Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The Paths to College and Career English Language Arts materials for Grade 10 fully meet the expectations of alignment to the standards. The texts, associated tasks, and activities provided by the materials provide the opportunities for students to become proficient readers, writers, and speakers over the course of the year. Text-connected writing, speaking, research, and listening tasks build students' content knowledge while strengthening their literacy skills to prepare them for increasingly more complex texts and tasks.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Text Quality

0
15
28
32
29
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Building Knowledge

0
15
28
32
30
28-32
Meets Expectations
16-27
Partially Meets Expectations
0-15
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
23
30
34
30
30-34
Meets Expectations
24-29
Partially Meets Expectations
0-23
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Text Quality & Complexity and Alignment to Standards Components

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

Texts are of high quality and worthy of students’ time and attention. Students are supported in their growth as readers through questions and tasks that build in sophistication throughout the year to help students demonstrate their acquisition of knowledge and skills. There are opportunities for students to engage in evidence-based discussions about the texts and topics under study. The materials provide varied and frequent writing opportunities to build student skills in both on-demand and process writing and require students to support their writing with evidence from the texts they are reading. There are limited opportunities for students to receive explicit instruction in grammar and conventions, though the students are held accountable for this knowledge on the writing rubrics.

Criterion 1a - 1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.
15/16
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Criterion Rating Details

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and include both rich content and models of high-quality writing. Students read and experience both literary and informational texts in the balance called for in the standards. Texts are of varying levels of complexity that are appropriate for the grade band or appropriate to the demands on the reader or the task. The publisher does not provide text complexity analysis, but does provide some rationale for the placement of the text in this grade level. Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.

Indicator 1a

Anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that anchor/core texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading.

Anchor texts are of publishable quality. Each anchor text contains content worthy of study and provides a foundation for learning across a unit. Texts provide models of extraordinary writing. All texts presented are of high interest, thought-provoking, and contain rich language with numerous instructional opportunities for both the instructor and students. Examples include:

  • In Module 1, students read “The Palace Thief” by Ethan Cronin. This collection of four short stories has strong content, rich with academic vocabulary. The main character is a classics professor who presents timeless stories couched in a modern dilemma.
  • In Module 1, students read excerpts from The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan and Friday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger. These anchor texts present contemporary stories of young people overcoming challenges. Students can identify with the timeless conflicts between youth coming-of-age and parents reluctant to let them.
  • In Module 2, students read a collection of poems that consist of the following: “In This Blind Alley” by Ahmad Shamlu, “Freedom” by Rabindranath Tagore, and “Women” by Alice Walker. This collection of poems offer a counterpoint to Dr. King’s letter that provide international and feminist perspective on the human rights movement.
  • In Module 3, students read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Students explore the ethics of medical research as they gain a compassionate understanding of race relations and the hierarchy of privilege versus need in American society.
  • In Module 4, students read Macbeth by William Shakespeare. A classic for high school students, this Shakespearean tragedy develops many central ideas, including the role of fate and agency and the relationship between appearance and reality.
  • In Module 4, students read “Death of a Pig” by E. B. White. The text is a classic tragedy that students can use as an example of the narrative essay’s structure. Students can identify with how White unfolds and draws connections between key events and ideas to develop a central idea.

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.
*Indicator 1b is non-scored (in grades 9-12) and provides information about text types and genres in the program.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

There is a balance of informational and literary texts across the entire year. In almost every module presented throughout Grade 10 materials, students read and experience both literary and informational texts. These texts include, but are not limited to: articles, poems, short stories, plays, magazine excerpts, letters, excerpts from nonfiction text, and excerpts from fiction text.

Literary texts include:

  • The poems “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” by Sir Walter Raleigh, and “Raleigh Was Right” by William Carlos Williams.
  • The short story “The Palace Thief” by Ethan Canin.
  • The canonical play Macbeth by William Shakespeare.
  • The poems “Freedom” by Rabindranath Tagore and “Women” by Alice Walker.
  • Excerpts from the fictional novel The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan.
  • The short story "Death of a Pig" by E.B. White.

Informational texts include:

  • Excerpts from the nonfiction text Friday Night Lights, by H. G. Bissinger.
  • The canonical letter “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was drafted by various representatives and affirmed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris.
  • The literary nonfiction text The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade level (according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis).
4/4
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis.

    Materials offer a range of texts that are of varying levels of complexity. Overall, a large number of texts are on grade level, based on Lexile level and themes throughout each text. While there are texts that are above grade level based on Lexile level, these texts are paired or greatly scaffolded for student comprehension. The texts that are considered below grade level based on Lexile level are rich in theme and worthy of study. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • Students read Shakespeare’s Macbeth. While a Lexile level is not listed for this version of the play, the text acts as a canonical piece of literature for Grade 10 students to study, dissect, and read. While this is non-standard prose and difficult to measure quantitatively, the story is timely for Grade 10 students to analyze complex characters and conflicts that develop over the course of a text.
    • Students read an excerpt from The Prince with a Lexile level of 1430. Students read chapters 17 and 18 as a comparative text to Macbeth. Analysis of complex themes, including the traits that contribute to successful rulers, allows students to make connections between multiple texts.
    • Students read the nonfiction text, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, which has a Lexile level of 1140. The nonfiction text provides students with starting point for research of multiple topics. The texts allows students to analyze, reflect, and research multiple topics by modeling the research process and high quality writing. While this text is considered below grade level based on quantitative measures, the text is qualitatively rich.
    • Students read Friday Night Lights with a Lexile level of 1220. Reading excerpts from this text, students follow the author's delicate balance of characterization and plot development. Students analyze events, conversations, and emotions in order to learn how the author advances his own point of view. While this text is considered below grade level based on quantitative measures, the text is qualitatively rich.

    Indicator 1d

    Materials support students' literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials support students’ literacy skills (understanding and comprehension) over the course of the school year through increasingly complex text to develop independence of grade level skills. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels).

    Throughout the school year, students read poems, short stories, articles, and excerpts of longer texts with guided instruction and consistent discussion in pairs, small groups, and whole class. Each module contains tasks which require students to use selected works to cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says. Texts move from mostly literary texts in the first module to exclusively informational texts in the third module as students complete their own research project. More complex texts are read in smaller chunks in class, with as little as three or four paragraphs for an instructional lesson, with time and attention given to the complexities of the text substance and structure. Students build strength of analysis and comprehension with common texts then build stamina through independent reading. Students complete independent reading of self-selected texts throughout the school year. A reading journal logs student interaction and occasional analysis of independent texts. Examples include:

    • In the beginning of the year, Module 1 supports students' ability to read closely for textual details and make claims about and across texts using specific textual evidence. In three units covering 37 lessons, students read three poems, a short story, and a novel excerpt.
    • In the middle of the year, students complete Module 2 where they use rhetoric and word choice to develop ideas and claims. Students learn to generate and respond to questions in scholarly discourse as they analyze informational texts and literature with opposing viewpoints on the same topic.
    • In Module 3, students research and write about areas of investigation evidenced in the anchor text. This serves as the foundation of research process for students, overall, in Grade 10.
    • By end of the year, students are able to comprehend complex works with multiple central ideas and claims that can be found in paired texts within Module 4.

    Indicator 1e

    Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

    The publisher does not provide text complexity analysis, but does provide some rationale for the placement of the text in this grade level. An overview to the curriculum maps lists what students will do throughout the module from the beginning of the school year to the end of the school year. For example, in Module 1, the Teacher Edition states, “Students begin with poems that allow them to analyze dialogue within Christopher Marlowe’s “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love,” Sir Walter Raleigh’s response poem, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd,” and William Carlos Williams’s response poem, “Raleigh Was Right.” The unit begins with students listening to and analyzing Marlowe’s poem; various elements within the text include figurative language and tone. By reading Raleigh’s poem and Williams’s poem, students analyze word choices and how they affect the meaning and tone of the poem. With several short writings, students are prepared for an assessment that allows them to do comparative writing over the poems using relevant and sufficient evidence to support their analysis.”

    There is no information identifying quantitative measures of complexity nor is there a specific qualitative analysis of any of the texts included. There is information at the beginning of each unit to explain the tasks and purposes of each text.

    Indicator 1f

    Anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that anchor and supporting texts provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading proficiency. Each lesson follows a standard structure: overview and identification of targeted content standards, homework check, class reading and collaborative conversations, quick write to process information, and closing activity to prep homework; the majority of the activities are based solely on the text(s) in question. Students interact with texts in multiple ways including the following: teacher read-alouds, independent reading, anchor text readings and annotations, anchor text small group readings, whole group readings and discussion questions, paired readings, vocabulary journals and annotations, and research-based texts of student choice.

    Students engage in a range of text types, both literary and informational. More complex texts are chunked with guiding questions that lead students through analysis with talk partners. Less complex texts ask students to do more independent processing. Students self-select resources to read in support of research and novels for independent study. The lesson structure remains consistent throughout the year so that students develop fluency with analytic practices.

    Criterion 1g - 1n

    Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.
    14/16
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    -
    Criterion Rating Details

    Text-dependent and text-specific questions are included throughout the modules and include exemplar responses. Students have varied opportunities to demonstrate understanding in each module and prepare for the culminating task in multiple ways that integrate skills, such as: close reading, annotating, reading independently and in small groups, hosting whole class and small group discussions in multiple formats, and asking and answering questions. There are multiple opportunities for students to engage in evidence-based discussions; however, there are few protocols to support those discussions. Opportunities are presented for students to engage in speaking and listening activities to demonstrate their mastery of content.

    Materials require students to engage in both on-demand and process writing across a variety of writing types, include frequent opportunities for students to write evidence-based claims relating to various topics and in response to text sets organized around the topic.

    There are limited opportunities for students to receive explicit instruction in grammar and conventions, though the students are held accountable for this knowledge on the writing rubrics.

    Indicator 1g

    Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text dependent/specific, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

    In Grade 10, text-dependent and text-specific questions are included throughout the modules. Each module is divided by units of study with individual lessons. Each unit is centered around a direct quote that functions as the theme of the unit. Questions require repeated close reading focusing on a range of text segments from the use of a particular word ranging to reading and surveying a segment of text. Students also practice analyzing the overall tone, theme, or effect across an entire text. Students are required to go back into the text and read closely in order to determine what the text says explicitly while responding to questions that require students to provide evidence for inferences drawn from the text. Text-dependent questions build upon one another, providing opportunities for students to engage deeply with texts through close reading.Teachers are provided with exemplar student responses for questions and tasks.

    In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 5, students read and analyze “The Palace Thief.” In “Activity 4: Reading and Discussion,” students respond to questions, such as:

    • How does Hundert’s description of Sedgewick’s behavior in their conversation after the competition develop Sedgewick’s character?
    • What does Hundert’s description of his failure to follow his own “code of morals” suggest about the characters of Hundert and Sedgewick?
    • How does Hundert’s conversation with the senator on page 173 affect Hundert’s view of Sedgewick on page 174?

    In Module 2, Unit 3, Lesson 5, students listen to Malala Yousafzai’s “Address to the United Nations Youth Assembly.” Then, they read paragraphs one through six (1-6) of the transcript. In “Activity 4: Reading and Discussion,” students respond to questions, such as:

    • In paragraph 5, what are Yousafzi’s stated purposes for addressing the United Nations Youth assembly?
    • According to paragraph six (6), what did the Taliban hope to achieve by shooting Yousafzai?
    • Based on your response to the last question, what can you infer about Yousafzai’s actions before the shooting?

    Exemplar student answers are provided in the Teacher Guide. For example, in Module 4, Unit 3, Lesson 3, students read and analyze chapter eighteen, “How a prince should keep his word,” from The Prince. In “Activity 4: Reading and Discussion,” students respond to the following questions:

    • What distinction does Machiavelli make between princes and men in chapter eighteen (18), paragraph two (2)?
    • How does this distinction further develop a central idea of the text?

    Indicator 1h

    Materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/ text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of sequences of text-dependent/text-specific questions with activities that build to a culminating task which integrates skills to demonstrate understanding.

    Students have varied opportunities to demonstrate understanding in each module. Students prepare for the culminating task in multiple ways that integrate skills, such as: close reading, annotating, reading independently and in small groups, hosting whole class and small group discussions in multiple formats, and asking and answering questions.

    Every lesson culminates in a Quick Write assessment task. This assessment provides information about students understanding of the lesson objectives and texts. Teachers are provided with high performance response criteria. Lessons contain sets of high quality text-dependent/specific questions that build to the culminating task. For example, in Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 5, students respond to the following prompt, citing textual evidence to support analysis and inferences drawn from the text: “Analyze the impact of Shakespeare’s use of figurative language on the mood of the scene (Act 2.1). The activities and questions leading up to this task include:

    • Students participate in a Masterful Reading of Act 2.1. Students are asked to listen for details that develop the mood of the scene.
    • What time is it at the beginning of the scene? Support your answer with evidence from lines 1-4.
    • What effect does Shakespeare create in lines 1-14? Use specific examples to support your answer.
    • How do Shakespeare’s specific word choices in these lines contribute to the mood of the scene?
    • What is the effect of Shakespeare’s references to the supernatural in Act 2.1?

    Each unit includes a Mid-Unit Assessment and an End-of-Unit Assessment that connect to the Module Performance Assessment. These unit assessments give teachers feedback as students work towards the Module Performance Assessment. For example, in Module 2, the Unit 2 End-of-Unit Assessment asks students to “Analyze how the interactions between Hundert and the Bells develop a central idea of the text in 'The Palace Thief'.”

    Each module includes a Module Performance Assessment that serves as a culminating task. The lessons and activities that are completed within the units of study lead to preparing students for the Performance Assessment. Supporting lessons contain text-dependent and text-specific questions, tasks, and assignments. Thinking, speaking, writing, and listening skills are the focus of key ideas and details in the modules. Writing and reading are integrated throughout the tasks. Text-dependent questions scaffold throughout the modules to help students become equipped to respond to the culminating tasks. Students demonstrate understanding through written expression, oral discussions, and presentations within groups. For example, in the Module 3, the Performance Assessment, students to respond to the following prompt: “Build on the analysis you did for your research-based argument paper by producing a 5-minute podcast. Synthesize your research and offer salient points of research in an engaging oral presentation that demonstrates command of formal spoken English. Your podcast should detail your central claim, two supporting claims with relevant and sufficient evidence and one counterclaim with corresponding limitations.”

    Indicator 1i

    Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols to engage students in speaking and listening activities and discussions (small group, peer-to-peer, whole class) which encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax.
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidence-based discussions (small groups, peer to peer, whole class) that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. There are multiple opportunities for students to engage in evidence-based discussions; however, there are few protocols to support those discussions. Students work in small groups, with partners, and engage in whole group during discussion. There are few teacher supports or guidance for discussions. For example:

    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students work in small groups to read page 155 of “The Palace Thief” and discuss questions such as "What relationship does Canin establish between the narrator and his students on page 155? What relationship does Canin establish between the narrator and St. Benedict’s School on page 155? What do the narrator’s expectations of his students suggest about what he values?" There are no protocols or further teacher guidance.
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students are asked, “In paragraph 1, how does Skloot connect Henrietta and the future of medicine? What does Skloot mean when she describes HeLa cells as 'immortal' (p. 1)? Cite evidence from the text to support your understanding of the word immortal? How have Henrietta’s cells 'helped with some of the most important advances in medicine' (p. 2)?” After students read and annotate in small groups, they share with the whole class. There are no protocols or further teacher guidance.
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 4, students are assigned to read Act I of Macbeth. In Activity 5: Small Group Activity, students are provided with definitions for"esteem’st," "ornament," and "enterprise". They are instructed to write them in their vocabulary journals; however, there is no further guidance or instruction for the words.
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 4, Activity 5: Small Group Activity, students are given the task to engage in collaborative discussion after reading Macbeth. Teachers remind students to do the following: set goals for the discussion, summarize of agreement and disagreement, and make new connections in light of new evidence and reasons. There is no further protocol or teacher guidance to help host this discussion.

    Indicator 1j

    Materials support students' listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials support students’ listening and speaking (and discussions) about what they are reading and researching (shared projects) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

    Opportunities are presented for students to engage in speaking and listening activities for the texts they are reading and for the chosen area of investigation that they want to research. Students further demonstrate their speaking and listening skills through creating and sharing inquiry questions and engaging in discussion regarding self-created inquiry questions.

    Throughout the modules, students are given opportunities to respond to higher order questions by utilizing textual evidence. Furthermore, students are directed to read and annotate with their peers, take notes, and respond to their peers’ questions and thoughts. Students collaborate with others and revise writings, as needed. Teachers are provided with exemplar answers as models, as well as student look-fors. For example:

    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students read page 155 of “The Palace Thief” and discuss questions, such as “What relationship does Canin establish between the narrator and his students on page 155? What relationship does Canin establish between the narrator and St. Benedict’s School on page 155? What do the narrator’s expectations of his students suggest about what he values?”
    • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 12, Activity 4, within Reading and Discussion, students form small groups after reading “Letters from a Birmingham Jail.” As they read individually, they are assigned to annotate, so they can share out during discussion. Student groups are then assigned to reread paragraph 24, and answer assigned questions before sharing out to centralize the discussion. Students are asked the following questions to think about before discussion: “How does King begin paragraph 24, and how does this connect to the last sentence in paragraph 23? What is the significance of this connection?"
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students meet in small groups to discuss, “In paragraph 1, how does Skloot connect Henrietta and the future of medicine? What does Skloot mean when she describes HeLa cells as 'immortal' (p. 1)? Cite evidence from the text to support your understanding of the word immortal? How have Henrietta’s cells 'helped with some of the most important advances in medicine' (p. 2)?” After students read and annotate in small groups then share with the whole class.
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 12, students Turn and Talk with a partner to discuss the following questions: "What does Macbeth still desire to know (lines 115-117)? How do the interactions between Macbeth and the Witches affect Macbeth’s state of mind in this scene? How does this final series of apparitions fulfill Hecate's’ directions in act 3.5 (lines 28-33)?"

    Indicator 1k

    Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing grade-appropriate writing (e.g. grade-appropriate revision and editing) and short, focused projects.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

    There are regular, on-demand writings called Quick Writes that include a rubric and a writing checklist. These are used consistently throughout lessons and build to the unit assessments. Each unit includes a mid-unit and end-of-unit assessment, which provide students an opportunity to develop process writing habits that include using evidence from text analysis and information from research or inquiry projects. Graphic organizers, rubrics, and exemplar responses are provided for written responses throughout the units.

    In the Module 1, Module Performance Assessment, students develop a process writing and choose two narrators from the module texts and explore how their different points of view impact the development of a common central idea. Students participate in multiple quick writes throughout the unit to prepare for the final process writing:

    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 1, students respond to a Quick Write: “How does Canin develop the character of the narrator in this passage?” The Quick Write rubric and checklist are provided to guide both development of and reflection after the task. Students are reminded to use vocabulary from the lesson in their response.
    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 8, students respond to a Quick Write: “What does Hundert’s reaction to his retirement suggest about his character?”
    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 13, students write a multi-paragraph essay to analyze how the interactions between Hundert and the Bells develop a central idea of the text, “The Palace Thief.”

    In Module 3, students engage in an inquiry-based, iterative process for research. Building on work with evidence-based analysis, students explore topics that have multiple positions and perspectives by gathering and analyzing research based on vetted sources to establish a position of their own. Students read and analyze sources to surface potential problem-based questions for research, and develop and strengthen their writing with self-edits, peer reviews, and revision to produce effective evidence-based arguments. Students participate in multiple Quick Writes throughout the unit to prepare for the final process writing:

    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 1, students are introduced to the High Performance Response criteria at the beginning of the lesson. At the end of the lesson, they respond to the Quick Write prompt based off of the novel, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: “How does Skloot unfold events in this excerpt and what connections does she draw among these events?” Students have an opportunity to read collaboratively and discuss the passage before the quick write activity. A high performance response is included in teacher resources.
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 4, students utilize a short response rubric to guide on-demand and short writing response development. At the end of the lesson, students are presented the following quick writing prompt: “Determine a central idea in this excerpt and analyze how specific details about HeLa cells contribute to its development." At the end of the unit, students first analyze the seed text, and then they explain the possible questions they would like to research with an explanation of why they are intrigued by this course of inquiry. Students have been building parts of the final process writing assessment through the series of quick writes. Students are provided a checklist and rubric for the end of unit writing assessment. A high performance response is included in teacher resources.

    Indicator 1l

    Materials provide opportunities for students to address different types/modes/genres of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the expectation that materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards. (Writing opportunities incorporate digital resources/multimodal literacy materials where appropriate. Opportunities may include blended writing styles that reflect the distribution required by the standards.)

    The distribution of writing assignments for Grade 10 can be found in the four modules, and the Curriculum Map details what types of writing are available. Students focus on developing expository writing in Modules 1-3 and argumentative writing in Module 4. Students address multiple text types and genres through Quick Writes, Mid-Unit Assessments, End-of-Unit Assessments, and Module Performance Assessments. For example,

    • In Module 1, Unit 1, The End-of-Unit Assessment asks students to “write an expository essay to explain how a shared central idea develops over the course of the three poems presented in the unit.”
    • In Unit 3, the Mid-Unit Assessment has students select one of two prompts to write an expository essay: “In ‘Rules of the Game,’ to what extent does Waverly meet her mother’s expectation that she master ‘the art of invisible strength’ over the course of the chapter?” Or, "In ‘Two Kinds,’ Jing-mei states, ‘My mother believed you could be anything you wanted to be in America.’ To what extent does JIng-mei’s story support this belief?”
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, the End-of-Unit Assessment unfolds in two parts. Students have been building parts of the final process writing assessment through the series of Quick Writes. The unit assessment pulls all the pieces together and prepares for the next unit. Students first analyze the seed text then explain the possible questions they would like to research with an explanation of why they are intrigued by this course of inquiry. Students are provided a checklist and rubric for the end of unit writing assessment. In Unit 3, for the final assessment of the module, students write a researched argument about a topic inspired by the reading throughout the module and developed by the student.
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 5, students respond to the following prompt, citing textual evidence to support analysis and inferences drawn from the text: “Analyze the impact of Shakespeare’s use of figurative language on the mood of the scene (Act 2.1).

    Indicator 1m

    Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support sophisticated analysis, argumentation, and synthesis.

    Instructional materials include frequent opportunities for students to write evidence-based claims relating to various topics and in response to text sets organized around the topic. Students are asked to analyze text, develop claims, and support those claims with evidence from the text. There are opportunities to practice and demonstrate literary analysis, understanding of author’s craft, and synthesis of information from class discussions. Tools, such as graphic organizers are provided to help students analyze and organize text to be used in later writing. The checklists and rubrics also include criteria for using evidence which asks students to support explanations/claims with evidence from the text by using accurate quotations, paraphrases, and references.

    Opportunities for writing to sources include informal writing with Quick Writes, within the units and formal writing in the form of Module Unit Assessments and the culminating Module Performance Assessments. High performance responses are also included. These response provide examples for the teacher and list criteria that students can refer to when writing. For example:

    • In Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, students analyze a poem by Philip Marlowe for the cumulative impact of specific word choices and imagery on meaning and tone. The end-of-lesson Quick Write prompt is as follows: “How do the time and place that Marlow evokes in stanzas 3-6 develop a central idea of his poem?” In Unit 1, Lesson 5, students write to explain how Williams introduces and develops a central idea in “Raleigh Was Right.” In Unit 2, students read “The Palace Thief” by Ethan Canin throughout 13 lessons and analyze the narrator’s development for a mid-unit writing assessment in how the narrator’s interactions with other characters contributes to the development of a central idea. Students must use evidence from the text to support their written responses. In Unit 2, Lesson 2, students examine their lists of inquiry questions to select, vet, and refine at least five lines of inquiry for assessment. In Unit 2, Lesson 6, students use the “Research Frame Tool” to group and categorize questions for research. In Unit 3, students use at least one of the texts to analyze character development and the author’s craft in the mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments.
    • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 8, students complete several assignments. For the Quick Write assignment, students answer the following prompt: “Determine King’s purpose in paragraphs 16-18 and analyze how he uses rhetoric to advance that purpose." For a student to score as a "High Performer," he or she must do the following:
      • Identify King’s purpose (e.g., King’s purpose is to convince his addresses of the importance of disobeying unjust laws.)
      • Cite specific examples of King’s rhetoric and explain how each example advances his purpose (e.g., King uses biblical and historical references to show his addresses that people they admire also disobeyed unjust laws: “Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego...early Christians...Hungarian freedom fighters” all disobeyed the unjust laws of their rulers (par. 17-18).
    • In Module 3, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is the mentor text that is the basis of the research unit. Unit 1 models how to initiate a process of inquiry-based research. In Lesson 4, students complete the Quick Write, which requires students to respond to the following prompt: ”Determine a central idea in this excerpt and analyze how specific details about HeLa cells contribute to its development.” In Lesson 8, students complete the Quick Write, which requires students to respond to the following prompt: “How does Skloot use specific details in this section to further develop and refine a central idea in the text?” In Unit 2, students vet their research approach and refine paths to inquiry. In Unit 3, students navigate the research writing process including reviewing and revising multiple drafts.
    • In Module 4, students complete the following Quick Write: “How do White’s specific word choices in section 4 refine the tone of ‘Death of a Pig’?” Students use annotations and evidence from the text to address the prompt.

    Indicator 1n

    Materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.
    1/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meetthe criteria that materials include instruction and practice of the grammar and conventions/language standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application in context.

    There is little explicit instruction over the course of a year's worth of material. There is no increasingly, sophisticated context; instead, there are irregular attempts to address grammar and convention instruction in some modules for each grades. The standards are mentioned on the writing rubrics where students are held accountable; however, there is little to no instruction to help them to satisfy the standard prior to mid-point or final writing assessments. Overall, coverage of the language standards primarily focuses on word meanings with few opportunities for explicit instruction.

    Within Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 8, students begin the lesson by reading standard L.9-10.1.b: use different types of phrases when writing and speaking to express ideas clearly and to make speech and writing interesting. The standard is not addressed during instruction and is not mentioned again in task descriptions or directions.

    • Within Lesson 12, students read L.9-10.2. During close reading, students note how the author uses semicolons.
    • The mid-unit assessment checklist in the student journal includes an expectation that students demonstrate a command of conventions and spell accurately as does the end of unit assessment.

    In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 11, as students analyze "Letters from Birmingham Jail," they are asked to look at King’s use of semicolons to join phrases in a list. They are tasked with answering the following questions: “How does King’s use of semicolons relate to his use of parallel structure in paragraph 11? How does King use semicolons and parallel structure to advance his purpose in paragraph 11?”

    Within Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 9, students are reminded about semicolons as experienced in Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 12. They are then instructed to highlight semicolons in the Skloot’s text, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, as they connect historical events.

    • In Lesson 15, the End-of-Unit Assessment includes a writing checklist and rubric that expect demonstration of a command of conventions and appropriate use of language.

    In Module 3, Unit 3, students complete the research paper writing process. During the review and editing process, students demonstrate command of conventions and spelling.

    • Within Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 5, students focus on Activity 4, which focuses on “Parallel Structured and Varied Phrases”; this aims to teach students that “effective writing contains various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, etc.) and clear sentence structures, such as parallel structure.” Students work in pairs as they use “Death of a Pig” to analyze parallel structure and various types of phrases. The instructor points out definitions and examples of both parallel structure and phrases as a way to scaffold what students are supposed to complete in this assignment.

    Gateway Two

    Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

    Meets Expectations

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    Gateway Two Details

    The topical and thematic modules that comprise the materials work to build students' knowledge across topics and content areas. Vocabulary instruction is focused on text-specific words and does not build or measure the acquisition of domain-specific vocabulary. Questions and tasks guide students as they engage in research, and sharpen and employ reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in service of building knowledge.

    Criterion 2a - 2h

    30/32
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    Criterion Rating Details

    The instructional materials are divided into modules that are organized around a topic or theme. Sequenced text-specific questions and tasks engage students in a deeper analysis of the texts’ language, craft, and structure and requires students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts. Module performance assessments serve as culminating tasks that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through a blend of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The materials include a well-designed plan for year-long writing development that will assist students in building and demonstrating their mastery of the topics and texts under study. Additionally, students are required to engage in a progression of research and writing projects to help them explore and understand the topics they are studying.

    The materials do not have a well-articulated plan for instruction or assessment of academic vocabulary, focusing instead on developing vocabulary with multi-meaning and nuanced words rather than on domain-specific words such as those found in discipline development.

    The materials employ an accountability design that supports each student’s independent reading in and out of class.

    Indicator 2a

    Texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students' knowledge and their ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that texts are organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ knowledge and their ability to read and comprehend and analyze complex texts proficiently.

    Texts are organized into modules. There are four modules that explore a particular literary element or idea. Students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts is supported by engaging in analysis, participating in evidence-based discussions, and writing to inform in the first two modules. In the third module, students learn the principles of research. In the last module, students study argumentation techniques to write their own arguments. Repeated reading for different purposes and to develop vocabulary with increasingly complex texts continues throughout the year.

    Each module is divided into units. Each unit is entitled with a quotation from a text included as student reading. The quotation serves as the theme that build students’ knowledge while enhancing their ability to read and comprehend complex texts proficiently. The texts are connected by cohesive topics throughout the modules. The units within the module focus on a theme that can be supported in the various texts and demonstrated in the tasks and activities. Students are given numerous opportunities to independently practice with the texts and to build understanding.

    • In Module 1, students make connections across various poems as they explore how authors draw on and transform source material in the development of central ideas. Students continue to develop skills with a close reading of a contemporary short story and excerpts from novels, including The Joy Luck Club and Friday Night Lights.
    • In Module 2, students read the autobiographical essay, “A Genetics of Justice” by Julia Alvarez. Using this text students build skills for reading and understanding a literary nonfiction. The secondary text in this unit is Mark Memmot’s “Remembering to Never Forget: Dominican’s Parsley Massacre,” a journalistic text that covers the Trujillo dictatorship. Students are able to analyze two texts that handle political issues from differentiating perspectives.
    • In Module 3, students research multiple perspectives on a topic to develop and support a position. The central text for the entire module is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Students study the author’s craft, read selected articles on the central topic, and develop an essential question for research.

    Indicator 2b

    Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced higher order thinking questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language (words/phrases), key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts in order to make meaning and build understanding of texts and topics.

    In each lesson, text-based questions build from comprehension to deeper analysis questions exploring how the text works and what the text means. Students explore author’s craft, as well as key details. Students examine the effectiveness and impact of an author’s purpose, word choice, and use of figurative language, in order to derive meaning from texts. Key ideas, craft and structure are present within each question set. Question set build upon one another to push students to higher order thinking. For example:

    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 11, students read and annotate “The Palace Thief” and answer questions, such as:
      • How does Hundert’s opinion of Sedgwick based on the second cheating incident contribute to the development of a central idea of the text?
      • How do Hundert’s thoughts during the night after the competition develop a central idea of the text?
      • How does Hundert’s use of figurative language on page 197 develop a central idea of the text?
    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 15, students read and annotate The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Students are asked a series of prompts and questions including:
      • Students are reminded to use domain-specific vocabulary. Then they are to choose one central idea that Skloot develops in the texts.
      • Another assignment asks students to articulate two or three areas of investigation and where they emerge from the text.
    • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 5, students evaluate E.B. White’s “Death of a Pig.” students are asked a series of prompts and questions including within Activity 2 in Homework Accountability:
      • What characteristics and components of a narrative essay are present in White’s “Death of a Pig”?
      • How does White achieve beauty and meaning in the context of this narrative essay?

    Indicator 2c

    Materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

    Materials contain text-dependent questions that support student analysis across the text. The questions provided are scaffolded and offer opportunities to raise the level of rigor in the classroom through deeper analysis and textual evidence to justify students’ responses. The texts are organized in a manner that poses thought-provoking questions to students from the beginning to the end of the lesson. The questions also provide opportunities for each student to demonstrate these skills using one text or multiple texts. Module 3 focuses on research-based questions that extend beyond the classroom.

    • In Module 1, students conduct a close read of several texts, including poems and excerpts from two narrative nonfiction texts; students then write an essay where they develop a central idea by explaining how the relationships between children and their parents differ or relate.
    • Within Module 2, Unit 2, students read and analyze paragraphs 20-22 of “A Genetics of Justice.” Students participate in a whole group and small group discussion, both using the text as evidence. Questions from the small group activity are as follows:
      • How does Alvarez’s use of the word especially further develop an idea that she introduces in paragraphs 2-6?
      • How do Alvarez’s specific word choices develop the idea of trauma in the first three sentences of paragraph 20?
      • What consequences does Alvarez’s mother fear as a result of her husband’s activities?
        • After student pairs work on the above questions, they are given a graphic organizer, the Discussion Tool, to help compose ideas as they are being discussed by each group.
    • In Module 3, students answer questions regarding Henrietta Lacks’ cancer cells, from the text, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and how they were used in research. Then, students identify their own areas of investigation based on their reading and understanding of the text, paired with the text-dependent and text-specific questions. While conducting research, students explore the author’s method(s) of presenting the story of Henrietta Lacks.
    • Within Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 13, students read Act 4.2 of Macbeth. To learn how figurative language reveals meaning, they are assigned to answer the following questions:
      • What words or phrases develop your understanding of how Lady Macduff feels about Macduff?
      • What metaphor does Lady Macduff use to illustrate Macduff’s “madness” (line 4)?
      • How does this figurative language develop a central idea in this scene?
        • To assist students with answering the questions, students annotate their texts for the central idea, using the code “CI.” This strategy assists “them to keep track of evidence they will be using later in the lesson assessments and Performance Assessment, which focus on the development of central ideas.”

    Indicator 2d

    The questions and tasks support students' ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that the questions and tasks support students’ ability to complete culminating tasks in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills (e.g. combination of reading, writing, speaking, listening).

    Each module includes a Module Performance Assessment that serves as a culminating task in which they demonstrate their knowledge of a topic through integrated skills. The lessons and activities that are completed within the units of study lead to preparing students for the Performance Assessment. Supporting lessons contain text-dependent and text-specific questions, tasks, and assignments. Thinking, speaking, writing, and listening skills are the focus of key ideas and details in the modules. Writing and reading are integrated throughout the tasks. Text-dependent questions scaffold throughout the modules to help students become equipped to respond to the culminating tasks. Students demonstrate understanding through written expression, oral discussions, and presentations within groups. Each unit also includes both a Mid-Unit Assessment and an End-of Unit of Unit Assessment that connect to the Module Performance Assessment. These unit assessments give teachers feedback as students work towards the Module Performance Assessment.

    In Module 1, student explore the intertextuality of three related poems that span several centuries. Students study character motivations and interactions of complex characters and explore the effects of those interaction on character identities. In the Module 1 Performance Assessment, students to respond to the prompt, “Draw on your analysis of two of the 10.1 texts in order to respond to the prompt, How do the two narrators’ different points of view affect the development of a common central idea?” As students work through the units, the Mid- and End-of-Unit Assessments provide feedback. For example,

    • In the Unit 2 End-of-Unit Assessment students, “Analyze how the interactions between Hundert and the Bells develop a central idea of the text in ‘The Palace Thief’”.
    • In the Unit 3 End-of-Unit Assessment students read two texts and write a formal, multi-paragraph response to answer the prompt, “How do the relationships between children and their parents develop a central idea common to these two texts?”

    In Module 3, students conduct inquiry-based research to surface and track potential research topics regarding medicine, ethics, and scientific research topics to produce evidence-based arguments. In the Module 3 Performance Assessment, students respond to the prompt, “Build on the analysis you did for your research-based argument paper by producing a 5-minute podcast. Synthesize your research and offer salient points of research in an engaging oral presentation that demonstrates command of formal spoken English. Your podcast should detail your central claim, two supporting claims with relevant and sufficient evidence and one counterclaim with corresponding limitations.” As students work through the units, the Mid- and End-of-Unit Assessments provide feedback. For example,

    • In the Unit 1 End-of-Unit Assessment students respond to prompts citing textual evidence to support analysis and inferences drawn from the text. Part 1 asks students to “Choose one central idea that Skloot develops in the text. How does Skloot unfold an analysis of this central idea?”
    • In the Unit 2 End-of Unit Assessment students complete a research portfolio.
    • In the Unit 3 End-of-Unit Assessment students work in class to finalize research-based argument papers.

    Indicator 2e

    Materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/ language in context.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet the criteria that materials include a cohesive, consistent approach for students to regularly interact with word relationships and build academic vocabulary/language in context.

    There is not a long-term plan for the development of academic vocabulary with the intention of employing skills and strategies that will allow the student to develop the skills needed to accelerate vocabulary learning in their reading, speaking, or writing tasks. There are no checks for proficiency that occur regularly throughout the modules. There is greater emphasis on developing vocabulary with multi-meaning and nuanced words than on domain-specific words such as those found in discipline development.

    • In Module 2, Unit 1, students write the definitions of "fellow" and "clergymen" on their copies of the text or in a vocabulary journal. They are then given an assignment where they have to analyze the salutation of “Letters from a Birmingham Jail” where Dr. King addresses to his “fellow clergymen.”
    • Additional words are given to students for this same lesson: untimely, criticisms, engaged, and constructive. They are asked to write the definitions on their copy of the text or in their vocabulary journal. During the Quick Write Activity, students are asked, “How do specific words and phrases contribute to the impact of King’s opening?” This allows students to use the words that they have been given as vocabulary for the reading selection.
    • Within Module 3, Unit 1, students are assigned to read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. In student pairs, the following questions are assigned to challenge students to learn vocabulary words in context: “How are the HeLa cell contained? What are vials?” The text also requires students to answer the additional question, “What does contamination mean in this passage?”
      • During the lesson closing activity, students are instructed “to continue adding to their vocabulary journal when appropriate.”
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, as students read Act 4.2 of Macbeth, they are provided with words during the Reading and Discussion activity. The words are as following: diminutive and judicious. Students write the definitions on their copy of the text or in their vocabulary journals. They are reminded to use explanatory notes to help with challenging language.

    Indicator 2f

    Materials contain a year long, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a yearlong, cohesive plan of writing instruction and practice which support students in building and communicating substantive understanding of topics and texts.

    Module 1 introduces expository/informational writing in a series of lessons intended to develop close reading habits paired with evidence-based writing. Modules 2 and 3 extend and deepen the expository/informational writing skills and habits. Module 4 is dedicated exclusively to argument writing. Most lessons end with a Quick Write, on-demand assessment, which provides the opportunity to respond to texts, often following a text-based discussion in class. Quick Write activities in all instances act as major process writing assignments. Mid-unit and end-of-unit writing assignments allow extended writing. In Module 3 students research to support exploration of topics.

    In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 8, students complete the following activities:

    • For the Mid-Unit Assessment, students complete a Text-Based Response. Students must “Rely on [their] reading and analysis of paragraphs 1-15 of ‘A Genetics of Justice’ to write a well developed response to the following prompt: How does Alvarez develop the claim she makes in paragraph 15?”
    • Students are tasked with the End-of-Unit Assessment: Text-Based Response. Students must “Rely on [their] reading and analysis of ‘A Genetics of Justice’ to write a well-developed response to the following prompt: How does the sentence ‘No flies fly into a closed mouth’ (par. 21) develop and refine one of Alvarez’s ides in ‘A Genetics of Justices’?”
    • Both the Mid-Unit and the End-of-Unit Assessments are assessed and scored using the same criteria.

    In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 24, students complete the following activities:

    • For the Mid-Unit Assessment: Text-Based Response, students must “Rely on [their] reading and analysis of Acts 1 and 2 of Macbeth to write a well-developed response to the following prompt: How do Shakespeare’s structural choices create an effect of mystery, tension, or surprise in the first two acts of the play?”
    • Utilizing the “Homework Scaffolding Tool” for Macbeth, students are assigned to read the Acts 3.3 and 3.4: LInes 1-41 as they are written in the tool’s first column. In the second column, students answer questions, and in the third column they examine the vocabulary found in the selected lines. This assignment prepares students to answer the Text-Based Writing Prompt: “Which character is most responsible for the tragedy of Macbeth?”
    • In the End-of-Unit Assessment, students rely on their close reading and writing to write an argument paper.

    Indicator 2g

    Materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials include a progression of focused, shared research and writing projects to encourage students to develop and synthesize knowledge and understanding of a topic using texts and other source materials.

    Module 3 is dedicated to conducting a sustained research project. Students practice the skills and concepts of research throughout all modules via extension questions with each text. Students are presented with questions regarding historical figures in specific texts, etc. Module 3 offers students the opportunity to synthesize their findings through a major process writing: a written argument.

    Students examine mentor texts and determine qualities of well-researched, evidence-based writing. Students also develop their own line of inquiry and present their findings in a culminating task. Students also practice the research process through Accountable Independent Reading (AIR), which pushes students to discuss the text and relate it to what they are doing within their personal lives; students must go outside of their regular assigned tasks to meet with a school librarian to identify a text that peeks their interest(s). Students synthesize knowledge gained through AIR with current assignments and projects.

    Students are presented with graphic organizers that provide students a method of recording information, and rubrics make expectations for quality explicit. The use of rubrics encourages synthesis of knowledge and understanding of said topic(s). Overall, students will research an area of investigation by generating inquiry-based questions, evaluating sources (self-selected texts), analyzing the claims of authors, and developing their own claims and counterclaims throughout.

    In Module 3, students read and analyze The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot to understand the process of research and explore the ethics of medical research. Students then develop a line of inquiry, determine sources to explore, and prepare to share their findings as a final product. The final product of inquiry is both an evidence-based research paper and a podcast which provides opportunity to demonstrate use of media and tools for presentation. Students engage in discussion to fine tune and refine their research. They work with peers to review, edit, and revise papers. During the process of inquiry, students are taught to search for details, select details for relevance, connect details for coherence, and make a claim. The students gain a deep understanding of a topic by developing evidence to support a claim throughout the module.

    Indicator 2h

    Materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.
    4/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials provide a design, including accountability, for how students will regularly engage in a volume of independent reading either in or outside of class.

    Students read independently and regularly for homework. Students’ independent reading is often completed as assigned homework. Students do have some opportunities to read independently in class. The reading assignments, in and outside of class, often require that students annotate the lesson’s text. The assignments extend the day’s lesson or prepare students for the following day. This includes finding new words and using context clues to draw meaning. There is a Homework Accountability activity in the next day’s lesson following the assignment.

    Additionally, students are assigned several nights a week to read their Accountable Independent Reading (AIR) text. AIR is a frequent daily expectation for homework, and through protocols built into the lessons, students engage in accountable talk in pairs and with their teacher about their independent reading texts. In the Teacher Resource Book, teachers are instructed to use the school librarian or media specialist to help students locate quality, high-interest texts. The accountability for independent reading can be seen in the follow-up activities which usually require students to share with a classroom or group what they have read.

    Within Module 2, Unit 1, after reading “Letters from Birmingham Jail,” in whole-class instruction, students are assigned to read the text again, independently, with the task of answering questions. Teachers are instructed to direct student pairs to reread and analyze paragraphs 26-29 and answer questions before sharing out with the class.

    In Module 4, Unit 2, students are studying the play, Macbeth. In class, they use a masterful reading to assist with their understanding of the text, but homework assignments require independent reading. For example, “Read Act 1.4, lines 1-65. Use the explanatory notes to support your reading, as well as the Homework Scaffolding Tool: Macbeth, Act 1.4, and be prepared to discuss the plot of this scene in the following lesson.”

    Gateway Three

    Usability

    Meets Expectations

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    Gateway Three Details

    Materials can be completed over the course of a single year of instruction and include quality review and practice opportunities and a standards alignment for questions, tasks, and assessment items.

    The Teacher Guide and Resource Books for each module include a curriculum map, instructional support notes, an explanation of the role of the standards in the overall context of the materials along with information on the instructional approaches included in the program and the research-based strategies that are included. The materials do not provide support for communication with stakeholders to support student progress and achievement.

    Included assessments are meaningful, standards-aligned, and offer assistance for interpreting and applying results. Routines and guidance for ongoing monitoring of student progress are included. Independent reading is systematically supported.

    Materials provide strategies to meet the needs of most learners, including English Language Learners and students with disabilities, but does not provide support for students performing above grade level. A variety of grouping strategies are included to maximize collaboration and learning.

    All digital materials included in the program are web-based, platform neutral, and work with a variety of browsers. Effective use of technology is supported and draws students back to evidence and texts. The materials do not allow for personalization or customization for students using adaptive devices. The materials do not provide a digital collaboration space or students and teachers. The materials can be easily customized for local use.

    Criterion 3a - 3e

    null
    8/8
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    Criterion Rating Details

    Materials are thoughtfully designed with an effective lesson structure and pacing that can be completed over the course of a single year of instruction while still allowing for maximum student understanding and opportunity for mastery. Materials include quality review and practice resources that are clearly labeled and supported. A standards alignment for questions, tasks, and assessment items is included with the materials. Materials are designed to support thoughtful engagement with the materials and does not distract students from the content or skills being presented.

    Indicator 3a

    Materials are well-designed (i.e., allows for ease of readability and are effectively organized for planning) and take into account effective lesson structure (e.g., introduction and lesson objectives, teacher modelling, student practice, closure) and short-term and long-term pacing.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.

    The materials are designed in a consistent manner throughout each of the four modules. The four modules make up one year of instruction. Each module is arranged into units comprising one or more texts. The texts in each module share common elements in relation to genre, author’s craft, text structure, or central ideas. Each unit in a module builds on the skills and knowledge students develop in preceding unit(s). The number of lessons in a unit varies based on the length of the text(s). Each lesson is designed to span one class period. Within the units, each lesson is constructed in a similar manner, including a lesson introduction, homework accountability, reading and discussion, quick write assessment, homework, and closing.

    The curriculum provides a full year of modules and units, including the following:

    • Curriculum Map
    • Module Overview
    • Unit Overview
    • Formative and summative assessments, including a Module Performance Assessment
    • Lesson Plans
    • Instructional Notes and Differentiation Considerations
    • Tools and Handouts
    • Rubrics and Checklists

    Indicator 3b

    The teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

    Each module makes up a year of instruction. Each lesson suggests the proportion of a class period to spend on specific activities. However, teachers are reminded to move at the pace they think is best given their students’ needs and the literacy skills demanded by the standards.

    The module overview, the curriculum map, and module-at-a-glance calendar provide an exact number of lessons per module, the standards associated with each lesson in the unit, and the year-end task associated with each module. For instance, Module 9.1 has 52 lessons while Module 9.3 has 35 lessons.

    The program suggests that when students are engaged in substantive, evidence-based discourse and are making meaning of the text, it is not necessary to push forward to the next question or task. Teachers are directed to make decisions regarding what is most appropriate for their students as the students grow in their understanding and capacity for independent work.

    Indicator 3c

    The student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet expectations that the student resources include ample review and practice resources, clear directions, and explanation, and correct labeling of reference aids (e.g., visuals, maps, etc.).

    Materials include but are not limited to graphic organizers, text-dependent questions, reference charts, anchor charts, unit assessments, supporting excerpts or texts, close read guides, jigsaw question strips, essay rubrics, reference aids, model writings, entrance and exit tickets, vocabulary words list and definitions, and writing prompts. Examples include:

    • In Module 10, Unit 1, Lesson 2, on p. 39, students are instructed to form small groups and complete a Paragraphs 3–5 Jigsaw Tool. After each group has completed a Paragraphs 3–5 Jigsaw Tool, they are instructed to form new groups. Each group should have at least one representative for each paragraph so every group includes students who have read each of the three paragraphs. Instruct students to discuss the questions marked as “Key Question” on their tools. After students discuss all Key Questions, students are instructed to select other questions from the tools to discuss. Students discuss all the Key Questions from their Paragraphs 3–5 Jigsaw Tools.
    • In Module 10.2, Unit 1, Lesson 3, on p. 47, teachers are asked to distribute the Argument Visual handout. The teacher must then explain to students that they should use specific terms to ensure that they describe arguments accurately. The teacher will then define the selected vocabulary terms and demonstrate how they relate to each other using the visual. Students are then asked to use those domain-specific terms in their discussion of the text.

    Activities that are completed with teacher guidance have directions included in the teacher lesson plan notes. Resources that are completed independently or in small groups without direct teacher guidance include clear directions and explanations so that the task can be completed.

    Reference aids, such as handouts, are clearly and correctly labeled as such at the top and in the teacher’s materials.

    Indicator 3d

    Materials include publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items.

    Alignment to the CCSS-ELA is documented in multiple places in the curriculum. CCSS standards are documented on the 9-12 Grade Curriculum Map, at the module level, at the unit level, and in the teacher's notes for each lesson. Alignment for all assessments are also provided in the Curriculum Overview.

    The grade-level curriculum map lists all assessments and the standards that are being assessed. This map also includes a chart that illustrates which standards are being assessed in each module.

    At the beginning of each module, there is a Unit-at-a-Glance chart that provides teachers with an overview of standards taught and assessed in each lesson. At the beginning of each module there is a module overview which includes a description of assessments which include the performance task, Mid-Unit Assessments, and End-of-Unit Assessments. This overview includes standards being assessed in each assessment. The performance task, mid-unit assessment, and end of unit assessment for each module includes alignment documentation of the standards addressed. An example includes:

    In Module 3 on p. XXVIII is the curriculum map for the module. This includes the standards being assessed in this module and the mid and end-of-unit performance tasks that will assess these standards. Also, in Module 3 on p. XLI is the standards map for the module. Assessed standards are standards that are assessed in Unit and Module Performance Assessments. Addressed standards are standards that are incorporated into the curriculum, but are not assessed. Standards marked with an asterisk (*) are year-long standards included in each module.

    Indicator 3e

    The visual design (whether in print or digital) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 contain visual design (whether in print or digital) that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

    The material design is simple and consistent. All modules are comprised of materials that display a simple design and include adequate space to capture thoughts as needed. The font, size, margins, and spacing are consistent and readable. All modules include graphic organizers that are easy to read and understand. There are no distracting images and the layout of the student consumables is clear and concise.

    Criterion 3f - 3j

    Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
    8/8
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    Criterion Rating Details

    Materials contain a Teacher Guide and Teacher Resource Book for each module. The Teacher Guide includes a curriculum map for each module. These materials support the teacher as they present the content. The Teacher Edition provides instructional notes to support teachers with additional content knowledge and full adult-level explanations to support implementation. Documentation is provided to explain the role of the standards in the overall context of the materials as well as information on the instructional approaches included in the program and the research-based strategies that are included. The materials do not provide support for communication with stakeholders to support student progress and achievement.

    Indicator 3f

    Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

    Materials contain a Teacher Guide and Teacher Resource Book for each module. The Teacher Guide includes a curriculum map for each module that includes:

    • Number of Lesson in the Unit
    • Literacy Skills and Habits
    • Assessed and Addressed CCSS
    • Assessments

    At the beginning of each Module, there is an overview with that list the texts, number of lesson in Module, Introduction, Literacy Skills and Habits, English Language Arts Outcomes, including Year-Long Target Standards, Module-Specified Assessed Standards, Addressed Standards, Module Performance Assessment, List of Texts, and Module-at-a-Glance Calendar.

    Each lesson begins with an Introduction that provides the teacher with an objective and rationale. An overview of the selection is given, as well as the assignments that will be completed by students. Each Assessment, whether question or task, comes with answers. There is also a “High Performance Response” which tells students what students who excel at the assessment or task should have in their work. The teacher guide also provides vocabulary words with part of speech and definition. Step by step instructions are given for each activity with colored font that indicates instructional notes for the teacher.

    The Teacher Resource Book contains copies of the texts studied in each lesson. Any rubrics or checklist that are used in the lesson are also included. Additionally, the Teacher Resource Book contains the mid-unit assessment and the end-of-unit assessment with necessary rubrics to grade the assignments.

    Indicator 3g

    Materials contain a teacher's edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a Teacher Edition edition that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced literacy concepts so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.

    Materials include a Teacher Guide that has a section for each lesson labeled “Instructional Notes” that provides easy to follow recommendations with scaffolding ideas, differentiated assignments with possible responses, and reading activities with answers that students may give.

    The Teacher Guide uses Learning Sequence symbols to assist teachers with interpreting how to read the material. The symbols and codes are explained so that teachers will know the following:

    • Percentage of time the lesson should take
    • Plain text to indicate teacher’s actions
    • Bold text to indicate the questions teachers should asks students
    • Italicize text to indicate a vocabulary word
    • An arrow pointing right to indicate teacher action
    • Two arrows in the form of a circle to indicate possible student response to the teacher
    • The letter “i” lowercase in a circle to indicate the instructional notes for the teacher which are in orange font

    Indicator 3h

    Materials contain a teacher's edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum.

    The series in grades 9-12 follow the same format in providing a teacher’s edition that explains the role of the specific ELA/literacy standards in the context of the overall curriculum. This information is repeated in the materials in several locations.

    First, there is a Curriculum Map across grades 9-12 that addresses the four modules in each grade by listing each unit, along with the addressed standards and the assessed standards.

    Secondly, the Year-long Target Standards are listed in each grade after the first module. Teachers are made aware that the standards will be “strong focus in every English Language Arts module and unit in grades 9–12.”

    Finally, the standards are listed next to activities within each lesson. Some of theses activities even require that students explain how their work for a particular lesson addresses a specific standards.

    Indicator 3i

    Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.

    Materials reviewed for Grades 9-12 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies.

    In grades 9-12, the instructional approaches of the series follow the Universal Design for Learning. Each unit of instruction contains the following principles:

    • Provide multiple means of representation
    • Provide multiple means of action and expression
    • Provide multiple means of engagement

    In the preface under “Structure of the Module” for grades 9-12, the publisher adds, “Each module comprises up to three units and provides approximately eight weeks of instruction. Each unit includes a set of sequenced learning experiences that scaffold knowledge and understanding of the concepts and skills demanded by the CCSS. Module 1 at each grade level establishes the foundation of instructional routines used throughout the year. Paths to College and Career reflects the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to support:

    • English language learners (ELL)
    • Students with disabilities (SWD)
    • Accelerated learners
    • Students performing below grade level

    Lessons are not scripts but rather illustrations of how instruction might be sequenced. Each module is adaptable and allows for teacher preference and flexibility to meet both students’ needs and the requirements of the instructional shifts and the standards.”

    Indicator 3j

    Materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents, or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that materials contain strategies for informing all stakeholders, including students, parents or caregivers about the ELA/literacy program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

    There is no information or activity that includes stakeholders. Students are instructed to work in groups or pairs to discuss material and standards. Even with the AIR (Accountable Independent Reading), students are asked to contact a librarian or media specialist, but this is only for selecting a text, not sharing or informing stakeholders of the information or assignment.

    Criterion 3k - 3n

    Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
    8/8
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    Criterion Rating Details

    Materials offer regular and systematic opportunities for meaningful, standards-aligned assessment of student progress. Additionally, support is provided to aid teachers in interpreting student performance results and to provide suggestions for reteaching. The materials include embedded routines and guidance for ongoing monitoring of student progress. Materials also provide support for teachers as they hold students accountable for self-selected independent reading in service of growing strong, confident, and motivated readers.

    Indicator 3k

    Materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials regularly and systematically offer assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress.

    Students have multiple and varied opportunities to demonstrate understanding in each module. Students prepare for culminating tasks in multiple ways that integrate skills, such as close reading, annotating, reading independently and in small groups, hosting whole class and small group discussions in multiple formats, and asking and answering questions.

    Every lesson culminates in a Quick Write assessment task. This assessment provides information about students understanding of the lesson objectives and texts. Teachers are provided with high performance response criteria. Lessons contain sets of high-quality, text-dependent/specific questions that build to the culminating task.

    Each unit also includes a Mid-Unit Assessment and an End-of-Unit Assessment that connect to the Module Performance Assessment. These unit assessments give teachers feedback as students work towards the Module Performance Assessment.

    Each module includes a Module Performance Assessment that serves as a culminating task. The lessons and activities that are completed within the units of study lead to preparing students for the Performance Assessment. Supporting lessons contain text-dependent and text-specific questions, tasks, and assignments. Thinking, speaking, writing, and listening skills are the focus of key ideas and details in the modules. Writing and reading are integrated throughout the tasks. Text-dependent questions scaffold throughout the modules to help students become equipped to respond to the culminating tasks. Students demonstrate understanding through written expression, oral discussions, and presentations within groups.

    Indicator 3l

    The purpose/use of each assessment is clear:
    0/0

    Indicator 3l.i

    Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.

    Each unit includes a Mid-Unit Assessment and an End-of-Unit Assessment that connect to the Module Performance Assessment. These unit assessments denote the standards being emphasized.

    Each module includes a Module Performance Assessment that states the standards. The lessons and activities that are completed within the units of study lead to preparing students for the Performance Assessment also include standards. For example,

    • In Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 15, the teacher begins the lesson by reviewing the following assessed standards: RI.9-10.2, RI.9-10.3, W.9-10.2.b, d, e, W.9-10.9, L.9-10.1, and L.9-10.2 The End-of-Unit Assessment requires students to compose a multi-paragraph response analyzing the central idea in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and an analysis of two to three areas of investigations discovered through their reading of this text (Module 3 Teacher Guide, pg. 161).
    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 13, teachers review the lesson agenda and standards RL.9-10.2, RL.9-10.10.3, W.9-10.2.a, b, W.9-10.4, L.9-10.1, and L.9-10.2. To meet these standards, students write a multi-paragraph response analyzing how interactions between characters’ development in “The Palace Thief” by Ethan Canin (Module 1 Teacher Guide, pg. 201).
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 9, students are informed of the following standard for assessment of the lesson: RL9-10.2. Students analyze Act 3, Scene 1 of Macbeth to determine the development of the central of this scene (Module 4 Teacher Guide, pg. 189).

    Indicator 3l.ii

    Assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that assessments provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow up.

    High performance indicators and exemplar responses are provided throughout materials, including End-of-Unit Assessments, Module Performance Assessments, and other assessment tools. These indicators provide some guidance for teachers for interpreting student performance. For example,

    • At the end of Module 1, students complete the Module Performance Assessment. Teachers are provided high performance response indicators with specific examples upon which to gauge student learning: "Identify the narrators of the selected texts (e.g., the “passionate shepherd,” the “nymph,” Hundert, Waverly Jong, Jing-Mei, or H.G. Bissinger); Analyze for each selected text how the narrator’s point of view contributes to the development of the shared central idea; Include a strong introduction and conclusion." Teachers are also provided with an explanation of the standard-specific demands of the performance assessment as further guidance (Module 1 Teacher Guide, pg. 341-344).
    • In Module 4, Unit 2, Lesson 19, students complete a Quick Write that serves as the assessment for this lesson: "How does Shakespeare unfold and develop an element of tragedy in Act 5, Scenes 7 and 8?" High Performance Response indicators with examples provide some “look-fors” for teachers as they assess student learning: "Identify an element of tragedy in Act 5, Scenes 7 and 8 (e.g., a tragic hero, a reversal of fortune, pity and fear, a tragic flaw, a resolution of conflict, a moment of recognition, etc.)" (Module 4 Teacher Guide, p. 282).

    Indicator 3m

    Materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials should include routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress.

    Throughout lessons, Instructional Notes offer recommendations, background information, optional or differentiated activities, or optional reading and discussion questions for teachers to consider. Some Instructional Notes provide specific Differentiation Considerations, which suggest visuals, tools, practices, models, or adaptations for students who may need extra support to achieve lesson goals. The Teacher Resource Books also include supporting materials that might be required for lessons such as reproducible tools, handouts, rubrics, and checklists. For example,

    • In Module 2, Unit 2, Lesson 2, the following guidance is offered: “Differentiation Consideration: If students struggle, consider illustrating the different parts of Trujillo’s uniform by posting or projecting pictures of plumed Napoleonic hats, tasseled military uniforms, epaulettes, red sashes, and military dress uniform with a ceremonial hat and white gloves and explaining what they are” (Module 2 Teacher Guide, pg. 259).
    • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 7, teachers are given the following guidance and suggestion for differentiation as students work closely with research tools (Conducting Independent Searches Checklist, Potential Sources Tool, Taking Notes Tool, and Research Frame Tool): “Consider drawing students’ attention to their application of standard W.9-10.7, through the use of research skills necessary to complete this activity. Place students in groups of four or five that remain consistent throughout the module. Consider forming groups ahead of time to maximize the range of different research topics and questions within each group. The goal of these groups is to create small communities of inquiry/research teams that provide support and and accountability to one another. Differentiation Consideration: Some of the topics students are researching may yield complex or inaccessible texts. To address this concern, consider collaborating with a librarian or media specialist to access free databases . . . “ (Module 3 Teacher Guide, pg. 244-245).

    Indicator 3n

    Materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

    Opportunities for students to engage in independent reading occur throughout the modules and lessons, with students being held accountable through Accountable Independent Reading (AIR) texts focused on specific readings standards when required for homework. For example,

    • In Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 7, students are instructed to read their AIR texts with a focus reading standard of their choice (RL.9-10.3 or RI.9-10.3) and prepare for a 3-5 minute discussion based on the standard (Module 1 Teacher Guide, pg. 157).
    • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 16, students discuss as partners how they applied the reading standards to their AIR texts for homework for the previous lesson. Students share how they applied the focus standard and follow this with writing an objective summary of King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (Module 2 Teacher Guide, pg. 177).

    Criterion 3o - 3r

    Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so that they demonstrate independent ability with grade-level standards.
    6/10
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    Criterion Rating Details

    Materials provide strategies to meet the needs of most learners, including English Language Learners and students with disabilities, but does not provide support for students performing above grade level. A variety of grouping strategies are included to maximize collaboration and learning.

    Indicator 3o

    Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners so the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards.

    Materials provide structured lessons with supports noted within each lesson. The Teacher Guide includes Differentiation Considerations noted in orange ink and indicated with a distinct icon. For example,

    • In Module 1, Unit 3, Lesson 11, “Consider posting or projecting the following guiding question to support students in their reading throughout this lesson: How does Bissinger distinguish his point of view from that of the people he describes?”
    • In Module 3, Unit 2, Lesson 2, “If students need help with this review, instruct them to refer to the Posing Inquiry Questions Handout from 10.3.1 Lesson 3.”

    Indicator 3p

    Materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.
    2/4
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 partially meet expectations that materials regularly provide all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with extensive opportunities to work with grade-level text and meet or exceed grade-level standards.

    All students engage in the same complex text. Scaffolds are provided so that all students can access the complex texts and meet or exceed grade-level standards as they build strength in reading. Students select texts for Accountable Independent Reading (AIR) which provides opportunities to build stamina at the student’s reading level.

    While materials provide structured lessons with supports noted within each lesson, teachers are not directed or given guidance to support ELL students. The Teacher Guide includes Differentiation Considerations noted in orange ink and indicated with a distinct icon that may help support these students; however, more guidance may be necessary for ELL students. For example,

    • In Module 2, Unit 1, Lesson 6: “Consider posting or projecting the following guiding question to support students in their reading throughout this lesson: How is Shamlu’s 'In This Blind Alley' similar to King’s 'Letter from Birmingham Jail'?”
    • In Module 4, Unit 1, Lesson 7, “Students may need more support in understanding the components of a complete sentence in order to understand independent clauses. Consider explaining the basic functions of a subject and verb within a sentence. Consider providing the following examples: The following are complete sentences because they contain a subject and a verb: I run. The dog eats. My sister is tall. The following are not complete sentences because they do not contain a subject and a verb: My older sister. The blue wall in the classroom. Yelling loudly outside.”

    Indicator 3q

    Materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.
    0/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that materials regularly include extensions and/or more advanced opportunities for students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

    While the materials are rigorous, there are not extensions or advanced opportunities provided within materials. Support for instruction includes differentiation for students who need extra support, but does not explicitly address students who read, write, speak, or listen above grade level.

    Indicator 3r

    Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
    2/2
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

    Materials offer a range of opportunities for students to collaborate while reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students work independently, in pairs, in small groups, and in large groups throughout the lessons. Grouping suggestions are explicitly stated within materials.

    Grouping strategies mentioned in the “Teacher Flexibility to Scaffold Students to Independence” within the Teacher Guide include structuring collaborative conversations in pairs and small groups. In most lessons, students discuss homework in pairs or in small groups with occasional whole class discussions. In the Reading and Discussion sections of each lesson, students collaborate in pairs and small groups as they prepare to present in whole groups.

    Criterion 3s - 3v

    Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
    0/0
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    Criterion Rating Details

    All digital materials included in the program are web-based, platform neutral, and work with a variety of browsers. Effective use of technology is supported and draws students back to evidence and texts. The materials do not allow for personalization or customization for students using adaptive devices. The materials do not provide a digital collaboration space or students and teachers.

    The materials can be easily customized for local use.

    Indicator 3s

    Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices. This qualifies as substitution and augmentation as defined by the SAMR model. Materials can be easily integrated into existing learning management systems.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructions materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet expectations that digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.), “platform neutral” (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform), follow universal programming style, and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.

    The curriculum modules can all be downloaded from the Wiley: Paths to College and Career Website. This includes the Teacher Guide, Teacher Resource Book and Student Journal. Module download was tested with multiple internet browsers and operating systems and is compatible with Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome browsers, and Windows, Android, and Apple platforms.

    Indicator 3t

    Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate and providing opportunities for modification and redefinition as defined by the SAMR model.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Materials offer web addresses where appropriate and include film segments during multiple lessons. Some texts are accessible online to build background knowledge and can be used to supplement the anchor texts. Text Sets include a variety of options beyond print, such as videos, audio, images, and timelines.

    Indicator 3u

    Materials can be easily customized for individual learners.
    0/0

    Indicator 3u.i

    Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations.

    Digital materials can not be personalized or edited. There is no evidence of adaptive or other technological innovations.

    Indicator 3u.ii

    Materials can be easily customized by schools, systems, and states for local use.
    0/0
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    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials can be easily customized for local use.

    The Module Overview provides a map of the entire module. This gives teachers the information needed to make decisions about adapting or changing activities to customize for local use. The overview includes an introduction, the literacy skills and habits, the outcomes, and standards addressed. This also includes a description of the final Module Performance Assessment and a Module-at-a Glance Calendar that shows key features of the units. Materials also include a Unit Overview that gives recommended actions for preparing for instructional, materials required, and recommended technology. Lessons also include percentage of time estimates for each section of the lesson, to better help teachers plan and adjust for customizing. Each of these overviews allows teachers to plan and adjust materials as necessary.

    Indicator 3v

    Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.)
    0/0
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    -
    Indicator Rating Details

    The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 do not meet the criteria that materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).

    There are no opportunities provided for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other within materials.

    Additional Publication Details

    Report Published Date: Mon May 14 00:00:00 UTC 2018

    Report Edition: 2015

    Title ISBN Edition Publisher Year
    ELA 10.1 Teacher Guide 978-1-1191-2287-6 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.1 Teacher Resource 978-1-1191-2288-3 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.2 Teacher Resource 978-1-1191-2289-0 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.2 Teacher Guide 978-1-1191-2291-3 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.2 Student Journal 978-1-1191-2293-7 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.3 Teacher Guide 978-1-1191-2294-4 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.3 Teacher Resource 978-1-1191-2295-1 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.3 Student Journal 978-1-1191-2297-5 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.4 Teacher Guide 978-1-1191-2298-2 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.4 Teacher Resource 978-1-1191-2299-9 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.4 Student Journal 978-1-1191-2300-2 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA 10.1 Student Journal 978-1-1191-2626-3 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA Teacher's Grade 10 Bundle 978-1-1191-5736-6 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015
    ELA Student's Grade 10 Bundle 978-1-1192-2352-8 PCG Education published by Wiley 2015

    About Publishers Responses

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    Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

    The publisher has not submitted a response.

    Educator-Led Review Teams

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    After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

    All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

    ELA HS Rubric and Evidence Guides

    The ELA review rubrics identify the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubrics support a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

    For ELA, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

    • Text Quality and Complexity, and Alignment to Standards with Tasks Grounded in Evidence

    • Building Knowledge with Texts, Vocabulary, and Tasks

    • Instructional Supports and Usability

    The ELA Evidence Guides complement the rubrics by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

    X