Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

Mirrors & Windows: Connecting with Literature - Grade 10 partially meets expectations of alignment. High quality anchor texts are paired with text-based writing and some speaking and listening work. Students have frequent opportunities to engage in research activities and integrated writing to build grade-level writing skills. The materials are not organized around topics and themes and therefore do not build knowledge and vocabulary consistently across a topic. Culminating tasks to do not require demonstration of knowledge built throughout a unit and do not require integration of skills.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Partially Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
28
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
18
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
0
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. Text are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests. Materials meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. Students encounter a wide variety of texts with a range of length and difficulty throughout each unit and throughout the year. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Materials partially meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Materials provide opportunities and some protocols for evidence-based discussions. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice a mix of both on-demand and process writing along with opportunities to engage in writing activities over the course of the year in a variety of modes, including argumentative, informative, narrative, and descriptive writing as well as research writing and writing to sources. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
16/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

Materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that texts are worthy of students’ time and attention. Materials meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests. Materials meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level. Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis. Students encounter a wide variety of texts with a range of length and difficulty throughout each unit and throughout the year. The texts are quantitatively supported by a Lexile level and qualitatively supported by purpose and rationale; this is provided for every unit and found within The Scope and Sequence Guide located in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.

The materials meet the criteria as many of the anchor texts are previously published and widely read works of literature, including selections from the Common Core Exemplars. Both the authors and content of the texts represent a variety of cultures and cross-curricular connections that address a range of student interests appropriate for 10th grade students.

Examples of publishable and worthy texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, the anchor text is “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe. This gothic fiction short story has vivid descriptions, rich vocabulary, and elicits critical thinking.
  • In Unit 2, students read “from Desert Exile, The Uprooting of a Japanese-American Family” by Yoshiko Uchida. This autobiography gives historical context on internment camps, has cross-cultural connections, and strong vocabulary.
  • In Unit 3, the anchor texts are “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” by William Shakespeare and “I know I am but summer to your heart” by Edna St. Vincent Millay. These sonnets are written in old English diction with abstract concepts.
  • In Unit 4, the anchor text is The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. This text provides historical context, footnotes, and conflict/tension.
  • In Unit 5, the anchor texts are excerpts from Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali by D.T. Niane, and The Once and Future King by T.H. White. These legends have cross-cultural references, geographical connections, archetypes, archaic language, and academic vocabulary.
  • In Unit 6, students read an excerpt from Maus: A Survivor’s Tale I by Art Spiegelman. This excerpt from a graphic novel has cross curricular Social Studies connections, symbolism, and historical context.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The materials present students with a variety of different text types and genres including, but not limited to articles, autobiographies, short stories, poems, fables, memoirs, legend, novel excerpts, plays (dramatic and tragic), and mythology. Many of the literary texts consist of short stories and poems; however, units are divided by genre, not text type--thus, texts that identify as poem, short story, article, etc. are specific to said unit. For example, Unit 2 is dedicated almost exclusively to nonfiction texts, while Unit 3 is mostly dedicated to poetry. Most informational texts stand as supports for literary text to provide context, criticism, or analysis. All texts within the curriculum can be found listed in the Range of Reading section located at the beginning of the Teacher Edition in the Program Overview.

Literary Texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Unit 1: “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe
  • Unit 2: “Thoughts of Hanoi” by Nguyen Thi Vinh
  • Unit 3” “Ex-Basketball Player” by John Updike
  • Unit 4: The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
  • Unit 5: “A Tree Telling of Orpheus” by Denise Levertov
  • Unit 6: Excerpt from Maus: A Survivor’s Tale by Art Spiegelman

Informational Texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Unit 1: “The Kite Runner: A Servant’s Son” by Edward Hower
  • Unit 2: “Montgomery Boycott” by Coretta Scott King
  • Unit 3: “Well-Versed Approach Merits Poetry Prize” by Joanne Lannin
  • Unit 4: “Glaspell’s Trifles” by Judith Kay Russell
  • Unit 5: “Lord of the Rings Inspired by Ancient Epic” by Brian Handwerk
  • Unit 6: "In a Sunburned Country" by Bill Bryson

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis.

The majority of texts are at the appropriate quantitative level. Within the series, quantitative texts levels range from 650L-1450L with some texts above and below the current grade level Lexile and stretch bands. Texts that are above or below grade level quantitative bands have qualitative features and/or tasks that bring them to the appropriate grade level. Along with Lexiles, each text is labeled as moderate, easy, or advanced. Texts are scaffolded with Units 1-5 as Guided, Directed, and Independent Reading, and Unit 6 is centered on Independent Reading. Supports are provided in the additional resource materials, particularly the Meeting the Standards Resource Guide that has guided reading activities with graphic organizers, vocabulary development, and practice quizzes. The Program Planning Guide contains lesson plans that provide student tasks and multiple reading strategies to support student learning.

Examples of texts that have the appropriate level of complexity for Grade 10 include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, students read “Masque of Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe. This text is at a 1220L Stretch Lexile Band for 9-10th grade. This Anchor Text is a challenging read; however, it is in the Directed Reading section with appropriate supports. This Poe classic is a horror story that explores the topic of social responsibility. Reading strategies of visualizing and making inferences are highlighted in the Teacher’s Edition. Vocabulary words are underlined and defined as a footnote.
  • In Unit 2, students read “Desert Exile” by Yoshiko Uchida. This text is at a 1260L Stretch Lexile Band for 9-10th grades.This non-fiction autobiography anchor text is in the Guided Reading section, and many supports are provided. A timeline is provided to help students chart the chronological sequence of events. Five vocabulary words are previewed before reading.

Examples of texts that are above the quantitative measure, but are at the appropriate level for Grade 10 based on qualitative analysis and associated tasks include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 6, Primary Source Connection: Hongo Reflects on the Legend by Garrett Hongo. This text is at a 1500L. Students also read a poem by Hongo that is of moderate level making them familiar with the topic. It is important for high school students to read informational text. The short length of the piece makes it accessible for students.

Example of text that are below the quantitative measure, but are at the appropriate level for Grade 10 based on qualitative analysis and associated tasks include but are not limited to:

  • In Unit 1, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. This text is a 910L, and while this is considered an easy read just outside the low end of the grade band, the cultural references and complexity of the topic make this work of fiction appropriate at this grade.
  • In Unit 6, from Maus: A Survivor’s Tale 1 by Art Spiegelman. This is a non-prose graphic novel excerpt with no Lexile. The subject matter makes this story an appropriate read due to its content, not reading level. This story of a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe and his son, a cartoonist who tries to come to terms with his father's story and history itself, is profound book for any student who needs support with reading.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

The materials contain six units over the course of the school year. Students encounter a wide variety of texts with a range of length and difficulty throughout each unit and throughout the year. Students read and analyze these texts through a gradual release of responsibility model - beginning with guided reading, moving to directed reading, and ending in independent reading. In the early sections of each Unit, the teacher supports the students with before, during, and after reading questions. These supports are identified for ease of teacher use, and they are designed to lessen over the course of the school year. Unit 6 is an Independent Reading unit, designed to allow students to apply the literacy skills that they have developed over the course of the preceding five units. At this stage in the year, students have the routines for questioning themselves about the text in place, so the selections have minimal Refer and Reason questions at the end. There are Differentiated Instructions for students who require continued support. Each unit’s Scope & Sequence Guide lists which reading skills students will work on in each text. The end of unit writing tasks are independent of one another and do not appear to increase in difficulty or complexity.

At the beginning of the year, the students are establishing routines for reading the selections in each unit. They are guided through the process of building background knowledge about a text, setting a purpose for reading, and taking note of reading skills that will benefit them when they start reading the text. They are also guided through the process of using reading strategies and making connections while reading. Lastly, they are guided through the process of remembering details about the text and interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating the text after they have read it. In the middle of the year, students are more practiced at before, during, and after reading strategies. Their ability to access and interact with the text should be increasing, and student answers to questions and classroom discussions are likely increasing in depth. By the end of the year students should be able to read, comprehend, and examine texts independently through established routines for thinking about the text before reading it, asking self-generated questions of the text while reading it, and answering provided questions that ask them to refer to the text and reason with the text after reading it. Examples include:

  • In Unit 1, students read the anchor text,“The Monkey’s Paw,” a short story by W. W. Jacobs. For this short story, students practice identifying and analyzing the sequence of events that take place throughout the story. Students are asked to analyze the literature through the lens of foreshadowing: “The dark and stormy weather creates a spooky atmosphere, or mood. Students might note that dark and stormy weather in fictional tales typically indicates that something bad is going to happen.” Students are then prodded via a discussion topic led by the instructor based on specifically making predictions: “The three wishes resulted in death for the first man to possess the monkey’s paw. Model for students how to predict. You might say, ‘I predict someone in the story is going to die, but I’m not sure who.’”
  • In Unit 2, students read Elie Wiesel’s speech, “Keep Memory Alive.” For this specific reading, students practice identifying and analyzing main idea/central idea throughout the reading. Within the After Reading section, students are presented with a Collaborative Learning opportunity where they practice main idea: “Use the internet to find a complete version of Elie Wiesel’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Then work with two or three classmates to find another speech by Wiesel, or another acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize. With your group, analyze the speeches. Identify the main message of each speech, the purpose of each speech, and any rhetorical devices, such as parallelism, that the speaker uses. Also compare the voices...of the speeches.”
  • In Unit 3, students read two sonnets: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” by William Shakespeare and “I know I am but summer to your heart” by Edna St. Vincent Millay. Students practice compare and contrast skills in analyzing Shakespeare’s and Millay’s sonnets. Within the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, instructors must “Point out to students that at line 9 the speaker’s argument takes a new turn. How does this development compare with the turning point of Shakespeare’s sonnet?” Instructors are also given a possible answer to support students’ inquiry. Students are also supported in developing skill through the After Reading section: “1a. In Millay’s sonnet, identify the comparison the speaker makes in line 1. 2a. In Millay’s sonnet, list the statements in lines 5-8 that illustrate the comparison the speaker makes in line 1. 3b. Contrast the poem’s last six lines with lines 1-8. How does the speaker’s focus shift?”

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The texts that are present within the materials are quantitatively supported by a Lexile level and qualitatively supported by purpose and rationale; this is provided for every unit and found within The Scope and Sequence Guide located in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition. Each selection in the Teacher’s Edition also has a Preview the Model or Selection section that has notes on text complexity, difficulty considerations, and ease factor. In every Before Reading section, teachers are presented with objectives that students should master by the end of the text selection, and a Launch the Lesson section that gears students toward questions that reflect the theme(s) and issues present within the text selection. Although Unit 3 is dedicated holistically to poetry, poems often do not provide Lexile levels, so the texts are rated as Easy, Moderate, and Challenging to make up for the absence of Lexiles. All of the texts chosen are connected and appropriate for Grade 10, while allowing for differentiation and flexibility for students and teachers.

Examples of instructional and text notes found in Grade 10 materials include the following:

In Unit 3, students read “Remember,” a lyric poem by Joy Harjo. This poem is part of the Guided Reading model. Because this is a poem, a Lexile level is not available; however, “Remember” is identified as Moderate in terms of difficulty. Within the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, difficulty considerations are also listed for teachers as well as ease factors. The qualitative analysis consists of Build Background, Analyze Literature: Voice and Theme, Set Purpose, Meet the Author, and Use Reading Skills. All of these elements within the Before Reading section identify the rationale for educational purpose that connect to the standards: cause and effect, context and setting, and irony of situation. The rationale for educational purposes is also extended in the Launch the Lesson section: “Explain that, as they read this poem, students may be reminded of a chant. Have students share associates with the word ‘chanting’--as, for example, in prayers or religious ceremonies, at political rallies, at sports contests, during certain strenuous physical tasks such as rowing, and so on. What are some of the features that chants have in common? Elicit that chants are often associated with repetition and intense emotion or effort.”

In Unit 5, the anchor texts are excerpts from Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali by D.T. Niane and The Once and Future King by T. H. White. These are Guided Reading selections, with a moderate reading level and Lexile levels of 930 and 970, respectively. Difficulty considerations for Sundiata include unfamiliar names, cultural references, and vocabulary. Ease factors include dialogue and reader empathy. Difficulty considerations for The Once and Future King include archaic language and vocabulary. Ease factors include humor and familiar story. Rationale includes an exploration of heroes, historical and cultural context, and the identification of legends and archetypes.

Indicator 1f

Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

The materials are organized into six units. Units 1-5 are arranged by genre, such as fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and folk literature; Unit 6 covers a variety of genres under the blanket of Independent Reading. Within each unit, students are exposed to a volume of reading in the particular genre under study, with reading that is varied in length. There is a range of Lexile levels from easy to moderate to challenging within the curriculum. Taken as a whole, the grade-level materials cover a wide variety of texts in various genres and of various lengths. Following the gradual release of responsibility model, each unit begins with a Close Reading Model which exposes students to the before, during, and after reading process. The Close Reading Model is followed by Guided Reading Selections that help guide students further through the before, during, and after reading process. As students become more independent, they move from Guided Reading to Directed Reading to Independent Reading exercises.

During the course of Unit 1, Fiction, students read multiple texts, each with a suggested pacing of one to three days. Nineteen of the selections are short stories, three are poems, and one each of FAQ document and map, novel excerpt, literary review, and employee document. The texts vary in length. Unit 1 begins with a close reading of “The Open Window,” a short story by Saki, followed by three more guided reading texts. The Directed Reading section includes the anchor text “Masque of the Red Death,” a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. The Independent Reading section includes texts such as “A White Heron,” a short story by Sarah Orne Jewett.

During the course of Unit 3, Poetry, students read many different texts. Each text has a suggested pacing guide of one to two days. Students are presented with two Anchor Texts within this unit, both of which are sonnets. Students read multiple poems--including sonnets, narrative poems--a news article, a tanka, a map and table, and a villanelle. Unit 3 begins with “I Am Offering This Poem,” a lyric poem by Jimmy Santiago Baca, which is part of the Close Reading Model. This Guided, Close Reading is followed by three additional Close Readings. Students then practice Directed Readings and Independent Readings.

During the course of Unit 6, Independent Reading, students read multiple texts, including a passage from Maus: A Survivor’s Tale 1 by Art Spiegelmann. Each text has a suggested pacing guide of one to 3 days--the longest reading pacer being for “The Hitchhiker,” an easy selection radio drama written by Lucille Fletcher. This unit includes short stories, an anthropological analysis entitled “The Vanishing Hitchhiker” by Jan Harold Brunvand, poems, a reflection, a fact sheet, travel writing, a narrative nonfiction, and a consumer document. The Meeting the Standards Resource Guide provides an Independent Study Reading Guide, with a Checklist to help students track their progress through Unit 6.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
12/16
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts. Some questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly. Materials provide opportunities and some protocols for evidence-based discussions. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports. Materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice a mix of both on-demand and process writing along with opportunities to engage in writing activities over the course of the year in a variety of modes, including argumentative, informative, narrative, and descriptive writing as well as research writing and writing to sources. Materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply research-based and evidence-based writing to support analyses, arguments and synthesis. Materials partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials provide a consistent format for students to engage with text-dependent questions and/or tasks. However, text-dependent/specific questions, tasks, and assignments do not consistently support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. Many questions have students recall key details within texts and do not build to questions that ask students to analyze or infer based on what they have read. Questions do not grow in complexity across the course of the year.

In Units 1-5, questions, tasks, and assignments can be found via the Close Reading Model: Before, During, and After Reading. The Before Reading section includes four subsections with questions embedded within the margins of the textbook: Build Background, Analyze Literature, Set Purpose and Use Reading Skills. The During Reading section includes three subsections: Use Reading Strategies, Analyze Literature, and Make Connections. The After Reading section includes four subsections: Refer to Text, Reason with Text, Analyze Literature, and Extend the Text. The curriculum also includes Differentiated Instruction, Common Core Assessment Practice, Meeting the Standards, and Exceeding the Standards guides that also provide text-dependent questions. Each unit provides a variety of supports to text-dependent and text-specific questioning. Many questions that ask for student opinion require students to engage with the text directly as inferences are made, and students are required to provide support from the text in most of the work they complete within the unit.

  • In Unit 1, students read, “The Open Window,” a short story by Saki. As students are reading, During Reading questions are scattered throughout the text to support students in their reading, such as, “What can you guess about Framton Nuttel from his doubts about formal visits?” Students also encounter other questions, such as “Picture the scene of the returning hunters in your mind. How might that scene seem frightening or pleasing in different contexts?” Once students complete the short story Guided Reading, they complete the After Reading section, and are asked to answer text-dependent questions in the Refer to Text and Reason With Text section, such as: "List questions Vera asks Framton about the ‘people around here’ and about her aunt. What does Vera suggest is the reason for Framton’s quick departure? Infer why Vera asks these questions. Explain the purpose of Vera’s story about Framton Nuttel.”
  • In Unit 2, students read a lyrical poem titled “I am Offering this Poem” by Jimmy Santiago Baca. Students are asked to answer recall questions, such as: “List the objects to which the poem is likened. How should the recipient keep the poem? Summarize the last stanza of the poem. Propose whether the speaker has actually experienced the difficult times mentioned in the poem. Use evidence from the poem to support your answer.”
  • In Unit 3, students read two sonnets: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day” by William Shakespeare and “I know I am but summer to your heart” by Edna St. Vincent Millay. With the Shakespeare sonnet, students are presented with a Mirrors and Windows question: “How do you respond to the speaker’s assertion that the ‘eternal summer’ of his beloved will never fade? Is he being realistic, or is this claim merely wish fulfillment? Why do you think so?” This question requires students to reference line nine and make valid inferences once the sonnet has been read; this requires students to go back to the text to review explicit evidence. Once both poems have been read, students then complete questions within the Refer to Text and Reason With Text section. For example, students are asked: “In Shakespeare’s sonnet, identify the word in line 9 that introduces an important shift in the speaker’s focus. Contrast the poem’s last six lines with lines 1 - 8. How does the speaker’s focus shift?”
  • In Unit 4, students read A Marriage Proposal, a one act play by Anton Chekhov. In the After Reading, Refer to Text and Reason With Text section, students are asked: “List the opposing viewpoints of the two arguments. Given what you know about the characters’ goals, why is the fighting funny? Identify ways Chekhov uses humor in this play. How does Chekhov’s use of humor contribute to the message of the play?”
  • In Unit 5, while reading the narrative poem, “Magic Words,” by Nalungiaq, students are asked to answer the following questions: “What can you infer about the relationship of the Inuits with nature by the ideas expressed in these first few lines? Which lines in particular convey a sense of magic so frequently found in oral traditions?”
  • In Unit 6, students read from In a Sunburned Country, a travel writing by Bill Bryson. In the Refer to Text and Reason with Text section, students are asked: “At the beginning of the story all Pakhom wants is a chance to have is his own land. Each time he gets new land, describe how his attitude changes. Citing evidence from the story, compare the value Pakhom places on land and wealth, with what he places on his family. What makes greed incompatible with caring for and about other people?”
  • The Assessment Project for In a Sunburned Country a travel writing by Bill Bryson, asks students to write a one page biography about Pakhom’s life, based on what they learn about Pakhom from the story. Students should demonstrate in their writing an understanding of Pakhom’s character.

Indicator 1h

Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials containing sets of sequences of text-dependent/text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

After every text selection in the After Reading, Refer to Text, Reason with Text section, there are text-dependent questions, and throughout each reading, there are strategies and activities that build students’ skills to complete the end of unit activities. Each unit includes three types of culminating activities: a Speaking and Listening Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Test Practice Workshop. The performance tasks that the students are asked to complete in these culminating activities correspond to the questions, discussions, and writing prompts that students have completed throughout the unit as they read the various selections. The lessons are detailed, follow a step-by-step process, have checklists to support students, and the Language Arts Handbook and the Exceeding the Standards Speaking and Listening Resource Guides support students by providing additional lessons on the skills necessary to complete each task. However, skills are often not integrated. Students complete each workshop independently of one another. Some tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students are often demonstrating mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge.

At the end of Unit 1: Fiction, there are three culminating tasks for the unit. For the Speaking and Listening Workshop, students are to present a horror story. The preparation for this speech includes selecting a story, reading the story, mapping out the story line, visualizing the story, creating mood and tone, and practicing. Activities throughout the unit that build to this culminating task include:

  • Visualize a scene in the story, “The Open WIndow.” “Picture the scene of the returning hunters in your mind. How might that scene seem frightening or pleasing in different contexts?”
  • Visualize a scene in “The Monkey’s Paw.” “Imagine in your mind Mrs. White’s physical reaction to the stranger’s news.” Students also create a plot diagram for the story. Additionally, after reading the story, they write a dramatization of a scene in the story then perform it while being videotaped.

These tasks require students to demonstrate the skill of presenting a story, but do not build to integrate skills that demonstrate understanding.

For the Writing Workshop, students write a plot analysis of one of the short stories in the unit. Students select their topic; gather information; organize their ideas into a plot element chart; write their thesis statement; draft their introduction, body, and conclusion; evaluate their drafts; revise their drafts for content, organization, and style; proofread for errors; publish and present their work; and reflect on their work. Activities throughout the unit that build to this culminating task include:

  • Studying, identifying, and making a timeline of the plot elements of “The Monkey’s Paw.” “Take a look at the timeline you made. Summarize what has happened in the story so far.”
  • Analyzing plot in “Through the Tunnel.” “What are the main conflicts in ‘Through the Tunnel’? How are they resolved?”

These tasks require students to demonstrate the skill of plot analysis, but do not build to integrate skills that demonstrate understanding.

For the Test Practice Workshop, the first section asks students to practice the reading skill of making inferences about a text through reading the short story, “Love Poems,” by Lon Otto; answering reading comprehension questions on the text; responding to a constructed response prompt on the text: “Why, do you think, does the man love the woman’s quality of being a private person? Use information from the passage to explain your answer,” and completing an extended writing prompt on an issue presented in this prompt: “Write a reflective essay for an interested reader about a book, movie, or play that has a significant impact on you. Explain why it has been important.” Activities throughout the unit that build to this culminating task include:

  • Making inferences while reading “The Open Window,” by Saki: “What can you guess about Framton Nuttel from his doubts about formal visits?”
  • Making inferences while reading “The Monkey’s Paw.” “Based on Mrs. White’s behavior, what can you infer about her state of mind?"

These tasks require students to demonstrate the skill making inferences, but do not build to integrate skills that demonstrate understanding.

At the end of Unit 3, in the Writing Workshop, students are asked to to write a Lyric Poem: ”Using concise language and imagery, write a lyric poem that expresses emotions about a specific subject.” Students write a lyric poem in three steps: step one, prewrite, select your topic, gather information/discovery, organize your ideas, write your opening. Step two, students draft your opening stanza, draft your body stanzas, draft your concluding stanza. Step three, students revise your poem and evaluate your draft.” Activities that build to the culminating task include:

  • Students read “The Bean Eaters,” a lyric poem by Gwendolyn Brooks, and “Dream Variations,” a lyric poem by Langston Hughes. After answering a series of text-dependent questions that require students to apply, describe, and analyze the text, students create new understandings from their knowledge of working with the text. In the Writing Options, Creative Writing, “A tribute is a brief speech that expresses gratitude, respect, honor, or praise. Choose either the speaker in 'Dream Variations' or the elderly couple described in the 'Bean Eaters,' and write a tribute that conveys your appreciation for their lives. When you have finished, post your tribute on the classroom bulletin board.”
  • In Teaching Note, Freewrite Activity, students read “from Holidays,” a prose poem by Jamaica Kincaid. “As another writing option, ask students to imagine they are alone in a secluded setting. Tell them: 'There is no television or telephone or nobody to talk to. What would you do? What might you think about? Would you enjoy the solitude? Would you be bored? Pretend you are really in such a situation and freewrite following your train of thought. If you get stuck while freewriting, keep repeating the last thing you have written until it triggers another idea.”

These tasks are not connected to texts and do not require students to use evidence to demonstrate understanding.

In Unit 6, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, Writing Workshop, Narrative Writing, the assignment is to “write a short story about a strange happening. The Purpose is to entertain and/or enlighten your readers. The audience is classmates, teachers, and readers of a teen literary magazine.”

This task is not connected to a text and does not integrate skills to demonstrate understanding of a topic.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The materials provide opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions. There are opportunities for classroom discussion throughout the materials.The Program Planning Guide provides several evaluation forms for communication, such as: Communicating in a Pair Group (Self-Evaluation), Communicating in a Pair Group (Peer-Evaluation), Communicating in a Small Group, and Communicating in a Large Group. The Exceeding the Standards resource for speaking and listening includes rubrics for individual presentations. The Speaking & Listening rubric found in the Workshops gives explicit instruction on how students should share thoughts.

In Unit 1, students read “Two Kinds,” a short story by Amy Tan. In the Extend the Text, Collaborative Learning section, students are asked to engage in a speaking and listening activity, titled Debate Ideas About Extracurricular Activities: “Some adults push children into activities at a very young age. Others limit activities because of time, cost, or other concerns. Students have varied opinions on involvement, too. Hold a class debate on whether extracurricular involvement should be limited. Divide into two groups, one in favor of extracurricular involvement from an early age, and one opposed to it. Work in your groups to prepare arguments. Each group will have three minutes to present its initial arguments. Then each group will have two minutes to respond to the other group’s arguments. Finally, each group will have two minutes for a concluding statement.”

In Unit 3, Poetry, students are asked to prepare and oral interpretation, "Rehearse and oral interpretation of 'Jazz Fantasia." Students reread the poem, develop a script, and present the oral presentation to a live audience. Students then invite the audience to give feedback.

In Unit 5, students read “The Happy Man,” a short story by Naguib Mahfouz. In the Teacher Guide, Teaching Selection, Critical Thinking, Discussion Guide section, teachers are given the following suggestion: “Ask students to discuss the following questions: Is complete happiness an ‘impossible quest,” as Uncle Bashir believes? If yes, what in the modern world prevents complete happiness? Do you know of people who seem to be extremely happy? If yes, what seems to be the source of their happiness? Is there a special formula for happiness?”



Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The materials provide the teacher with ample questions to engage students in thinking about and responding to the text; however, no explanation is given on how the students will share this thinking - be it verbal or written, individual, or in groups. There are few supports or follow up questions to support students' listening and speaking to deeper their understanding about what they are reading and researching.

Throughout the Annotated Teacher Edition there are many places that prompt teachers to have students discuss in the context of pre-reading. Since these discussion opportunities occur prior to actually reading the text, discussions aren’t evidence-based. For example, in the Launch the Unit section, questions for a whole-class discussion on the text type being studied in the unit are provided. The Speaking and Listening portion of the Exceeding the Standards resource provides opportunities for students to prepare projects, and to present information orally to the class through narratives, speeches, poems, dramatic scenes, and interviews, but these activities are not tied to the texts that are studied in the unit. In the Exceeding the Standards resource for speaking and listening, the majority of tasks are presentations--these supports tie to the speaking and listening requirements, but there are very few shared projects. Also, there are some relevant follow-up questions and supports, but the supports and follow-up questions are designed for students to respond to individually, rather than practicing through the Speaking and Listening standards with one another or in small and large groups.

Each unit includes a Speaking and Listening Workshop, but the emphasis is on the individual preparing for a particular presentation. There are collaborative research and discussion activities that can be found in the Teacher Edition, most notably as Teaching Note(s) that suggest activities for students to process the text they are reading through pair and small group work, often focused on generating questions about the text. Students may also take part in Collaborative Learning, which usually occurs in the After Reading section where students practice speaking and listening skills--this includes student planning for group activities, group skit presentations, short discussions, etc. There are other frequent questions and activities that are designed to have students speaking and listening, but they do not require the student to have interacted with the text being studied. Rather, they are based on personal thoughts and experiences and connections to themes.

The speaking and listening opportunities require students to provide evidence from what they are reading and researching. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1, students read “The Masque of the Red Death,” a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. The Extend the Text - Collaborative Learning activity prompts students to Make a Map: “The detailed description on pages 84-85 is quite complex and can be difficult to visualize. With a partner, read the description again and create a map of the fortress. Use an overhead perspective. Once you have established the layout of the rooms, color and furnish them as they are described in the story. When you are finished, compare your map with the maps of other pairs to see if you depicted the fortress in the same way.”
  • In Unit 5, students read “The Drowned Maid” from “The Kalevala,” an epic by Elias Lonnrot. The Extend the Text Critical Literacy section prompts students: “Research another epic besides The Kalevala, such as Homer’s The Iliad or The Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, the Indian Ramayana, Dante’s The Divine Comedy, the old English Beowulf, or John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Then gather with a few classmates and take turns presenting what your epic is about and give a plot summary. Explain what makes your epic an epic. What heroes and gods are portrayed? What does the epic reveal about the legends, beliefs, values, laws, arts, and ways of life of the people from whose culture it arose?"

Frequently, questions and activities provide speaking and listening opportunities about what students are reading and researching, but do not require students to have interacted with the text being studied. Discussions are based more on personal thoughts and experiences and connections to the themes. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 4, the Critical Thinking Discussion Guide provides this prompt: “This story contains a surprise ending which, like a gunshot, shocks the reader and provokes a response. Ask students to discuss the surprise ending. Is it foreshadowed in any way during the story? If so how? Call on volunteers to offer examples of other short stories they have read with surprise endings. How do students feel about this device in fiction? Encourage them to exchange and support their opinions. Though this prompt is tied to a text, the discussion takes place outside the text with students pulling from prior knowledge in order to discuss.
  • In Unit 5, the Extend the Text, Collaborative Learning, Practice Storytelling states, "Many children’s stories, such as 'Cinderella,' 'The Frog and the Prince,' and 'Beauty and the Beast,' contain elements of magic. Work with other students to brainstorm a list of such stories. Take turn telling these stories to each other orally. Then discuss how stories change when they are told orally."

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.

The materials provide ample opportunities for students to practice a mix of both on-demand and process writing. At the end of every reading selection, students are presented with an After Reading section that includes an Extended Text section. Within this section, students are presented with two on-demand writing options. At the close of every unit, students are presented with a Writing Workshop opportunity, which is a process writing where students prewrite, draft, and revise over time. Students are given both examples and steps to follow to ensure success. There are focused projects that incorporate digital resources where appropriate, as explained in the Introduction to Media Text and Visual Media resource.

Examples of on-demand and process writing that meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • In Unit 1 of the Annotated Teacher's Edition, students read “Through the Tunnel,” a short story by Doris Lessing. In Extend the Text, Writing Options, Narrative Writing section, students are provided an on-demand writing opportunity in which they are asked to: “Write a narrative paragraph, or paragraph that tells a story, for classmates about an experience you had that challenged you, taught you a lesson, or gave you an opportunity to prove yourself. In your paragraph, describe the experience and what you learned or gained from it. Consider using an instructive or inspirational tone. Begin by brainstorming a list of possible experiences you could write about. Once you’ve narrowed your list to one experience, jot down a list of details. Then begin drafting your paragraph.”
  • In Unit 2 of the Annotated Teacher's Edition, students read an excerpt from Desert Exile: The Uprooting of a Japanese-American Family, an autobiography by Yoshi Uchida. In the Extend the Text, Writing Options, Creative Writing section, students are provided an on-demand writing opportunity and asked: “Imagine that you are the narrator of Desert Exile and that, while interned at Tanforan, you write a letter to President Roosevelt describing conditions there and conveying your opinions about the internment of Japanese Americans. Write a letter of two or three paragraphs, making sure you express yourself with a firm but respectful tone.”
  • At the end of Unit 3, students complete a process writing workshop where they compose a lyric poem: “Using concise language and imagery, write a lyric poem that expresses emotions about a specific subject.” This is a multi-step process that takes them through the entire process of prewriting, writing, and revising.
  • In Unit 5, students compose a research paper. In the overview of the research paper students are supported by reading about an example: “The legend of King Arthur and the popular trilogy The Lord of the Rings center on the drama of struggle and conquest...When writing about a conflict, whether for a news story, argumentative essay, or research paper, a writer’s mission is to clarify the roots of the conflict, present its development, and examine both sides.” And, within the “Prewrite” section, students are given their research paper prompt: “You may write about any conflict that has taken place in any culture at any time in history. Types of conflict include ethnic and racial tension, civil wars, clashes between new ideas and tradition, and differences in values. Brainstorm a list of conflicts about which you’d like to learn more. Then choose one that interests you.” Students must complete a prewrite, draft, and revision stage for this process writing.
  • In Unit 6, students read “Geraldine Moore the Poet,” a short story by Toni Cade Bambara. Once students finish reading, they are presented with two writing options at the close of the reading selection:
    1. Pretend you are Geraldine Moore. Before you go to sleep that evening on Miss Gladys’s couch, write a diary entry about the events of the day--from your sudden eviction to Mrs. Scott’s emotional reaction to your words. Make sure to include your feelings about all that has happened to you.
    2. Imagine you have been asked to review Geraldine Moore’s poem for a collection of works by young poets. Write a one-page literary review of the poem, analyzing such aspects as its tone, theme, style, and imagery. Come up with a title for the poem that you can refer to as you write.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. (Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.)

The materials provide students ample opportunities to engage in writing activities over the course of the year in a variety of modes, including argumentative, informative, narrative, and descriptive writing as well as research writing and writing to sources. Within these general categories, there is also a wide variety of specific writing tasks. Each of the reading selections is followed by two writing activities in two different modes, and the writing workshop at the end of each unit gives an in-depth exploration and practice of a specific mode as well. Where appropriate, writing opportunities are connected to texts and/or text sets (either as prompts, models, anchors, or supports). Each lesson offers a purpose for the writing, a teaching and modeling section, examples to help guide students, and independent writing time.

In Unit 1, after reading “The Monkey’s Paw,” a short story by W.W. Jacobs, students complete a text extension activity where they compose a piece of informative writing with the following prompt: “Imagine ‘The Monkey's Paw’ is going to be included in this suspense anthology write a one-page analytical introduction to be included in the anthology in which you discuss the use of foreshadowing in the story. Use the notes you took while reading or skim the story to find examples of foreshadowing. Introduce the story, describe examples of foreshadowing and explain the impact of each example. Summarize how the foreshadowing contributes to suspense.”

In Unit 3, after reading “Eating Alone” by Li-Young Lee and “The Floral Apron” by Marilyn Chin, students complete a text extension activity where they compose a piece of creative writing: “Imagine that the speakers in 'Eating Alone' and 'The Floral Apron' meet at a dinner party and begin to discuss their childhood experiences with each other. Write a dialogue for these characters in which they exchange memories and comment on the significance that these recollections have for them. Try to make your dialogue consistent with the personalities and character traits of the speakers, as these are revealed in each poem.”

In Unit 4, Annotated Teacher Edition, Extend the Text, Writing Options section, students complete an argumentative writing piece: “Write a literary review for your local paper. Be sure to include Sandberg’s use of figurative language to emulate the sound of the jazz culture.” They also write an informative piece: “Write a three paragraph critical analysis that examines the poem’s image, sound devices and how these things contribute to what the poem means to you.”

In Unit 5, students read the legend, “The Silver Pool,” retold by Ella Young. Once students complete the reading of “The Silver Pool,” students are presented with two writing options in the Extend the Text section, located within the After Reading section:

  • Creative Writing: “A field guide is a book used by naturalists and botanists (scientists who study plants) to identify animals and plants found in nature. The book includes descriptions and, usually, drawings or photographs of various species. Write a field guide entry for the Salmon of Knowledge. How would you describe the magical fish so that visitors to the area can recognize it? If you like, you may also draw or paint the fish to illustrate the entry.”
  • Informative Writing: “A classmate has several question about ‘The Silver Pool.’ Why, for instance, is the Salmon given a key role in the tale, and why would eating it provide knowledge? Why was poetry of such importance to the ancient Irish? And what happens to the hero in other tales in the Fionn Saga? Research the answers to these questions (or others you may have) on the Internet or in the library and write a three to four paragraph informative essay.”

In Unit 6, students read Pablo Neruda’s poem, “House,” and a short story by Ray Bradbury, “There Will Come Soft Rains.” Once students complete both the short story and poem, they are presented with two writing options, both of which are within the creative writing realm:

  1. Pretend the house is being interviewed. Write a monologue by the house recalling its day-to-day activities and its fateful end.
  2. What do you think the world will be like in 2026? Will humanity destroy itself? Write the outline for a short story that addresses these questions. Include detailed descriptions of the plot, setting, conflict, and characters.

Within Unit 6, students complete an Independent Reading; they read an excerpt from Maus: A Survivor’s Tale I, a graphic novel by Art Spiegelman. Once students read and analyze the excerpt from the graphic novel, students are presented with two writing options:

  • Try to create a section of your own graphic novel in the spirit of Spiegelman’s Maus by interviewing an adult and recreating a brief scene from their own life in panels. Create your own text and images to convey the scene. If you are not comfortable including your own drawings, consider creating collages from magazines or newspapers.
  • Maus uses a cartoon-like style to depict an extremely horrific period in Europe’s history. Write an analytical essay that discusses both positive and negative outcomes that could result from this conflicting style and subject combination.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.

The materials provide opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply research-based and evidence-based writing to support analyses, arguments and synthesis.". At the end of every reading selection, in the After Reading/Extend the Text section, students are presented with two on-demand writing options that prompt students to complete short, research-based writing using the texts within the section. The writing prompts that require students to interact with the text explicitly state that the students need to cite evidence. Students experience research-based and evidence-based writing within every Writing Workshop section that occurs at the close of each unit. Many writing opportunities are focused around each student’s analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources.

In Unit 1 students read “Two Friends,” a short story by Guy de Maupassant. In the After the Reading, Writing Options, Extend the Text, Argumentative Writing section, students write an argumentative essay using the following prompt: “Was it wise for the two friends next door to go fishing during a war? Should they have just stayed home? Write a five- paragraph argumentative essay in which you take a position on whether or not the two friends were foolish to go fishing. In your first paragraph, introduce the title and author of the story and state your position. Use the next three paragraphs to argue three points in support of your position. Use evidence from the story to support your ideas. Also use these paragraphs to refute any argument someone might take against your position.”

In Unit 1 students read “On the Rainy River,” a short story by Tim O’Brien. In Writing Options question one, students are asked: “Consider the friendship between Songsam and Tokchae and friendships you have experienced. Write an ode to friendship. In your poem, you may choose to identify the important elements of friendship, explain how friendship affects lives, or praise a particular friend. Use examples from your own experience or from the story to illustrate your ideas and your ode.”

In Unit 2, students read “We Heard It Before We Saw Anything,” a news article by Julian West, and “Like Being Spun in a Giant Washer” by David Williams. In the After the Reading, Writing Options, Extend the Text, Creative Writing section, students respond to the following prompt: “Imagine you are the president of Sri Lanka. Write a press release in which you declare a national state of emergency for your country in the aftermath of the tsunami. A press release is an announcement delivered to the press by a government agency or other organization. Be sure to use the facts gathered from both news articles to help support the need for a declaration of a national state of emergency.”

In Unit 3, after reading “Introduction to Poetry” by Billy Collins, students complete a text extension activity which requires them to use evidence from the text: “An analogy is a comparison of two things that are alike in some ways but otherwise quite different. Writers often use things that are well-known to help readers understand objects or ideas that are less familiar. In lines 12-16 of this poem, what well-known action is being described? What less familiar action is being compared to this action? How does this comparison help you to understand the less familiar action? Write an essay answering these questions and summarizing what the analogies tell you about the less familiar action.”

In Unit 3, after reading “Jazz Fantasia” by Carl Sandburg, students complete a text extension activity which requires them to use evidence from the text: “The style of ‘Jazz Fantasia’ is probably quite different from that of other poems you’ve read. Imagine you want to explain to a friend what this poem is about and how it is unique. Write a three-paragraph critical analysis that examines the poem’s images, rhythms, and sound devices and how these things contribute to what the poem means to you. Use specific lines from the poem to support your ideas. If there are parts of the poem that don’t make sense to you or that you don’t care for, include these types of things in your analysis as well.”

In Unit 3, after reading “Three Tankas,” by Okamoto Kanoko, Miyazawa Kenji, and Tsukamoto Kunio, students complete a text extension activity which requires them to use evidence from texts: “How does the tanka compare with other types of poetry? Choose another poem from the unit. In a two-page compare-and-contrast essay, discuss the similarities and differences between the poem you chose and the tanka. In your comparison, consider the following elements of poetry: speaker, imagery, rhythm, and theme. Also consider your reaction to the different types of poetry. Which do you find more compelling? Be sure to cite specific examples from the texts to support your ideas.”

In Unit 5 students read “Orpheus,” a myth retold by Robert Graves, and “Tree Telling of Orpheus,” a lyric poem by Denise Lvertov. Once students complete both readings, they are presented with two writing options within the After Reading, Extend the Text section; the second writing option is evidence-based to support a character sketch: Descriptive Writing: “For an encyclopedia of famous mythological characters, write a brief character sketch of Orpheus, based on what you learned about him from the myth and the poem. A character sketch is a description of a character in a story. The character sketch should include a description of the character’s physical appearance, as well as attributes of his or her personality. Be sure to use evidence from the texts to support your ideas.”

In Unit 5 students read “Mother Holle,” a fairy tale by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, and “The Wonderful Hair,” a fairy tale retold by Parker Fillmore. Once students complete both fairy tale readings, they are presented with two writing prompts at the end of the selection within the After Reading, Extend the Text section; the second writing option is evidence-based to support argumentative writing: “Write a review of ‘Mother Holle’ or ‘The Wonderful Hair’ for your local newspaper. In addition to providing your opinion of the story, consider the messages that you think each story suggests and how well you think these messages come across. Also consider the characters and the development, or lack thereof, of the characters. How do the characters support the messages of the story? Be sure to include specific examples to strengthen your argument.”

In Unit 5 students complete the writing workshop activity, which is an extended project where students practice informative writing through the lens of a research paper. The prompt for the research-based writing is as follows: “You may write about any conflict that has taken place in any culture at any time in history. Types of conflict include ethnic and racial tension, civil wars, clashes between new ideas and tradition, and differences in values. Brainstorm a list of conflicts about which you’d like to learn more. Then choose one that interests you.” Within the Prewrite section, there is a support for Narrowing the Topic: “Do some preliminary research on your broad topic as a way of finding a narrow area on which to focus. For example, a research paper on racial conflict in the United States could be a thousand pages long and still not cover everything, but a paper on the 1965 race riots in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, would be manageable.” The research requirement further pushes students to find reliable sources: “To determine whether a site is reliable, find out who created it. If it is the website of an educational institution or professional organization, it is probably reliable...Try to find both primary sources and secondary sources.”

In Unit 6 students read an excerpt from In a Sunburned Country, a piece of travel writing by Bill Bryson. Once students have completed this reading, they are presented with two writing options; the second writing option is based off of the reading, but also requires students to complete additional research: “Bryson mentions several different types of poisonous creatures native to Australia. Choose one of these creatures to research. Then create an informative fact sheet about the creature and what people should do if they encounter the creature.”

In Unit 6 students read Gabriel García Márquez’s short story, “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings.” Once students have completed the reading, they are presented with two writing options, both of which are evidence-based and require students to go back to the text:

  1. Write a children’s book based on this story. Before you begin, decide what you think is the theme, or central message, of García Márquez’s tale and consider how you can get this message across to young readers. Read your story to elementary school children for their reactions.
  2. You and a friend disagree about whether this story is really about the old winged man or about the villagers who are affected by him. Choose your position, and write a one-page argumentative essay in which you support it.

Indicator 1n

Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
1/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria for materials including instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

The materials contain several workshops in grammar and style, as well as vocabulary and spelling. Within each unit, students experience between two and six Grammar and Style Workshops; all workshops have students practice various grammatical and syntactical tasks that apply directly to the texts they read within the unit. However, there is inconsistent support for students to practice in increasingly sophisticated contexts. The skills instruction does not include opportunities for application both in and out of context. Additionally, the materials do not promote and build students’ ability to apply conventions and other aspects of language within their own writing. There are minimal opportunities to practice skills taught in the unit with the selected readings in the Teacher’s Edition, therefore limiting opportunities for increased sophistication of the addressed standards. While the resource workbook, Exceeding the Standards, includes “comprehensive skills development lessons," the same language standards are not necessarily addressed during the Writer’s Workshop task or other possible places within the unit of study. Therefore, students are not consistently given opportunities to apply the lessons on grammar and conventions in context.

In Unit 1, students experience three Grammar and Style workshops. Within each Grammar and Style workshop, students practice Understand the Concept and an Apply the Skill sections. There are five Grammar and Style workshops within Unit 1. One example is:

  • Parallel Structure: In the Parallel Structure Workshop, students read about parallelism; as they build their knowledge they are also presented with examples throughout. Students are also presented with Review Terms. Within the Apply the Skill section students practice the following skills: Identify Parallel Structure, Correct Parallel Structure, Improve a Paragraph, Use Parallel Structure In Your Writing, and Extend the Skill. An example from Correct Parallel Structure is as follows: “2. Jerry’s feelings are conflicted between longs to go to the bay and contrition for making his mother anxious.” An example from Extend the Skill is as follows: “Many speeches, such as Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, and John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address, use parallelism. Use the library or Internet to find a copy of one of one of these speeches, or a different speech that interests you, and identify examples of parallelism in the speech you choose. How might the use of parallel structure influence the effect of the speech on its listeners?”

In Unit 2, students experience two Grammar and Style Workshops. Within each Grammar and Style Workshop, students practice an Understand the Concept section and an Apply the Skill section. Within Unit 2, there are six Grammar and Style workshops. One example is:

  • Consistent Use of Verb Tenses: For this workshop, students read about consistent use of verb tenses; as they build their knowledge they are also presented with examples throughout. Students are also presented with Review Terms. Within the Apply the Skill section students practice the following skills: Identify Verb Tenses, Correct Errors in Verb Tense, Use Verb Tenses Consistently in Your Writing, and Extend the Skill. An example from Use Verb Tenses Consistently in Your Writing is as follows: “Choose one of your favorite authors and write a two-paragraph biographical sketch of him or her. Pay close attention to the verb tenses you choose to use, and try to use them consistently throughout the two paragraphs. When you have finished your draft, exchange it with a partner. Your partner should check carefully for consistent use of verb tenses. Rewrite any sentences that contain errors.”

In Unit 4, Drama, there are three grammar and style workshops: Active and Passive Voice; Hyphens, Dashes, and Ellipses; and Coordination, Subordination, and Apposition. It contains two Vocabulary and Spelling Workshops: Using a Dictionary and Thesaurus, and Spelling Rules and Tips. Examples include:

  • In the Hyphens, Dashes, and Ellipses Workshop, students read about the appropriate time to use each of the three pieces of punctuation. They then complete practice exercises such as identifying the proper placement of hyphens and dashes in sentences: “1. Julius Caesar was approximately fifty six years old when he died.”
  • In the Coordination, Subordination, and Apposition Workshop, students read about independent and subordinate clauses, appositives and appositive phrases. They then complete practice exercises such as identifying whether a sentence uses a coordination, subordination, apposition, or a combination of the three: “1. Creon buried our brother Eteocles with military honors, gave him a soldier’s funeral, and it was right that he should.”
  • The Vocabulary and Spelling section of The Exceeding the Standards booklet includes practice exercises to support the spelling and word classification workshop: categorizing and classifying vocabulary; semantic mapping; spelling rules and tips; and spelling patterns.

In Unit 5, Grammar and Style, Understand the Concept, students learn the concept of Using Adjectives and Adverbs. After reviewing the terms. In Applying the Skill students Identify Adjectives and Adverbs in Literature. Students Understand Adjectives and Adverbs, by using them in sentences. Students also practice using Adjectives and Adverbs in Your Writing, by practicing writing a letter. In Extend the Skill, students practice using adjectives and adverbs while rewriting sentences.

In Unit 6, Independent Reading, grammar practice is only in the Exceeding the Standards resource, Grammar and Style.

  • Lesson 52: students practice recognizing sentence fragments. In Exercise 1, students practice Identifying Sentence Fragments, in Exercise 2, Understanding Sentence Fragments and in Exercise 3, Correcting Sentence Fragments.
  • Lesson 57: students practice Making Your Language Precise and Colorful. In Exercise 1, students practice Identifying Precise and Colorful Language in Literature, in Exercise 2, students practice Understanding Precise and Colorful Language, and in Exercise 3, students practice Using Precise and Colorful Language in Your Writing.
  • Lesson 61: students practice developing appropriate paragraph format in The Paragraph.In Exercise 1, students practice Identifying Main Ideas in Paragraphs in Literature, in Exercise 2, students practice Understanding Main Ideas and Supporting Details in a Paragraph, and in Exercise 3, students practice Using Related Sentences to Develop a Main Idea in a Paragraph.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Partially Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Materials do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic or theme/topic or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently. While there are some targeted questions and series of questions for students that promote students’ ability to draw conclusions and cite textual evidence, determine theme, and analyze point of view, they do not promote students' building knowledge of the content and texts. Students are presented with text-dependent and text-specific questions; however, the questions do not require students to build knowledge across the text. Culminating tasks do not require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic, nor do they integrate skills. Materials include vocabulary over the course of a school-year, but there is no cohesive plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Materials include a variety of resources and supports to provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in research activities that support the understanding of texts and topics within texts. Materials meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Criterion 2a - 2h

18/32
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials build knowledge through integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Materials do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic or theme/topic or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.While there are some targeted questions and series of questions for students that promote students’ ability to draw conclusions and cite textual evidence, determine theme, and analyze point of view, they do not promote students' building knowledge of the content and texts. Students are presented with text-dependent and text-specific questions; however, the questions do not require students to build knowledge across the text. Materials include a variety of resources and supports to provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. Materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in research activities that support the understanding of texts and topics within texts. Materials meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic or theme/topic or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.

The materials are organized by units consisting of broad genres: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, folk literature, and independent reading. A quote at the beginning of each unit is intended to give insight into the collection of literature in the unit. Along with the quote are guiding questions and commentary that are meant to expand upon the quote. While the quote, questions, and commentary at the beginning set the stage for defining a theme or topic, the texts throughout the unit do not consistently connect back to them.Many of the texts in the unit do not relate to each other with a common theme or topic, and students do not build knowledge to help them better read complex texts. Many of the Mirrors & Windows questions focus on text-to-student understanding, rather than the text, and they are not building the student's textual knowledge.

In Unit 2, Nonfiction, students are presented with the following in the Unit 2 Overview: “A natural disaster takes the lives of tens of thousands of people. One couple's stand against racism changes a nation. Two families in different parts of the world suffer through the same war. These are just some of the real people and events you will discover in this unit. As you read, you will look at the world through someone else’s eyes--eyes not too different from your own.” While there are questions presented at the beginning of the unit, the questions themselves, along with the commentary, fail to identify an actual topic or theme; a topic or theme is hinted at, but the presumed topic or theme is not clear. Students read “Montgomery Boycott,” an excerpt from Coretta Scott King’s memoir. In the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, instructors are presented with the following Mirrors & Windows task prior to students: “The Mirrors & Windows questions at the end of this selection encourage students to consider the theme of great leaders facing fear. To prepare students to answer these questions, ask them to name great leaders from history and discuss fears these people may have had.” Students, at the end of the reading selection, are presented with the Mirrors & Windows question: “‘Fear was an invisible presence at the meeting, along with courage and hope.’ When have you been both fearful and courageous at the same time? What does it mean to you that tremendous leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. also experienced fear?” The preceding questions are focused on text-to-student connections in lieu of building textual knowledge.

In Unit 4, Drama, students begin with a quote at the beginning of the unit: “Drama is life with the dull bits cut out.” Included with the quote are guiding questions and a suggestion for students to approach reading the texts in the unit: “Have you ever seen in someone an unquenchable desire for fame or greatness? Think about a story on the news that made you ask, ‘What was that person thinking?’ Most of the plays you will read in this unit were written long before you were born, but you’ll find as you read them that even though times have changed, the desires and behavior of human beings have not.” Each of selections has its own Mirrors and Windows questions for the students to explore. For example, A Marriage Proposal is about marriage. The Teacher’s Edition suggests that teachers “ask students the following: What do you think people in late-1800s Russia wanted out of marriage? Is it different from what people expect today? Ask them to read to find out why the people in the play want to get married.” The Mirrors and Windows question at the end of A Marriage Proposal asks students to tie the selection in with marriage: “What do you think makes for a good marriage? How has the thinking about what makes a good marriage changed over time? Will Lomov and Natalia have a good marriage?” Again, the preceding questions are focused on text-to-student connections in lieu of building textual knowledge.

In Unit 6, Independent Reading, students are introduced to the following guiding questions: “What is your opinion about reading? What do you prefer to read: novels, comic books, or scientific journals? Being able to read well is a skill that is essential to all walks of life. The selections in this unit are for you to read independently. As you read, remember to use the strategies and skills you've encountered in previous units.” Students independently read “Geraldine Moore the Poet,” a short story by Toni Cade Bambara. The Mirrors & Windows focus questions at the beginning of the text asks students, “What is the purpose of poetry? What should poetry express? Does everyone have the ability to write good poetry? Why or why not?” The Mirrors & Windows focus questions at the end of the text, asks students, “Try expressing what is it like to be…. to be…. alive in this…..this glorious world. Is Mrs. Scott correct in her ideas about the purpose of poetry? What would you say to someone who thinks art and literature have nothing to do with the problems of everyday life?” While these questions are engaging, students are not necessarily building knowledge, and the teacher will need to supplement with additional texts and questions to deepen knowledge.

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

While there are some targeted questions and series of questions for students that promote students’ ability to draw conclusions and cite textual evidence, determine theme, and analyze point of view, they do not promote students' building knowledge of the content and texts. There are few questions that support students in analyzing author’s language and word choice. The questions that do focus on language and structure do not support students to analyze its effect on the text.

In Unit 2, students read a passage from “My Left Foot.” Sequenced sets of questions provide students practice with re-reading and include the following:

  • “To what does Brown compare his brothers and sisters?” A metaphor is used, and students must have the skills to identify and interpret the metaphor.
  • Students make a prediction: “What do you think will happen to change Brown’s life?”
  • Students close their eyes and visualize a scene that is described in the passage.
  • In the Refer to Text Reason with Text section, students first list details that Brown gives about his birth, and then students explain the passage.

In Unit 3, students read “I Am Offering This Poem,” a poem by Jimmy Santiago Baca; this poem is presented as a Close Reading Model. As students read Baca’s poem, they reference questions within the margins that address specific parts and aspects of the text that build and develop students’ understanding and set teachers up for more success guiding students to academic vocabulary practice. For example:

  • “Use Reading Strategies (Visualize): Picture each image in your mind as you read. What feelings do the images create inside you?
  • Analyze Literature (Analogy): An analogy is a comparison of two things that are alike in some ways but otherwise quite different. In lines 1 - 13 what four items does the speaker compare to the gift of the poem? How effective are these four analogies?
  • Use Reading Strategies (Make Inferences): Why is the metaphorical cabin or hogan “tucked away” in the trees?
  • Analyze Literature (Image and Imagery): Which images do you find the most powerful? Why?”

In Unit 4, students read the Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. During reading, strategies are reviewed throughout the unit, such as ask questions, make predictions, visualize and make inferences. After reading the play, students answer the following questions in the After Reading Refer to Text Reason with Text section: “Distinguish whose armies are fighting during the battle. What is the outcome of the battle? What happens to Brutus and Cassius? State what Brutus and Cassius say to each other at end end of Scene I. Quote what Brutus says when he dies. To whom does he say it to?” These questions will yield comprehension information for teachers, but do not require students to consider anything beyond surface-level information.

In Unit 5, students study Reading Folk Literature Independently. This section within Unit 5 prepares students’ reading skills and provides a framework for reading folk literature. These "checklist" questions will help aid in students' general comprehension of the texts, but the teacher will need to add more to support students in growing knowledge and/or doing deeper analysis of vocabulary and text components: "From which culture does this tale come? Who are the characters in this tale? Which supporting details describe the characters? Where does the narrator or author seem to make judgements about the characters or their actions?" After reading, students answer: "What is the final result of the tale? What seems to be the main message of the tale?”

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

In the curriculum, students are presented with text-dependent and text-specific questions; however, the questions do not require students to build knowledge across the text. Included are some text-dependent questions for each selection in the form of During Reading questions and After Reading questions. The During Reading questions require only a surface amount of knowledge to complete. The After Reading questions are broken into Refer to Text and Reason with Text questions. The Refer to Text questions require surface knowledge of the text. The Reason with the Text questions are designed to increase in complexity from understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating; however, these questions comprise a small percentage of the questions and tasks that students are required to address.

Most questions and tasks do not require that students refer to the text, and it is unclear how the questions work to build knowledge across an individual text. Each unit includes two texts that are paired with the intention of teaching literary elements across texts. The individual paired texts have text-dependent questions at the end, but there is only one question that asks the students to compare the texts, and the question does not promote a deep analysis of the texts. There are other text-to-text connections established in the units, but the questions about these connections do not require an analysis of the integration of ideas.

The Mirrors & Windows questions are mainly text-to-student questions, where students are not required to read the text in order to be able to respond. The Annotated Teacher’s Edition presents verbal questions within the outside band as students are reading, but students are not practicing questions independently or in groups. The Exceeding the Standards and Meeting the Standards supplemental resources offer additional, yet limited, activities within the unit to compare a set of texts. Various texts within the units have student writing, speaking, and researching tasks for evidence of students’ need to perform analysis of texts to complete quality cumulative assignments and tasks.

In Unit 1, Fiction, students read and compare two texts: “Catch the Moon” by Judith Ortiz Cofer and “Two Kinds” by Amy Tan. At the end of the second text, students are asked these comparison questions: “What traits do the main characters of each story have in common? How are they different? Compare the relationships between Luis and his father and Jing-mei and her mother. How do these relationships help characterize Luis and Jing-mei?”

In Unit 2, Nonfiction, students read an excerpt from the autobiography My Left Foot by Christy Brown. At the end of the selection, students are asked text-dependent questions. In order to Refer to the Text, students are asked to “Name the character traits of Brown’s mother.” To further Reason with the Text, students are asked to “Describe how Brown feels about his mother. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.”

In Unit 3, Poetry, students read two lyric poems: “Eating Alone” by Li-Young Lee and “The Floral Apron" by Marilyn Chin.

  • In Compare Literature: Setting and Mood, student are asked: “In these two poems, what similarities and setting can you identify? What are some of the differences? In 'Eating Alone,' how would you describe the mood of the whole poem? In 'The Floral Apron,' at what point is there a shift in mood? How does the shift contribute to the meaning of the poem?”
  • In Extend the Text, Writing Options: Creative Writing, students are asked: “Imagine that the speakers in 'Eating Alone,' and 'The Floral Apron,' meet at a dinner party and begin to discuss their childhood experiences with each other. Write a dialogue for these characters, and comment on the significance that these recollections have for them.” Informative Writing: “Research the background and family histories of Li -Young Lee and Marilyn Chin more fully, using library and internet sources. Then write a four-paragraph analysis in which you discuss the importance of historical context for these two poems.”

In Unit 4, Drama, students read, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Act V, a play by William Shakespeare, and Literature Connections: “from The Prince, A Treatise by Niccolo Machiavelli,” and Informational Text Connection, “Et tu, Denzel? Washington shakes up Shakespeare,” an article by Allison Samuels.

  • The After Reading, Reason with Text questions have students refer to both the play and the treatise: “Relate this information to Shakespeare's Caesar and Antony. Would Machiavelli characterize each man as a lion, a fox, or a combination of both animals? Cite evidence from the play that supports lion-like or fox-like qualities of each man.”
  • The Text to Text Connections sections asks: “Does the portrayal of Julius Caesar in Shakespeare's play align with what Machiavelli states about him? Which man do you think Machiavelli would have admired more: Brutus or Anthony? What advice might he have given Brutus? Do you agree with Machiavelli's political perspective? Why or why not?”

In Unit 5, Folk Literature, the main question is “What stories do you remember from your childhood? As you read the stories and poems in this unit, you may find some of the situations or settings unfamiliar. Focus on the characters instead; you may have more in common than you think.” At the beginning of the Unit, students read a myth, a poem, two legends, and the anchor text, an epic legend. There are text-dependent questions at the end of each text in the Refer and Reason section, and there are tasks; however, they are listed as extensions and are optional.

  • The texts read in the Guided Reading section include: “Orpheus” by Robert Graves, “A Tree Telling of Orpheus” by Denise Levertov, The Once and Future King by T.H. White, and a legend by Sir Thomas Malory. These texts directly support the Anchor text, Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali. Mirrors & Windows questions are provided at the beginning and end of each text selection:
    • For Orpheus: “The Mirrors & Windows questions at the end of the selection ask how the myth of Orpheus reflects the cultural values of the ancient Greeks. You may want to introduce this idea before reading by asking 'What do myths reveal about the cultures that created them?'”
    • The Literary Element listed in the Scope and Sequence is “Plot and Conflict,” and the Mirrors and Windows theme is “Greek Culture.”
  • The Guided Reading section of Unit 5 features a novel excerpt from The Ingenious Hildalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha. The Mirrors & Windows question before reading is “What behavior does the author parody through this depiction of Don Quixote?” After reading, students are asked questions about the character of Don Quixote.The Literary Element listed in the Scope and Sequence is “Parody and Illusion,” and the Mirrors and Windows theme is “Character.”
  • After reading “Mulan,” an Anonymous ballad translated by Hans H. Frankel, students are asked the Mirrors & Windows question, “Suppose a friend tells you Mu-lan should not have taken such drastic measures to save her father--that she acted impulsively. How would you respond?” The Literary Element listed in the Scope and Sequence is “Ballard,” and the Mirrors and Windows theme is “Courage and Foolishness.”
  • The Culminating Tasks are a Speaking and Listening Workshop to prepare a Multimedia Presentation and Writing, Informative Writing, Write a Research Paper.

Unit 6 is presented to students as an Independent Reading Unit. Considering this unit is entirely dedicated to independent reading, Before Reading and After Reading sections have changed. In both the Annotated Teacher’s Edition and the Student Edition, there are no Before Reading sections; instead, there are short blurbs about the author and poem selection. So, as students are reading within the student textbook, they are not presented with a purpose, objectives, or additional guiding information. Although, students are still presented with Mirrors & Windows questions at the close of every text, and students also experience a Refer and Reason section that poses three questions at the end of every individual or paired readings, the questions presented are not sequenced in a way that builds student knowledge and integration of ideas across individual or paired readings.

  • Students read “Contents of the Dead Man’s Pocket,” a short story by Jack Finney. After students read Finney’s short story, they read a fact sheet by the American Psychological Association: “Mind/Body Health: Job Stress.” At the close of the short story, students are presented with a Mirrors & Windows question: “How do you determine what is important in life? Is there anything important enough to risk your life for?” There is no Mirrors & Windows question present for the fact sheet. Students then are presented with the Refer and Reason section that has three questions all in regard to “Contents of the Dead Man’s Pocket,” which have students recall and identify information. There is, however, one Text to Text Connection question: “After reading this article, what evidence from ‘Contents of the Dead Man’s Pocket’ makes clear that Tom Benecke is suffering from job stress? How does the story’s ending suggest that he has recognized his problem? What changes do you think he might make in his life as a result of this experience?”
  • Students read “Miriam,” a short story by Truman Capote. At the close of the text, students are presented with the following Mirrors & Windows question: “If you were Mrs. Miller at the end of the story, what would you do? How have you handled frightening or unexplainable situations in the past?” Students are then presented with Emily Dickinson’s poem, “The Only Ghost I Ever Saw.” At the close of the text no Mirrors & Windows question is present. Students are then required to complete three Refer and Reason questions; an example is as follows: “Who do you think Miriam is? Is she real, a ghost, or a figment of Mrs. Miller’s imagination? Who is the old man? Use evidence from the text to explain your answers.” Students are also presented with two Text to Text Connection questions; one of which is as follows: “Compare and contrast the speaker’s reaction to the ghost in Emily Dickinson’s poem with Mrs. Miller’s reaction to Miriam. Which do you find more surprising?”

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
0/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Culminating tasks do not require students to demonstrate knowledge of a topic, nor do they integrate skills. Students complete each workshop independently of each other. Some tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students are often demonstrating mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge. After every text selection in the After Reading, Refer to Text, Reason with Text section, there are text-dependent questions, and throughout each reading, there are strategies and activities that build students’ skills to complete the end of unit activities. Each unit includes three types of culminating activities: a Speaking and Listening Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Test Practice Workshop. The performance tasks that the students are asked to complete in these culminating activities correspond to the questions, discussions, and writing prompts.

In Unit 3, tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students demonstrate a mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge. For example:

  • Speaking and Listening Workshop: Students present an Oral Response to Literature, “When you present an oral response to literature, you simply state aloud your reactions to something you have read. You present informal oral responses every time your teacher asks you to share your ideas about something you have read. In this workshop, you will present a formal two-minute oral response to poetry. Students will follow five steps to prepare their oral response to literature; step one, select a poem;step two, study the poem; step three, organize your ideas; step four, practice; step five, deliver the response. This task is loosely related to a text, but focuses on student reaction and not the building of knowledge.
  • Writing Workshop: Students write a Lyric Poem: ”Using concise language and imagery, write a lyric poem that expresses emotions about a specific subject.” Students write a lyric poem in three steps: Step one, prewrite, select your topic, gather information/discovery, organize your ideas, write your opening. Step two, draft your opening stanza, draft your body stanzas, draft your concluding stanza. Step three, revise your poem and evaluate your draft. This task focuses on the skill of writing a lyrical poem.

In Unit 5, tasks are loosely connected to unit texts, while others are not connected to texts. Students demonstrate a mastery of the unit skills rather than demonstrating understanding or knowledge. For example:

  • Speaking & Listening Workshop: Prepare a Multimedia Presentation. In this workshop, you will prepare and deliver an informative presentation using a combination of text, sound, pictures, animation, and video. A multimedia presentation uses a variety of media, a plural form of medium referring to a system of communication, information, or entertainment.” This tasks focuses on the skill of creating a multimedia presentation. Students are asked to pick a topic that they know well. Directions and teacher support focus on the development of the presentation, not building knowledge of a topic but does not build knowledge of a unit topic.
  • Writing Workshop: Informative Writing: “Research a conflict and write an informative paper reporting your findings. Use sources, document them carefully, and prepare a final bibliography to accompany your paper. The Purpose is to research and analyze a conflict and inform your audience about the issues involved. The Audience is members of a community organization interested in learning more about the conflict. Select your topic - you may write about any conflict that has taken place in any culture at any time in history." This assignment focuses on the process of research and does not build knowledge of a unit topic.
  • Test Practice Workshop: Students practice specific reading skills, such as evaluating cause and effect. Students also go through a mini writing skills workshop, where they practice the argumentative essay in the format of a timed writing, and they practice revising and editing skills. This workshop focuses on the reading skills cause and effect and does not build knowledge of a topic.

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/language in context.

Materials include vocabulary over the course of a school year, but there is no cohesive plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts. Vocabulary is repeated in contexts, as seen in the Vocabulary and Spelling lessons which are integrated with two of the literature selections in each unit. These lessons incorporate vocabulary words from the preceding selection to provide context and repetition for students to increase their understanding and vocabulary knowledge. However, academic vocabulary is not repeated sufficiently across units throughout the course of the year.

The Teacher’s Edition has key terms with definitions, but there is little to no representation of academic vocabulary. When the academic vocabulary is mentioned within a unit or along with a reading they are not repeated sufficiently through the unit or throughout the course of the year.

A Language Arts Handbook is provided as a student resource at the back of the text which includes Vocabulary and Spelling, and teachers can direct students to these resources.

The Meeting the Standards Unit Resources do include cumulative vocabulary lists and the Teacher’s Edition provides a Building Vocabulary section that includes an overview of all unit vocabulary words, academic vocabulary, and key terms. The Master word lists cover vocabulary from Common Core Tier One, Tier Two, and Tier Three words. Academic words included and addressed in the Vocabulary Practice Lessons that follow do not appear in other Vocabulary Lessons within the grade level and do not appear within the assessment practice or Writing Workshop within the same unit. Additionally, the Exceeding the Standards resource includes a vocabulary and spelling section that contains lessons and practice on word parts and word origins; borrowed words and informal language; testing vocabulary and choosing words; and working with academic vocabulary.

In Unit 2, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, after the Scope and Sequence, Building Vocabulary, Selection Words section, is Academic Vocabulary, which “consists of words that are used in the directions about the lessons. Academic vocabulary words explain to students what to focus on within the selection, help establish the story context, clarify the meaning of literary terms, and define the goals or instructional purpose (Common Core Tier Two Words).

In Unit 2, Annotated Teacher's Edition, Vocabulary and Spelling, Understand the Concept section, students practice using Prefixes, Roots, and Suffixes: “Participating in this lesson will enable students to understand the concept of using prefixes, roots, and suffixes. Review terms relevant to prefixes, roots and suffixes. Practice the concept by completing skill exercises. Apply the concept to extension activities.”

In Unit 3, students complete a Vocabulary & Spelling lesson on literal and figurative meanings of words. Students are given the following review terms within this lesson: literal language, figurative language, simile, metaphor, personification, and hyperbole. There are four exercises labeled A through D. In Exercise A, students “Identify each of the following quotations as a simile, metaphor, personification, or hyperbole”; Exercise B states, “With a partner, brainstorm a simile, metaphor, personification, and hyperbole for each word listed below. Then use the items you brainstormed for one of the words to write a sonnet about that word. Share your sonnet with the class in a formal poetry reading.” Exercise C requires students to “Rewrite the paragraph shown below, adding figurative language to make it more vivid and appealing. Try to use at least one simile, one metaphor, and one personification”; Exercise D requires students to “Write a paragraph in which you describe a special person in your life, such as a family member, classmate, friend, or adult mentor. Use at least four figures of speech in your writing: one metaphor, one personification, and one hyperbole.”

In Unit 4, students complete a Vocabulary & Spelling lesson on using a dictionary and thesaurus correctly. Students are given the following review terms within this lesson: main entry, pronunciation, part-of-speech label, etymology, definitions, example phrase, synonyms, and other forms. There are four exercises labeled A through D. In Exercise A, students “Use a dictionary to find the etymology (the origins) of each of the following words from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and the poem ‘The Ides of March’ (page 600). Also note the pronunciation and the various meanings of each word, if there is more than one”; Exercise C states, “Using a thesaurus, rewrite the sentences below to replace the overused word great with a more interesting or appropriate word or words.”

In Unit 5 students take part in a vocabulary and spelling lesson on words with multiple meanings. During the lesson they encounter these vocabulary words: derived, versatile, sovereignty, contrivance, wile, lewdly, and profanely. They also review or learn the key terms connotations, verbs, nouns, adjectives, and homographs. Once they understand the key terms, they practice their understanding of these terms by choosing the correct definition of a word based on the context clues provided.

In the introduction to Unit 6, during the introduction, students encounter the vocabulary words revelation, abruptly, vendor, and bland. They also review or learn the key terms preview, purpose, visualize, inferences, clarify, summarize, and prior knowledge.

Indicator 2f

Materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

The materials include a variety of resources and supports to provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks. Throughout each unit, at the end of each reading selection, informal writing activities are provided. Students are gradually released to perform independent reading and tasks towards the end of each unit; each unit culminates with a Writing Workshop that has a highly scaffolded process toward a writing piece, as well as a scaffolded on-demand writing prompt. The assessments for Units 5 and 6 include an extended writing prompt, increasing the cognitive demand on students toward the end of the year. Throughout the year, both teacher and peers provide feedback to ensure that students' writing skills are increasing. Multiple additional writing supports can be found in the support materials of the curriculum.

  • The Common Core Assessment Practice booklet that contains reading selections with occasional short answer questions that refer to the text and constructed response writing prompts covering argument, informational/explanatory, and narrative writing types.
  • The Meeting the Standards booklet has short answer questions that relate to texts and the use of literary elements, and it has worksheets that can be used to scaffold some of the Extend the Text writing prompts.
  • The Exceeding the Standards booklet gives detailed, structured support for the entire writing process for one type of writing per unit.
  • The Assessment Guide has a summative assessment for each of the reading selections in each unit that includes a writing prompt that requires students to reference the text.

When all of the program resources are used in coordination with each other, teachers can provide a year-long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

Examples of a cohesive plan of writing instruction and tasks to meet the criteria for this indicator include, but are not limited to, the following:

In Unit 1, Annotated Teacher's Edition, the first selection is a Close Reading of “The Open Window,” a short story by Saki. In the Extend the Text, Writing Options, Creative Writing section, students are given the following prompt: “Using what you have learned about Frampton and his sister from the story and filling in the rest with your imagination, write the letter of introduction Frampton presents to Mrs. Sappleton. Keep in mind that the Suttles and Framptons belong to ‘polite society.’" An additional support for this story is provided in the Meeting the Standards Guide, Analyze Literature, Characterization section. To gain a better understanding of the author’s fleshing out of the characters, students find evidence in the story that supports the character descriptions provided. There is a graphic organizer with sections for each character beginning with Vera. Students fill in the following three columns: What a character says, What a character does, and What the author says.

In Unit 2, Annotated Teacher's Edition, the first selection is a Close Reading of “Montgomery Boycott” by Loretta Scott King. Students are provided the following writing opportunities:

  • In Extend the Text, Writing Options, Creative Writing section, students are given the following prompt: “Write a leaflet to promote the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Your purpose is to get the proper information to people and to convince them to join the boycott. The leaflet should be persuasive, as well as informative."
  • In Extend the Text, Writing Options, Media Literacy, Analyze Civil Rights Coverage section, students are given the following prompt: “Research coverage of the Civil Rights movement in newspapers and magazines and on the radio, television, and internet. How objective is each report? Whom does each report quote, and how long is each quotation? Write a report on the overall impression of the stories you investigated."

In Unit 3, students read Joy Harjo’s poem, “Remember.” At the close of the reading selection, students compose a piece of informative writing: “Imagine the city you live in is considering building a history center to teach visitors about the city’s past. Write a business letter to the mayor of your city in which you express approval of the plan for a history center and point of the importance of remembering the past. Incorporate into your letter some of the ideas Joy Harjo expresses in her poem about what makes the past significant.” Students are also supported in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts through the Analyze Literature section that focuses on voice and theme: “Reread the poem. Then, in two or three sentences, describe your impression of the poet’s voice, or unique personality and attitude. Consider how the poet chooses to speak directly to the reader. How does this choice affect the theme of the poem?”

In Unit 4, students are presented with a writing workshop opportunity where they must compose an argumentative essay: “Write an argumentative essay, aiming to convince a larger audience to consider your viewpoint about a subject that is important to you.” This writing prompt is supported by all topics and texts covered within the unit: “People thrive on sharing ideas and perspectives and use persuasion as a tool to argue viewpoints, remedy injustices, weigh alternative visions, and simply present opinions, sometimes in ways that improve the human condition. In the Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus and Antony attempt to persuade the Romans of their contrasting views on Caesar’s assassination. In A Marriage Proposal, Lomov tries to persuade Natalia and Chubukov the Oxen Meadows are his...Persuasive language occurs everywhere...In an argumentative essay, the writer respectfully presents a clear position on an issue, using logic, reason, and information, to convince readers to see his or her viewpoint and, if appropriate, to take action on it.”

In Unit 5, after reading selections from Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali by D.T. Niana and The Once and Future King by T.H. White, students complete a writing activity to extend the text: “How is each of these stories a Cinderella story, or a tale of an unexpected hero? Write a literary analysis on which you state this theme and discuss how each selection develops it. Begin by writing a thesis statement that expresses the shared theme. In your introduction, describe the plot of each selection. Devote one body paragraph to theme development, and add a brief conclusion. The Meeting the Standards booklet has several supporting activities for this text, including one that supports this prompt where students “Complete the table by providing details and general information about the hero of each selection.”

At the end of Unit 5, Folk Literature, students participate in a writing workshop where they complete a Research Paper: “Research a conflict and write an informative paper reporting your findings. Use sources, document them carefully, and prepare a final bibliography to accompany your paper.” Every aspect of the writing process is detailed for the students, including selecting a topic; narrowing a topic; finding sources; taking notes; organizing ideas; writing a thesis statement; drafting the introduction. body, and conclusion; using proper documentation; evaluating the draft; revising, proofreading, and publishing.

At the end of Unit 6, Independent Reading, students participate in a writing workshop where they complete a short story: “Write a short story about a strange happening.” Every aspect of the writing process is detailed for the students, including selecting a conflict; planning the story; drafting the opening, middle, and end; evaluating the draft; revising; proofreading; editing; and publishing.

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

The materials provide frequent opportunities for students to engage in research activities that support the understanding of texts and topics within texts. Each selection is followed by at least one opportunity for students to engage in a research task, which includes a variety of individual, partner, and small group projects. Throughout each unit, students are presented with an After Reading section after each text or grouping of texts. Within most After Reading sections, students complete tasks in categories such as: Media Literacy, Lifelong Learning, Critical Literacy, Collaborative Learning, etc. Within these categories, students compose research that is influenced by the topic(s), themes, and genre of the specified reading selection. The textbook offers research opportunities through various writing options also located within the After Reading section. Materials meet the expectations of including a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials. Research projects are varied throughout the instructional materials and offer tasks that are connected to most texts within a unit.

In addition to opportunities in the textbook, the Exceeding the Standards resource provides extension activities for several selections that ask the students to engage in a more complex research process with multiple steps. The grade 10 research tasks support the intent and depth of the standards.

In Unit 1, in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, students read, “The Open Window,” a short story by Saki. In The After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options, Critical Literacy section, students Research and Compare Social Conventions: “Research the social conventions of another time in American or world history. Provide as much information as you can to explain the reasons behind the conventions. Then write a report comparing and contrasting these conventions (or rules of etiquette) with modern conventions for similar situations.”

In Unit 2, in the Annotated Teacher’s Edition, students read, “Montgomery Boycott,” a memoir by Coretta Scott King. In the After Reading, Extend the Text, Writing Options, Media Literacy section, students Analyze Civil Rights Coverage: “Research coverage of the Civil Rights Movement in newspapers and magazines and on the radio, television, and the internet. How objective is each report? Whom does each report quote, and how long is each quotation? Does each story appear at or near the beginning, middle, or end of the medium? Can you tell what the reporter thinks of the movement? Write a report on your overall impression of the stories you investigated.”

In Unit 3, students read “Making a Fist,” a lyric poem by Naomi Shihab Nye. At the close of the text in the After Reading section, students complete Critical Literacy, Develop Interview Questions: “Locate one or two of Naomi Shihab Nye’s collections of poetry: for example, Different Ways to Pray (1980), Yellow Glove (1986), or The Flag of Childhood: Poems for the Middle East (2002). Read other poems by this author, and think about the common elements among their subjects and themes. Then prepare a list of interview questions for Nye, asking her to comment on ways in which her poetry reflects her life experiences and her most important values. Share your questions with a small group of classmates.

In Unit 4, students read “A Marriage Proposal,” a one-act play by Anton Chekhov. At the close of the text in the After Reading section, students Research a Russian Writer: “Fyodor Dostoevsky, Ivan Turgenev, and Leo Tolstoy were all, like Chekhov, nineteenth-century Russian writers. Research one of these authors and read a short story by him. As you read the story, note characteristics of the writer’s style, themes, and characters. In an informative speech, present your findings to the class."

In Unit 5, students complete a Writing Workshop. For this Writing Workshop, students must compose a research paper. The assignment states, “Research a conflict and write an informative paper reporting your findings. Use sources, document them carefully, and prepare a final bibliography to accompany your paper”; the purpose in completing this writing workshop is “To research and analyze a conflict and inform your audience about the issues involved.” For this research paper, students must complete a Prewrite section that supports students in the following areas: Select Your Topic, Narrow Your Topic, Find Sources, Take Notes, Organize Your Ideas, K-W-L Chart, and Write Your Thesis Statement. Students then complete a Draft phase of their research that supports in the following areas: Draft Your Introduction, Draft Your Body, and Draft Your Conclusion, Use Proper Documentation. To close the research Writing Workshop, students must complete the Revise section that supports students in the following areas: Evaluate Your Draft and Revise for Content, Organization, and Style. Students then compose a Writing Follow-Up: Publish and Present and Reflect. Within this Writing Workshop, students see an exemplar example through all stages of the writing process.

In Unit 6, students read In a Sunburned Country, a piece of travel writing by Bill Bryson. At the close of the text, students are presented with the following writing option: “Bryson mentions several different types of poisonous creatures native to Australia. Choose one of these creatures to research. Then create an informative fact sheet about the creature and what people should do if they encounter the creature.”

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

The materials use a gradual release of responsibility model in order to engage, motivate, and challenge students. The selections for Units 1-5 begin as Guided Reading, move to Directed Reading, and end in Independent Reading. Instead of students choosing texts that they would like to read, the textbook provides the independent texts. In the independent reading phase, there is minimal support before and after reading, and students apply the skills they have learned throughout the unit independently. At the close of every Independent Reading, students are are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

Unit 6 focuses entirely on independent reading with selections that have students practice the reading strategies and skills that students have learned. At the end of each unit, there is a list of suggested readings that relate to the topics and subject matter in the unit as a reference for students who wish to further their interests. The Program Planning Guide includes a Reading Log for students to keep track of their weekly reading: date, title, author, pages read, summary/reactions, and genre. The Reading Log provides accountability for outside of class reading, and end-of-selection Refer and Reason questions provide accountability for in-class independent reading selections. Additional supports for students are found in several of the curricular resources such as the Meeting the Standards and the Exceeding the Standards resource guides.

Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

In Unit 1, students read from A Kite Runner, a novel excerpt by Khaled Hosseini and “The Kite Runner: A Servant’s Son,” a review by Edward Hower. At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

  • An example of a Refer and Reason question is as follows: “3. Quote what the narrator says that the end of the selection about people who say what they mean. Write a continuation of the story that shows how this assumption might be a problem for Hassan in the future.”
  • An example of a Writing Options question is as follows: “1. Write a retelling of the incident described by Amir from Hassan’s point of view. Keep in mind what you know about Hassan and his relationship with the Amir.”

In Unit 2, students read “Something Could Happen to You,” an autobiography by Esmeralda Santiago. At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

  • An example of a Refer and Reason question is as follows: “2. Describe what the narrator of 'Something Could Happen to You' learn about being Hispanic. How does she feel about being Hispanic? What are her greatest obstacles as a recent immigrant?”
  • An example of a Writing Options question is as follows: “1. Imagine that you are Miami, young Esmeralda's mother. In a series of journal entries, record your impressions of American life soon after your arrival in Brooklyn. Also jot down your thoughts about how Esmerelda seems to be adjusting to life and her new neighborhood.”

In Unit 3, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, Independent Reading, there are seven lyric poems, a map, and a villanelle. The Independent Reading section begins with Reading Poetry Independently, Theme, Realizations. Reading skills addressed include: understand denotation and connotation, use context clues, determine the appropriate meaning for the context. The villanelle, entitled “The Waking,” is written by Theodore Roethke. Students answer Refer and Reason, text-dependent questions after reading. The Independent Reading, Respond to Drama, Independent Reading Activity is: “Ask students what they think makes a play worth reading.” Students respond to several questions, and have a choice of six plays in which to choose to read.

In Unit 4, Annotated Teacher’s Edition, Program Resources, EMC Access Editions, instructs teachers that for additional independent reading, they may wish to refer students to one of EMC’s Access Edition titles, such as the “Tempest” by William Shakespeare. Each Access Edition contains a thorough study apparatus, including background information, literal comprehension questions, footnotes, vocabulary definitions, and related projects and activities. An Assessment Manual offering worksheets and exams is available for each Access Edition.”

In Unit 5, students read an excerpt from Homer’s The Iliad. At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

  • An example of a Refer and Reason question is as follows: “2. As he is near death, what does Hector beg of Achilles? How does Achilles respond? Judge whether his reaction is justified. Why or why not?”
  • An example of a Writing Options question is as follows: “2. Why do heroes matter to a culture or society? In a personal essay of two or three paragraphs, discuss your ideas about heroes and heroism, with an emphasis on the role that they play in contemporary society.”

In Unit 6, students read Sandra Cisneros’s short story, “Geraldo No Last Name.” At the close of the text, students are held accountable for their independent reading task in their answering of three Refer and Reason questions and two Writing Options.

  • An example of a Refer and Reason question is as follows: “Describe how the hospital staff and police react to Geraldo’s emergency situation and death, and what the staff does for Marin. What apparent attitudes do they have toward Geraldo and Marin? Do you think these attitudes are warranted? Explain.”
  • An example of a Writing Options question is as follows: “2. What roles do race, class, and ethnic background play in the story? Choose one of these things and examine the part it plays in the story. Consider the attitudes Marin, the hospital staff, and police have toward Geraldo’s race, class, and ethnicity. Think about ways the story might have been different if Geraldo were of a different race, class, or ethnicity. Then write a three-paragraph literary analysis that explains what you’ve discovered.”

Within the Program Planning textbook, teachers are provided a Reading Log to give students. The Reading Log consists of sections for the date in which the text was read, title, author, pages read, and a section for summary/reactions. At the bottom of the Reading Log, students must select the genre read, which consists of the following: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Drama, and Folk Literature. This reading log is kept throughout the entirety of the unit.

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

Criterion 3a - 3e

null
0/8

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
0/2

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
0/2

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
0/2

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
0/2

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
0/2

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
0/2

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
0/2

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/2

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
0/8

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
0/0

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
0/2

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
0/2

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
0/2

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
0/0

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
0/10

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
0/2

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
0/4

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
0/2

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/2

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
0/0

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
0/0

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
0/0

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
0/0

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
0/0

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
0/0

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Oct 24 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2016

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Grade 10 Mirrors & Windows Teacher Edition 978-0-82197-374-5 EMC School 2016
Grade 10 Mirrors & Windows Student Edition 978-0-82197-396-7 EMC School 2016

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

X