Alignment to College and Career Ready Standards: Overall Summary

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for alignment to the CCSS. In Gateway 1, the instructional materials meet the expectations for focus by assessing grade-level content and spending at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade, and they are coherent and consistent with the Standards. In Gateway 2, the instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, and they partially connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

See Rating Scale
Understanding Gateways

Alignment

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Meets Expectations

Gateway 1:

Focus & Coherence

0
7
12
14
14
12-14
Meets Expectations
8-11
Partially Meets Expectations
0-7
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway 2:

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

0
10
16
18
16
16-18
Meets Expectations
11-15
Partially Meets Expectations
0-10
Does Not Meet Expectations

Usability

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Meets Expectations

Not Rated

Gateway 3:

Usability

0
22
31
38
33
31-38
Meets Expectations
23-30
Partially Meets Expectations
0-22
Does Not Meet Expectations

Gateway One

Focus & Coherence

Meets Expectations

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Gateway One Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for focusing on the major work of the grade and having a sequence of topics that is consistent with the logical structure of mathematics. The materials do not assess topics before the grade level indicated, spend at least 65% of class time on the major clusters of the grade, and are coherent and consistent with the Standards.

Criterion 1a

Materials do not assess topics before the grade level in which the topic should be introduced.
2/2
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that they assess grade-level content. Each Eureka Module includes one or more assessments that hold students accountable for Kindergarten content. These assessments are the Mid-Module and End-of-Module assessments. Examples of the assessments include:

  • In Module 1, End-of-Module Assessment Task: Students work with flat and solid shapes. Students classify and sort these shapes (K.MD.3 ,K.G.1, K.G.2, K.G.3, K.G.4).
  • In Module 4, Mid-Module Assessment, Topic B: Students use number bonds and cubes to assist with composing and decomposing numbers (K.NBT.1).
    • T: (Put a 5-stick of the same-colored linking cubes and a tub of loose same-colored linking cubes in front of the student.) Show me 6 with the cubes. Show me 6 fingers the Math Way.
    • T: (Place the tub of loose linking cubes, two 5-sticks, and the number bond mat in front of the student.) Use the cubes to show me a number bond for 7.
    • T: (Put the number bond in a different orientation. Write 8 in the whole of the number bond in front of the student. Be sure that linking cubes are accessible so that the student may use linking cubes or drawings as support if needed.) Use your marker to complete this number bond. (Note how the student strategizes to solve the problem. What is she using to decompose 8, e.g., mental math, cubes, fingers, drawings? How does she know the quantities for each part: subitizing, counting all, counting on, etc.?)
  • In Module 6, End-of-Module Assessment Task, Topic A: Students model shapes in the real world by building shapes from sticks and clay balls (K.G.5).
    • T: (Place all straws and formed clay connecting balls in front of the student.) Build a square.
    • T: (Place solid shapes in front of the student.) Choose one object that has the shape you just built.
  • In Module 6, End-of-Module Assessment Task, Topic B: Students compose simple shapes to form larger shapes (K.G.6).
    • T: (Give the student two right triangles.) Use these triangles to make a rectangle.
    • T: (Give the student the 3-piece paper square puzzle disassembled.) This was a square. Then, I cut it into three pieces. Can you put it together so it makes a square again?

K.CC.1 is not assessed as it is written in the standards; teachers would need to extend the problem to ensure that the standard is met (count by tens and ones all the way to 100). K.CC.5 is not extended through 20 as indicated by the standard. Two geometry standards are also not extended to the detail given in the standards. For K.G.3, assessments do not include the words flat or solid, and for K.G.1, assessments do not require students to state relative positions of objects.

Indicator 1a

The instructional material assesses the grade-level content and, if applicable, content from earlier grades. Content from future grades may be introduced but students should not be held accountable on assessments for future expectations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that they assess grade-level content. Each Eureka Module includes one or more assessments that hold students accountable for Kindergarten content. These assessments are the Mid-Module and End-of-Module assessments. Examples of the assessments include:

  • In Module 1, End-of-Module Assessment Task: Students work with flat and solid shapes. Students classify and sort these shapes (K.MD.3 ,K.G.1, K.G.2, K.G.3, K.G.4).
  • In Module 4, Mid-Module Assessment, Topic B: Students use number bonds and cubes to assist with composing and decomposing numbers (K.NBT.1).
    • T: (Put a 5-stick of the same-colored linking cubes and a tub of loose same-colored linking cubes in front of the student.) Show me 6 with the cubes. Show me 6 fingers the Math Way.
    • T: (Place the tub of loose linking cubes, two 5-sticks, and the number bond mat in front of the student.) Use the cubes to show me a number bond for 7.
    • T: (Put the number bond in a different orientation. Write 8 in the whole of the number bond in front of the student. Be sure that linking cubes are accessible so that the student may use linking cubes or drawings as support if needed.) Use your marker to complete this number bond. (Note how the student strategizes to solve the problem. What is she using to decompose 8, e.g., mental math, cubes, fingers, drawings? How does she know the quantities for each part: subitizing, counting all, counting on, etc.?)
  • In Module 6, End-of-Module Assessment Task, Topic A: Students model shapes in the real world by building shapes from sticks and clay balls (K.G.5).
    • T: (Place all straws and formed clay connecting balls in front of the student.) Build a square.
    • T: (Place solid shapes in front of the student.) Choose one object that has the shape you just built.
  • In Module 6, End-of-Module Assessment Task, Topic B: Students compose simple shapes to form larger shapes (K.G.6).
    • T: (Give the student two right triangles.) Use these triangles to make a rectangle.
    • T: (Give the student the 3-piece paper square puzzle disassembled.) This was a square. Then, I cut it into three pieces. Can you put it together so it makes a square again?

K.CC.1 is not assessed as it is written in the standards; teachers would need to extend the problem to ensure that the standard is met (count by tens and ones all the way to 100). K.CC.5 is not extended through 20 as indicated by the standard. Two geometry standards are also not extended to the detail given in the standards. For K.G.3, assessments do not include the words flat or solid, and for K.G.1, assessments do not require students to state relative positions of objects.

Criterion 1b

Students and teachers using the materials as designed devote the large majority of class time in each grade K-8 to the major work of the grade.
4/4
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade. This includes all clusters within the domains K.CC, K.OA and K.NBT.

  • More than 65 percent of the lessons are explicitly focused on major work, with major work often included within supporting work lessons as well.
  • Of the 152 lesson days, approximately 113 days (74 percent) are spent on the major clusters of the grade.
  • Of the six modules, Modules 1, 4 and 5 focus on major work. Module 3 devotes more than half of the lessons to major work.
  • Of the 45 assessment days, 39 assess major work.

Indicator 1b

Instructional material spends the majority of class time on the major cluster of each grade.
4/4
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for spending a majority of instructional time on major work of the grade. This includes all clusters within the domains K.CC, K.OA and K.NBT.

  • More than 65 percent of the lessons are explicitly focused on major work, with major work often included within supporting work lessons as well.
  • Of the 152 lesson days, approximately 113 days (74 percent) are spent on the major clusters of the grade.
  • Of the six modules, Modules 1, 4 and 5 focus on major work. Module 3 devotes more than half of the lessons to major work.
  • Of the 45 assessment days, 39 assess major work.

Criterion 1c - 1f

Coherence: Each grade's instructional materials are coherent and consistent with the Standards.
8/8

Indicator 1c

Supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that supporting work enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Supporting standards/clusters are connected to the major standards/clusters of the grade. For example:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 5: K.MD.B supports the major work of K.CC.A and K.CC.B. Students sort and glue down objects into three different categories and count the number of objects in each category as part of their concept development work.
  • In Module 2, Lesson 2: K.G.1, K.G.2 and K.G.4 support the major work of K.CC.A. Students count to and write 3 while learning about triangles.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 7: K.MD.1 and K.MD.2 support the major work of K.CC.4c, K.CC.5 and K.CC.6. While measuring cubes/sticks, students also count to find other cubes/sticks that would equal the same amount. “Color 1 cube red and the rest green (5 total). How many cubes did you color? Is the stick the same length as the gray stick? Together 1 cube and 4 cubes are the same length as _____.”
  • In Module 6, Lesson 3: K.G.4 and K.G.5 support the major work of K.CC.4. Students work within geometry to build cubes while practicing counting the faces of the cubes.

Indicator 1d

The amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one school year in order to foster coherence between grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

Instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that the amount of content designated for one grade level is viable for one year. As designed, the instructional materials can be completed in 180 days. The suggested amount of time and expectations of the materials for teachers and students are viable for one school year as written and would not require significant modifications.

The instructional materials consist of 6 Modules. Instruction and assessment days are included in the following count:

  • Module 1: 43 days
  • Module 2: 12 days
  • Module 3: 38 days
  • Module 4: 47 days
  • Module 5: 30 days
  • Module 6: 10 days

All lessons are paced to be 50 minutes in length. Lessons include fluency practice, application problems, concept development and a student debrief. Lessons vary in amount of time spent on various sections, but time estimates are reasonable and appropriate for the activities described.

Indicator 1e

Materials are consistent with the progressions in the Standards i. Materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards. If there is content from prior or future grades, that content is clearly identified and related to grade-level work ii. Materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems iii. Materials relate grade level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for the materials being consistent with the progressions in the standards. The instructional materials give all students extensive work with grade-level problems and identify as well as explicitly connect grade-level work to prior or future grades.

Each module starts with a summary of what concepts will be taught within that module.

The lessons support the progression of Kindergarten standards by explicitly stating connections to prior or future grades. The following examples are from Module 3:

  • “Having observed, analyzed, and classified objects by shape into predetermined categories in Module 2, students now compare and analyze length, weight, capacity, and finally, numbers in Module 3.”
  • “The module supports students’ understanding of amounts and their developing number sense. For example, counting how many small cups of rice are contained within a larger quantity provides a foundational concept of place value: Within a larger amount are smaller equal units, which together make up the whole.“ Four cups of rice is the same as 1 mug of rice.” Compare that statement to “10 ones is the same as 1 ten.” (1.NBT.2a)
  • “If students progress quickly in comparing weight by estimating, they may be ready to use the balance scale sooner, allowing for the consolidation of Lessons 8 and 9.”

Foundational standards from Pre-Kindergarten are included for each module. (New York State Education Department) examples from Module 1 include:

  • Compare numbers PK.CC.6
  • Count to tell the number of objects PK.CC.3 | PK.CC.3.a | PK.CC.3.b |PK.CC.3.c | PK.CC.4
  • Counting and Cardinality PK.CC.1 | PK.CC.2 | PK.CC.3 | PK.CC.3.a| PK.CC.3.b | PK.CC.3.c | PK.CC.4 | PK.CC.6
  • Know number names and the count sequence PK.CC.1 | PK.CC.2

Initial lessons are focused on building fluency with numbers 1-10 before applying mathematical concepts to numbers. Content builds in a logical sequence. Students first learn mastery of counting to ten (Module 1) before building to addition/subtraction to ten (Module 4), addition/subtraction to twenty (Module 5) and counting to 100 (Module 5). Module 5 includes two different Grade 1 standards (1.OA.8 and 1.NBT.3); however, both standards are included as a logical extension of the topic being taught (composition and decomposition of teen numbers) and are not assessed in module assessments.

The instructional materials attend to the full intent of the grade-level standards by giving all students extensive work with grade-level problems. The following examples are from Module 4:

  • In Module 4, students develop a deep understanding of number sense through a variety of lessons. Students revisit composing and decomposing numbers to 5, and then continue on with numbers 6-8. Then, students are introduced to addition and subtraction, first creating number sentences without unknowns (5 + 2 = 7) to develop an understanding of the addition/subtraction symbol and each number within the equation. Next, students move to working within addition/subtraction word problems and unknowns. Students draw a box around the total to track unknowns.
  • In Lesson 8, a Homework Question states, “On the back of your paper, draw a set of 7 squares and circles. Make a number bond, and fill it in. Now, write a number sentence like the sentence above that tells about your set.”
  • In Lesson 16, a Problem Set Question states, “There are 5 turtles swimming. Draw 2 more turtles that come to swim. How many turtles are swimming now? Draw a box around all the turtles, draw a mystery box, and write the answer.”
  • In Lesson 25, a Problem Set Question states, “Draw 9 balloons. Color some red and the rest blue. Make a number bond to match your drawing.”

Indicator 1f

Materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards i. Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. ii. Materials include problems and activities that serve to connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that materials foster coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the standards.

Materials include learning objectives that are visibly shaped by CCSSM cluster headings. For example:

  • In Module 1, Topic B: "Classify to Make Categories and Count," is shaped by K.MD.B, "Classify Objects and Count the Number of Objects in Each Category."
  • In Module 3, Lesson 1: “Compare lengths using taller than and shorter than with aligned and non-aligned endpoints.” is shaped by K.MD.A, “Describe and compare measurable attributes.”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 7: "Compare Objects Using the Same as...," is shaped by K.CC.B, "Count to Tell the Number of Objects."
  • In Module 5, Lesson 6: "Model with Objects and Represent Numbers from 10-20 with Place Value or Hide Zero Cards." is shaped by K.NBT.A, "Work with Numbers 11-19 to Gain Foundations for Place Value."

Materials include problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain, or two or more domains in a grade, in cases where these connections are natural and important. For example:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 5: Measurement and Data (K.MD) connects to Counting and Cardinality (K.CC). Students use “linking cube stairs” to compare lengths while counting.
  • In Module 6, Lesson 3: Geometry (K.G) connects to Counting and Cardinality (K.CC). Students work with cubes and count faces.

Gateway Two

Rigor & Mathematical Practices

Meets Expectations

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Gateway Two Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for rigor and mathematical practices. The instructional materials attend to each of the three aspects of rigor individually, and they also attend to the balance among the three aspects. The instructional materials emphasize mathematical reasoning, partially identify the Mathematical Practices (MPs), and partially attend to the full meaning of each practice standard.

Criterion 2a - 2d

Rigor and Balance: Each grade's instructional materials reflect the balances in the Standards and help students meet the Standards' rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for reflecting the balances in the Standards and helping students meet the Standards’ rigorous expectations, by helping students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application. The instructional materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, give attention throughout the year to procedural skill and fluency, spend sufficient time working with engaging applications, and do not always treat the three aspects of rigor together or separately.

Indicator 2a

Attention to conceptual understanding: Materials develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific content standards or cluster headings.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings.

The materials include problems and questions that develop conceptual understanding throughout the grade level. For example:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 5, students develop conceptual understanding that the last number name mentioned tells the number of objects counted. Students sort pictures into three weather categories and count the number of pictures in each category. The teacher is prompted to ask the following questions, “T: Great Job! I wonder how many sunny pictures we found? Let’s count them. (Number each picture as it is counted.) How many sunny pictures? S: 5. T: What number did I write beside the last picture? S: 5.” (K.CC.4)
  • In Module 4, Lesson 8, students engage in grade-level mathematics when using clay to decompose the numeral 7. The Application Problem states, “Ming has 5 raisins. Represent her raisins with the clay. Dan has 2 raisins. Represent his raisins, too. How many raisins are there in all? Put Ming’s raisins into a 5-group. Now, put Dan’s raisins in a row underneath Ming’s raisins like this. Do you still have 7 raisins? Hide the bottom 2 raisins. How many raisins do you see now? Talk about the raisins with your friend. Draw a number bond to represent Ming’s and Dan’s raisins.” (K.OA.3)
  • In Module 4, Lesson 22, students develop conceptual understanding of decomposing numbers less than or equal to 10. Students reflect on prior strategies that decompose numbers with drawings. The teacher is prompted to ask the following questions, “T: Put your cubes away. We learned another way to show 6 this year with our 5-groups. Does anyone remember how we could draw 6 the 5-group way? T: Let’s roll the die to see how many we should take away from our 6. How many? S: 3. T: I will cross off 3 to show the ones we are taking away. How many are left? S: 3. T: What would my number sentence be? S: 6 – 3 = 3. T: How could we make a number bond about our picture and then show that we are taking part away?” (K.OA.3)

The materials provide opportunities for students to independently demonstrate conceptual understanding throughout the grade. For example:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 7, students independently demonstrate conceptual understanding of the relationship between numbers and quantities. Students match linear configurations of objects up to 5 with numerals on cards by coloring with the same color. The Problem Set states, “Count and color.”
  • In Module 5, Lesson 6, students independently demonstrate conceptual understanding of place value. Students model with number cards to show their knowledge of place value. The teacher is prompted to ask the following questions, “T: Watch this magic. Here is my 10. Here is my 8. I push them together, and I have ten 8. This is how we write ten 8. T: Talk to your partner. What happened to the 0 of the 10 ones? S: It went under the 8, it disappeared. It isn’t there anymore, it is hiding. T: Yes! It is hiding. I’m going to write the number without the cards. (Write 18.) It is like there is a 0 hiding under this 8. T: I want each of you to write this number on your personal white board. When I say to show me your board, show me. T: Show me! T: Here is a bag with a set of these cards for you. Partner A, open the bag, and put all the numbers on your work mat. With your partner, put them in order from 1 to 10. T: Partner B, show me ten 8 with your cards. Be sure to hide the zero!” (K.NBT)

Indicator 2b

Attention to Procedural Skill and Fluency: Materials give attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that they attend to those standards that set an expectation of procedural skill and fluency.

The instructional materials develop procedural skill and fluency throughout the grade level. For example:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 10, students develop procedural skill and fluency when using cotton balls and white boards to touch and count. The teacher is prompted to ask the following questions, “T: Put your cotton balls in a line across the top of your personal white board like this. T: Now, touch and count them. S: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. T: You might start at the top of your board and draw tally marks to match your cotton balls like this. (Demonstrate moving from left to right while drawing one tally to match one cotton ball.)
  • In Module 5, Lesson 1, students develop procedural skill and fluency when decomposing the number 3. The teacher is prompted to ask the following questions, “The use of wait time encourages students to subitize rather than having them touch and count. T: (Before beginning the activity, place 2 bananas and 1 bear on a desk or table behind the screen.) Peek-a-Boo! (Raise and lower the screen.) Peek-a-Boo! (Again.) T: Wait for the signal. How many things did you see in all? (Signal when ready.) S: 3. T: Wait for the signal. How many bananas? (Signal when ready.) S: 2 bananas. T: Wait for the signal. How many bears? (Signal when ready.) S: 1 bear. T: Very good. Let’s play again! Continue with other decompositions of 3 (e.g., 1 banana and 2 bears, 3 bears and 0 bananas). As students progress, determine if they can remember the number for longer periods of time. Encourage them to show the number on their fingers the Math Way instead of saying it.”

The instructional materials provide opportunities to demonstrate procedural skill and fluency independently throughout the grade level. For example:

  • In Module 4, Lesson 6, students independently demonstrate procedural skill and fluency of addition within 5 by creating a story that matches a given number bond. The Problem Set states, “Tell a story that matches the number bond. Draw pictures that match your story. 3 + 1 = 4”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 4, students independently demonstrate procedural skill and fluency of subtraction within 5 by creating a story that matches a given picture. The Problem Set states, “Look at the picture. Tell your neighbor a story about the dogs standing and sitting. Draw a number bond, and write numbers that match your story.”

Students build fluency for adding and subtracting to 5 in 5-10 minute fluency practice activities before lessons. These fluency practices are provided in three of the six modules. For example:

  • In Module 4, Lesson 1, students use math cards with partners to create addition facts to 5.
  • In Module 5, Lesson 17, students create combinations of addends to 5 with partners.
  • In Module 6, Lesson 5, students color worksheets coded by sums and differences through 5, as well as practice facts orally with the teacher.

Indicator 2c

Attention to Applications: Materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that the materials are designed so that teachers and students spend sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics. Engaging applications include single and multi-step problems, routine and non-routine, presented in a context in which the mathematics is applied.

The instructional materials include multiple opportunities for students to engage in routine and non-routine application of mathematical skills and knowledge of the grade level. For example:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 3, students listen to directions and apply their knowledge of lengths to draw a picture. “Draw a monkey with a very long tail. Draw a monkey with a very short tail. Now, draw a yummy banana for the monkeys to share. Is the banana longer than or shorter than the tail of the first monkey? Is it longer than or shorter than the tail of the second monkey? Tell your partner what you notice.”
  • In Module 6, Lesson 6, students engage in grade-level mathematics when applying an understanding of shapes to the world around them. The Application Problem states, “You are going to be a detective today! First, look around the classroom to see if you can find things made of more than one shape, like we did yesterday. Second, draw one thing on your whiteboard. Third, use your marker to draw the shapes inside. (If necessary, give hints about items such as tiles, bricks, window panes, and so on. Encourage students to look for and highlight the shapes within shapes on their boards. T: Turn and talk to your partner about the hidden shapes that you found!” (K.G.2)

The instructional materials provide opportunities for students to demonstrate independently the use of mathematics flexibly in a variety of contexts. For example:

  • In Module 4, Lesson 32, students independently demonstrate the use of mathematics by solving both addends unknown word problems. The Problem Set states, “Listen to the word problem. Fill in the number sentence. Cecilia has 9 bows. Some have polka dots, and some have stripes. How many polka dot and how many striped bows do you think Cecilia has? 9 = ___ + ___” (K.OA.3)
  • In Module 4, Lesson 34, students independently demonstrate the use of mathematics by solving subtraction word problems. The Problem Set states, “Fill in the number sentences and number bonds. There are 9 babies playing. 2 crawl away. How many babies are left? 9 - 2 =___.” (K.OA.2)
  • In Module 5, Lesson 22, students independently demonstrate the use of mathematics by comparing numbers less than 10. The Application Problem states, “Lisa has 5 pennies in her hand and 2 in her pocket. Matt has 6 pennies in his hand and 2 in his pocket. Who has fewer pennies—Lisa or Matt? How do you know?” (K.CC.C)

Indicator 2d

Balance: The three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. There is a balance of the 3 aspects of rigor within the grade.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations that the three aspects of rigor are not always treated together and are not always treated separately. The lessons include components such as Fluency Practice, Concept Development, and Application Problems. Conceptual understanding is addressed in Concept Development. During this time, the teacher guides students through a new concept or an extension of the previous day’s learning. Students engage in practicing procedures and fact fluency while modeling and solving these concepts. Fluency is also addressed as an independent component within most lessons. Lessons may contain an Application Problem which connects previous learning to what students are learning for the day. The program balances all three aspects of rigor in every lesson.

All three aspects of rigor are present independently throughout the program materials. For example:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 25, students practice fluency when counting and drawing dots on a ten-frame from a given number. Fluency Practice - Five Shortcut states, “T: I’m going to say a number, and I want you to draw that many dots. Remember to start at the top, filling in the rows from left to right, the same way we see on our 5-group cards!” (K.CC.4)
  • In Module 3, Lesson 21, students develop conceptual understanding when comparing sets of shapes using vocabulary such as more, less, and fewer. The Problem Set Question states, “Color the shapes. Count how many of each shape is in the shape robot. Write the number next to the shape. Look at the robot. Color the shape that has more. Are there more rectangles or circles?” (K.MD.3)
  • In Module 4, Lesson 16, students engage in the application of mathematics by solving a word problem involving addition. The Application Problem states, “Note: A set of 10 linking cubes for each student deliberately gives students more cubes than necessary to model the story so that they can select those needed from the larger set. 3 airplanes were flying in the air. Use your cubes to show the planes. 3 more airplanes came to join the flying fun. Show the airplanes with your cubes. Now, with your cubes, show how many airplanes were flying in the air. Talk to your partner about what the number sentence would look like. Note: This problem sets the stage for solving add to with result unknown word problems in today’s lesson.” (K.OA.2)

Multiple aspects of rigor are engaged simultaneously to develop students’ mathematical understanding of a single topic/unit of study throughout the materials. For example:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 2, students develop conceptual understanding of non-standard measurement while applying it to objects within the classroom. Students compare the length or height of items in the classroom to the length of a piece of string. Students find at least five things that are longer than their string and at least five things that are shorter than their string, and then record them on charts. (K.MD.2)
  • In Module 5, Lesson 4, students develop conceptual knowledge of tens (The Ten Way) and fluently count to 10. The Application Problem states, “At recess, 17 students were playing. 10 students played handball while 7 students played tetherball. Draw to show the 17 students as 10 students playing handball and 7 students playing tetherball.” (K.CC.4)

Criterion 2e - 2g.iii

Practice-Content Connections: Materials meaningfully connect the Standards for Mathematical Content and the Standards for Mathematical Practice
8/10

Indicator 2e

The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout each applicable grade.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten partially meet expectations that the Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified and used to enrich mathematics content within and throughout the grade level.

The eight MPs are identified within the grade-level materials. The Standards for Mathematical Practice are identified at the beginning of each module under the Module Standards. The tab named "Highlighted Standards for Mathematical Practice" lists all of the MPs that are focused on in the module. Each MP is linked to the definition of the practice as well as in which lessons throughout the series that practice can be found.

Each Module Overview contains a section titled, “Focus Standard for Mathematical Practice.” Every practice that is identified in the module has a written explanation with specific examples of how each practice is being used to enrich the content of the module. For example:

  • In Module 3, the explanation for MP 7 states, “Look for and make use of structure. Students use structure to see that the amount of rice in 1 container is equal to the amount in 4 smaller containers. The smaller unit is a structure, as is the larger unit.”

Each lesson specifically identifies where MPs are located, usually within the margins of the teacher edition. However, there is no additional teacher guidance or explanation as to how the practice enriches the content specifically within that lesson. This is evident in all modules within the series.

Indicator 2f

Materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten partially meet expectations that the instructional materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard. Examples of where the instructional materials attend to each of the MPs include:

  • In Module 1, Lesson 14, MP 4 is identified in the teacher materials and attend to the full meaning of the practice when the students represent decompositions of the number 3 with materials and drawings. “T: Watch me put my parts together to make a tower of 3 again. There is a special math way to write what I just did. (Write 3 = 1 + 2.) We call this a number sentence. (Repeat the decomposition exercise to show that 3 = 2 + 1.) T: Put your cubes back in the bag. I’m going to draw some cubes on the board. (Draw a rectangle divided into 3 squares to look like a linking cube tower.) I will color 2 squares red. I will color the rest blue. How many cubes are in my tower? S: 3.”
  • In Module 2, Lesson 6, MP 6 is identified in the teacher materials and attends to the full meaning of the practice when the students attend to precision while describing how solids are alike and different. “T: (Hold up the cube.) Look at this solid. Find the one that looks like it on your desk. How is it different? (Continue examining the solids until students have had a chance to describe them all. Encourage the students to use language such as edges, corners, sides, points, and curves in their discussion.)"
  • In Module 4, Lesson 31, MP 1 is identified in the teacher edition and attends to the full meaning of the practice when the students solve an addition word problem. “T: I’m going to let you try a problem with your partner now on your personal white board. Listen carefully to my story, and draw a picture about what happens. When you have finished your picture, fill in the number sentence to solve the problem. T: Maggie had 4 pennies. Her mom gave her 5 more pennies. How many pennies does Maggie have now? Draw the pennies, and make a number sentence. (Allow time for drawing and discussion, circulating to ensure understanding during this new, more independent phase of problem solving.) T: How many pennies does Maggie have now? What was the number sentence? S: 4 + 5 = 9. She has 9 pennies now.”

There are a few instances where the materials do not attend to the full meaning of one or two MPs. For example:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 2, MP 5 is identified in the teacher materials when students compare objects in the classroom to a piece of string. “T: Today, your job will be to compare the length or height of things in our classroom to the length of a piece of string. You will each have a string of your own to use. First, I will make one for myself. (Cut a piece of string approximately one foot long, and show it to the students. Label the string with a piece of masking tape and your initials.) T: I want my string to be this long. Now, I want to compare it to some things in the room. Let’s make a chart. (On the board, create a quick chart as follows.)” This is an example of not attending to the full practice as the students are given a tool to use rather than selecting a tool to compare measurements of objects.
  • In Module 3, Lesson 14, MP 7 is identified in the teacher edition when students compare volumes of two different containers. This is an example of not attending to the full practice as students are not prompted to look for any patterns or structure to aid in their reasoning.

Indicator 2g

Emphasis on Mathematical Reasoning: Materials support the Standards' emphasis on mathematical reasoning by:
0/0

Indicator 2g.i

Materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

Student materials consistently prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others. For example:

  • In Module 2, Lesson 2, the students create a triangle on their geoboard and prove to another student that what they created is a triangle.
  • In Module 5, Lesson 8, the Application problem states, “Peter drew a number bond of 13 as 10 and 3. Bill drew a number bond, too, but he switched around the 10 and 3. Show both Bill’s and Peter’s number bonds. Draw a picture of thirteen things as 10 ones and 3 ones. Explain your thinking to your partner about what you notice about the two number bonds.”
  • In Module 5, Lesson 14, in the Debrief students prove that the number of objects is the same regardless of the configuration. They discuss with partners and share out which way they think is the most convincing.

Indicator 2g.ii

Materials assist teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for assisting teachers in engaging students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics.

Teacher materials assist teachers in engaging students in both constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others, frequently throughout the program. The teacher materials consistently provide teachers with question prompts for student discussion and possible student responses to support that discussion. For example:

  • In Module 2, Lesson 2, teachers are prompted to engage students in constructing an argument by having students create a triangle on geoboards and stating their reasoning for why it is a triangle. “T: Now, create your own triangle on your geoboard, and then show your partner. Be sure to tell how you know it is a triangle! (Allow time for sharing and discussion.)”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 11, teachers are prompted to engage students in constructing and analyzing an argument by having students use a pan balance to compare the weights of equal pieces of clay. The students discuss whether the two sides of their scales are the same size or the same weight and how they know. “Talk to your partner. What do you think will happen when you put the two smaller balls back on the scale? T: Okay. Put the balls back on the scale. T: How are they the same? Are they the same number? The same size? “Let’s try another experiment. Partner A, take your ball and quickly make it into three smaller balls. T: Talk to your partner. What will happen this time when Partner A puts his or her part back on the scale?”
  • In Module 5, Lesson 20, teachers are prompted to engage students in constructing an argument by having students discuss the two parts that can make up a number in the teens and the best method for displaying how the two parts make a whole number. “Talk to your partner. When we solved our story problem today we had two parts. What is another way you already know to show a number in two parts?”

Indicator 2g.iii

Materials explicitly attend to the specialized language of mathematics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for explicitly attending to the specialized language of mathematics.

In each module, the instructional materials provide new or recently-introduced mathematical terms that will be used throughout the module. A compiled list of the terms along with their definitions is found in the Terminology tab at the beginning of each module. Each mathematical term that is introduced has an explanation, and some terms are supported with an example.

The mathematical terms that are the focus of the module are highlighted for students throughout the lessons and are reiterated at the end of most lessons. The terminology that is used in the modules is consistent with the terms in the standards.

The materials provide explicit instruction in how to communicate mathematical thinking using words, diagrams and symbols. For example:

  • In Module 2, Lesson 5, the Notes on Multiple Means of Representation states, “Support students who struggle by partnering key words such as next to, below, above, and below with modeling the actions for them.”
  • In Module 2, Lesson 7, the Notes on Multiple Means of Action and Expression states, “As the vocabulary terms cone, face, cube, corners, and edges come up in the lesson, the teacher can use gestures like touching her face and then the face of the solid while saying the word face in order to enrich English language learners’ experience and make it easier for them to access the content of the lesson.”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 27, the Notes on Multiple Means of Engagement states, “Ask students to verbalize who has more as they take turns every time they play the game. For example, “I have 8 cubes, and you have 3 cubes; 8 is more than 3.” Or, “I have 4 pennies, and you have 7 pennies; 4 is less than 7.” English language learners benefit from the practice and can be easily observed as to which students might be confused between more and less.”

The materials use precise and accurate terminology and definitions when describing mathematics and support students in using them. For example:

  • In Module 4, Lesson 20, the materials use precise terminology of minus and support students in using the term when showing an example. The Concept Development states, “Put 3 linking cubes in your hand, and take them away. How many are left on the table? Yes, 5 take away 3 is 2. There is a special Math Way to write what we just did. We had 5 cubes.
  • I will write the number 5 to show all of the cubes together. (Demonstrate.) There is a special sign we can use when we want to show that we are removing some cubes. It looks like this. (Write the minus sign.) How many did we take away?”
  • In Module 3, Lesson 8, the mathematical term weight is in bold writing within a question listed in the Student Debrief section. These questions guide teachers in leading a class discussion. “How did you decide which objects on the Problem Set would be heavier? Could you make a prediction even though you couldn’t feel their weight?”
  • In Module 5, Lesson 3, the materials use accurate terminology when students learn the concept of teen numbers. The Problem Set states, “Early finishers: Write your own teen number in the box. Draw a picture to match your number.”

Gateway Three

Usability

Meets Expectations

Criterion 3a - 3e

Use and design facilitate student learning: Materials are well designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing.
8/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectations for being well designed and taking into account effective lesson structure and pacing. The instructional materials distinguish between problems and exercises, have exercises that are given in intentional sequences, have a variety in what students are asked to produce, and include manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent.

Indicator 3a

The underlying design of the materials distinguishes between problems and exercises. In essence, the difference is that in solving problems, students learn new mathematics, whereas in working exercises, students apply what they have already learned to build mastery. Each problem or exercise has a purpose.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation that the underlying design of the materials distinguishes between lesson problems and student exercises for each lesson. It is clear when the students are solving problems to learn and when they are applying their skills to build mastery.

Each lesson follows a typical sequence that is facilitated by the teacher and may include components such as Fluency Practice, Application Problem, Concept Development and Student Debrief.

The Fluency Practice component is found in a majority of lessons and builds mastery of grade-level math facts.

Students apply previously learned mathematical knowledge to solve a problem in the Application Problem component of a lesson.

Within the Concept Development component of a lesson, Problems are included in each lesson to be completed by students within the class period either individually or with a partner. These Problems generally reinforce and/or extend the new mathematical concepts explored in a lesson.

Students build mastery when they apply what they have learned to solve problems in the Problem Set component of a lesson. The Problem Set problems typically mirror the types of problems introduced during the Concept Development portion of a lesson.

Most lessons include an Exit Ticket at the end of a lesson. The Exit Ticket is aligned to the Problems and Problem Sets a majority of the time.

Indicator 3b

Design of assignments is not haphazard: exercises are given in intentional sequences.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for not being haphazard; exercises are given in intentional sequences.

Module sequences follow the progressions outlined in the CCSSM Standards to support students’ conceptual and skill development.

Lessons within modules are intentionally sequenced so students develop understanding leading to content mastery. The overall structure of a lesson provides students with problems and activities that are sequenced from concrete to abstract thinking.

Indicator 3c

There is variety in what students are asked to produce. For example, students are asked to produce answers and solutions, but also, in a grade-appropriate way, arguments and explanations, diagrams, mathematical models, etc.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for having variety in what students are asked to produce.

The instructional materials prompt students to produce mathematical models and explanations of their reasoning when finding solutions to various problems. The Read, Draw, Write procedure provides students with an opportunity to represent their solution in a drawing and make connections between the drawing and the equations.

Students use mathematical models such as number lines, number bonds, tape diagrams and 5-groups. For example, in Module 4, Lesson 12, students create a number bond that matches the given 5-group representation of the number 8. “5 squares are colored. Color 3 more squares to make 8. Complete the number bond.”

Students produce solutions, construct viable arguments, and critique the reasoning of others within all components of the instructional materials including group and partner discussions. The materials consistently call for students to use the language and intent of the standards when producing solutions.

Indicator 3d

Manipulatives are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and when appropriate are connected to written methods.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for having manipulatives that are faithful representations of the mathematical objects they represent and, when appropriate, are connected to written methods.

The series includes a variety of manipulatives and integrates hands-on activities that allow the use of physical manipulatives. For example:

  • Manipulatives are consistently aligned to the expectations and concepts in the standards. The majority of manipulatives used are counting objects and geometry tools. In Module 2 Lesson 2, students use geoboards to create triangles and then explain to a partner why it is a triangle.

Examples of manipulatives for Kindergarten include:

  • Rekenreks
  • Five and Ten Frames
  • Pattern Blocks
  • Counting Objects
  • 2-D and 3-D Shapes
  • Linking cubes

Indicator 3e

The visual design (whether in print or online) is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The visual design in Eureka Kindergarten is not distracting or chaotic and supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject.

The instructional materials follow a consistent visual format. The instructional materials consistently label the modules, topics and lessons. Within each module, lessons with similar or related content are grouped into topics.

The print and visuals on the materials are clear without any distracting visuals or overabundance of text features. Lesson materials for teachers are divided into sections with consistent bold headings such as Concept Development and Student Debrief. Lesson materials for students are labeled as Problem Set to signify individual practice problems. The Homework section of each lesson is visually formatted to match the Problem Set.

Student practice problem pages frequently include enough space for students to write their answers and demonstrate their thinking. There are no distracting or extraneous pictures, captions or "facts" within lessons.

Criterion 3f - 3l

Teacher Planning and Learning for Success with CCSS: Materials support teacher learning and understanding of the Standards.
7/8
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectations for supporting teacher learning and understanding of the Standards. The instructional materials support: planning and providing learning experiences with quality questions; contain ample and useful notations and suggestions on how to present the content; and contain full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge.

Indicator 3f

Materials support teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students' mathematical development.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for supporting teachers in planning and providing effective learning experiences by providing quality questions to help guide students’ mathematical development.

Each lesson contains narratives for the teacher to help guide student development and provide quality questions. Lessons contain various narratives that are labeled, "Notes on Multiple Means of Representation,” “Notes on Multiple Means of Engagement,” “A Note on Standards Alignment,” and “Note on Materials” to name a few. These narratives provide teachers with mathematical summaries of the concept being presented, examples of the concept, suggestions to help students make connections between concepts, and correct vocabulary use within the lesson.

Quality questions are provided for the teacher to guide students through the concepts being taught in the Concept Development section of the lesson. The Student Debrief section provides questions for discussion and guiding questions designed to increase classroom discourse and ensure understanding of the concepts. For example:

  • In Module 3, Lesson 4, a Student Debrief question states, “How did you compare the sticks in the sorting activity? (Review the importance of endpoint alignment.)”

Indicator 3g

Materials contain a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials include teacher guidance for the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectations for containing a teacher edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials. Where applicable, materials also include teacher guidance on the use of embedded technology to support and enhance student learning.

The Overview of each module provides several suggestions for delivering instruction such as alignment to standards, important vocabulary, assessment, and foundational skills for future grades.

Each lesson provides teachers with various side narratives and examples on how to present the content. Most lessons have pictures or other graphics with annotations, demonstrating the concepts for the teacher.

The Concept Development section includes a sample script to prepare the teacher for what might happen when presenting the material.

Answer keys are included for all of the Problem Sets, Exit Tickets, Homework, and Tests, including written annotations to show how student work should look.

There is a repeated process for solving word problems called the Read, Draw, Write approach, which the manual explains in the module overview.

Indicator 3h

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that contains full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge of the subject, as necessary.
2/2
+
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet expectations for the teacher edition containing full, adult-level explanations and examples of the more advanced mathematics concepts in the lessons so that teachers can improve their own knowledge.

The module Overview provides information about the mathematical connections of concepts being taught. Previous and future grade levels are also referenced to show the progression of the mathematics over time. Important vocabulary is included along with definitions and examples of the terms.

Lesson narratives provide specific information as well as examples about the mathematical content within the lesson and are presented in adult language. These narratives contextualize the mathematics of the lesson to build teacher understanding, as well as guidance on what to expect from students and important vocabulary.

The teacher edition provides each step of the solution to the problems posed to students.

Indicator 3i

Materials contain a teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials) that explains the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade twelve.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten partially meet expectations for explaining the role of the specific grade-level mathematics in the context of the overall mathematics curriculum.

In the Module Overview, there are a few specific descriptions of the coherence of the mathematics; however, it is usually focused on the previous grade level. The previous grade-level standards are listed in the Foundational Standards section. There is no explanation of the role the grade-level mathematics plays to future grades, and the standards for future grades are not listed.

There is no discussion of the grade-level content's role in Kindergarten through Grade 12.

In the document called "A Story of Units: A Curriculum Overview for Grades P-5," there is a description of the module sequence which includes the connection to the previous grade and the next future grade. No connection is made to other grade levels.

Indicator 3j

Materials provide a list of lessons in the teacher's edition (in print or clearly distinguished/accessible as a teacher's edition in digital materials), cross-referencing the standards covered and providing an estimated instructional time for each lesson, chapter and unit (i.e., pacing guide).
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten provide a list of concepts in the teacher edition that cross-references the standards addressed and provides an estimated instructional time for each unit and lesson.

The materials provide a module overview that specifies the grade-level standards addressed in each module. The standards are listed in the Focus Standards section of the overview. An estimated number of instructional days is given for each module to be completed.

Each section within a lesson is labeled with an estimated number of minutes that it should take to complete

Indicator 3k

Materials contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten contain strategies for informing parents or caregivers about the mathematics program and suggestions for how they can help support student progress and achievement.

There are resources online that inform parents about the mathematics of the program as well as give suggestions for how they can help support their child.

The online parent resources are divided into several categories. The Parent Support section allows parents to create an account to gain access to resources. Parent Tip Sheets are free to parents and include suggested strategies, vocabulary, and tips to support learning at home. Parents can learn more about the spiral bound books that can be purchased that provide step-by-step explanations of homework problems in the Homework Helpers section. The Grade Roadmaps section explains grade-level math concepts and gives suggestions on facilitating learning outside of the classroom.

There is also a section where parents can download card games to help build fluency in math.

Indicator 3l

Materials contain explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identification of the research-based strategies.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten contain some explanations of the instructional approaches of the program. Some modules contain Methods of Instructional Delivery. When this section is available, it provides teachers with information on how to prepare to teach the lesson, strategies utilized throughout the lesson, and the benefits of the strategies. There is additional information about the instructional approaches in A Story of Units Curriculum Overview. Lastly, the opening letter from Executive Director Lynne Munson addresses some of the research and philosophy behind the instructional materials.

Criterion 3m - 3q

Assessment: Materials offer teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards.
6/10
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Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for offering teachers resources and tools to collect ongoing data about student progress on the Standards. The instructional materials provide opportunities for identifying and addressing common student errors and misconceptions and ongoing review and practice with feedback. The instructional materials do not provide strategies for gathering information about students’ prior knowledge, partially have assessments with standards clearly denoted, and partially include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers.

Indicator 3m

Materials provide strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.
0/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten do not meet the expectations for providing strategies for gathering information about students' prior knowledge within and across grade levels.

There are no strategies or assessments that are specifically for the purpose of assessing prior knowledge.

Indicator 3n

Materials provide strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing strategies for teachers to identify and address common student errors and misconceptions.

Each End of Module Assessment includes a chart titled Progression toward Mastery to help teachers with assessing progress toward mastery.

Teachers can address errors and misconceptions by facilitating mathematical conversations between students. Teachers are provided with a list of possible discussion questions in the Student Debrief section of most lessons.

The marginal notes often suggest ways to support students as a whole and subgroups of students who might need support. In particular, the "Multiple Means of..." notes tend to focus on student misconceptions.

Indicator 3o

Materials provide opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing opportunities for ongoing review and practice, with feedback, for students in learning both concepts and skills.

The lesson structure consisting of fluency activities, an application problem, concept development practice, and problem sets provides students with opportunities to connect prior knowledge to new learning, engage with content, and synthesize their learning. Throughout the lesson, students have opportunities to work independently with partners and in groups where review, practice, and feedback are embedded into the instructional routine.

The Fluency section of a lesson provides ongoing review and practice of previously-taught concepts. The Problem Set problems for each lesson activity reinforce skills and enable students to engage with the content and receive timely feedback. In addition, discussion questions in the Student Debrief provide opportunities for students to engage in timely discussion on the mathematics of the lesson.

The summative assessments contain rubrics to provide feedback to the teacher and student on a student’s progress towards mastery.

Indicator 3p

Materials offer ongoing formative and summative assessments:
0/0

Indicator 3p.i

Assessments clearly denote which standards are being emphasized.
1/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten partially meet the expectation for assessments clearly denoting which standards are being emphasized.

The summative assessments which include the Mid-Module and End-of-Module Assessment meet the expectations by clearly denoting the standards being emphasized; however, the formative assessments such as Exit Tickets do not.

The Mid-Module and End-of-Module Assessments align each item to specific standard(s). Each of these assessments include a Progression Toward Mastery rubric that lists specific standards being assessed and describes how mastery is determined.

Indicator 3p.ii

Assessments include aligned rubrics and scoring guidelines that provide sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.
1/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The materials reviewed for Kindergarten partially meet the expectations for this indicator. The summative assessments meet the expectations, but the formative assessments do not.

  • For the Mid-Module and End-of-Module assessments, there are rubrics for scoring the items, as well as an answer key with sample answers.
  • Rubrics and scoring guides are clear and helpful. Examples of student work receiving top grades on the rubric are included.
  • In the Progression toward Mastery section of the summative assessments there is a detailed rubric for grading student mastery from 1 to 4. If the student does not achieve total mastery (step 4), then the teacher can look at the next steps to see what or how to follow up with the student. For example, when a student's mastery is step 2, teachers can look at steps 3 and 4 to guide follow-up instruction.

Indicator 3q

Materials encourage students to monitor their own progress.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten do not include opportunities for students to monitor their own progress. There is one exception within the Fluency Sprints. Students complete the sprint twice with a goal of increasing their score on the second round.

Criterion 3r - 3y

Differentiated instruction: Materials support teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades.
12/12
+
-
Criterion Rating Details

The instructional materials for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectations for supporting teachers in differentiating instruction for diverse learners within and across grades. The instructional materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics. The instructional materials also consistently provide: strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons; strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners; tasks with multiple entry points; support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations; and opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

Indicator 3r

Materials provide strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.
2/2
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-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing strategies to help teachers sequence or scaffold lessons so that the content is accessible to all learners.

Lessons are sequenced to build from conceptual understanding, using representations ranging from concrete and pictorial to the more abstract.

Marginal notes in most lessons often suggest ways for teachers to support students as a whole as well as subgroups of students who might need extra support. This includes support for vocabulary, representations, engagement options and materials.

The modules and topics within each module are sequenced according to the CCSSM "Progressions of Learning." A description of the module sequence and layout is provided.

Indicator 3s

Materials provide teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of a range of learners.

The lesson structure: Fluency, Application Problem, Concept Development, and Student Debrief all include guidance for the teacher on the mathematics of the lesson, possible misconceptions, and specific strategies to address the needs of a range of learners.

The marginal notes often suggest ways to support students as a whole and subgroups of students who might need extra support. This includes support for vocabulary, representations, engagement options, and materials.

Indicator 3t

Materials embed tasks with multiple entry-points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation that materials embed tasks with multiple entry­ points that can be solved using a variety of solution strategies or representations.

Most lessons include problems within the components of Application Problem, Problem Sets, and Homework that students can choose their own solution strategy and/or representation as well as solve the problems in a variety of ways.

The embedded tasks include multiple representations such as drawings, charts, graphs, or numbers or words.

Indicator 3u

Materials suggest support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics (e.g., modifying vocabulary words within word problems).
2/2
+
-
Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation that the materials include support, accommodations, and modifications for English Language Learners and other special populations that will support their regular and active participation in learning mathematics.

There are marginal notes in the teacher edition that provide strategies for English Language Learners and other special populations. The Notes on Multiple Means of Engagement give teachers suggestions about meeting the needs of ELL students. These margin notes include sentence starters, physical responses, and vocabulary support.

On pages 14-20 of "How to Implement A Story of Units," there are suggestions for working with ELL students and students with disabilities. Page 14 states, "It is important to note that the scaffolds/accommodations integrated into A Story of Units might change how a learner accesses information and demonstrates learning; they do not substantially alter the instructional level, content, or performance criteria. Rather, they provide students with choices in how they access content and demonstrate their knowledge and ability."

Indicator 3v

Materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation that the materials provide opportunities for advanced students to investigate mathematics content at greater depth.

There are marginal notes in the teachers edition that provide strategies for advanced students. The Notes on Multiple Means of Engagement give teachers suggestions about meeting the needs of advanced students.

The curriculum specifies that not all pieces within a section of a lesson must be used, so advanced students could be asked to tackle problems or sections a teacher does not use for all students.

Teachers are given suggestions for working with above-grade-level students on page 20 of "How to Implement A Story of Units."

Indicator 3w

Materials provide a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.
2/2
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten meet the expectation for providing a balanced portrayal of various demographic and personal characteristics.

The lessons contain a variety of tasks and situations in the story problems that interest students of various demographic and personal characteristics. The names chosen in the lessons represent a variety of cultural groups.

The application problems include real-world situations that would appeal to a variety of cultural and gender groups.

There is a balanced approach to the use of gender identification.

Indicator 3x

Materials provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten provide opportunities for teachers to use a variety of grouping strategies.

Notes within the lessons provide teachers a variety of options for whole group, small group, partner, or individual work.

There are opportunities for different groupings; however, the fundamental models are Modeling with Interactive Questioning, Guided Practice, and Independent Practice.

There are also suggestions for small-group work within the differentiation pages of the "How to Implement" document.

Indicator 3y

Materials encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.
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Indicator Rating Details

The instructional materials reviewed for Eureka Kindergarten occasionally encourage teachers to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.

There is limited evidence of teachers needing to draw upon home language and culture to facilitate learning.

There are occasions (mostly with Spanish) where students are encouraged to make connections to words in their home languages."

How to Implement A Story of Units" offers teachers this guidance: "Know, use, and make the most of student cultural and home experiences. Build on the student's background knowledge.”

Criterion 3aa - 3z

Effective technology use: Materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning. Digital materials are accessible and available in multiple platforms.
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Criterion Rating Details

Reviews for this series were conducted using print materials, which do not include an instructional technology component. Materials were not reviewed for this criterion.

Indicator 3aa

Digital materials (either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum) are web-based and compatible with multiple internet browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.). In addition, materials are "platform neutral" (i.e., are compatible with multiple operating systems such as Windows and Apple and are not proprietary to any single platform) and allow the use of tablets and mobile devices.
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Indicator Rating Details

Reviews for this series were conducted using print materials, which do not include an instructional technology component. Materials were not reviewed for this indicator.

Indicator 3ab

Materials include opportunities to assess student mathematical understandings and knowledge of procedural skills using technology.
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Indicator Rating Details

Reviews for this series were conducted using print materials, which do not include an instructional technology component. Materials were not reviewed for this indicator.

Indicator 3ac

Materials can be easily customized for individual learners. i. Digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. ii. Materials can be easily customized for local use. For example, materials may provide a range of lessons to draw from on a topic.
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Indicator Rating Details

Reviews for this series were conducted using print materials, which do not include an instructional technology component. Materials were not reviewed for this indicator.

Indicator 3ad

Materials include or reference technology that provides opportunities for teachers and/or students to collaborate with each other (e.g. websites, discussion groups, webinars, etc.).
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Indicator Rating Details

Reviews for this series were conducted using print materials, which do not include an instructional technology component. Materials were not reviewed for this indicator.

Indicator 3z

Materials integrate technology such as interactive tools, virtual manipulatives/objects, and/or dynamic mathematics software in ways that engage students in the Mathematical Practices.
0/0
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Indicator Rating Details

Reviews for this series were conducted using print materials, which do not include an instructional technology component. Materials were not reviewed for this indicator.

Additional Publication Details

Report Published Date: Mon Aug 27 00:00:00 UTC 2018

Report Edition: 2015

About Publishers Responses

All publishers are invited to provide an orientation to the educator-led team that will be reviewing their materials. The review teams also can ask publishers clarifying questions about their programs throughout the review process.

Once a review is complete, publishers have the opportunity to post a 1,500-word response to the educator report and a 1,500-word document that includes any background information or research on the instructional materials.

Educator-Led Review Teams

Each report found on EdReports.org represents hundreds of hours of work by educator reviewers. Working in teams of 4-5, reviewers use educator-developed review tools, evidence guides, and key documents to thoroughly examine their sets of materials.

After receiving over 25 hours of training on the EdReports.org review tool and process, teams meet weekly over the course of several months to share evidence, come to consensus on scoring, and write the evidence that ultimately is shared on the website.

All team members look at every grade and indicator, ensuring that the entire team considers the program in full. The team lead and calibrator also meet in cross-team PLCs to ensure that the tool is being applied consistently among review teams. Final reports are the result of multiple educators analyzing every page, calibrating all findings, and reaching a unified conclusion.

Math K-8 Rubric and Evidence Guides

The K-8 review rubric identifies the criteria and indicators for high quality instructional materials. The rubric supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators.

For math, our rubrics evaluate materials based on:

  • Focus and Coherence

  • Rigor and Mathematical Practices

  • Instructional Supports and Usability

The K-8 Evidence Guides complement the rubric by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria.

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