Spelling, Word Parts, Understand the Concept section it says, “When you come across an unfamiliar word, try analyzing the parts. You may be able to determine the meaning of the word if you recognize its root and affixes.” Students Apply the Skill: “Exercise A - Decode or sound out the words in each row of the preceding chart. Then write a definition for each of the words. Identify the origin of the word part listed. Use a dictionary to help you. Then use each word in a sentence in which the word’s meaning is clear from the context. Work with a partner, take turns reading your sentences aloud and listening for meaning.”
    • In Unit 3, students read Queen Elizabeth I’s Speech to the Troops at Tilbury. Students are presented with Preview Vocabulary (treachery and concord), Selection Words (multitude and stead), and Academic Vocabulary (colony, armada, unprecedented, domination, plunder, notorious, and antagonize). The Preview Vocabulary definitions are included within the text, as students read. The student textbook also identifies where the words are located within the text; it is the student’s responsibility to identify the Selection Words and Academic Vocabulary.
    • In Unit 4, students are presented with a Vocabulary & Spelling activity that focuses on contractions. Students are presented with two sections in this activity: Understand the Concept and Apply the Skill. Within the Apply the Skill section, students complete two exercises. In Exercise A, students must “Write [the following] sentences on a sheet of paper. Then, underline the contractions and circle the possessives.” In Exercise B, students must “Revise the sentences in Exercise A, writing out each contraction above the line. Note the difference in formality between the original and revised sentences.”
    • In Unit 5, students take part in a vocabulary and spelling lesson on political and historical terms. During the lesson they encounter these vocabulary words: political science, documentary, and adopted. They also review or learn the key terms sword part, etymology, dictionary, and context clues. Once they understand the key terms, they practice their understanding of these terms by determining the meaning of words in a passage based on context clues.
    • In Unit 6, students take part in a vocabulary and spelling lesson on syntax. During the lesson they encounter these vocabulary words: awkward and conventionally. They also review or learn the key terms inflected language, syntactic language, syntax, verb, noun, rhythm, and rhyme. Once they understand the key terms, they practice their understanding of these terms by rewriting lines of a poem using conventional syntax.
    • In Unit 7, in the Annotated Teacher's Edition, Vocabulary and Spelling, Understand the Concept section students practice using Homophones: “One of the difficulties with the English language is that many were sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings these homophones can cause confusion in writing unless you remember the differences along with some simple rules.” Students Apply the Skill by Improving the Use of Homophones Using the Correct Homophones.
    • In Unit 8, Exceeding the Standards resource, the Vocabulary & Spelling focus is Building Effective Sentences and Paragraphs Lessons 52-58. In Lesson 57: Making Your Language Precise and Colorful, “When you write, use words to tell your readers exactly what you need. Colorful language-such as precise interesting nouns, verbs, and modifiers-tells your readers exactly what you mean and makes your writing more interesting. Precise nouns give your readers a clear picture of who or what is involved in the sentence.” Students practice in Exercises 1-3 Identifying, Understanding and Using Precise, and Colorful Language.
    • In Unit 9, Annotated Teacher's Edition, Vocabulary and Spelling, Understand the Concept section, students practice using Greek and Latin Words: “What you may not recognize is that many English words are based on words or word parts in Latin and its predecessor, ancient Greek. For instant, the word tyranny in the first excerpt from ‘Shooting an Elephant’ comes from the Greek word tyrannos, a term for a person who seized power and became the absolute ruler of a Greek city-state. The vocabulary word prostrate comes from the Latin prefix pro- (“before”) and the verb sternere (“to spread out, throwdown”). Knowing common Greek and Latin word parts can help you determine the meanings of unfamiliar word you encounter in reading materials and on test. Familiarize yourself with these common Greek and Latin word parts.” Students practice Applying the Skill, determining the meaning of words using Greek and Latin word parts and finding the etymology of subject area words.

    Indicator 2f

    Materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

    The materials include a variety of resources and supports to provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. Throughout each unit, at the end of each reading selection, informal writing activities are provided. Students are gradually released to perform independent reading and tasks towards the end of each unit; each unit culminates with a Writing Workshop that has a highly scaffolded process toward a writing piece, as well as a scaffolded on-demand writing prompt. The assessments for Units 5 and 6 include an extended writing prompt, increasing the cognitive demand on students toward the end of the year. Throughout the year, both teacher and peers provide feedback to ensure that students' writing skills are increasing. Multiple additional writing supports can be found in the support materials of the curriculum.

    • The Common Core Assessment Practice booklet that contains reading selections with occasional short answer questions that refer to the text and constructed response writing prompts covering argument, informational/explanatory, and narrative writing types.
    • The Meeting the Standards booklet has short answer questions that relate to texts and the use of literary elements, and it has worksheets that can be used to scaffold some of the Extend the Text writing prompts.
    • The Exceeding the Standards booklet gives detailed, structured support for the entire writing process for one type of writing per unit.
    • The Assessment Guide has a summative assessment for each of the reading selections in each unit that includes a writing prompt that requires students to reference the text.

    When all of the program resources are used in coordination with each other, teachers can provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

    Examples of a cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to, the following:

    In Unit 1, students read and excerpt from Beowulf, translation by Burt Raffel and from Grendel, by John Camplin Gardner. In the Extend the Text, Writing Options, Informative Writing section, students are given the following prompt: “Draft an essay comparing how the modern Grendel by John Camplin Gardner compares to the ancient Beowulf. You might consider how the themes of each work relate to the themes of Germanic society of its time. You might compare the portrayals of Grendel, or you might choose another topic to explore.

    In the Unit 2 Writing Workshop, students are given the following prompt: “Write a cover letter and resume for a job you are interested in obtaining.” They are then given the following guiding sections and supports:

    • Prewrite: select your topic, gather information, organize your ideas, and write your objective
    • Draft your cover letter, draft your resume
    • Revise: evaluate your drafts, revise for content, organization and style, proofread for errors
    • Writing Follow Up: publish and present, reflect

    In Unit 3, students read “Song: To Celia” and “On My First Son,” both poems by Ben Jonson. Once students complete both texts, they are presented an informative writing option that supports the topic of loss and disappointment--topics experienced through both poems: “Write two paragraphs comparing and contrasting the speaker in ‘Song: To Celia’ with that in ‘On My First Son.’ What loss or disappointment has each speaker experienced? What attitude does each speaker have toward this experience? How are their experiences similar and different?”

    In Unit 4, students are presented with a Writing Workshop where they must describe a character through descriptive writing: “A well-written character captures your attention. You may come to empathize with her, as you would a friend, or you may come to despise this individual, as you may Lady Macbeth. Writing a character description can help you understand a character. Whether your reaction is based on like or dislike, your aim in writing the description is to understand the character intimately. For this assignment, you will write a character description to try to understand a character.” Within the Prewrite section, further supports are given in selecting the topic: “Review the characters from the selections you have read in this unit. List three to five that you have reacted to, either positively or negatively. Choose the one that most intrigues you.”

    At the end of Unit 5, students participate in a Writing Workshop where they write a satire: “Write a satire about a contemporary social issue or institution.” Every aspect of the writing process is detailed for the students, including selecting a topic; gathering information; organizing ideas; writing a thesis statement; drafting an introduction, body and conclusion; using proper documentation; and revising, proofreading, and publishing.

    In Unit 6, after reading “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Coleridge, students complete a text extension writing activity: “Summarize the main plot of ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ in writing. Then retell the story in graphic novel format, with the goal of visually capturing the poem’s more chilling moments. Where possible, include the poem’s original dialogue in the drawings. Share the poem with friends who have not read it.” The Meeting the Standards booklet has several supporting activities for this text, including one that supports this prompt where students complete a plot analysis.

    In Unit 7, Annotated Teacher's Edition, students readThe Crucible, Act 4, a drama by Arthur Miller. In the After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students practice Creative Writing: “Choose a character from The Crucible and write a paragraph that describes, from the character's point of view, his or her position on the events of the play. Include evidence from the play to support your character’s position. Be careful not to name or otherwise directly identify the character. In small groups, take turns reading your paragraphs aloud. As you listen to each reading, identify the position taken and the evidence supporting that position. Try to identify the character using this information.”

    In Unit 8, Annotated Teacher's Edition, students read “Morning Song” and “Mirror,” lyric poems by Sylvia Plath. In the After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students practice Informative Writing: “Write a comparison-and-contrast essay in which you discuss the differences and similarities between the speakers and Plath’s poem. You may present your ideas point by point or analyze one poem at a time.”

    In Unit 9, Annotated Teacher's Edition, students read independently “Fahrenheit 451, The Authorized Adaptation,” a graphic novel by Tim Hamilton. In Writing Options, question two, students write an Argumentative Essay: “Digital technology has made it possible to read most materials using media other than print. Will printed books become obsolete and cease to exist? Write an argumentative essay in which you argue for or against the future of printed books.”

    Indicator 2g

    Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
    4/4
    +
    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

    The materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in research activities that support the understanding of texts and topics within texts. Each selection is followed by at least one opportunity for students to engage in a research task, which includes a variety of individual, partner, and small group projects. Throughout each unit, students are presented with an After Reading section after each text or grouping of texts. Within most After Reading sections, students complete tasks in categories such as: Media Literacy, Lifelong Learning, Critical Literacy, Collaborative Learning, etc. Within these categories, students compose research that is influenced by the topic(s), themes, and genre of the specified reading selection. The textbook offers research opportunities through various writing options also located within the After Reading section. Materials meet the expectations of including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Research projects are varied throughout the instructional materials and offer tasks that are connected to most texts within a unit.

    In addition to opportunities in the textbook, the Exceeding the Standards resource provides extension activities for several selections that ask the students to engage in a more complex research process with multiple steps. The grade 12 research tasks support the intent and depth of the standards.

    In Unit 1, in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, students read from Beowulf, verse translation by Burton Raffel. In The After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options, Collaborative Learning section, students Compare Cultures: “Work in small groups to analyze the boasts made by human characters in Beowulf. Then compare and contrast the Anglo-Saxon idea of a boast to that of modern culture. How is the concept changed? Who in modern culture is known for boasting? Why? And compare your groups ideas with those of other groups.”

    In Unit 2, in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, students read “The Prologue from The Canterbury Tales,” a frame tale by Geoffrey Chaucer. In The After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options, Lifelong Learning section, students Research Social Stratification: “Using Library Internet sources, research social stratification or (class structure) in the Medieval period. Identify the primary social classes and what determined membership in them. To which class does each character in “The Prologue” belong? Create a chart that identifies the primary social classes and list the pilgrims that belong each class.”

    In Unit 3, students read a sonnet by Sir Philip Sidney, “With how sad steps.” At the close of the text, in the After Reading section, students participate in a Lifelong Learning activity: “Research the Moon. Divide the class into two groups, and have each group use the Internet and print sources to learn more about the moon. You might start your research with the article on NASA’s website. One group should focus on cultural and religious beliefs about the moon. What beliefs have people held about the moon? What has it symbolized? The second group should research scientific topics, answering questions about the moon’s surface, distance from the earth, phases, and so on. Both groups should synthesize the ideas from their sources, making logical connections and using evidence from the texts to support their inferences and conclusions. The groups should then share their findings. The entire class should explore the traits that lend themselves to literary references.”

    In Unit 4, students read several plays by Shakespeare including The Tempest. At the close of the text, in the Writing Options section: “Find and view a modern film version of one of the Shakespeare plays you just sampled. Compare and contrast the movie’s presentation of each monologue or soliloquy with the lines from original play. Consider how well the acting, set design, costumes, and other elements communicate the central message of the passage. Describe similarities and differences between the actor’s interpretations and the original script, and analyze the effectiveness of the actor’s delivery."

    In Unit 5, students read Sir John Suckling’s poem, “Song,” also known as “Why so pale and wan.” At the close of the text in the After Reading section, students complete a Collaborative Learning task: “A number of famous people have been imprisoned for their political, social, or religious beliefs, including St. Paul, Thomas More, Martin Luther King Jr., Susan B. Anthony, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and Nelson Mandela. Research one of these people or someone else who has been imprisoned. Find out the reason for the person’s imprisonment and what he or she accomplished. Share your research with several classmates in an oral presentation.”

    In Unit 6, students read three poems by William Blake: “The Lamb,” “The Tyger,” and “London.” At the close of the text in the After Reading section, students complete a Media Literacy task: “Research other Romantic poets who wrote poems about London, as well as Romantic authors who wrote fiction set in the city. (For example, see Wordsworth’s poem ‘Composed Upon Westminster Bridge,’ on page 673.) Choose several pieces of literature to include in an anthology about the Romantics’ view of London. Then create a book of poems, using unique fonts and graphics for each selection.” Within the same After Reading section, students must complete the Collaborative Learning task: “In a small group, research changes in graphic elements used in British poetry across time periods. Graphic elements in poetry include unconventional capitalization or type styles, varying line lengths, unusual word placement, and integrated illustrations (like William Blake’s engravings). Choose three poems from different time periods, and compare and contrast how the graphic elements work together with the text to express the theme of each poem. Cite examples from the poems to support your inferences and conclusions.”

    In Unit 7, students read “My Last Duchess” and “Porphyria’s Lover,” poems by Robert Browning. After reading the selections, students complete a Critical Literacy assignment where they write a public service announcement: “Write a public service announcement (PSA) about domestic abuse or dating violence. Research the subject to get statistics and other facts. Narrow the topic to a specific message you wish to convey. After crafting your message, record your PSA for a radio spot or videotape it for television.”

    In Unit 8, students read “When You are Old,” “The Wild Swans at Coole,” and “The Lake Isle of Innisfree,” poems by William Butler Yeats. After reading the selections, students complete a Collaborative Learning assignment where they conduct a research project: “How does Yeats’s portrayal of the waterfowl in ‘The Wild Swans at Coole’ compare with that of a scientific discussion of them? Do brief research on swans in the library or on the Internet. Then compare Yeats’s view of the long-necked gliders with a nonfiction portrayal of these creatures.”

    In Unit 9, students read “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” and “Fern Hill” by Dylan Thomas. After reading the selections, students complete a Lifelong Learning assignment where they research cultural views of death: “Work in small groups to research views of death and dying in different past and present-day cultures. For example, you might research why the ancient Egyptians created elaborate tombs filled with everyday necessities or how the concept of a wake developed. Compile your research into a short report, and present your findings to the rest of the class.”

    Indicator 2h

    Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 12 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

    The materials use a gradual release of responsibility model in order to engage, motivate, and challenge students. The selections for Units 1-5 begin as Guided Reading, move to Directed Reading, and end in Independent Reading. Instead of students choosing texts that they would like to read, the textbook provides the independent texts. In the independent reading phase, there is minimal support before and after reading, and students apply the skills they have learned throughout the unit independently. At the close of every Independent Reading, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

    At the end of each unit, there is a list of suggested readings that relate to the topics and subject matter in the unit as a reference for students who wish to further their interests. The Program Planning Guide includes a Reading Log for students to keep track of their weekly reading: date, title, author, pages read, summary/reactions, and genre. The Reading Log provides accountability for outside of class reading, and end-of-selection Refer and Reason questions provide accountability for in-class independent reading selections. Additional supports for students are found in several of the curricular resources such as the Meeting the Standards and the Exceeding the Standards resource guides.

    Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

    In Unit 3, students read an essay, “Meditation 17 (“Perchance he for whom this bell tolls”) from Devotions: Upon Emergent Occasions,” by John Donne. At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of five Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

    In Unit 4, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, Program Resources, EMC Access Editions, "For additional independent reading, you may wish to refer students to one of EMC’s Access Edition titles. Each Access Edition contains a thorough study apparatus, including background information, literal comprehension questions, footnotes, vocabulary definitions, and related projects and activities. An Assessment Manual offering worksheets and exams is available for each Access edition.”

    In Unit 5, Part 2, students read Charlotte Smith’s sonnet, “Pressed by the Moon, Mute Arbitress of Tides.” At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

    • An example of a Refer and Reason question is as follows: “1. Identify the natural elements Smith refers to in the sonnet. What do these elements suggest about the speaker’s attitude toward nature?”
    • An example of a Writing Options question is as follows: “1. Write a newspaper article about the events described by the speaker of this poem. In your article, answer the questions who, what, when, why, and how. Use an objective tone. You may want to include a quote from the speaker. How might she answer your questions?”

    In Unit 6, Part 2, students read an excerpt from “Introduction to Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley. At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

    • An example of a Refer and Reason question is as follows: “1. According to Shelley, what context is the best for invention? What raw material--experiences, ideas, emotions--might she have used to create her novel?”
    • An example of a Writing Options question is as follows: “1. Create a setting that evokes strong feelings of foreboding or anticipation is essential to a successful work of Gothic fiction. Write a paragraph describing the setting for a Gothic story or novel. Use your imagination as well as details from abandoned houses you have seen in real life or depict in movies or on television.”

    Within the Program Planning textbook, teachers are provided a Reading Log to give students. The Reading Log consists of sections for the date in which said text was read, title, author, pages read, and a section for summary/reactions. At the bottom of the Reading Log, students must select the genre read, which consists of the following: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Drama, and Folk Literature. This reading log is kept throughout the entirety of the unit.

    In Unit 7, students read the independent reading selection, “The Lagoon,” a short story by Joseph Conrad. Students answer Refer and Reason questions at the text to check their comprehension and interpretation of the text: Examples of these questions are as follows:

    1. “Identify the moral dilemmas Arsat faces in ‘The Lagoon.’ Discuss what choices he makes and what consequences follow each choice.”
    2. “What does Tuan tell Arat about the woman’s fate? How does Arsat respond? Judge Arsat’s guilt or innocence in this story. Do you feel sympathy for him? Why or why not?”
    3. “Recall the story that Arsat tells Tuan. Why does Arsat tell his story to Tuan? What does he want form Tuan? Does he get it?”

    In Unit 8, students read the independent reading selection, “The Garden Party,” a short story by Katherine Mansfield. Students answer Refer and Reason questions at the text to check their comprehension and interpretation of the text. Examples of these questions are as follows:

    1. “What is Mrs. Sheridan’s brilliant idea about the leftover food from the party? What does her decision reveal about her character?”
    2. “Compare and contrast the attitudes of Laura, Jose, and Mrs. Sheridan toward the workers and the servants. How does Mansfield reveal these attitudes for the reader?”
    3. “Describe how Laura feels about bringing the leftovers to Mrs. Scott, the widow of the dead worker. If you were Mrs. Scott, how might you feel toward Laura as she enters the cottage bearing a basket of leftover party food? Why?”

    Gateway Three

    Usability

    Not Rated

    Criterion 3a - 3e

    null
    0/8

    Indicator 3a

    Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
    0/2

    Indicator 3b

    The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
    0/2

    Indicator 3c

    The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
    0/2

    Indicator 3d

    Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
    0/2

    Indicator 3e

    The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
    0/0

    Criterion 3f - 3j

    Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
    0/8

    Indicator 3f

    Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
    0/2

    Indicator 3g

    Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
    0/2

    Indicator 3h

    Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
    0/2

    Indicator 3i

    Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
    0/2

    Indicator 3j

    Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
    0/0

    Criterion 3k - 3n

    Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
    0/8

    Indicator 3k

    Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
    0/2

    Indicator 3l

    The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
    0/0

    Indicator 3l.i

    Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
    0/2

    Indicator 3l.ii

    Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
    0/2

    Indicator 3m

    Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
    0/2

    Indicator 3n

    Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
    0/0

    Criterion 3o - 3r

    Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
    0/10

    Indicator 3o

    Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
    0/2

    Indicator 3p

    Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
    0/4

    Indicator 3q

    Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
    0/2

    Indicator 3r

    Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
    0/2

    Criterion 3s - 3v

    Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
    0/0

    Indicator 3s

    Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
    0/0

    Indicator 3t

    Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
    0/0

    Indicator 3u

    Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
    0/0

    Indicator 3u.i

    Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
    0/0

    Indicator 3u.ii

    Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
    0/0

    Indicator 3v

    Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
    0/0

    Additional Publication Details

    Report Published Date: Wed Oct 24 00:00:00 UTC 2018

    Report Edition: 2016

    Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
    Grade 12 Mirrors & Windows Teacher Edition-British Tradition 978-0-82197-420-9 EMC School 2016
    Grade 12 Mirrors & Windows Student Edition-British Tradition 978-0-82197-442-1 EMC School 2016

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    ELA HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

    The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

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    • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

    • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

    • Instructional Supports and Usability

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