Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials reviewed for Literacy By Design do not meet the expectations for alignment. The materials partially meet the expectations for providing high-quality texts that help to grow students reading skills and content knowledge. The materials do not provide consistent opportunities for building strong skills in reading, writing, and speaking through rich, evidence-based materials, discussions, and tasks. The foundational skills included in the materials only partially meet expectations.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

|

Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
20
37
42
19
37-42
Meets Expectations
21-36
Partially Meets Expectations
0-20
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
N/A
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

|

Not Rated

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
N/A
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Does Not Meet Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards. The instructional materials include some texts that are worthy of students' time and attention. Questions are frequently literal or related to personal connections and do not provide opportunities for rich and rigorous, evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills. Speaking and listening activities may need to be supported with extensions to dive deeper into the text, specifically as it relates to evidence based discussion. Materials partially address foundational skills to build comprehension and provide questions and tasks that guide students to read with purpose and understanding, making connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning during reading. Materials provide opportunities to practice oral and silent reading fluency across the grade level. Opportunities to practice and apply re-reading and self-correction are limited.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
10/20
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for including anchor texts that are of publishable quality, are worthy of especially careful reading and/or listening, and consider a range of student interests. Texts partially meet the criteria for text complexity and are not accompanied by a text complexity analysis. Materials meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.
2/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The read-aloud modeled reading texts are of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading; however, the other texts, including those found in shared reading and interactive reading are not all of publishable quality. Many of the well-known anchor texts are only included as modeled reading in the Teacher Edition. There is very limited representation of well-known authors or widely-accepted works of children's literature except for the modeled reading at the start of each theme. Expository texts provide interesting information or engaging illustrations around the theme, but the highest quality texts are those in the modeled readings

Below are examples of publishable, high quality texts. These texts are worthy of students' time and attention, and worthy of multiple readings. Texts are engaging, contain strong content and academic vocabulary, and are thought-provoking. Examples include:

  • Dangerous Crossing by Stephan Krinsky
  • Papa's Mark by Gwendolyn Battle
  • Firestorm by Jean Craighead George
  • Moretti on the High Wire by Emily Arnold McCully
  • A Statue Comes Down by Melissa Blackwell Burke
  • Chato’s Kitchen” by Gary Soto
  • “Papa’s Mark” by Gwendolyn Battle-Lavert
  • And Away We Go by David Dreier
  • Women of the Revolution by Alice Leonhardt
  • Ocean Census Half Completed by David Drier
  • Famous Firsts by Ernestien Glesecke
  • Amazing Bamboo by Nicole Zern

Below are examples of texts that are not considered publishable, high-quality texts. The majority of these texts are simple, with explicit language and themes, and a predictable storyline. Because of these features, the texts are not appropriate for rereading.

  • Women of the Revolution by Alice Leonhardt
  • Gram's Declaration of Independence by M.J. Cosset
  • An Important Debate by David Dreier
  • Into the Deep by Abby Jones
  • From Sea to Shining Sea by M.J. Cosson
  • Something to Sneeze About by Tisha Hamilton

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

There is a mix of literary and informational texts. The units' themes are evenly divided between science and social studies. The core texts and the supplemental materials include a wide distribution of genres and text types as required by the standards. Genres and text types include: action, articles, biographies, fairy tales, folktales, historical fiction, journal entries, lab reports, memories, mysteries, mythology, persuasive essay, poetry, science fiction, social studies,

The following are examples of literary texts found throughout the Grade 5 materials:

  • Theme 2: A Statue Comes Down by Melissa Blackwell Burke
  • Theme 3: Chato’s Kitchen by Gary Soto
  • Theme 5: Papa’s Mark by Gwendolyn Battle-Lavert
  • Theme 7: Big Blue by Shelly Gill
  • Theme 9: Bewildered for Three Days by Andrew Glass
  • Theme 11: Walking in Space by Ann Weil
  • Theme 13: And Away We Go by David Dreier
  • Theme 15: Inside Job by Kathleen Powell

The following are examples of informational texts found throughout the Grade 5 materials

  • Theme 1: Women of the Revolution by Alice Leonhardt
  • Theme 3: Let’s Get Cooking by Ruth Siburt
  • Theme 6: Guess Who’s Home by Alice McGinty
  • Theme 7: Ocean Census Half Completed by David Drier
  • Theme 11: An Out of this World Vacation by Alice Leonhardt
  • Theme 12: Famous Firsts by Ernestien Glesecke
  • Theme 15: Amazing Bamboo by Nicole Zern
  • Theme 16 Smart Food, Smart Choices, Healthy You by Alice Leonhardt

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.
2/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

Many of the texts in the Sourcebook are read alouds and are below grade level or at the bottom of the band consistently. While the illustrations are engaging and students can relate, the majority of the texts are not complex. Because the majority of the applications involve making connections, students can complete the tasks, with little understanding. The questioning after many of the texts are text connection questions rather than critical analysis questions. While many of texts fall within the grade level quantitative scale for Grade 5, the qualitative features are, for the majority of texts, slightly complex. The reader and task demands are also not complex, as every time a student finishes a text, he/she answers questions about the text with a partner or in a small group, and the rigor of the questions does not increase. Many of the questions are about word study, grammar, or a reading strategy, instead of about the evidence or analysis of the text.

The Modeled Reading texts are in the Grade 5 Lexile band. Students begin the year by hearing On Boston’s Freedom Trail, which is a personal narrative with a Lexile of 850, but contain slightly complex qualitative features (text structure and meaning) to moderately complex (language features and knowledge demands). Similarly, in Unit 3, Theme 5, Week 1, the humorous fiction text A Not Very Well-Kept Secret has a Lexile of 850, but only contains slightly complex qualitative features. In Unit 4, Theme 7, students hear the story Squid Attack, which has a Lexile of 850 but slightly complex qualitative features, with the exception of its language features, which is moderately complex. While Hank, Make Your Bed, comes later in the year (Unit 7, Theme 14), the Lexile is a 750 and the qualitative features are slightly complex.

The informational texts have a slightly lower quantitative range than the literary texts and some informational texts fall below the grade level Lexile band. For example, in Unit 5, Theme 9, students hear From Sea to Shining Sea, with a Lexile of 550 and only slightly complex qualitative features. The qualitative features remain the same in Unit 7, Theme 13 with the text Cast Your Vote for the Future, which has a lexile of 550. In Unit 7, Theme 14, the Lexile of Bill Gates is 650, which is at the lower end of the Lexile band, and contains only slightly complex qualitative features.

The materials provide leveled texts for small group reading, which is the only time students read independently. The Grade 5 Small Group Reading texts include Levels P - W. The program considers P - Q as on level and U - W as above-level. None of the included texts in Levels P and Q have a below-grade level Lexile, even though the program considers them below grade level. The Longest Shortcut by Early Ayder is a Level P or Lexile 780 while Castles in the Air by Celia Warren is a Level Q or a 920L. Both of these fall above the Grade 5 Lexile band. An example of a Level U text, which is considered an enrichment text, is The Return of the Wolf by Margaret Su; however, it only falls at a Lexile of 750. Making a Difference by Janet Coburn, labeled as a level V, but has a Lexile of 1080.

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)
0/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.).

Materials do not fully support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. The materials largely focus on comprehension strategies rather than on the close reading and analysis of a text. In the Grade 5 materials, the majority of the texts are read-alouds, shared reading, or interactive reading. There is also small group instruction, in which students read texts on their level. In each theme, a modeled reading is conducted on the first two days. For example, in Unit 4, Theme 7, Week 1, the teacher does a modeled reading of Big Blue, while students look at illustrations, as the text is not provided in the student version. The strategy for the week is creating mental images, which the students do with a turn and talk partner. For the shared reading activity for this theme, students read a newspaper article called, “Ocean Census Half Completed”. The teacher reads it aloud while the students follow along in the Sourcebook. The interactive reading for this is the text Squid Attack. On the first day of interactive reading, the teacher reads the first two pages aloud and models using the comprehension strategy. On the next day, the teacher summarizes the excerpt from the previous day, and then the students read the remainder of the text in pairs.

Little opportunity is present for students to independently read the anchor text. The majority of the questions after a text focus on comprehension strategies. The program focuses on 8 key comprehension strategies, which, according to the materials, undergirds comprehension instruction across all grade levels. These comprehension strategies are taught in the first half of the year, which is followed by review in the second half of the year to reinforce the strategies. The line of questioning does not increase as students progress throughout the materials. For example, in Unit 1, Theme 1, the comprehension strategy is making connections and the questions begin with “have you...” or “have you ever...” Similarly, in Unit 5, Theme 9, three of the five questions also begin with “have you ever”. There is an additional 45 minute small group lesson where students read from leveled readers, and independent reading is suggested; however, there is no specification provided. The materials suggest that at the end of small group reading, the class should return to discuss what happened in small group and interactive reading; however, it does not explicitly provide students time to independently read or practice the literacy skills.

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
0/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The publisher does not provide a rationale for the placement of the texts in Grade 5. There are no text complexity analyses proved. Quantitative and qualitative measures are not included, nor are they discussed in the instructional materials. The only rationale given is that the texts are chosen for their social studies and science content. The publisher includes a general statement in the Program Overview that states, “Whole class materials for Learning by Design feature fiction and nonfiction selections linked to science and social studies themes based on national standards for each grade level. The focus of instruction is on listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the context of content area themes.”

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a broad range of text types and disciplines as well as a volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

In Grade 5, students engage with a variety of topics and genres including articles, fairy tales, folktales, historical fiction, horror, journals, lab reports, memoirs, mysteries, mythology, persuasive essays, poetry, science fiction, and social studies. Students engage with many genres throughout a single theme. For example, in Theme 10, students engage with a journal, a historical fiction, a personal narrative, a poem, and an adventure story. Students engage with a broad range of text types and disciplines, as well as engaging in a volume of reading.

Throughout the materials, students are exposed to a variety of topics and genres. During the week, students are given opportunities to participate in a modeled read-aloud, sharing reading, and interactive reading, where the teacher begins reading and the student finishes the text with a partner. During the modeled reading, students often turn and talk to discuss the comprehension strategy with a partner. One example of a modeled reading text is Chato's Kitchen by Gary Soto, found in Unit 2, Theme 3. During the shared reading, the teacher reads aloud while the students follow along. The shared reading is often used as the mentor text for writing. During the interactive reading, students often hear the teacher read the text on the first day, and then partner read on the second day. In addition to these texts, students also look at photos/illustrations, read leveled readers, and brief text passages with the vocabulary words. They also receive an article explaining the reading strategy. There is mention of using novels and independent reading, but there is no explicit guidance for this in the lesson plans. In Unit 4, Theme 7, the teacher begins with a modeled reading of an adventure story called Big Blue while the students look at an illustration. Then students are given a brief passage called "Blue Whales" that contains the words for the Structured Vocabulary Discussion. In addition, students are given a two page instructional article about the reading strategy for the week, entitled "Create Images". Then students receive a two page Shared Reading newspaper article called "Ocean Census Half Completed" and the teacher reads it aloud while the students follow along. The interactive reading passage in this theme is a horror story called Squid Attack. On Day 4 of the week, the teacher reads the first two pages aloud and does a think aloud to reinforce the comprehension strategy. On Day 5, the teacher summarizes the excerpt and the students read the rest of the passage in pairs. Every day there is a 45 minute small group lesson when students read from leveled readers and the comprehension bridge.

Criterion 1g - 1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
6/16
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. Few questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, and there are no culminating activities at the end of a theme or unit. The instructional materials provide some opportunities to practice speaking and listening skills, but the skills are practiced in order to build background knowledge prior to reading a text and the materials do not support evidence based discussions with relevant follow-up questions. There are few opportunities provided for evidence-based writing. Materials partially meet the expectations for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for the grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text)

In the Grade 5 materials, a large number of questions are personal connection questions that are related to the themes and events in the text. Often, the questions prompt the students to compare personal experiences with something that happened in the text. However, at the end of each selection, there is a page titled Think and Respond that has different sets of questions. In the Reflect and Write and Critical Thinking sections, there are often two to three text dependent questions. In the Comprehensive Teacher’s Guide, there are questions in the margins titled Precise Listening and Think Aloud!. The Precise Listening often directs students back to the text to employ a reading strategy or to identify a text feature. The Think Aloud! questions are mostly about making personal connections. In addition, in the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, there are more questions, labeled literal and inferential. Overall, the majority of questions, tasks and assignments are not text dependent.

There are examples in the materials of text-specific questions. Some examples include:

  • “What sort of actions were the colonists considering at this time? How does the text give you a mental picture of Rollie as he sinks below the surface? (The Declaration of Independence in Unit 1, Theme 2, Week 1, Lesson 4)
  • “Was a crime committed in this story?” (The Smell of Soup and the sound of Money in Unit 2, Theme 4, Week 2, Lesson 9)
  • “How can you understand what Smith means by “run” in this passage?” (The Life and Travels of Jedediah Smith in Unit 5, Theme 9, Week 2)
  • “How is Abe’s experience at this station similar to and different from his experience at other stations along the route?” (One Hundred Sixty Miles of Bad Weather! In Unit 5, Theme 10, Week 2, Lesson 9)
  • “What does it mean that ‘Earth had no pull’? How do the visuals show you the meaning” (How Gravity Was Invented in Unit 6, Theme 11, Week 1, Lesson 4)
  • “Why does Sam need a definition of bird flu?” (Tracking the Bird Flu in Unit 6, Theme 13, Week 2, Lesson 8)

In the SourceBook, there are specific comprehension strategies taught such as connections and synthesizing, that require the students to use the text, though specific instructions for students are limited. For example, on page 10, students are taught how to make connections using the text Dangerous Crossing. The teacher gives specific direct instruction and the students turn and talk to make a connection. Independent practice time is not provided. Later in the materials, students are taught to synthesize materials. The teacher explains the strategy and then students turn and talk to discuss How the U.S. Government Works by synthesizing ideas. The next page of the materials suggests that students synthesize throughout the theme; however, no specific instruction or direction is given for students to practice this skill in an ongoing manner.

Throughout the program, there are many questions that are not text dependent, but that are personal questions about the students’ lives and experiences as well as about the reading strategy. Some questions do require the text, but do not use the questions to stimulate or enhance comprehension. Some of these non-examples include:

  • “What difficult job have you ever had to do?” (The Nighttime Ride of Sybil Ludington in Unit 1, Theme 1, Week 2, Lesson 6)
  • “Have you ever seen a house with signs or decorations to show support or a cause? (A Statue Comes Down in Unit 1, Theme 2, Week 2, Lesson 8)
  • “What traditions does your family have around special meals?” (Abuela's Feast in Unit 2, Theme 3, Week 1, Lesson 4)
  • In the Reverse Think-Aloud Technique, the student listens to a partner while he/she reads and then the student stops the partner at random and asks them what they are thinking of in the moment. (The Life and Travels of Jedediah Smith in Unit 5, Theme 9, Week 2, Lesson 9)
  • “Did the author persuade you to accept her view of space tourism? Why or why not?” (An-Out-of-This-World Vacation in Unit 6, Theme 11, Week 2, Lesson 10)
  • “What is important for you to understand on this page?” (Tracking the Bird Flu in Unit 6, Theme 13, Week 2, Lesson 8)

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for having sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent/specific questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

There are no culminating activities at the end of a theme. Enrichment Activities are available in the margin of the Comprehensive Teacher’s Guide that ask the students to do some independent writing, and present their ideas and findings to the class, however, there is no teacher guidance for these activities. There are no culminating tasks or activities that provide a synthesis of texts, information, or skills taught throughout a theme, and no rubrics are included for standard alignment or mastery. The culminating tasks that are provided do not have a coherent sequence of text-dependent questions. A generic rubric for writing is provided in the Appendix, however, there is no reference to it in the materials encouraging teachers to reference it. An assessment book is provided, but the assessment tasks are a mix of multiple choice questions and extended response questions. The questions are not consistent and only a portion are text-dependent questions.

In Theme 6, Week 2, Lesson 9, students engage in a discussion with a partner at the end of reading Who’s Home. Students share thoughts with each other, but are not guided by a set of questions, therefore, a structured culminating activity is not evident. In Theme 11, Week 1, Lesson 5, students read How Gravity was Invented and then are asked a single question, “Would a scientist explain gravity the same way that the text explains it?” In addition, text is absent for students to refer to when responding about how a scientist would explain gravity.

The materials include paper and pencil assessments. Each theme includes Ongoing Test Practice, which is intended to be used as homework after Lesson 7 of each theme. The Ongoing Test Practice includes a passage to read, multiple choice questions, and an extended response question. For example, in Theme 14, two of the questions include the student identifying the line from the passage that contain a metaphor and the line from the passage that contain an analogy. There are also mid-year and end-of-year reviews that include essay prompts. Again, the questions posed are not necessarily text-dependent, nor are they sequential.

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for materials providing frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer-to-peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.

The Think Aloud! teacher modeling occurs in the first lesson of every theme. It includes modeling of specific listening skills such as active or precise listening and then asks students to think about the focus questions prior to reading and then they answer the focus questions, usually two evidence-based questions are provided during the turn and talk with a partner activity after reading the text. Focus questions do not provide any indication of what types of responses the teacher should expect or a guide to model responses for the students.

Throughout the curriculum, students have opportunities for turn and talks; however, these discussions are frequently not evidence-based. Students are often asked to make connections they had while reading with a partner and/or to reflect on their application of the comprehension strategy. There is no evidence of the teacher modeling these discussions or protocols. There is an explanation of the turn and talk model in the Comprehensive Teacher’s Guide Professional Handbook section (p. T63), but there is no protocol or modeling of the structure for the students. The teacher is often instructed to say “Discuss with a partner...” but how to do this appropriately is not evident in the curriculum. There are no opportunities embedded in the curriculum for the teacher to model for students the use of academic vocabulary and syntax in discussions that are connected to a text. There are no protocols for evidence-based discussions. There is some modeling of speaking with correct syntax and academic vocabulary outside of these discussions, but this is not consistent throughout materials.

There are structured vocabulary discussions for each theme in the Sourcebook, but they are not evidence-based discussions. Discussions are started with a prompt from the teacher and then students are asked to share with a partner. This is no reference to using text-based evidence in the responses. There are few opportunities where the teacher encourages the use of academic vocabulary in evidence-based discussions.

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

There are some opportunities for students to practice their speaking and listening skills throughout the curriculum. They are asked to share their thoughts about vocabulary words, parts of the text, personal text connections, and a few times, specific details from the text. In Lessons 1 and 2 of each theme, there is a modeled reading lesson that focuses on one of the five listening skills taught in the materials. The teacher reads the text aloud and stops throughout to ask questions about the text, which are usually about connections, vocabulary words, and the reading strategy of the day. In addition, questions are asked before the text is read to build background knowledge and after the text is read. During the last lesson of each week, students participate in an interactive reading where they answer questions with a partner, however, they are not required to return to the text or support their responses and reasoning with evidence.

There are some opportunities for students to speak about the text with relevant follow-up questions and supports. In Theme 1, students discuss the events described in The Nighttime Ride of Sybil Ludington. They answer questions such as, "Was it difficult to gather colonial soldiers together quickly?" and "Was Sybil a better choice than her father for the job of contacting the colonial soldiers?" Another example, is in Theme 4, where students discuss the characters in The Smell of Soup and the Sound of Money with a group. Students discuss if there was a crime committed, what each character’s response to the accusation of a crime, and if justice was served in the story. While there are opportunities for students to engage in speaking and listening about the text, this is not consistent throughout the materials.

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 meet the criteria for materials, including a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

Each Theme includes a daily instructional routine that includes explicit instruction, modeling, and exemplar texts. Each two week theme includes a whole group project that takes place across ten lessons. Writer's craft and grammar are taught within the context of written assignments. Each theme addresses different types of writing and small group writing gives multiple supports to students. In the Writing Bridge resources, there are theme-connected prompts to offer options for small group or independent writing.

After Shared Reading and Word Study, students are often asked to write as one of the three activities. For example, in Theme 3, after reading the text Max’s Folly students respond to the prompt, “Choose five of the words with long-vowel, consonant silent e pattern that you created. Write a sentence using each of the words. Share your favorite sentences with a partner.”

After Interactive Reading, students are asked to Reflect and Write. For example, in Theme 12 students read the text, Famous Firsts and respond to the on-demand writing prompt, “On one side of an index card, write down the title of the section you read and its most important information. On the other side, write why you chose the information as important.”

Each theme includes a different writing type. At the end of the theme, the student Sourcebook includes a Writer’s Model of the writing type. Students respond to the writing in the Respond in Writing section of the resource. For example in Theme 6 students read a Writer’s Model that is in the form of a story and respond to the following questions, “The writer chose to tell this story from Jasmine’s point of view. How did that change how the events were described? Use details from the text to explain,” and “Did the writer tell the events of the story in an order that makes sense? Explain.” Students are then assigned the task to write the same type of writing through each of the writing process steps, including prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

In the Grade 5 materials, students have opportunities to write narrative and informational pieces, but very limited opportunities for opinion writing are found in the materials. Each Theme focuses on one genre or organizational structure, however, there is only one Theme that is devoted to opinion writing. A few questions throughout the Sourcebook are opinion based, but they do not involve direct instruction or prompt the students to write the answers

Students begin story writing in Theme 2, Week 2, Lesson 9. Students use a graphic organizer for prewriting, read a story that serves as a writer's model, and then participate in interactive writing. Students revisit story writing in Theme 16, Week 2, Lesson 8. Students can choose to write a story during the independent writing time. Students are also asked questions are reading stories in the SourceBook and some involve personal narrative writing. For example, in Theme 7, Week 1, Lesson 5, students write a letter about a vacation or water activity after hearing the stories Big Blue, Blue Whales, and Ocean Census Half Complete, and Nibble, Nibble, Nibble. Narrative writing is explicitly taught in Themes 2 and 16.

In Theme 5, Week 2, Lesson 9, students begin learning how to write biographies. Students are provided graphic organizers and watch the teacher model this form of writing before beginning. In Theme 11, Week 2, Lesson 8 students learn how to document their observations in observation logs. Students do this interactive writing on the first day and then practice during independent writing the second day. Informational writing is taught in Themes 5 (biography), 7 (newspaper article), and 9 (report).

Students are taught opinion writing in Theme 13, Week 1, Lesson 3. Students begin by reading a persuasive mentor text called Cast your Vote for the Future! and then the next day prepare to write an opinion piece about whether young people should limit television viewing. Students begin by researching, then participating through interactive writing. Students may write their own persuasive essay in subsequent days. Students are also asked opinion questions after reading stories in the Sourcebook; however, there is not explicit instruction to help students respond to these questions and they do not always require writing. For example, in Theme 7, Week 2, Lesson 6, students explain why they think Rollie was willing to go on another dive. In Theme 14, Week 2, Lesson 9, students write five sentences about the inventions they enjoy the most after reading Go Anywhere Music.

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.
0/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 do not meet the criteria for materials including frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information appropriate for the grade level.

There are few opportunities for evidence-based writing to develop or support claims. There are a few writing prompts that require evidence-based writing with claims, however, there is also no explicit instruction to support this type of writing. Students are not taught how to support answers with evidence from the text. Writing tasks can often be answered without analysis of the text because the focus of the materials is more about the traits of writing rather than building an understanding of a topic or text.

The Critical Thinking section in the Sourcebook provides evidence-based questions, but the students are expected to orally discuss the answers instead of write the answers. In Theme 3, Week 2, Lesson 6, students work with a group to discuss how the story helps one understand the difference between convection, conduction, and ration as well as how Abuela plans to use the microwave to heat the soup. In Theme 4, Week 2, Lesson 10, students are asked to explain what each character’s response to the accusation of the crime was with a small group after reading The Smell of Soup and The Sound of Money Created. Students are not asked to do any evidence-based writing.

Additionally, in Theme 7, Week 2, Lesson 6, after hearing Squid Attack students are asked why Rollie was willing to go on another dive and was Rollie’s reaction to the giant squid a reasonable reaction. The students discuss these questions with a partner. However, students do write what happened to Rollie on his previous dive. This is one of the few instances where students answer an evidence-based question in writing. In Theme 13, Week 2, Lesson 10, students discuss how bird flu is different from most diseases in the way it is spread with a partner. Again, students engage in discussion about the topic, but does not contain a writing task with text evidence to support.

At the beginning of each theme, there are theme topic prompts that at times require students to evidence from the text, but can be answered with background knowledge. In addition, there is not instruction provided to students on how to answer the questions. For example, in Unit 1, Theme 1, the first prompt is to write about the revolutionary war from the point of view of a colonist who lives in America in the 1770s. The second prompt is, “If you had lived during the time of the American Revolution, would you have supported the Colonists or the British?” While both of these questions could require the students to use evidence from the text, it is not explicit nor is instruction provided. Similarly, in Unit 3, Theme 5, the questions prompts are “Imagine that you are a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. Write about what you would add to the Constitution” and “Select one of the amendments in the Bill of Rights and write about its importance to citizens.” In these cases, guidance is not provided to the teacher on when students should be completing these tasks nor how to teach students to answer these questions.

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials including explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The grammar sections of the program provide students with opportunity to learn about the writing process, improve upon their writing and using verb tenses in their writing. Some of the language standards such as the use of verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, conditions; use correlative conjunctions; use a comma to set off the words yes and no; use of commas in a series; use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence; use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works; and compare and contrast the varieties of English are not present in the materials. Opportunities to practice grammar and convention standards are in-context are limited.

Examples of language standards present in the material are:

  • L.5.1a Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.
    • In Theme 9, Week 2, Lesson 6, students share prepositions and descriptions they have found in the text, “Lewis and Clark Journals.”
    • In Theme 15, in the grammar skills practice, students work on completing sentences with conjunctions and interjections.
    • In the Writing Resource Guide, Theme 15, students are taught about the different kinds of conjunctions. During Extending the Lesson, students underline a conjunction and identify if the conjunction is coordinate or subordinate.
  • L.5.1b Form and use the perfect verb tenses (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked).
    • In Theme 6, in the grammar practice, students work on identifying action verbs and linking verbs in sentences.
  • L.5.1c Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
    • In the source book for Theme 6, students read the story, “Halls of Power,” and then identify the verbs that are present in the story. Then students make a list of the verbs they hear in the story with a peer. The text talks about sequences and states and conditions.
  • L.5.1d Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.
    • In Theme 7 of the Writing Resource Guide, students work on past, present, and future verb tenses. The teacher begins by reading the Writer’s Handbook and reminds students that adding a verb can change a sentence and by using past, present and future tense verbs, one can change the meaning of the sentence.
  • L.5.2e Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
    • In Theme 8, Week 1, Lesson 1, students utilize the story, “Bottom of the Deep Blue Sea,” and identify their spelling words and complete activities with them.
    • In Theme 15, Week 2, Lesson 6, the teacher introduces a new set of spelling words to student using the spelling routine on page A32-A33.
    • In Theme 16 of the Writing Resource Guide, there is a lesson about commonly misused words. The teacher explains that words that sound the same can be confusing to spelling and know the meaning. During Extending the Lesson, students copy sentences and select the correct word for each sentence.
  • L.5.3a Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.
    • In Themes 2 & 3 in the Writing Resource Guide, there is a mini Lesson on how sentence fragments can impact writing. Students focus on taking two ideas and putting them together in a sentence.
  • L.5.3b Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.

Students have opportunities to apply some language standards in context. For example:

  • In Theme 15, Week 1, Lesson 4, students read the story on page 455 in the sourcebook, “Animalcules.” They create a conjunctions and interjection chart from words in the story.

Criterion 1o - 1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.
3/6
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the expectation that materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression. Materials partially meet expectations that materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks. Materials partially meet expectations that instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks addressing grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.

Materials provide consistent, explicit instruction in word study over the course of the year, however, irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition are not explicitly taught. The assessment system provides ongoing assessment of word study (synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, multiple-meaning words) through the Theme level tests as well as the mid-year and end-of -year tests. Fix-It sections (only 2 all year) do address word solving strategies explicitly, but only about the Read-on strategy. Opportunities to further Grade 5 students’ word analysis are missed because the materials contain whole class review foundational skills.

Materials contain explicit instruction of irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition consistently over the course of the year. Early to mid-year themes contain foundational skills from prior grade levels. Examples include:

  • The introduction to the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide at Grade 5 states that phonics and word study are correlated to reading levels. The levels for grade 5 are P-W. There is explicit instruction of word study in every lesson of the small group guide, but explicit instruction is not about irregularly spelled words, syllabication patterns, and word recognition. Meaning (word study) including prefixes and suffixes, contractions, multiple-meaning words, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, plurals, syllabication, idioms, and abbreviations occur in Levels N-W. For example:
    • In Level R, Small Group Reading, Lesson 1, the focus is on antonyms, inflected endings, and contractions. Students review the definition.
    • In Level W, in the text, “Myths of a Different Feather,” students learn about the suffix -able. Students discuss how words from the story were changed by the suffix (uncomfortable, remarkable, acceptable).
  • In Theme 2, Week 2, Lesson 6, the focus is on word families, including -ap, ig, op, ug, at, en, it, ot and un. These are primary grade level standards.
  • In Theme 3, Week 1, Lesson 1, students move into a long vowel word review and silent e. These are primary grade level standards.
  • In Theme 5, Week 2, Lesson 8, students review the definition of multiple meaning words on page 151 of their sourcebook. Students write sentences and then talk about the meanings of the words.
  • In Theme 8, Week 1, Lesson 1, students learn about inflected endings in order to decode words, ed, ing, and -s. These are primary grade level standards.
  • In Theme 9, Week 1, students are taught the prefix un. The students look up the word unexplored on page 268 of their sourcebook. They then find the root word.

Multiple assessment opportunities are provided over the course of the year to inform instructional adjustments of phonics and word recognition to help students make progress toward mastery. Examples include:

  • The Assessment Guide for Grade 5 contains Theme Progress Tests and test practice aligned to the Comprehensive Teacher’s Guide units. Word study is included in each of the theme progress tests, which are given on the last day of each theme. For example:
    • In Theme 1, there are multiple-choice questions on review of short vowels and initial consonants, “Which of these lists contains words that all have the same initial consonant? It also asks the students to select the correct word that has a short i sound. This is assessment of a primary grade level standard.
    • In Theme 9, the assessment includes 5 questions about prefixes. “Which prefix do you add to the complete to create a new word that means “not complete?”
    • In Theme 14, the assessment includes 5 questions about suffixes. “What suffix do you add to the word delight to make it mean in a way that is full of delight?
  • Mid-year and End-of-Year review tests are cumulative. The mid-year test contains questions about synonyms, homonyms, and antonyms and multiple-meaning words. “Which of these words is an antonym of properly?” The end-of-year review tests synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, prefixes, and suffixes.

Materials contain explicit instruction of word solving strategies (graphophonic and syntactic) to decode unfamiliar words. Examples include:

  • In Small Group Reading Guide, Level T, “The Great Escape,” students focus on the Fix-Up Strategy, Decoding and Word Analysis. “Tell students that when they come to a word they do not know they can figure it out by using the sounds of the letters or by breaking the word into smaller parts.” The teacher then gives the following example, “Some words such as caregiver are made up of two smaller words. Model the target skill: My grandpa hired a caregiver. I know that care can mean “help” and a giver is someone who gives, so I think my grandpa hired someone who gives help.”
  • In Small Group Reading Guide, Level W, “Countdown to a Space Shuttle Launch” - The Target skill is "Use Fix-Up Strategies: Decoding Word Parts," the teacher is instructed to explain the skill to students, "Tell students that to understand an unfamiliar word, they can use what they know about the sounds of letters and break the word apart to help understand its meaning. Looking at the parts of a compound word can provide the word's meaning." The teacher is then instructed to model the skill for students, "Write ongoing on the board. Then model the target skill: I can break this word into on and going. The tells me that the action is continuing."

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

Literacy By Design materials include opportunities for students to complete tasks in order to learn word analysis skills. The skills are similar in nature each week and include brief instruction. There are opportunities for students to complete activities that are in- and out-of-context. Assessments are provided in the materials such as the Theme assessments, but reviewers were unable to evaluate all the assessments for word analysis in-context including evaluating word analysis in Rigsby Reads.

Multiple and varied opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to learn, practice, and apply word analysis skills in connected texts and tasks. Examples include:

  • In Theme 5, Week 1, students listen for synonyms and antonyms while the teacher reads aloud a feature on The Constitution of the United States.
  • In Theme 10, Week 1, students practice finding words with the prefixes re- and pre- in the context of a text from the sourcebook.
  • In Theme 13, Week 2, students learn about the suffixes -ful, -able and -less. “Work with students to create sentence pairs that demonstrate how suffixes change words and their meaning.”
  • Meaning (word study) including prefixes and suffixes, contractions, multiple-meaning words, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, plurals, syllabication, idioms, and abbreviations occur in levels N-W. All are addressed within the context of the readings themselves. For example:
    • Level P, Small Group Reading, focuses on idioms and compound words.. Students review the definition and find idioms from the words in the reading. They also study suffixes -ly and -fully and the prefix dis- in the context of the readings.
  • Level Q, Small Group Reading, focuses on the prefix -un. They also study suffixes -ly, -fully-ion, and -tion, in the context of the readings.
  • In Level R, Small Group Reading, focuses on antonyms,inflected endings, and contractions, and the prefix dis-. Students review the definition and then identify inflected endings from the reading.
  • Level T, Small Group Reading, focuses on prepositions, pronouns, and idioms. Students review the definition and identify prepositions from a group of words on the board. They also study suffixes -ness, and -ment in the context of the readings.
  • Level U, Small Group Reading, focuses on homonyms, antonyms, and multiple-meaning words. They also study suffixes -ful and -less in the context of the readings, as does Level V.
  • Level W, Small Group Reading, focuses on suffix -able, in the context of the readings.

Materials include word analysis assessment to monitor student learning of word analysis skills. Examples include:

  • There is a benchmark book assessment where the teacher listens for students word analysis skills when they are reading text. This is completed 3 - 4x a year or as necessary.
  • Every two weeks students are assessed with theme progress assessments that measure students’ comprehension, phonics, and word study skills.
  • In Theme 5, the assessment includes 6 questions about synonyms and antonyms and multiple-meaning words. “Which meaning does the word rights have in this passage?” “Which sentence contains an antonym of the word ridiculous?”
  • In Theme 9, the assessment includes 5 questions about prefixes. “Which prefix do you add to the complete to create a new word that means “not complete?”
  • In Theme 14, the assessment includes 5 questions about suffixes. “What suffix do you add to the word delight to make it mean in a way that is full of delight?”

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Grade 5 partially meet the criteria for instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Literacy By Design materials include opportunities for students to have access to small group readers where they practice a variety of fluency strategies. Students have opportunities to practice oral and silent reading. Also, included are different assessments in order to help the teacher identify how students are doing in overall fluency. Opportunities to practice and apply re-reading and self-correction are limited. Opportunities to practice and build fluency with poetry are limited.

Multiple opportunities are provided over the course of the year in core materials for students to demonstrate sufficient accuracy and fluency in oral and silent reading. Examples include:

  • In Theme 1, Week 1, lesson 3, students learn to use punctuation to inform meaning as the fluency methodology.
  • In Small Group Guided Reading Manual, Appendix A27, teachers are provided with three different fluency routine ideas. These ideas include: Reader’s Theater, Partner Reading, and Repeated Reading. Explicit instructions are provided for each routine. For example, for partner reading the steps include: “1. Organize students into partners of mixed abilities. 2. Have partners select a familiar text to read together. 3. Have one student finger point to the text as the partners read aloud in union. 4. Have partners switch roles and read the text together again.”
  • In the Small Group Reading Teacher’s Guide, it states on page T14 that fluency skills are modeled in whole class instruction, and that systematic and explicit fluency instruction exists in every small group reading lesson. There are Fluency Readers for independent reading and practice and Fluent Reader software for repeated practice and assessment. (I don’t have these). All the fluency lessons are grounded in the readings. For example:
    • In Levels P, Q, and R, there are fluency lessons on changing voice to reflect characters, conveying emotion and meaning, using punctuation to inform meaning, and reading in phrases. For example, the teacher models reading the first sentence on page 2, stopping at periods and pausing at commas. Students then take turns reading their own text sections.
    • In Level S, the teacher introduces a fluency focus on stressing words with special type treatment and reading in phrases. The teacher models chunking a reading into phrases for smoother reading. Students then take turns reading the text section they have practiced. This is continued in Levels T and U.
    • In Level W, “Myths of a Different Feather,” the fluency focus for this books is “stress words with special type treatment.” The teacher discusses the skill, “Explain that sometimes words are italicized or written in all capital letters to let the reader know that these words should be read with special feeling. Reading these words with a louder voice or more emotion can help you better understand the story or how a character is feeling.”The teacher then models using this skill.

Materials support reading or prose and poetry with attention to rate, accuracy, and expression, as well as direction for students to apply reading skills when productive struggle is necessary. Opportunities were missed over the course of the school year to have students pay attention to rate, accuracy and expression when reading poems. Examples include:

  • In Theme 2, Week 2, when students read the poem “Independence Day,” the focus of the lesson is on onomatopoeia and the teacher is instructed to “Have partners of mixed abilities read the poem softly together. After reading, have them discuss any onomatopoeic words they found.” An opportunity was missed to have students practice rereading the poem with their partner to build fluency.
  • In Theme 8, Week 2, when students read the poem “Going, Going, Gone?” the focus of the lesson is on simile. There is no mention made of having the students reread the poem to work on accuracy, rate or expression.

Materials support students’ fluency development of reading skills (e.g., self-correction of word recognition and/or for understanding, focus on rereading) over the course of the year (to get to the end of the grade-level band). Opportunities are modeled by the teacher, but student practice opportunities are limited. Examples include:

  • In Theme 5, Week 1, Monitor Understanding, Teacher Think Aloud, “The story says that voting posters were hammered on every house and tree and even hung around animals’ necks. I don’t understand why. If I reread the passage, I see that Election Day was near and they wanted to get the word to everyone. Now I understand the passage better.”
  • In Theme 8, Week 1, Use Fix-Up Strategies, Teacher Think Aloud, “I don’t know what the word microscopic means. I think I’ll get an idea of the meaning from the words and phrases around it when I read on. I read that the arrow worm, which is less than a quarter of an inch long, “swallows the tinier dinoflagellate” so microscopic must mean something that is very, very small.”

Assessment materials provide teachers and students with information of students’ current fluency skills and provide teachers with instructional adjustments to help students make progress toward mastery of fluency. Examples include:

  • With the Fluent Reader Software, students choose from five text passages, three from fluency readers and two that are unseen. Students listen and read along. Then students record themselves reading, and they listen to the playback, comparing their recordings to the fluent reader.
    • The software evaluates students initial reading rates and measures their progress up against the words per minute goal. The teachers use a fluency rubric to assess where students are at in this area.
  • In the Small Group Guided Reading Manual, Appendix A28, instructions are provided for completing a fluency assessment. The instructions tell teachers to use a text from guided reading group that the student has already read. Specific fluency passages are not provided. A benchmark chart is included that provides teachers with the number of words per minute a student should be able to read correctly at the end of their grade level. A fluency assessment rubric is also provided that helps the teacher score a student’s expression, accuracy, punctuation, phrasing, pace and comprehension.
  • Teachers use the RIgby READS diagnostic test for reading level placement. This includes fluency as one of the five-pillars.
  • There are no fluency questions in any of the 16 Theme Progress Tests or in the mid-year or final year exams.
  • A benchmark assessment and evaluation kit is mentioned on page T17, which includes information about student reading accuracy.

Gateway Two

Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

Not Rated

+
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Gateway Two Details
Materials were not reviewed for Gateway Two because materials did not meet or partially meet expectations for Gateway One

Criterion 2a - 2h

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.
N/A

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
N/A

Indicator 2c

Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
N/A

Indicator 2d

The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic (or, for grades 6-8, a theme) through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
N/A

Indicator 2e

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary words in and across texts.
N/A

Indicator 2f

Materials support students' increasing writing skills over the course of the school year, building students' writing ability to demonstrate proficiency at grade level at the end of the school year.
N/A

Indicator 2g

Materials include a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.
N/A

Indicator 2h

Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
N/A

Gateway Three

Usability

Not Rated

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Gateway Three Details
This material was not reviewed for Gateway Three because it did not meet expectations for Gateways One and Two

Criterion 3a - 3e

Indicator 3a

Materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
N/A

Indicator 3b

The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
N/A

Indicator 3c

The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
N/A

Indicator 3d

Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
N/A

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
N/A

Criterion 3f - 3j

Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.

Indicator 3f

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
N/A

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
N/A

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
N/A

Indicator 3i

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
N/A

Indicator 3j

Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
N/A

Criterion 3k - 3n

Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.

Indicator 3k

Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3l

The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
N/A

Indicator 3l.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
N/A

Indicator 3l.ii

Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
N/A

Indicator 3m

Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
N/A

Indicator 3n

Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
N/A

Criterion 3o - 3r

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3p

Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
N/A

Indicator 3q

Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
N/A

Indicator 3r

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
N/A

Criterion 3s - 3v

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.

Indicator 3s

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
N/A

Indicator 3t

Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.
N/A

Indicator 3u

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
N/A

Indicator 3u.i

Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
N/A

Indicator 3u.ii

Materials can be easily customized for local use.
N/A

Indicator 3v

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
N/A

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Wed Dec 05 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2013

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Essential Resource Guide Grade 5 978-0-5477-2975-6 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Student Sourcebook, Volume 1 Grade 5 978-0-5477-3458-3 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Student Sourcebook, Volume 2 Grade 5 978-0-5477-3459-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Writing Resource Guides Grade 5 978-0-5477-3501-6 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Assessment Guide Grade 5 978-0-5477-4165-9 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Benchmark Book Evaluation Guide Grade 5 978-0-5477-4245-8 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Comprehension Organizers Grades 3-5 978-0-5477-4247-2 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Comprehension Bridges Grade 5 978-0-5477-4255-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Skills Master Grade 5 978-0-5477-4270-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Writing Bridge Grade 5 978-0-5477-4284-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Small Group Reading Teacher's Guide Complete Grade 5 978-0-5478-2514-4 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Whole Class Complete Package with Grade 5 978-0-5478-3694-2 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Small Group Complete Package with Grade 5 978-0-5478-3708-6 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Complete Comprehensive Teachers Guide Package Grade 5 978-0-5478-4863-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Benchmark Assessment Package Grade 5 978-0-5478-4876-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Small Group Teacher Resources Grade 5 978-0-5478-5184-6 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Comprehensive Teacher Resources Grade 5 978-0-5478-5388-8 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Common Core Correlation Booklet Grade 5 978-0-5478-6492-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Leveled Reader Bundle, Level R Digital Content Grade 5 978-1-3289-2544-2 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Leveled Reader Bundle, Level S Digital Content Grade 5 978-1-3289-2546-6 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Leveled Reader Bundle, Level T Digital Content Grade 5 978-1-3289-2548-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Leveled Reader Bundle, Level U Digital Content Grade 5 978-1-3289-2549-7 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Leveled Reader Bundle, Level V Digital Content Grade 5 978-1-3289-2550-3 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2013
Literacy by Design Teacher's Guide Small Group Reading Grade 5 978-1-4189-3305-0 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008
Literacy by Design Comprehensive Teacher?s Guide Grade 5 978-1-4189-3311-1 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2008

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Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

ELA 3-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

  • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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