Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for alignment to the CCSS. In Gateway 1, the instructional materials meet the expectations for focus by assessing grade-level content and spending at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade, and they are coherent and consistent with the Standards. In Gateway 2, the instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, and they connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
18
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
36
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for focusing on the major work of the grade and having a sequence of topics that is consistent with the logical structure of mathematics. The materials do not assess topics before the grade level indicated, spend at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade, and are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for assessing grade-level content. The program provides Mid-Unit Assessments and Unit Assessments online for each unit. There are two versions (Form A and Form B) of all assessments for each of the seven units.

Mid-Unit and Unit Assessments contain grade-level content questions. Examples of questions include the following:

  • Unit 2 Unit Assessment Form A Problem 3 asks “How many shovels?” and “Draw one pail (picture of a pail) for each shovel.” (K.CC.5)
  • For Unit 4 Mid-Unit Assessment Form B Problem 1 students are asked to solve 2 + 2 and are given pictures of pigs to help solve the equation. (K.OA.5)

Overall, assessment items are aligned to Kindergarten standards.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for assessing grade-level content. The program provides Mid-Unit Assessments and Unit Assessments online for each unit. There are two versions (Form A and Form B) of all assessments for each of the seven units.

Mid-Unit and Unit Assessments contain grade-level content questions. Examples of questions include the following:

  • Unit 2 Unit Assessment Form A Problem 3 asks “How many shovels?” and “Draw one pail (picture of a pail) for each shovel.” (K.CC.5)
  • For Unit 4 Mid-Unit Assessment Form B Problem 1 students are asked to solve 2 + 2 and are given pictures of pigs to help solve the equation. (K.OA.5)

Overall, assessment items are aligned to Kindergarten standards.

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for spending the majority of class time on the major clusters of the grade. This includes all of the clusters in K.CC, K.OA, and K.NBT. To determine focus on major work, three perspectives were evaluated: the number of units devoted to major work, the number of lessons devoted to major work, and the number of instructional days devoted to major work. Of the three perspectives, the number of instructional days is most representative and was used to determine the score for this indicator.

  • Kindergarten instruction is divided into seven units. Units 1 through 5 address K.CC, K.OA, and K.NBT. Therefore, 5 out of 7 units, approximately 71 percent, focus on major work of the grade.
  • Kindergarten instruction is divided into 32 lessons. Twenty-five out of 32 lessons, approximately 78 percent, focus on major work of the grade.
  • Kindergarten instruction consists of approximately 169 instructional days. Approximately 134 out of 169, approximately 79 percent, of the instructional days focus on major work of the grade.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for spending the majority of class time on the major clusters of the grade. This includes all of the clusters in K.CC, K.OA, and K.NBT. To determine focus on major work, three perspectives were evaluated: the number of units devoted to major work, the number of lessons devoted to major work, and the number of instructional days devoted to major work. Of the three perspectives, the number of instructional days is most representative and was used to determine the score for this indicator.

  • Kindergarten instruction is divided into seven units. Units 1 through 5 address K.CC, K.OA, and K.NBT. Therefore, 5 out of 7 units, approximately 71 percent, focus on major work of the grade.
  • Kindergarten instruction is divided into 32 lessons. Twenty-five out of 32 lessons, approximately 78 percent, focus on major work of the grade.
  • Kindergarten instruction consists of approximately 169 instructional days. Approximately 134 out of 169, approximately 79 percent, of the instructional days focus on major work of the grade.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
8/8

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for supporting content enhancing focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.

Examples of the connections between supporting work and major work include the following:

  • In Unit 6 Lesson 28 on sorting objects, students count objects (K.CC.B) in order to sort the objects into groups (K.MD.3).
  • In Unit 7 Lesson 30 in the Problem Solving Connection, students solve addition and subtraction word problems (K.OA.A) while recognizing shapes (K.G.2).
  • In Unit 7 Lesson 31 students consider the number of sides in two different shapes (K.G.4) and also consider the number of sides altogether in two shapes (K.OA.A).

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for the amount of content designated for one grade-level being viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades. The suggested pacing includes 160 days of lessons and another 9 days for assessment, making 169 days of materials. According to the Teacher Guide, pages A38-A39, each lesson is expected to last between 30-45 minutes.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for being consistent with the progressions in the standards. Content from prior grades is identified or connected to grade-level work, and students are given extensive work with grade-level problems.

Overall, materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. Typically, material related to prior and future grades is clearly identified or related to grade-level work.

The materials relate grade-level concepts to prior knowledge from earlier grades. Each Lesson Overview provides a Learning Progression. The Learning Progression explains connections between prior grades and the lesson. For example, in Unit 5 Lesson 21 the progression states, “In Kindergarten, children learn the counting sequence to 100 and count objects to 20. In previous lessons, they have recognized that the numbers 1-10 represent quantities and that these quantities can be combined to form greater quantities through addition.” Additionally, each unit begins with a progression overview document. This document connects grade level concepts to specific standards from prior grades, and this document also connects grade-level concepts to future standards. Student prior knowledge is activated and connected to new skills and concepts on the first day of each lesson in Use What You Know. For example, in Unit 5 Lesson 21 students begin with a review of rote counting to 20, which was learned in earlier Kindergarten lessons. Students use this prior knowledge as a foundation for learning teen numbers, which is new mathematics content for the grade-level.

The instructional materials provide given extensive work with grade-level problems. Lessons provide grade-level problems for students. Students spend five days in a lesson working with grade-level standards. During modeled and guided instruction, students explore ways to solve problems using multiple representations and prompts to reason and explain their thinking. The guided practice allows students to solve problems and discuss their solution methods. The independent practice provides students the opportunity to work with problems in a variety of formats to integrate and extend concepts and skills. The Practice and Problem Solving Guide provides additional practice problems for each of the lessons, and the back of the Practice and Problem Solving Guide provides problems for additional skills practice. Each lesson also has math center activities which provide additional practice with grade-level problems.

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for fostering coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and when the standards require. Overall, materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings and opportunities to provide problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains, when these connections are natural and important.

Instructional materials are clearly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. The units are divided into instruction focused on domains. Kindergarten standards are clearly identified in the Table of Contents and a CCSSM Focus box found at the beginning of each lesson. Additionally, a CCSSM Correlation Chart identifies which lessons address specific standards. Instructional materials shaped by cluster headings include the following examples:

  • Unit 1 Lesson 1 Understand Counting is shaped by K.CC.B, count to tell the number of objects.
  • Unit 5 Lesson 21 Understand Teen Numbers is shaped by K.NBT.A, work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.
  • Unit 6 Lesson 26 and Lesson 27 Compare Length and Compare Weight are shaped by K.MD.A, describe and compare measurable attributes.

Instructional materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains in a grade in cases where the connections are natural and important.

  • Unit 1 Lesson 4 Count 5 connects K.CC.A and K.CC.B as students engage in counting groups of objects and writing the number of objects within 5.
  • Unit 3 Lesson 11 Count 10 connects K.CC.A and K.CC.B as students engage in counting objects within 10.
  • Unit 5 Lesson 23 Make Teen Numbers (K.NBT.A) is connected to counting to 100 by ones (K.CC.A).

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

+
-
Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for aligning with the CCSS expectations for rigor and mathematical practices. The instructional materials attend to each of the three aspects of rigor individually, and they also attend to the balance among the three aspects. The instructional materials emphasize mathematical reasoning, identify the Mathematical Practices (MPs), and attend to the full meaning of each practice standard.

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for reflecting the balances in the Standards and helping students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application. The instructional materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency, spend sufficient time working with engaging applications, and do not always treat the three aspects of rigor together or separately.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings. Students use pictures, manipulatives, and models to demonstrate conceptual understanding.

The Teacher Resource Book contains a section called Concept Extension that provides teachers with additional ways to support building students’ conceptual understanding. Examples of how the Concept Extension supports teachers in building conceptual understanding include:

  • Unit 1 Lesson 3 shows teachers how to deepen students’ understanding of the relationship between counting and the amount left over (K.CC.B).
  • Unit 4 Lesson 16 shows teachers how to connect subtraction and addition (K.OA.A).
  • Unit 5 Lesson 22 shows teachers how to find number pairs with teen numbers (K.CC.5).

Standard K.OA.1 focuses on representing addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

  • In Unit 4 Lesson 14 Understand Addition students draw pictures of things they might add together (2+1), and then they add two of the items to another item using the words “add” and the “addition sign.” Students are given two different colors of connecting cubes to add. Students also use their cubes to write addition number sentences in order to connect what they made and what they write. Finally, students work with a partner to find the pairs of addends to make 4.
  • In Unit 4 Lesson 16 Understand Subtraction students use counters to physically take a counter away when subtracting 5-1. Students also model number sentences with counters.

Cluster K.NBT.A addresses conceptual understanding of working with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.

  • In Unit 5 Lesson 21 Understand Teen Numbers students first show how to count to 11 using their fingers and then use a partner to show an additional finger. Next they use ten blue counters and then add on 1 more red counter to show 11 and come to the understanding that 11 is 10 and 1 more. Students then use counters and 10-frames to add 10 and 1 more to conclude that they can count on from 10 instead of starting at 1. Finally, students fill a 10-frame with counters and add 1.

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for giving attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency. The materials provide opportunities to attend to procedural skill and fluency throughout the course, including fluency to add and subtract within 5 (K.OA.5).

All lessons provide an opportunity for students to use computation skills. Each lesson contains a Building Fluency section which is designed to be used twice during a lesson. The Student Practice and Problem-Solving Book contain fluency practice pages, and Math Center Activities are included in the Teacher Toolbox which include activities for both procedural skill and fluency.

  • In Unit 4 Lesson 15 students are provided opportunities to practice finding the sum of related facts (K.OA.5).
  • In Unit 2 Lesson 8 students show combinations within 5 (K.OA.5) and practice rote counting to 30 on day 1 and day 3.
  • In Unit 7 Lesson 29 Problem-Solving Connections includes three problems:
    • 1. “A dog has 3 spots on his ear and 5 spots on his body. How many spots does he have in all?
    • 2. There are 6 people. Some wear orange coats and the rest wear blue coats. How many people can wear blue coats and how many can wear orange coats?
    • 3. There are 8 leaves on the ground. 3 leaves are under a cone and the rest are not. How many leaves are not under a cone?”

iReady Door 24 Plus is a free iPad app for fact fluency practice and is only available in the Apple platform. The game does include the fluencies for Kindergarten.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for being designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade.

Each lesson includes guided practice Practice Together and independent practice Practice by Myself where students apply what they have learned to solve real-world problems. Most lessons also have an online interactive tutorial for students which features real-world applications. In addition, there are Problem Solving Connection problems where students are exposed to situations to apply addition and subtraction (K.OA.2). The following problems are examples of the application problems included in the instructional materials:

  • Unit 2 Lesson 8: “How can you tell how many counters you need to draw to finish each picture so that it shows 6?”
  • Unit 2 Lesson 10: “There are 5 jars of jam on a shelf. 3 more are put on the shelf. How many jars of jam are on the shelf now?”
  • Unit 4 Lesson 15: Students think of an addition story problem they could tell using given numbers.
  • Unit 4 Lesson 17: “There are 5 balloons. Some pop. Now there are 4 balloons left. How many balloons popped?”
  • Unit 5 Lesson 21: “Bob has 8 blocks. He gets 2 more blocks. How many blocks does he have now?”

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for balancing the three aspects of rigor. Overall, the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately within the materials.

Each lesson contains opportunities for students to build conceptual understanding, procedural skills and fluency, and apply their learning in real-world problems. Lessons are designed so students engage with all three components of rigor at different points in the lesson. During Guided Instruction and Guided Practice, students explore alternative solution pathways to master procedural fluency. During Independent Practice, students apply the concept in real world applications where they need to use both the procedural skills and their understanding of the concept to solve problems with multiple solutions and explain/compare their solutions.

For example, in Unit 1 Lesson 5 students use what they know (conceptual understanding) about whether a friend has more, the same, or fewer number of snacks. Students then use counters to identify the values. During Guided Practice students exhibit procedural skill and fluency as they count, identify sets, and compare sets to written numbers. Students then apply their knowledge during Independent Practice by counting a set, writing the number, and modeling a set that is either less than or more than.

In Unit 4 Lesson 14 students develop an understanding of the addition sign (conceptual understanding), see ‘plus’ in place of ‘and,” and use the plus sign under the word plus (procedural skill).

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
10/10

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for identifying the Mathematical Practices (MPs) and using them to enrich the mathematics content within and throughout the grade.

The MPs for each lesson are identified in the CCSS Focus section as part of the Lesson Overview. SMP TIPs are found in the Teacher Resource Book throughout the lessons, and these tips highlight the integration of particular MPs within the lessons. The MPs are also identified for each lesson in the Table of Contents for the Teacher Resource Book on pages A4-A7.

Some examples of where the MPs are identified and used to enrich the mathematics content include:

  • Unit 3 Lesson 11: MPs 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8 are identified in the Lesson Overview. The SMP TIP in the lesson for MP1 states, “Allowing children sufficient time to think through the problem on their own encourages them to try different approaches if their first or second attempt does not work. This builds confidence in finding ways to use what they learned from those attempts to revise their thinking on subsequent attempts.” The SMP TIP in the lesson for MP6 states, “In counting the groups on this page to identify those showing 10, children must attend to precision, being sure to count each object only once to maintain the relationship between sequential number names and counted objects.” The SMP TIP in the lesson for MP7 states, “The Hands-On Activity requires children to use structure to determine where the count sequence breaks down as a means to identify the missing number. Alternate regular counting activities with ones like this to help reinforce structure.”
  • Unit 4 Lesson 20: MPs 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8 are identified in the Lesson Overview. The SMP TIP for MP2 states, “Using number sentences to describe story problems shows that children can reason quantitatively. They see that 2 and 3 is 5 when adding windows and that 4 and 1 is 5 when adding children. Encourage children to tell addition and subtraction story problems throughout the day to show that they can make sense of quantities and their relationships.” The SMP TIP for MP7 states, “Seeing the relationship between addition and subtraction facts helps children to look for and make use of structure. Encouraging children to use this relationship between addition and subtraction will help them to add and subtract more fluently.”
  • Unit 5 Lesson 25: MPs 1, 6, 7, and 8 are identified in the Lesson Overview. The SMP TIP in the lesson for MP8 states, “Asking children to explain how they decided which numbers were wrong encourages them to express regularity in repeated reasoning. Continuing to have children count aloud and then identify mistakes in counting will help them look for and recognize repetitive actions in counting.”

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for carefully attending to the full meaning of each practice standard. Overall, the materials attend to aspects of the mathematical practices (MPs) during different lessons throughout the grade, so when taken as a whole, the instructional materials attend to the full meaning of each MP.

Examples of where the instructional materials attend to each of the MPs include:

  • MP1: In Unit 1 Lesson 1 students complete several word problems. The SMP TIP for MP1 in the lesson states, “Allowing children sufficient time to think through the problem on their own encourages them to try different approaches if their first or second attempt does not work. This builds confidence in finding ways to use what they learned from those attempts to revise their thinking on subsequent attempts.”
  • MP2: In Unit 1 Lesson 3 students match a group of 4 counters to 4 apples helping them make sense of the abstract idea of 4 as a quantity. In Unit 3 Lesson 12 students develop an understanding that 10 is greater than 8 no matter the objects being counted or how they are arranged by comparing a quantity of 10 items to a quantity of 8 items.
  • MP4: In Unit 4 Lesson 16 students model a subtraction problem by drawing a set of items and showing that some items are being taken away by circling those items or putting an X through them. Teachers are prompted to have students share their models and consider which models might be more useful than others.
  • MP5: In Unit 4 Lesson 15 students complete addition problems and are able to use two-sided counters or 5-frames as tools for helping them complete the problems.
  • MP7: In Unit 1 Lesson 6 students are asked to make observations about train cars colored yellow and blue. The SMP TIP in the lesson for MP7 states, “Asking children to make observations about how the cars are the same helps them to see single objects as being composed of smaller units in different ways. Encourage children to make similar observations about the different number pairs throughout the lesson.”
  • MP8: In Unit 5 Lesson 24 students are developing skill in counting numbers up to 100. The SMP TIP in the lesson for MP8 states, “The Talk About It question encourages children to look for patterns in numbers. If time allows, ask children to describe other patterns they see in the hundreds chart.”

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others. Overall, the materials offer students multiple opportunities to construct viable arguments and/or analyze the arguments of others throughout the materials.

Examples where students are prompted to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others include:

  • In Unit 1 Lesson 1 students look at the counting depicted on the student practice page and think about whether the objects on the page were counted correctly. The students discuss, “What is the mistake in counting the soccer balls? What is the mistake in counting the children?”
  • In Unit 1 Lesson 5 students listen to the work of their peers’ and analyze their peers’ work by determining how their own explanations are similar and different.
  • In Unit 3 Lesson 12 students listen to their peers and then ask questions or make comments about the explanations given for drawing an appropriate picture based on the number given.

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for assisting teachers to engage students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards. The materials provide teachers with SMP TIPs to help facilitate students to construct arguments and/or analyze the arguments of others.

Examples where teachers are supported to help students construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others include:

  • In Unit 4 Lesson 19 the teacher is provided with the following prompt to help children develop a deeper understanding of problems completed involving subtraction within 10, “How are all the problems the same? How are they different? Why are the answers all the same?”
  • In Unit 7 Lesson 32 Talk About It notes for the teacher include, “When children have completed the page, say: 'Work with a partner. How are your pictures alike? How are your pictures different?' Pictures will be alike in that they both show triangles and squares, but how those triangles and squares are combined can produce a variety of differences.”

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for explicitly attending to the specialized language of mathematics. Overall, the materials for both students and teachers provide multiple ways for students to engage with the vocabulary of Mathematics.

  • The Student Practice and Problem Solving Book has notes at the bottom of the pages where mathematical vocabulary is defined.
  • The Teacher Resource Book has Lesson Vocabulary for each lesson with mathematical terms and their definitions.
  • Teachers are prompted in the Teacher Resource Book to have students use precise mathematical language. For example, Unit 4 Lesson 14 Step By Step states, “Introduce the term 'add' as a word for joining or putting together numbers.”
  • Each lesson has an “English Language Learners” section in the Teacher Resource Book that contains some ways to support vocabulary development for all students.
  • Lessons contain language objectives. For example, Unit 4 Lesson 15 states: “Tell put-together and add-to addition problems to match a given picture. Count pictures to find the total for an addition sentence.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for being well designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The instructional materials distinguish between problems and exercises, have exercises that are given in intentional sequences, have a variety in what students are asked to produce, and include manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
2/2
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for distinguishing between problems and exercises. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.

Students are learning new mathematics and solving problems in the beginning stages of each lesson in the Use What You Know and Explore Together sections. At the conclusion of lesson instruction, students complete exercises in the Practice Together and Practice by Myself that engage them in exercises to practice skills and in problems to apply learning.

The instructional materials provide problems and exercises in both the Ready Instruction book and the Practice and Problem Solving Book. For example, in Unit 3 Lesson 12 students compare two written numbers from 1 to 10. In the Lesson 12 Introduction the teacher is instructed to give one student six crayons and another seven. The teacher asks: “Who has more crayons? How do you know?” Students then work in pairs to compare six and seven counters to find out which has more. During Practice Together students use 10-frames to compare which number is less in a given pair of numbers. During the Practice by Myself Independent Practice Hands-On Activity “Make sets with more, less, and the same,” students are given thirty counters, 10-frame cards, and cards with six, seven, eight, or nine dots. Students engage with problems requiring them to choose a card and use counters to show more than that number. They continue using counters to show less than the number and the same as the number represented on their cards. In the Practice and Problem Solving Books, teachers are guided to have students complete more practice with ten frames and counters to compare different numbers within 10.

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations that the design of assignments is not haphazard and that the exercises are given in intentional sequences.

Problem sets and daily practice exercises relate to the mathematical concept developed in each lesson. The sequence of topics in each unit is intentionally planned to move from working with concrete and pictorial representations to more abstract work with numbers and computation. Each unit has a progressions chart showing how what students learn in Kindergarten will relate to what they will learn in future grades. Each lesson has a Learning Progression section in the lesson overview of the Teacher Resource Book which states what students are learning in Kindergarten and what will happen in the next grade.

Concepts are explored and developed in daily lessons and reinforced through partner work and independent practice. Lessons are designed using a scaffolded approach. Students are guided by the teacher in the beginning of instruction, move toward work with partners or in small groups, and finally work independently. For example, Unit 1 Counting and Cardinality Numbers 1-5 is followed by Unit 2 Counting and Cardinality, Numbers 6 - 9. The Unit 2 sequence of lessons is as follows: Lesson 7 Count 6 and 7; Lesson 8 Make 6 and 7; Lesson 9 Count 8 and 9; Lesson 10 Make 8 and 9. In Unit 3 Counting and Cardinality, Numbers to 10 the sequence of lessons continues from Unit 2. Lesson 11 Count 10 is followed by Lesson 12 Compare Within 10. Lesson 13 Make 10 completes this sequence of lessons.

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations that there is a variety in what students are asked to produce.

Students are expected to respond and produce solutions in various ways. They are asked not only to produce answers but to provide evidence through drawings, representations, and written explanations. Students are often asked to analyze and defend the work of others. They must justify their conclusions with verbal statements and mathematical reasoning.

Lessons are designed with a consistent routine that includes whole group, partner, and independent work. Problem, Talk About It, Hands-On Activity, Practice, and Problem Solving portions of each lesson require students to represent the problem in a drawing and make connections between the drawing and the equations. Question types vary and include draw a model, short answer, solve, explain, and multi-step performance tasks. Students are asked to produce various answers for the mathematical content that is the focus of each lesson. For example, in Lesson 11 students explain orally how to count sets of ten objects in different arrangements, represent a set of ten objects using counters in different arrangements, use numerals for 10 to show the total number of objects represented, and finally shade ten objects.

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for providing manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.

In the Hands-On Activities found within each lesson students use a variety of manipulatives including two-color counters, bear counters, cubes, attribute blocks, geometric solids, ten-frame representations, and number bonds. Students are frequently asked to look at a manipulative model and create a math equation from the representation. For example, in Lesson 15 students use red and yellow counters and a five frame to create an addition equation.

Throughout the materials, various manipulatives are introduced and used in lessons. Their use is appropriate for the mathematics content represented. For example, in Lesson 30 students sort two-dimensional and three-dimensional shape cards onto a mat. During the Hands-on Activity, pairs of students are given either a geometric solid (i.e. sphere, cube, cylinder, or cone), or a an attribute block (i.e. circle, rectangle, square, triangle, or hexagon). Students search for similar shapes in the classroom and share their shape name and the classroom object that has the same shape.

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The visual design of the instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten is not distracting or chaotic and supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The format of each lesson is consistent in both the Teacher Resource Book and Student Instruction Book. The pictures within the Student Instruction Book and the Interactive Tutorials on the Ready Teacher Toolbox are colorful, engaging, and represent items that are relevant to children.

The students have adequate space to work within the Student Instruction Book and Practice and Problem Solving Book. Each lesson for the teacher and student has a consistent layout throughout the series. The pictures match the concepts addressed. For example, the Unit 1 Lesson 2 Interactive Tutorial uses an animated clock to engage students in problems counting in a bakery. The arrow used to count objects for each problem is large. The “done” button turns green when referenced orally. The objects and contexts (cookies and chips) are appropriate for students, and the sequence of problems is logical.

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The instructional materials support: planning and providing learning experiences with quality questions; contain ample and useful notations and suggestions on how to present the content; and contain explanations of the grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations that materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development. Support is provided in the following ways:

  • Step by Step in each lesson organizes content into chunks for student learning and includes guiding questions, key points, and teacher prompts. For example, in Lesson 11 teachers are prompted to: “Discuss other size groups as well and note number pairs for 10...Ask: 'How many blue fish are there? (9) How many more will make 10? (1) Do you see one object you could add to the group to make 10?' (the seahorse or the snail)”
  • The Mathematical Discourse section in each lesson includes questions to engage students and advance their mathematical understanding. For example, Lesson 5 Mathematical Discourse Talk About It states: “When children have completed this page, say: 'Work with a partner. Was it easier for you to compare the plates and cups or to compare the dots? Why?'” There are also examples of possible responses for the teacher.

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations that they contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The instructional materials provide resources to support teacher planning.

  • The Teacher Resource Book provides a separate pacing guide for the year, month, week, and day.
  • The Unit Overview page includes lesson titles, page numbers, the primary and supporting standards, prerequisite skills, content objectives, learning progressions, lesson vocabulary, and a detailed pacing guide for whole and small group instruction for each lesson.
  • Two Common Core correlation charts, Ready Instruction Correlation and Interim Assessment Correlation, are included.
  • The Cognitive Rigor and Ready Chart lists specific questions identified as DOK level 3.

The Teacher Resource Book contains components to assist with lesson delivery.

  • At a Glance explains what students will be doing during each component of the lesson.
  • Step by Step organizes the lesson into chunks and provides guiding questions.
  • SMP Tips highlight specific Standards for Mathematical Practice.
  • Mathematical Discourse includes questions to engage students and advance their learning. Possible answers and key ideas to listen for in student responses are included.
  • Try It Solutions provide complete explanations and multiple solutions.
  • Concept Extensions, ELL Support, and Visual Models provide support, suggestions, and strategies to engage students with activities that support varied abilities.
  • Solutions in the Independent Practice section includes a correct response, at least one possible solution method, and the DOK level for the problems.
  • Quick Check and Remediation includes an exit slip to monitor understanding. A chart includes error analysis and remediation suggestions.
  • Hands-On Activity extends the concepts and skills using manipulatives and a collaborative group approach.
  • Challenge Activity extends the learning of those students who have mastered the skills and concepts.

The Teacher Toolbox found online contains the following technology components to assist with lesson delivery:

  • Interactive Tutorials are referenced as part of Day 1 instruction for most lessons and provide interactive video clips for delivery of student mathematical learning.
  • i-Ready Door 24 Plus is a free iPad app for fact fluency practice but is not explicitly included in the Teacher Resource Book for instruction.

i-Ready (available for additional purchase and used by most Ready users) is an Online Diagnostic and Instruction component.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for containing a teacher’s edition in print and online that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

In each lesson, information is provided for the teacher to understand and make connections between the mathematical content and practices, errors or misconceptions that may arise, and the rationale behind specific lesson parts.

  • In Unit 4 Lesson 14 the SMP TIP for MP2 states: “Telling a story with numbers allows children to make sense of quantities and understand how these quantities relate to real-world situations.”
  • In Unit 4 Lesson 15 Independent Practice Talk About It teachers receive the following information: “Responses should accurately reflect the addends and total in each problem. Discuss both add-to and put-together problems.” This guidance helps teachers to understand the types of operation problems within the lesson and to make connections to CCSSM Table 1 Common Addition and Subtraction Situations.

Throughout Ready Kindergarten there is guidance for teachers that identifies and connects the underlying mathematics of a lesson. These are written in adult language.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for containing a print teacher’s edition (in print and in the on-line Teacher Toolbox) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

Each unit begins with a Lessons Progressions Chart. This chart lists lessons that students are preparing for in future grades. For example, Unit 1 Lesson 5 is preparing students for Grade 1 Lesson 22 and Grade 2 Lesson 12.

Each Lesson Overview includes a Learning Progression section. This section begins with an explanation of how the lesson builds on prior knowledge from previous lessons in Kindergarten. The Learning Progression explains the lesson's overall connection to Kindergarten and the mathematical content of the lesson. This section also explains connections to Grade 1 and, if appropriate, to other future grades.

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten provide a list of lessons in both the printed and digital versions of the Teacher Resource Book that cross-reference lessons and standards and provide an estimated instructional time for each unit, chapter, and lesson.

  • A Year-Long Pacing Guide recommends the number of days for each lesson, including assessments. Lessons include recommended minutes per day.
  • The Unit Overview provides the focus standard for each lesson.
  • The Correlation Chart correlates the Common Core Standards with each instructional lesson.

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The Ready Kindergarten instructional materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

The Practice and Problem Solving Book includes a Family Letter for each lesson. The letter includes an explanation of the math and an activity for the family to use at home. A Spanish version of the letter is available online in the Teacher Toolbox.

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The Ready Kindergarten instructional materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of research-based strategies.

The Teacher Resource Book contains the following explanations of the program instructional approaches:

  • “Answering the Demands of the Common Core with Ready” details how the program addresses the shifts in the standards.
  • “Supporting Research” provides the instructional methods used by Ready, examples of where these methods are found in the program, and research that supports these methods.
  • “Cognitive Rigor and Ready” provides a table that combines the hierarchies of learning of Webb (Depth of Thinking) and Bloom (Types of Thinking) and provides a table that charts where higher-complexity items can be found within lessons.
  • References are provided at the back of the Teacher Edition. This list details key research reports on math instruction and learning.

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
8/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for offering teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. The instructional materials provide opportunities for identifying and addressing common student errors and misconceptions, ongoing review and practice with feedback, and having assessments with standards clearly denoted. The instructional materials do not consistently provide strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge or include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten partially meet expectations for supporting teachers with strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge within and across grade levels.

Prerequisite skills are listed for each unit and lesson. At the beginning of each unit in the Student Instruction Book students check off skills they already know in the “Self Check.” Filling out the checklist is explicitly called out in the “Step By Step” section at the beginning of the unit in the Teacher Resource Book. Prerequisite support lessons are provided for the teacher within each lesson to review prerequisite concepts or fill in gaps in student knowledge.

However, there are no pretests included within the program or systematic way to gather information about student prior knowledge. The i-Ready online component (available for additional purchase and used by most Ready users) is the tool provided to gather information about prior knowledge.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for providing strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.

  • The Quick Check and Remediation section at the end of a lesson presents a question to monitor understanding of the content of the lesson. This section includes a chart of incorrect answers, common errors, and remediation suggestions.
  • Lesson Quizzes provide the teacher with a Common Misconceptions and Errors section that describes common misconceptions and errors.

Within lessons themselves, directions instruct teachers to watch for specific errors and misconceptions, and suggestions are provided to address these errors and misconceptions. For example, in Lesson 22 the teacher direction states, “Watch for children who have difficulty starting with 10 and counting on. Find opportunities to practice counting with these children, counting on from 10 as well as from other starting points. Help them see that 1 more than 10 is always 11, 1 more than that is 12, and so forth.”

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.

Each lesson provides approximately one week of instruction. Over the course of the week, responsibility for the learning process transfers from the teacher to the student. Students move from scaffolded support to independent problem solving. Review and practice is incorporated in each lesson within the Ready Instruction Book and in each homework assignment within the Practice and Problem Solving Book.

Feedback is provided to students throughout lessons. Frequent feedback opportunities to address skills and concepts are provided in the Teacher Resource Book. The Quick Check and Remediation activity within each lesson provides teachers with sample errors and remediation strategies to address those errors. Assessments and Performance tasks include rubrics that can also be used to provide feedback.

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
0/0

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for offering ongoing formative and summative assessments that clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

  • Standards are clearly noted within assessments found in the Mathematics Assessments Teachers Guide.
  • An Interim Assessment is provided for each unit. Interim assessments provide standards correlations for each item. This information can be found on the Interim Assessment Correlations chart in the Teacher Resource Book.
  • Unit Assessments provide standards correlations for each item. Unit Assessments and correlations are found online in the Teacher Toolbox.
  • Lesson quizzes and quick checks are provided for most lessons. These quizzes assess the specific standards being taught in the lesson.

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten partially meet expectations for the inclusion of rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

Rubrics are used throughout the course. Rubrics can be found within lessons for some independent practice activities, in quizzes, mid- and unit assessments, unit performance tasks, and in the Assessment Book. The rubrics and scoring guidelines are easy to understand and interpret.

Within lessons rubrics and scoring guidelines do provide guidance for teachers to follow-up, and throughout Ready there is guidance for teachers on behaviors to look for, error alerts, and misconceptions. However, the lesson quizzes, mid- and unit assessments, interim assessments, and the Assessment Books provide little guidance for teachers on how to interpret student performance or suggestions for follow-up. For example, scoring rubrics are provided for Unit Performance Tasks, but follow-up suggestions based on scoring criteria are not provided.

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten do not include explicit opportunities for students to monitor their own progress.

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
12/12
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectations for supporting teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades. The instructional materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics. The instructional materials also consistently provide: strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons; strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners; tasks with multiple entry points; support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations; and opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for providing strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.

  • Each lesson follows a gradual release model in which carefully scaffolded support is withdrawn as students gain mastery. Each lesson consists of four components: Introduction, Modeled and Guided Instruction, Guided Practice, and Independent Practice.
  • Lessons are sequenced to build from conceptual understanding, using concrete and pictorial representations to more abstract representations.
  • The marginal notes in the Teacher Resource book often suggest ways to support students as a whole and subgroups of students who might need extra support. Notes include sections on vocabulary, concept extensions, visual models, hands-on activities and real-world connections.
  • Each Lesson contains a Differentiated Instruction page which contains an Quick Check and Remediation Activity, Hands-On Activity, and a Challenge Activity.
  • Center Activity PDF’s can be found online in the Teacher Toolbox to help further differentiation.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instruction materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.

The Teacher Resource Book contains the following support:

  • Each lesson includes a section called Small Group Differentiation that consists of two subsections: Teacher-led Activities and Student-Led Activities. Student–led Math Center activities in three different levels are referenced for additional instruction, if needed.
  • The margin notes in the Teacher Resource Book suggest ways to support students as a whole and provide specific strategies for subgroups of students who might need extra support. This includes sections on vocabulary, concept extensions, visual models, hands-on activities, and challenge activities.
  • The student Practice and Problem Solving book includes three levels of problems (basic, medium, challenge) that include verbal, visual, and symbolic representations.

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for embedding tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.

When solving problems, students often choose their own solution strategy and/or representation. The embedded tasks are presented using multiple representations (drawings, charts, graphs, numbers, or words) and different solution strategies.

  • Unit 2 Lesson 7 Problem Solving Connection Problem 3, “There are 7 people wearing hats. How many people can wear blue hats, and how many people can wear red hats?” Students work on the problem independently and share their answers with the class.
  • Unit 6 Lesson 26 Problem Solving Connection Problem 2, “There are 6 flowers. Some are tall. The rest are short. How many can be tall, and how many can be short?” Teachers are encouraged through the Step by Step instructions to read the problem and give students time to work independently to solve the problem. Students are also asked to share answers and discuss as a class. “Encourage children to explain how their answers are alike and how they are different. Ask if anyone got a different answer, to assess understanding and help children avoid common errors.”
  • Unit 1 Lesson 4 the Explore Together section notes: “Encourage children to describe the groups of objects they see in the picture.” The focus of the lesson is counting 5. The students have an opportunity to notice, count, and share with the class. Because students may notice different aspects of the image, the work is more open ended.
  • Unit 3 Lesson 11 the Mathematical Discourse section notes: “Erica was absent when her class learned about the number 10. What should her friends tell her to help her catch up on what she missed?” This section allows students to approach problems in multiple ways and to discuss their approach to the questions. The materials offer multiple examples of how students may describe 10.

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for suggesting support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics.

The Teacher Resource Book and online Teacher Toolbox contain the following support:

  • ELL Support Tips are found in the margin notes of each lesson of the Teacher Resource Book. For example, Unit 3 Lesson 13 includes an English Language Learners Tip: “Guide children to look at the bats at the bottom of the page. Ask children to tell the numbers that describe the two groups that make the 10 bats.”
  • A Differentiated Instruction page is included in some lessons of the Teacher Resource Book. For example, Unit 7 Lesson 31 Compare Shapes includes an Quick Check and Remediation, Hands-On Activity, and a Challenge Activity.
  • Math Center Activities are provided On Level, Below Level, and Above Level.

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet expectations for providing opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

Materials offer the following instructional support for advanced learners:

  • A Differentiated Instruction page that provides Challenge Activities is included in many lessons of the Teacher Resource Book. For example, in Unit 5 Lesson 22 students extend the concepts in the lesson by building numbers 11-15 using 2 groups of dots. For an additional challenge, teachers are instructed to remove the dot card for 10 from children’s sets.
  • Some lessons include a Concept Extension. For example, in Unit 4 Lesson 16: “Connect subtraction and addition. Write '2+1=3' on the board. Describe a real-world situation and have 3 children act it out. Say: 'There are 2 boys at a table. One girl joins them, and now there are 3 children at the table. Then have the girl walk away.' Ask: 'How many children are left after the girl leaves the table? (2) What number sentence shows how many children are left?' Write '3-1=2' on the board and say: 'Three take away 1 is 2.'”

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

  • The names and situations in the story problems represent a variety of cultural groups.
  • Student edition pictures include students from a variety of cultures.
  • The application problems include real-world situations that are appropriate to a variety of cultural and gender groups.
  • Interactive tutorials found online in the Teacher Toolbox represent students of both genders and various ethnicities.

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

The following strategies are found in the Teacher Resource Book:

  • The Gradual Release model incorporates teacher led whole and small group instruction for each lesson.
  • Pair/Share Tips found in the margin notes prompt students to compare answers and reason with a partner.
  • The online Teacher Toolbox provides protocols for the Think-Share-Compare Activities.
  • Margin notes within each lesson suggest appropriate grouping strategy - whole, small group, pairs, or individually - in different parts of the lesson.
  • The online Teacher Toolbox provides math center activities for each lesson.

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Ready Kindergarten provide limited support for teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.

  • The online Teacher Toolbox provides a Spanish version of the family letters included in the Practice and Problem Solving book.
  • Some English Language Learner support sections found in the margin notes discuss making the connection between the English vocabulary and the Spanish cognate.

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
0/0
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-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten integrate technology in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices. The digital materials are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers, but they do not include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills. The digital materials do not include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, and the materials offer some opportunities for customized, local use. The instructional materials do not include opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Ready Kindergarten digital materials are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers. The Teacher Resource Book, Teacher Toolbox, and Student Books are platform neutral and can be accessed on tablets and mobile devices. The i-Ready Door 24 Plus is used for fact fluency, and practice is only available for iPads.

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Ready Kindergarten do not include opportunities to assess students’ mathematical understanding and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.

i-Ready is an online diagnostic and monitoring tool (available for additional purchase and used by most Ready users). i-Ready has two components. i-Ready Diagnostic is an adaptive diagnostic, and i-Ready Standards Mastery is designed to provide information about mastery of individual grade-level standards.

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Ready Kindergarten digital instructional materials cannot be customized for individual learners or users. An additional purchase of i-Ready (available for additional purchase and used by most Ready users) does provide adaptive diagnostic and growth measures to support personalized instruction.

There are limited opportunities for the teacher to customize lessons for local use. Ready Teacher Resources include Reteach Ready Instruction Prerequisite Lessons, Tools for Instruction, and Math Center Activities. Prerequisite Lessons and Tools for Instruction are teacher-led activities for use with small groups requiring additional instruction and/or review of prerequisite concepts. Math Center Activities are student-led activities.

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Ready Kindergarten instructional materials do not provide opportunities for teachers to collaborate with other teachers or students to collaborate with other students.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
0/0
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The Ready Kindergarten instructional materials include Interactive Tutorials that are animated interactive lessons assigned to students in their personalized online instruction plan. These tutorials include integrative technology such as interactive tools and virtual manipulatives/objects to engage students in the Mathematical Practices as they model the mathematical content of the lesson.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Thu Apr 12 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2017

Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
Ready Math Practice Problem Solving Grade K Student Book (2016) 978-1-4957-1678-2 Curriculum Associates 2016
Ready Math Practice Problem Solving Grade K Teacher Guide (2016) 978-1-4957-1679-9 Curriculum Associates 2016
Ready CCSS Math Instruction Grade K Student Book (2017) 978-1-4957-2002-4 Curriculum Associates 2017
Ready CCSS Math Instruction Grade K Teacher Resource Book (2017) 978-1-4957-2012-3 Curriculum Associates 2017

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Math K-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The K-8 review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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